Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
" 'RHi
AH ArUMm.

Vol 62, No. 24

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NO PATRIOT
It was obviously no patriot who slashed this and one other flag in
private study booths in the Law Library Monday. Students had
propped the flags between books and found this sight when they
returned.

HEW-Banned Cyclamate
Contained In Gatorade

Gatorade, UFs very own parched throat slaker,
contains cyclamate, the sugar substitute banned
from the market last weekend by Secretary of
Health, Education and Welfare Robert H. Finch.
But Gatorades inventor, Dr. Robert Cade,
foreseeing Finchs decision, has already made plans
to replace cyclamate with a glucose fractose
mixture.
But theres a catch to this new ingredient. Unlike
cyclamate, glucose fractose is not dietetic.

Commission Blasts Transportation Committee

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government Parking and Transportation
Commission denounced the University Parking and
transportation Committee for what they termed
easy-going attitude toward a real problem that is
inexcusable.
SG commission chairman Harvey Alper said that
after meeting with the University committee that
it is our opinion that the committee is not aware
of the impact and hardship upon students and the
unconscionable vagueness of current parking and
traffic regulations.
Furthermore, said Alper, it appears to us that
the University committee either has minimal powers
or is entirely unaware of the powers it does have,

The
Florida Alligator
a r
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

URGES IMMEDIATE TRAFFIC SOLUTION

Although Cade removed cyclamate from
Gatorade, he does not believe it induces cancer.
1 dont feel there is any danger in human use of
cyclamate whatsoever, he said. The experiments
which led to the removal of cyclamate from the
market were grossly inadequate.
No research about cyclamate is being conducted
at the UF yet. Most members of the College of
Medicine say they are waiting until more extensive
data is released about the effects of the widely
consumed sugar substitute.

which appear from the outside to be considerable.
The SG commission, having talked to Student
Body President Charles Shepherd, has decided to go
to Vice President of Business Affairs William
Elmore, to whom the University committee reports
and ask for action on justifiable complaints of the
students, Alper said.
Alper said that he and his commission are aware
of the strain on the University committee but that it
ought to be aware of the strain on students.
He called for action now, not next week, next
month or next quarter. They should meet every day
if necessary.
Apparently the committee doesnt realize that
the rules have the foroe of law and cost money and
aggravation, said Alper.
aa**>m vr' * - **. **# * * 'i. r s

University of Florida, Gainesville

Shepherd Aims Gripes
At UF Student Senate

See Editorial Page 8
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
In a return exchange with
UFs now cardless card section,
Student Government officials
Monday emphasized that
complaints stemming from
disgruntled married, law and
medical students should be
aimed at the Student Senate, not
the executive branch.
Secretary of Athletics, Lee
Greene said his only
responsibility in the
administration of the card
section is to take the senate bill
to the ticket office and to
evaluate their performance.
During half-time of the
UF-UNC game the 1,288
members of the section,
displeased with their location,
threw their cards in the air and
onto the field and raised a
20-foot banner proclaiming Go
to Hell, Shepherd.
What they do not
understand is that the only thing
we have to do with bloc seating
is the administration of it as we
are directed by the senate,
Shepherd said.
Throughout the summer I
repeatedly requested a decision
on the card section and I didnt
get it because of politics and the
pressures of the budget, the
26-year-old student president
said.

Shepherd attacked the
senates action calling them
lacking in guts..
I think the senate refused to
face the issue of whether they
wanted a card section, he said.
If they wanted one it should
have been where they were,
behind the band on the 50-yard
line.
He said the leadership of the
senate at the time refused to
make any changes in the
composition of the section,now
reserved for married, medical
and law students.
I dont think they should be
the only ones in die card
section, Shepherd said.
Therefore, I plan to introduce
legislation which will again allow
SG to assume responsibility for
the administration of the card
section instead of the mayors
council.
Shepherd's bill, now in the
drafting stages, calls for opening
up membership in the card

Senate Bill May Revise
Student Card Section

A bill calling for the abolition
of the card section will be
proposed by the Student Senate
tonight.
The bill, to be introduced by
Majority Whip George Seide,
would spell the end of the
Saturday afternoon tradition for
the remainder of the 1969
football season.
The card section, composed
mostly of married, law and
medical students has also been a
traditional sore spot for bloc
seating administrators.
The bfll would not stop
proposals for a revised card
section for next season,
however.
Also slated for the evenings
agenda is the ratification of last
weeks general election. This
' formality would make the newly
elected senators legal. The new

Alper termed the committees action until now as
fine, but there are lots of little problems that they
need to be aware of.
He added they need to be open to suggestions to
rewrite the traffic and parking rules, to seek out
opinions of what is wrong and study them more
carefully.
Alper urged students with a complaint to male*
their voice known and suggested writing to him in
care of Student Government.
His commission, he said, will meet until the rules
are satisfactory. People have a right to our
protection and we intend to give it, he said. The
commission has Shepherds backing on the matter
and intends to see the problem through until it no
longer exists, Alper said.

\! mil *

Tuesday, October 21,1969

section to any student interested
in attending every game and
willing to cooperate with the
group's rules.
It will consist of 1,300
reserved seats from section 36
through section 38 (50-yard
line), row one up.
The proposed section will
double as a spirit section during
the game and act as a card
section during half-time," he
said.
The proposed bill, calls for
putting backs on the bleacher
seats, constructing a speaker
system and painting of the seats.
If passed by the senate, the
bill would go into effect Jan. 1,
1970 for implementation by a
special SG committee.
On the committee would be
the secretary of athletics, a
representative of Interhall, the
head cheerleader, president of
the senate and president of the
band. It would be headed by a
SG-appointed and senate-ratified
chairman, Shepherd said.

senate will convene for the first
time next Tuesday, after
tonight's ratification vote.
Tonights meeting has been
moved from 7:30 to 9 pjn. in
order to avoid a conflict with
progress tests, and will be held in
room 349 of the Reitz Onion.
TRAFFIC COURT
jurisdiction has been
extended to five more
violations page 2
Classifieds r l
Dropouts 6
Editorials 8
Entertainment 12
FSU News .6
Letters 9
Movies ii
Sports 14



!, Th* Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Octobar 21,1969

Page 2

Student Traffic Court Jurisdiction Extended

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Traffic Court now has
definite jurisdiction over five more
violations than in the past.
These new violations to be handled
by the court are:
failing to stop at a stop sign or stop
light
§ improper lane changes

Htahor idwrtion BuiMirm
'- \
(EMTORS NOTE: The following are questions and answers on the
npcoming Nov. 4 Higher Education Building Amendment
referendum.)
Q. Why is it necessary to resort to bonding for expanding our
state universities, junior colleges and vocational-technical schools?
A. Well, for one reason, there is no capital outlay money for
education forthcoming from legislative appropriations. Our lawmakers
said during the 1969 session that if any more money was
appropriated, taxes would have to be raised. They couldnt create a
personal or corporate income tax because to do so would have meant
changing the revised 1968 Constitution which prohibits such taxes.
The men in Tallahassee thought taxpayers would not have gone
along with an amendment calling for an income tax. Furthermore,
they felt a hike in taxes would have had bad political consequences.
But, more than that, they knew that since gross utility tax receipts
back in 1963 had already been pledged for fifty years to paying off
higher education bonds, an amendment reinstating a bonding
authority, deleted in constitutional revision, would find favorable
support because orijpnaOy taxpayers had approved a similar
amendment by a two-to-one margin.
Q. How much money will the sale of bonds bring in once the
amendment is approved?
A. About $l6O million over the next rive years, or an average of
$35 milfion per year.
Q. Mil the Higher Education Building Amendment bonding
authority adequately take care of state educational goals?
A. bio. More than S4OO million is needed over the next five years,
and while the $l6O million isn't adequate, it will be a start toward
meeting existing goals.
Q. What will money from the sale of bonds go for, and why?
A. Well, generally the money will be used for expanding our
universities, junior colleges and vocational schools, but this expansion
is needed because enrollment is expected to double in the next five
years. The total number of students is expected by just conservative
estimates to increase from 214,247 in 1968 to 410,928 in the fall of
1975.
Q. What will happen if voters decide not to restore the bonding
authority contained in the deleted amendment?
A. With no money coming, enrollment will have to be restricted.
At least half expected increase in enrollment will be turned away. If
legislators, educators and other state officials decide to go ahead and
accept all qualified students if the amendment does not pass, there are
several choices facing them in order to accomodate these students
adequately.
One is a hike in taxes, with the possible creation of income taxes.
Another is a huge increase in tuition. Fees now amount to $l5O per
quarter for instate students. They could soar to as high as SSOO a
term, based on average total capital outlay needs per year, and where
student fees would be depended upon for a sole source of funds.
(Address all questions to: The Amendment Answer Man, Florida
Alligator, Reitz Union, Campus.
IHI. I lORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June. July and August when it is published semi-weekly and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reita Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Host
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.53 per quarter.
T| Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or urn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
S is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
isement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
sevcatM times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
JSSp. 1
TrtE QUARTERLY IS HERE

FIVE MORE V\Q\ ATIONS ADDED

driving the wrong way in any
traffic lane
t improper U-tum
t improper passing-
Chief Justice of the Traffic Court
Bob Wattles said the campus police have
been very cooperative at the trials when
a question arises about the validity of
students tickets.
For example, area designation signs in
the Towers parking lot have been moved
and raised so they would be easier to
see. This could not have been done

Student Senate Against
Card Section Protest

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate is not in
sympathy with the actions of
students sitting in the card
section Saturday at the
UF-North Carolina game, and
will not condone their actions,
Senate Majority Whip George
Seide said Monday.
Card section participants
raised the ire of senators
Vandy Tickets
Now On Sale
Tickets for the Vanderbilt
game on Saturday are available
now at the six windows of the
ticket office in the stadium.
Fifteen thousand student
tickets, not counting date
tickets, were allotted for this
game. Os the 4,000 date tickets,
60 percent will go to the bloc
seating; 40 percent will go to the
window for general distribution.
At the windows, tickets are
placed on first-come, first-serve
basis.

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without the help of the campus police,
Wattles said.
He said the ticket rate has been
declining. The number of tickets
currently being given is just a little
above normal for this time of year,
Wattles said.
We will probably be able to go back
to holding court only every two weeks,
Wattles said.
Court has been held each week for
the past two weeks and will be held
again Tuesday night. Including this

Saturday during half time
ceremonies when they threw
their cards in the air and shouted
verbal abuses at Student Body
President Charles Shepherd.
Students in the section said
they were not given the seats
they were promised. They also
claimed that the necessary
instructions for the programs
tricks had been destroyed.
Seide has authored two bills
that he says will solve the
problem and straighten out the
card section.
Both bills will appear before
the senate at tonights regular
meeting of that body.
The first bill, which was
authored before Saturdays
melee, abolishes the card section
for the remainder of the 1969
UF football season.
Contained in the second bill is
the creation of a Spirit
Section which carries on the
same functions of the present
card section but prohibits any
one group from dominating the
section.
Students will be chosen at
random from the student body,

week's session there have been 61
appeals, Wattles said.
He said only about four or five out of
20 appeals are judged "not guilty.
However, there are various levels of
guilty, he added.
"Many people are found guilty with
extenuating circumstances. This means
they will probably be fined, but points
will not be assigned," he said.
Wattles said he would appreciate it if
any students with complaints would get
in touch with the traffic court.

will not be allowed to buy date
tickets for the section and card
section assignments will be
permanent for the entire school
year.
This means that married
students from the four villages,
law students, and medical
students who formerly sat in the
section with their wives or dates,
will no longer have that
privilege.
"These people were supposed
to be more responsible and
supposedly wouldn't mess
around. Why don't they act
responsible?"
Seide said he wasn't attacking
the people who sat in the
section. "I just want the section
to be open to the student
body."
The bill calls for a committee
to accept applications for seats
from students seeking seats in
the spirit section.
Seide said in the future there
will be photographs taken of the
section from across the field to
determine who isn't doing the
job.



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Photos by
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Teeedoy, October 21, tM, The Florida AlKfator. I

Page 3



Page 4

l, Tha Florida Aligator, TuM4ty,OetolMr 21,1968 *

Nixon Reaffirms Haynsworth Nomination

WASHINGTON (UPI) President
Nixon Monday reaffirmed his faith in
the nomination of Clement F.
Haynsworth to the Supreme Court and
branded charges against him as vicious
character assassinations.
At an impromptu news conference in
his office, the Chief Executive predicted
the Senate would confirm the
56-year-old federal appeals court judge
after senators had studied Haynsworths
background and charges against him as
carefully as the President said he had.
Nixon said half the judges in the
country would have to be impeached if
the charges of Haynsworths sitting in
on cases in which he had stock were to
prevail.
The President said that even if the
Greenville, S.C., judge asked for
withdrawal of the nomination, he would
oppose it.
I believe he will be a great credit to
the Supreme Court and I will stand by
him until he is confirmed and I believe

Chief TestifiesMaryJos Body Bore No Injuries

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. (UPI)
Police Chief Dominic Arena of
Edgartown, Mass., testified
Monday the body of Mary Jo
Kopechne bore no injuries that
I could see when it was taken
from Sen. Edward M. Kennedys
submerged automobile.
Arena, the first police officer
to investigate Mary Jos death

WW.VAViWW.V.W.VAViV.V/.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V..V.V.V.'.V.V.'.V.V.V.V.V.V.V
{ Mansfield Credits Nixon
With War Deescalation
WASHINGTON (UPI) Senate Democratic leader Mike Mansfield
credited President Nixon Monday with deescalating the Vietnam War.
He called for public support of Nixon as the best road to peace.
Mansfield said the United States should leave no residual force in
Vietnam when peace is achieved, as some administration spokesmen
have suggested, but instead should pull out lock, stock and barrel.
When that day comes I would like to see us enter into an
international agreement to insure the neutrality of all the nations of
Southeast Asia, the Democratic leader said in a Senate speech.
What the President has done to bring about a deescalation of the
conflict, said Mansfield, long a critic of U.S. involvement in Vietnam.
He cited reduced casualties and lower rates of infiltration by North
Vietnamese troops.
I would like to see the people of this nation get behind President
Nixon, not to prolong the war... but to urge him to keep on the road
he is traveling and do everything he can to speed it up, Mansfield
said.
Sen. J. William Fulbright, one week away from new public hearings
on the war, has indicated he favors setting a deadline for total troop
withdrawal 13 months from now.
W.C. FIELDS
REIGNS Supreme
tonight
9 PM ON
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***& 33B**
633 NW 13th ST.
REMEMBBt THIRSTY TIME 4:30 7.00
[THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
; AT BOOKSTORES

'V
he will be confirmed, Nixon asserted.
Theres no dishonor in standing by
an honest man, Nixon said, describing
Haynsworth as the honest man and a
man of integrity.
Some senators, with Sen. Birch Bayh,
D-Ind., at the forefront, have accused
Haynsworth of having a conflict of
interest for participating in a number of
cases decided by his 4th Circuit Court
of Appeals because of interest he held in
firms with litigation before him.
I reaffirm rhy support of Judge
Haynsworth and I reaffirm it with even

last July 18 on Chappaquiddick
Island, Mass., was the first
witness called at a hearing on a
request by Massachusetts
District Attorney Edmund S.
Dinis for an autopsy on Miss
Kopechnes body.
Under questioning by Dinis
assistant, Armand Fernandes Jr.,
Arena said that when scuba diver

PREDICTS SENATE CONFIRMATION

John Farrar arose to the surface
with Mary Jos body, he pulled
it to the top of the Kennedy
automobile with the aid of a
rope.
Arena said he cradled the
body in his arms momentarily
and placed it in a small rowboat.
She appeared normal in that
there were no injuries that I
could see, Arena said.

to it.
FACTUAL
SIZE

If you were always near a socket
when you needed a shave, that
IBHMi would be one thing.
But you arent.
You're all over the place.
So you need a shaver that goes where
its happening.
A shaver like the brand-new battery batteryoperated
operated batteryoperated Norelco Cordless 208.
With floating heads that fit the curves
of a mans face.
And self-sharpening blades inside those
floating heads that shave close and smooth

'.:m Norelcff
Even on a beard like yours.
. 1969 North American Philips Corporation, 100 East 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. 10017

greater conviction than before, said
Nixon. I believe this is vicious
character assassination.
Nixon appeared to be particularly
upset about suggestions that
Haynsworth had business associations
and dealings with Robert G. Bobby
Baker, former secretary of Senate
Democrats.
This is guilt by association and
character assassination of the worst
kind, said Nixon.
I know Bobby Baker myself, he
added. He then recalled that Bakers
wife had served several months on his
staff when he was a California senator.
There were some reports recently
that Haynsworth and Baker held stock
in the same cemetery corporation in
South Carolina.
The White House subsequently said
that Haynsworth and Baker barely knew
each other and said it was character
assassination to try to link Haynsworth
with Baker.

The police chief, under
cross-examination by a
Kopechne attorney, Joseph F.
Flanagan, answered No sir, I
did not when asked if he saw
any contusions or open wounds
or blood on the girls clothing.
Fernandes asked Arena if he
made a search for Kennedy after
his initial investigation of the
drowning.

Baker is under conviction on charges
of fraud and income tax evasion as a
result of outside activities while a
Senate employe.
Nixon praised Haynsworths ability
to go through the fire ... and the glare
of investigation ...
On the basis of his most recent study,
Nixon said, now that all the evidence is
in he strongly refutes any suggestions
that Haynsworth should have
disqualified himself in litigation
involving customers of firms in which he
owned stock.
In no way did Judge Haynsworth
use his influence nor was there any
indication he was influenced by his
stock ownership, the President said.
Nixon called reporters into his office
shortly after 11 a.m. EDT to discuss the
Haynsworth nomination and no other
subject with a late count showing 22
senators still uncommitted on the
nomination.

every day. The Norelco unique rotary ac action
tion action keeps the blades sharp while it
strokes off whiskers. Every time you shave.
The Norelco Cordless gives you close
shaves anywhere. Up to 30 days of shaves
on only 4 penlight batteries.
Handsomely styled in jet black and
chrome, theres even a mirror inside the
cap. So you can see what youre shaving.
And its small enough to fit your pocket.
Very self-sufficient.
All ready to sock it to your beard.

When I went back to the
office Sen. Kennedy was there
with Markham (Paul, a Kennedy
friend and former U.S. attorney
in Massachusetts)/ Arena said.
Arena said he told Kennedy,
Im sorry to tell you this, your
car was in an accident and there
was a fatality. He said the
senator responded by saying,
Yes, I was the driver.



ItO Awarded 1969 Nobel Peace Prize

OSLO (UPI) The 1969
Nobel Peace Prize was awarded
Monday to the International

S. Viet Slay 96 Cong

SAIGON (UPI)
Communiques Monday reported
96 North Vietnamese and Viet
Cong slain by South Vietnamese
forces driving into the U Minh
Forest for the first time in 14
months. U.S. helicopter gunships
supported the action, and one
was shot down.
Military sources said fighting
in the U Minh Forest of
Darkness ranged for five hours
Sunday and cost the South
Vietnamese force six men killed
and 16 wounded. One American
aboard the downed helicopter
was wounded, and the machine
was destroyed.
It was the first major push
into the 200-sqnare-imle forest
same August, 1968, when 219
Communists were reported
killed in a four-day sweep of
swamps and jungles filled with
giant mosquitos, stinging ants,
leeches and poisonous snakes.
Military sources said 600
Communist troops recently
moved into the U Minh 142
miles southwest of Saigon to
reinforce elements of the 273rd
Viet Cong regiment.
Several American servicemen
are believed to be prisoners of
the Viet Cong in the U Minh.
Last December, Maj. James
Rowe of McAllen, Tex., a Green
Beret, escaped from a VC prison
camp in. the U Minh where he
had been held for five years.
Elsewhere, the U.S. Command
said an Army OH6 light
observation helicopter was shot
down Sunday 30 miles
northwest of Saigon, wounding
one crewman.
Troops of the U.S. 109th
Light Infantry Brigade operating
44 miles northeast of Saigon
whrf jrji
With a John Roberts
class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida

IMPROVES WORLD SOCIAL CONDITIONS

Labor Organization (ILO), which
was formed at the end of the
World War I to help peace by

near Xuan Loc Sunday reported
discovering a complex of 56
Communist bunkers in thick
jungle.
The abandoned bunkers,
which spokesmen said showed
signs of recent use, were
destroyed.
Twelve miles to the south,
other units of die 199th found
25 bunkers, and they were also
destroyed.
The weekly American troop
strength report released Monday
listed 501,900 U.S. servicemen
as on duty in the war zone, a
drop of 3,700 from the last
accounting. The figures Showed
the new total was the fewest
since the week ending Jan. 31,
1969, when 429,900 American
were serving in Vietnam.
President Nixon has
announced plans for
withdrawing 60,000 Americans
by Christmas.

...put it I 1
things go better with COKE

Come on, man, shine a new light
on the subject. Views are changing
and Marg Benning of Auburn Uni University
versity University has created a new ad for
our good friend... Coca-Cola. But
its not just a bright idea, its Margs
impression of our product and
thats important to us. What about
you?
How do you see Coke as part
of your today? Why not take a few
moments to design 8n ad for us?
Show us your unique way of look-

"COOA.QOIA" AMP "COKE" AIM EEQMTEHCO TRAOE.HARKS WHICH IDENTIFY ONLY THE FRODUOT OF THE CONFANY.

improving working, and social
conditions the
world.
The ILO and the International
Court of Justice are the only
two organs of the defunct
League of Nations to survive.
The ILO is now one of the
special organizations of the
United Nations with
headquarters in Geneva.
Since 1948 it has been headed
by an American, David A.
Morse.
As usual, the Nobel
Committee of the Swedish
Parliament gave no reasons for
its decision and made it dear
there will be no comments.
It said only that toe s7s,oft

Nixon Calk For Softer Narcotics Laws

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Nixon
administration called Monday for softer narcotics
laws under which users of drugs ranging from
marijuana to heroin no longer would be jailed
automatically.
Simple possession of any drug would be a
misdemeanor on the first offense.
The revision in drug laws, presented to a Senate
hearing- would generally knock out harsh,

7 ...

prize would go to the ILO.
Informed sources in Oslo said
one of the reasons for the choice
was the valuable work done by
ILO in developing countries
where it has given valuable
technical assistance.
An ILO spokesman in Geneva
said the group received the news
with great delight."
We received toe news with

Tviafar, Oetbtwr ft, Wft, Tlm flnrifc

mandatory sentences prescribed by present law.
Judges would be given flexible options under the
new plan.

The bill would still outlaw marijuana as well as
harder drugs. But an administration spokesman said
the effect would be to crack down hard on
professional criminals' who sell drugs while taking
it easier on youths with otherwise clean records who
are caught at a pot party or even convicted of
simple possession of heroin.

ing at Coca-Cola. Go ahead. grab
a Coke and lay the words on us!
If your ad is chosen to be pub published,
lished, published, well lay $25.00 on you.
Who knows? You may be $25.00
richer. And, if nothing else, youre
bound to enjoy the Coca-Cola.
When your bright
idea for Coke is on r<
paper, mail it to: WSm
College NewspaperA&SP Ls s£S
P.O. Drawer 1734
Atlanta, Georgia 30301

great delight and can only say
that it is a great honor, said
ILO Public Affairs Director John
Weston.
We had been hoping but we
had no idea that we would be
awarded the prize. Morse, the
ILO director general, was visiting
the organizations branch office
in New York when the news
came from Oslo.
The ILO was formed in 1919
to bring governments, employers
and trade unions together for
united actions in the cause of
social justice.
It functioned as part of the
League of nations during two
world wars before it became
associated with the U.N.

Page 5



, The Florida AWprtor.Tuaaday, October 21. IMS

Page 6

Bureau Offers THE DROPOUTS

Speakers
The UF Honor Court Bar
Association has formed a
speakers bureau and is offering
qualified speakers to interested
groups.
Honor Court President Rick
Lazzara said the bureau was
formed to, M promote a better
understanding of the Honor
Code and Honor Court at UF.

WITH 25-CENT CHARGE
UF To Downtown Bus Service Starts Today

By JEFF BREIN
Alligator Staff Writer
A student spoke up and got action with the start
today of a round trip bus service from the UF
campus to downtown shopping areas.
Lee Burrows, UF traffic and parking coordinator
passed file students suggestion along to TN. Wells,
UF business manager who in turn contacted the
University Transit Co. who will handle the routing
and running of the busses.
The new bus service beginning today is not a
part of the campus shuttle service, Burrows said.
He explamed that 2S cents will be charged along
with an additional five cent charge for transfer
within the city bus route.
A bus will leave the main bus terminal behind

FSU
NEWS
HOMECOMING Replying
to press stories resulting from a
luncheon meeting last Friday
Jack Whitley, homecoming
chairman said Monday Were
not trying to shock our alumni
with this years Homecoming.
The press didnt get our
intentions straight when I talked
with them Friday at die
Chamber of Commerce meeting.
Instead of just wining and dining
old grads and asking them for
money, FSU Homecoming
organizers plan to present the
alumni with a large dose of
student-delivered social
awareness.
2,001 Co-author of the
book and film 2,001 A Space
Odyssey Arthur C. Clark will
speak at FSU tonight at 8 p.m.
in Wescott Auditorium.
The scientist and writer,
credited with developing the
communications satellite, will
speak on the topic of the
exploration of space in the first
lecture of this years university
lecture series.
THE*SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
ky...young and old...tome Just for the fun
of It, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
IMt $5 That's all it costs for our Special
ntroductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
1378-26461
CASSELS IN THE AIR
GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL
AIRPORT
BO WALDO ROAD
WKKm

FitoWS Tour. i actually A \
/ SEREtiAPMe \ SHATTEREP i ( NoT£t )( N 0... J
l ComtteALCMG?) A
V: -.v^v!k^^:lvraPrM
Kg t; l:gJ
7-30 and /0 : 00p.m.
"Florida Qym
$5.00 per couple
Oickets sold at:
J. Wayne Reitz Union Box Office
Record Bar
.i**_%*'*4 t V V J .* ) t ) ~**.-
* *'- < *" *.*
Hume Hall starting at 12:45. It will travel east on
Radio Road to S.W. 13th Street, then south to N.W.
9th Avenue.
The bus will travel through Sorority Row and
north on S.W. 10th Street to S.W. 4th Avenue.
From there it will travel to the downtown area, the
Gainesville Shopping Center, past the Center
Theatre and on to the Gainesville Mall.
On its way back to the terminal the busses will
stop on the UF campus at Mallory and Rawlings.
The service will run Monday through Friday on
an hourly basis.
The new service dubbed the Shoppers Special,
is according to Burrows, the first step into the
implementation of better service on campus.
A similar project ran for three days earlier this
year and was quite a success, Burrows said. He was

BY HOWARD POST
/- e-,
/ HBRMafTf|r Hg
IMS

referring to a promotional stunt offering free rides
to the Gainesville Mall on a double-decker London
bus.
In a letter to Gene Brown of the University
Transit Co., Wells said, the service will be on a trial
basis and may be discontinued at your option or
adjusted to run less frequently if so desired.
The new service will in no way affect the present
shuttle bus service oftthdUF campus.
We have added to the Blue route, making an
additional stop at the medical center. Burrows
said. We have no immediate plans of adding to
other routes although at times we have considered
it.
Burrows explained that two busses are often
added during peak hours of the day but an overall
change is not expected at this time.



AMONG THEM: BIRTH CONTROL
Commission Tackling Womens Problems

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the last of a two part
series on the Womens Commision.)
*
By ANNE B. FREEDMAN
Alligator Faaturas Editor
Under the casual cover of the UF coeds active
social and academic life are problems that her male
counterparts cant or wont change.
Unique womanly considerations like obtaining
reliable information of birth control before making
important decisions.
Or the annual and quarterly counseling hassles of
the serious coed who enters engineering, medicine,
agriculture or any of the other typically male
fortresses.
The Womens Commission has been formed as a
coordinating and initiating agency to help upgrade
the status of women on this campus, said Kathy
Spellmen, commission vice president.
Concerned with the close-to-home problems of
both single and married coeds, the commission is
currently organizing a birth control clinic with the
infirmary staff.
Literature on oral contraceptives and other
women-directed psychological and medical studies
will be accumulated in mass quantities in a library
type situation. The location has not yet been
decided.

Handball Complex Moved
Behind UFs Norman Hall

A handball complex being
planned for Broward Field has
been moved to behind Norman
Hall where there will be room
for only four instead of the
requested six courts.
The Student Government
financed courts were moved to
the campus most easterly
location when UF President
Stephen C. OConnells Campus
Planning and Land Use
Committee decided that their
construction would ruin a very
nice vista.
The designated area just north
of the tennis courts behind
Norman Hall is not large enough
for the planned six courts. Only
four of them wiU be built.
Physical Planning Consultant
L. Worth Crow felt that noise at
the construction site would not
be any problem.
The new location will
probably require levelling of the
1232 W. UNIV.
376-7657
WE
HAVE
CAMERA
RENTALS!
* < a % % ar .r * ** :

ground, a process expected to
cost about S3OOO, almost half
the price of one set of courts.
The facility was originally
designed as a part of a
recreational complex to be built
north of the tennis courts on
Broward field. The tennis courts
will remain at their present
location, and a swimming pool
and pumphouse planned for file
complex will not be moved.
SGs Secretary of Student

Jerry Uelsmann fl
acclaimed U.F. photographer will |H
"HAP ON IMAGES
B slide show Wk
B THURSDAY OCT. 23-7:3OPM B
Lounge 123 J. Wayne Reitz Union ;.JB

Are women getting shafted at the Placement
Service? Are they being kept out of the colleges of
medicine and law or grad schools? asks Kathy
Waldman, commission president.
These are the problems that male-oriented
organizations don't have the time or motivation to
go into. I dont think it's up to men to upgrade tie
status of women although it may be because of
them we are here. Besides, they seem pretty happy
the way things are, she said.
Coed participation in meaningful committees is
another aim of the commission.
We want to involve women in student
government. And volunteer groups like the Suicide
Crisis and Prevention Center, Miss Spellmen said.
Shed like to see interested and qualified women
in more responsible positions in student
government.
Im proud to say Im the first woman appointed
secretary of student affairs, Miss Spellman said.
The commission wants coeds to be able to obtain
the necessary counseling and advice to prepare them
for experiences in the working world.
Many have an identity problem when they
leave, Miss Spellmen said.
By directing women students to the appropriate
agencies on campus, the commission hopes to help
them avoid this situation.
We want to expand the day care centers on
campus so married women students can get out of

Services Howard Lubell says that
bids are being asked for the cost
of the project, expected to be
about $12,000. He hopes to
have construction completed
before spring quarter.
OUM Mi SUF IMPtOVIMINT }
:JCa Today 372454a
1018 YfiiMMyTA v fr l s fl it ? ? |

the house more often if they want to/* Min
Speflmen aid.
One delegate from a large northwestern college at
the national AWS .convention reported that an
abortion clinic had been formed in her community,
Miss Waldman said. The Womens Commission there
took a referral service under its offerings to women
students on that campus.
Miss Waldman said the UF Womens Commission
is looking into this.
UFs Womens Commission will have a mutually
helping type relationship with the Office of
Student Affairs.
Tigert has the information for programs we need
and we have what they want to know about the
students/' Miss Waldman said.
Both Dr. Betty Cosby, former dean of women
and now assistant to the vice president for student
affairs, and Frank Adams, dean for student
development have expressed favorable opinions
towards the planned activities of the Women's
Commission.
Its far more important to get a strong
representative action-group going than it is to have
some pseudo-group hanging in the air without a
purpose, Adams said.
Dr. Cosby said that a group of active coeds like
the commission could effectively direct the heeds of
the women of the campus into the channels of
student government.

ONLY TRANS-WORLD HAIRGOODS HAS THE
fd Sr
' j^p
WBSlffl
B |B jB B B fl
CURTAIN GOING UR ON A NEW FAU IOOK
FROM
TRANS-WORLD Vmpmtos I
CORNER UNIVERSITY AVE. & 13th ST. OPEN
GAINESVILLE <*"- ** '"JSi. sat
OTHER SHOWROOMS AT MUN SAT
ORLANDO, COCOA BEACH, DAYTONA BEACH & JACKSONVILLE

Tuwtey, October 21,1969, The Florida AWptor,
~ * > f ' ;

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 21.1969

Page 8

The
Flnrirlp Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
r iua iua Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
Th price of frMdofn Executive Editor News Editor
is the exercise of responsibility

Apathy: Whose Fault?

MR. EDITOR:
Bright and early Wednesday morning I went
downstairs into the Broward lobby intending to
exercise my right to vote. I handed the voting
official my picture ID. phis my athletic card, as my
Homecoming date still had my fee card for bloc
seating. I was told my athletic card was not an
acceptable substitute, therefore I could not vote.
I proceeded to make various phone calls to
several of the top cogs in the political machine,
including Charles Shepherd (who was busy). Each
of these persons quickly assured me that it was not
his fault and that I didnt have my fee card, and the
fact that I would need it had been publicized.
As a faithful Alligator reader, this statement led
me to question when, where, and how prominently
this publicity had taken place. After diligently

-Speaking Out

I write now from Florence, Italy, where I began
studying last June and will finish in December on
the Studies in Florence program sponsored by
Florida State University and open to all those,
sophomore and above, of state universities of
Florida. For the information of all, our program
goes like this: each week this summer we (100
students) studied from Monday till Thursday in our
Italian villa on a hillside overlooking beautiful
Florence.
Students chose from a list of liberal arts courses
and studied under American professors from FSU.
Thursday afternoons till Sunday nights were free, if
we desired, for travel. By train, boat, or better still,
just hitchhiking, we took advantage of a wealth of
places to visit.
It was during a school weekend at a scenic Italian
lake that I met a group of Czechoslovakians who
were on a short vacation. That night, at a campsite
by the lake, I talked with two Czech brothers who
spoke English quite well. They invited me to visit
them in Bratislava, a large town on the Danube
River; after partaking of their wine and warm spirit
I did not hesitate to accept their invitation.
The day I had planned to go it was impossible to
enter the country August 21 the first
anniversary l of the Russian occupation of
Czechoslovakia, a day marked by outbreaks of
violence and rioting in the streets. When I did enter
on September 10,1 stayed at a quaint flat in the old
part of the city. In one apartment live the single
younger brother, 27, the older brother, 30, with
wife and child, and the parents of the brothers.
What first struck me was the cost and standard of
living of the people. For instance, the younger
brother earns in one month as a doctor the same
salary that I earn in one week working as a hospital
employee. His salary comes into clearer perspective
by noting that he must work approximately four
times as long as I to buy the same retail article.
Further, the married brother must spend an
estimated 70 per cent of his salary on food.
This year, he and his family will move from his
parents flat to a new two bedroom apartment of
their own for which they have waited six years a
time which each Czech must wait. Czech made cars
take two years to reach the consumer. Consider also
that people desiring to leave the country must wait
no less than three months for a passport plus
provide a good reason for leaving the country.
If they do leave they can only exchange a
mavimiim the equivalent of thirty UJS. dollars. Both
brothers do wish things were better, but they have
learned to be satisfied with their present conditions.
Czechoslovakia has been a communist nation
since after World War 11. Only last year did Russia

Czechs Miss Their Freedom

searching through back issues of the Alligator, I
found that it had indeed been prominently
mentioned in small print in the last line of a tinny
block on page three of the October 13 issue.
I propose that the only people who were really
aware that the fee card would be required were the
Senators themselves. Thus candidates were hurt
from the inability of many independents and even
some Greeks to vote.
All of our leaders on campus continually point
to the apathy of students as judged by small
election turnouts. I in turn point to them and their
mishandling of election procedures as a major cause
of apathy on this campus.
BARBARA BOYT
CONNIE NUTARO

occupy the Czech territory, crush the liberal
socialist Czech government and mold a strict and
powerful party line organization. This Russian
action solicited hatred and demonstrations from the
Czech population.
I asked the older brother what has been the main
difference in Czech life since the Russian
occupation of last year. He spoke a plain truth,
When men become afraid it is bad and now men
have fear. We cannot write and cannot speak what
we want. Neither can the people read freely as
Russian influenced literature has replaced foreign
newspapers and magazines and strict penalties are
enforced for publishing underground literature
against the state.
Fortunately in Bratislava, the people can hear
radio free Europe from nearby Vienna. As this
brother remarks, As long as we can hear the news,
we can hear facts and opinions from both sides of
the iron curtain and we can for ourselves make a
choice^.
We discussed Vietnam and the older brother
cited a poignant analogy, The U.S. fights
communism in Vietnam. After World War 11, Russia
moved in to occuyp the Eastern European nations.
If the U.S. doesnt stand firm now in Vietnam, the
same thing will happen to Southeast Asia as
happened to these nations.
I must point out that students in the U.S. are
taught in school the virtues of freedom and
democracy. Yet, this Czech, having neither studied
nor felt the principles of freedom, had decided from
none other than his expreience that he wanted more
of a taste of freedom. He told me frankly, There is
really nothing we can do about our situation now
except live as we do.
He knows of the many Communist sympathizers
in the U.S. and to them he echoes these words:
You like the communism that you read about;
well, come and live in Czechoslovakia and see what
communism really is and then tell me how you like
it.
I told my hosts that Czech life was, seemingly,
much the same as in other countries f fans and
participants enjoyed athletic contests, people drank
and sang in pubs and walked noisily on the streets at
night, etc. They replied that what seemed the same
to the eye was in truth much different than in freer
countries. They said they thought it was hard for
me as a tourist to understand just seeing and not
living there.
The Czech citizen has lost personal freedoms at
the expense of fears that cloud an already
unforseeable future. Yet life goes on. Most citizens
feel strongly about Czechoslovakia; it is all they
have and they want to hang on to'what they have.

By Joel Berger

EDIT Oft/At
Time To Discard
9
Card sections, rat caps and rah-rah boys. It seems we have
advanced beyond the entire specter of this collegiate
dribble. f
Saturdays immaturity on the part ot our campus
grown-ups the married, law and medical students
seems to prove that it is indeed time we should out-grow
them. ...
Those students who have wearied the senate s ear from
time beyond recollection, claiming to have the
responsibility and wisdom to handle the
none-too-complicated chore of holding up colored cards,
threw not only their cards, but also their credibility to the
winds.
These mature adults, displaying temper-tan truim
apparently learned from (if not taught to) their children,
managed to embarass the entire student body by their
insipid actions at the Homecoming game.
And worse yet, they did not even know what they were
objecting to, for they accused Student Body President
Charles Shepherd of responsibility for their seating
assignment.
If they had given even the most cursory glance to this
newspaper, or investigated the issue to the shallowest depths
of its surface, they would have realized the inaccuracy of
their banner telling the president of the student body to
Go to Hell.
We are ashamed.
The university, displayed before the state and its highest
officials at our Homecoming, is embarassed.
We would hope that the 2,288 members of the
juvenile-acting card section are embarrased.
They certainly should be. If they are the least bit mature
beneath their external actions.
Responsibility for the card sections 30-yard-line to the
end zone seating belongs to the Student Senate.
The matter was discussed, and agreed upon by all parties,
at the Sept. 30 senate meeting.
Shepherd executed the senates orders, he did not
instigate them.
We assume, perhaps rashly, that this basic fundamental of
a democratic society and therefore, of our Student
Government, is not beyond the comprehension of the
members of the card section.
But in any case, their actions lead us to believe that they
do not deserve to represent the UF at any function,
including even a card-holding section at a football game.
We urge the senate to consider carefully the
demonstrated maturity of these students presently
occupying preferential seating in the card section.
And we urge the senate and the students of this
university to stand behind us, over-looking Florida Field
covered in paper squares, and demand the abolition of the
card section.
They have proved themselves to us and to the state.
It is an image we do not need.
And it is time they be discarded.
fl \S\ T I l if
ff
u 'I I §
Btu You A Iways Taught Me Not To Get Involved,
Mother,



Rally Censored Conservatives

MR. EDITOR:
I am a student. As a student,
I feel obligated to answer the
charges against our student
government.
Student government, like all
forms of representative
government, functions as a
representative of its
constituents. One of its duties,
indeed, one of its most
important duties, is to separate
personal feelings from
government policy. This has
become a difficult task.

WF mt/r 0/tt,
MORATORIUM RALLY
.... Another Ugly Man Contest?

SAIC Didn't Invite Hollis

MR. EDITOR:
Student Mobilization
Committee to End the War in
Vietnam (SMC) would like to
clarify a report in Thursdays
Alligator that a Mr. Jim Hollis
had been denied the right to
speak or had been cut from
Wednesdays Moratorium
agenda.
Both contentions are false.
SMC built the Moratorium to
demand an end to the war.
Speakers were invited from a
wide spectrum of the anti-war
coalition that supports the
demand of immediate U.S. troop
withdrawal from Vietnam.
During the course of our
building for the Moratorium,
Student Government started
something they called Gentle
Wednesday. To some extent SG
and SMC were able to work
together.
It was SG that invited Hollis
to speak Wednesday. SG tried to
force SMC to include Hollis in
our schedule. At no time did
SMC ever approach Hollis with
an invitation.
A compromise was worked

Donovan Needs No Apologist

MR. EDITOR:
In response to Miss Jessica
Everinghams article of October
14,1969:
I didnt know that people had
to be ... so straight or so
drunk they dont know what
theyre doing in order to
appreciate Donovans A
Natural High is the Best High in
the World. If Miss Everingham
had been so kind as to give us
the benefit of her esoteric
knowledge beforehand, we could
have all booed and preserved our
reputations.

Charles Shepherd, along with
many other government leaders,
has a personal aversion to the
war in Vietnam. As a student, he
has expressed these sentiments
in indisputable terms; but, as the
student body president he must
carefully weigh the opinions of
his constituents.
Student government
recognizes that the majority of
this student body is dissatisfied
with the war in Vietnam.
However, dissatisfaction stems
from many sources. Are we to
ignore the opinions which do

out between SMC and SG
whereby there would be an open
microphone period where Hollis
or anyone- else could freely
express his views. People of all
political persuasion did this, in
fact.
The objective reality of
Wednesdays demonstration by
2,500 people is that it was the
Vietnam Moratorium, sponsored
and built by SMC, that took
place. It was not SGs insipid
Gentle Wednesday.
Hence, there was no reason
for SMC to alter the schedule
built and approved by SMCs
500 members to include
someone like Hollis. In fact, the
only changes made in the agenda
were for matters of immediate
necessity.
We offered Hollis the
opportunity to speak first on the
open microphone. Hollis seems
to have felt it was below his
dignity.
The Alligator printed an
erroneous schedule, the source
of which is uncertain. A revised
official SMC schedule was given
to the Alligator Monday but was
omitted in Wednesdays paper.

Donovan is a sensitive and
perceptive artist who enjoys an
unusual mastery over the English
language and is capable of
delivering the precise message he
desires without the aid of
pompous apologists. I find it
difficult to believe that Miss
Everingham knows better what
Donovan means to say than he
himself does. And I feel insulted
to think I should need a Miss
Jessica Everingham to interpret
Donovans explicit message for
me.
RONDALD SMITH, 4BA

not match our own? No, we will
not and have not taken this
course of action.
Now, Mr. Morrison, let us
examine the Student
Mobilization Committee. By
your own count, your
membership is about 2Vi% of the
student body. Will you allow
student government to represent
the other 97H%? It seems that
you dont care for this idea.
Student government has
made every effort to cooperate
with SMC. However, we cannot
cooperate when it becomes

This schedule has no mention of
Hollis.
Our comment to Mr. Hollis is
that if you want to be a
regularly scheduled speaker of
something, build your own
pro-war program. I doubt if it
will be very successful but it is
certainly your right to do so.
On the other hand, do not
seek to impose yourself, Mr.
Hollis, on the rights of our
anti-war organization.
JOHN SUGG
SMC PUBLICITY
CO-CHAIRMAN

Deadline

Card Section Isnt For Kids

The flap going on this week over the card
section's demonstration at Saturdays
Homecoming game has caused many people to again
consider the future of one of the few card sections
still in existence.
The card section used to be located on the 50
yard line and was made of married students living
on campus, law and medical students. But they were
moved to the south end of the east stands and
didnt like the change. So instead of doing their
tricks, they tossed the cards into the air and hejd up
a banner saying Go To Hell Shepherd, referring to
Student Body Presdient Charles Shepherd.
The card section is a strange group. Heres a
restricted group of students who were given
excellent seats at games, merely for holding up a
card during part of halftime.
Other students were giving up chances of sitting
in these good seats for something they never
benefitted from, let alone got to see. The spectators
in the west and end zone stands get to see the card
tricks at the expense of most students.
The section was moved for this game, and the
lucky students who qualified to sit in the card
section were perturbed that they didnt have good
seats. So like the little child who cant have what he

obvious that 2 Vi% of the student
body wishes to censor what the
entire student body will be
allowed to hear.
You did not want the
following:
i a speaker from the black
student union,
a speaker from the student
government,
a conservative speaker. Mr.
Morrison, why? I know the
reason you opposed the first
two. You are not opposed io
blacks; you are not even
opposed to student government,
per se. However, you are
opposed to a speaker on this
issue whose views are not known
to you. Why number 3 scares
you, I dont know.
We live in a country where
every citizen has the right to
speak and to listen to whatever
he or she chooses. This is called
freedom of speech. I sincerely
hope that the citizens of this
country realize the importance
of this right. An educational
institution should be a guardian
of rights. It cannot afford to
deny them.
LEE GREENE

A Demonstration
Against Good Taste?

MR. EDITOR:
Dropped by the moratorium
rally in the Plaza. For a minute,
I thought they had revived the
Ugliest Man on Campus contest.
A girl in purple and green
front and nothing in back
walked by. Someone asked what
she was demonstrating against,
good taste?
Sign missing at rally: Go to
hell, NLF, go to hell ...You,
too, FSU.
When Asst. Prof. Megill said
he had thrown away his notes
from last years speech, one
fortyish prof was seen
applauding happily. Sounded
like the closing of Laugh-in.
Madenform was struck a
blow. I dont know which is

Tuesday, October 21,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

By Dave Doucette

wants, they threw a tantrum in this case they
threw their cards.
This would indicate that the students now in the
card section are more interested in sitting there for
the good seats than putting on an entertaining show.
The card section should be retained and
supported by SG, but a few changes should be
made:
The section should be moved to the north end
zone seats. This would allow the entire stadium to
see the card tricks.
Do away with the current restrictions as to
who sits in the section. Have someone organize
students who want to take part in the card section.
With the section in the north end zone students
would not be in it for the good seats, but to put on
a good show.
Have the Student Senate appropriate funds to
see that the card section is not in financial
difficulty.
t Have the section take more care in their
execution of the tricks.
The card section is an entertaining part of
football game halftime shows, but it needs to be
changed for the better, if it should survive.
No card section is better than one which acts like
a spoiled child.

OPEN FORUM:
There is no hope for
the complacent man."

scarcer, but form was
nonexistent.
The least they could do is
hold these spontaneous displays
of patriotism in an auditorium.
Dont they know you can get
hookworm sitting in the sand.
Especially with all those dogs
around.
The breeze was pleasant,
though. If you stayed up wind.
And, after those speaches, the
grass should grow better.
But, seriously, folks didnt
it make your spine tingle when
Megill, trying desperately to
look like Lenin instead of Wally
Cox, referred to the U.S.. as
our country? I didnt know
whether to laugh ... or
cry ... or run ... or die.
DOUGLAS LLOYD BUCK

Page 9



Page 10

>. Th Florida Alligator, Ttmday, Octobr 21,1969

NOON- 5 PM & 6 PM-9PM
Seminole Office
Room 330 Reitz Union
This is your only chance
there will be no other sittings
t
- 99
Sign-up for appointments
in the Student Publications Office
*
Bring $1.50 sitting fee
There will be Color Proofs
e
* * %.<* ' '' < *'vv iw .. v ><<<-<



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

f FOR SALE |
Sterep Component* or system cheap
am-fm receiver dual changer Sony
taoedeck wharfedale spkers AKG and
Roberts mikes Call 372-7024 after 5.
(A-st-24-p)
KEEP carpet cleaning problems small
use Blue Lustre wall to wall. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-24-c)
2 Drawer full suspension files, full
depth, your choice of colors.
Elsewhere $49.50, NOW ONLY
$39.95 at JR Office Furniture Co.,
620>/2 S. Main St., Call 376-1146.
(A-24-10t-c)
SPECIAL Study desk (36x24).
Perfect for apartment or trailer living.
Paint them any color, they look
sharp. New costs $35.00 or more.
NOW While They Last $14.95. JR
Office Furniture Co., 620*6 S. Main
St., Call 376-1146. (A-24-10t-c)
Build your camper now! 1-ton van,
new engine, good tires, body, brakes.
Mech. sound. S9OO or best offer. Call
378-4940 after 5. (A-st-20-p)
GunsGuns GunsInventory over
450. Buy SellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
( A-ts-6-p)
Lake front and lake view lots 30 min.
east of Gainesville skiing and fishing
REASONABLE TERMS. Call
evenings 376-8760. (A-lt-17-p)
Unclaimed freight. Discounts to 70%
on Sewing Machines, Stereos, Color
TVs car & home tape players, diving
gear and furniture plus many other
items. All '69 Models. May be seen at
1228 N.E. sth Ave. Phone 378-4186
hours Mon Thru. Thur. 9-6 Fri. & Sat
9 to 7. (A-13t-20-p)
1962 Allstate scooter with two
helmets. $60.00 or best offer. Call
378-8548 after 3:45. (A-3t-22-p)
Electricians dream. 2 portable stereo
record players with speakers for
$15.00 cheap or best offer. Call
376-4969 after 5:00 p.m. (A-4t-22-p)
Free One yr. old male housebroken
dog. Landlord says must go mixed
breed gentle affectionate. Call
378-4684 after 5:30 p.m. (A-3t-23-p)
HONDA CB 350 1968 Immaculate!
Firm $550 includes two helmets. See
Dave Buster 304 15th St. NW room
no. 9. (A-2t-23-p)
Must sacrafice brand new Honda
CI-175 Need money for school only
9 miles $525 Cost-$675. Phone
373-2912 evenings. (A-3t-23-p)
FOR RENT
Large clean modern efficiency three
blocks from campus. Lease from
Nov. 1- June 10. 00.50/mo. Suitable
for 2. 303 NW 17th St. apt. 28. Daily
6-9 p.m. (B-st-20-p)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance of
University 372-3357. (B-10t-20-c)
Camera Cannon q1,1.9f, 45mm lense
2x extender, sunshades, etc.,
electronic flash rechargeable,
collapsable tripon w/carrying case 4-6
pm. 378-8253. (B-4t-22-p)
Room for rent close to campus 115
NW 10th St. Apt. 2 everything
included linen maid, etc. $40.00 a
month cheap. See Chuckie or Phone
378-7222 (B-lt-24-p)
WANTED 1
Immediate Occupancy! Female
roommate wanted, central location.
For further information call
372-2393 or 376-7445 after 5.
(C-st-21-p)
good grief
its candy!
Ms j iIMI wPm v
Candy
PLUS CO-HIT [r]
JACKIE GLEASON 808 HOPE
JW^OCOMMITMARRIAGE^

Tuesday, October 21,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I WANTED I
ViMMStuig
Coed wanted to share 2 br AC Apt.
Separate bedrooms Vi blk from
campus. S4O/m Oct. rent free. Call
Barbie 372-2758. (C-3t-23-p)
Wanted: Married couples to
participate in a group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-10t-9-c)
GO WEST Driver Rider needed
(my car) for LA Or SF, Calif, trek.
Leave Nov. Call me as soon as.
possible. 378-1837. (C-3t-22-p)
Get Your Feet Wet in Business!
Young Executive Wants Part-Time
Assistant. Apply Only If You Are
Bright and Interested in Being
Challenged. Call Mrs. Imler for
Appointment 462-2499.
(E-6t-22-p)
LISTENERS WANTED. Will pay
$2.00 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Mary,
University Extension 2-2049 between
8 and 5 only for appointment.
(E-10t-18-p)
AUTOS
A
63 Chev Impala power steering and
brakes radio stereo tape heat clean
excellent condition $795. Cali Bob
373-1988 after 5 p.m. (G-st-24-p)
63TR4 wrecked engine and most of
car in perfect shape will sell entire car
or parts eng. wire wheels, trans. Call
378-7082 leave a message.
(G-st-22-p)
67 CORVETTE low mileage 427
glass and cloth tops air-conditioned
am/frh radio new radial tires 4 speed
etc. must sell at a sacrifice call
378-3687. (G-st-22-p)
Drive a yellow submarine! 1959
Porsche hi-performance 1600 new
clutch. Practically rebuilt, radio,
heater, $950. Call 376-4500 after 5.
(G-3t-23-p)
Rambler Sedan, 1959, by original
owner, standard transmission, good
running condition, *69 tags,
inspected, $225, 378-4548 after 6:00
p.m. (G-st-23-p)
PERSONAL |
Want to learn to fly? No club
membership dues. Just economical
flying $9.00 solo $13.00 dual Phillips
Flying Service 495-2124 after 6:00
p.m. (J-lOt-11-p)
Mom like ya to meet Jewish lawyer?
Law student desires coed to cook
several meals a wk. Miss moms yid
dishes. Free food. 108 NW 13 St. no.
4. (J-2t-23-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
enjoy these specialties
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
'/ 2 BROILED CHICKEN
Yellow Rice $1.09
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti
GAINESVILLE
\jT

Page 11

| PERSONAL i[
Flying Hawks Club Flight instruction
$7.00 solo, $12.00 Dual for Club
members FREE ground school 5 min.
from campus Stengel. 376-0011.
(J-10t-5-p)
| LOST A FOUND I
j:'x*x*x.x.xx*x*w.
Accutron wrist watch with "see thru
dial and wide leather band lost on
drillfield volleyball courts Saturday
Oct. 11. Reward $25. Call 372-9454
and ask for Kyle or leave message.
(L-st-23-p)
LOST: Black cat wearing red collar
male, last seen Sun. Oct. 12
Landmark area. Reward offered. Call
376-0928 please! (L-st-23-p)
Found Saturday after the football
game, near J.J. Finley, small female,
black and tan dog. Call Gebhardt,
372-6873. (L-3t-22-nc)
aro a BQQeppeoemLg.gJ'gfli.aaMWooeawedg
r SERVICES |
Repeat Special your portable
typewriter cleaned, adjusted,
lubrcated & new ribbon installed
(SAVE $10.00). Now $12.50.
Standard typewriters $19.50. All
work guaranteed. JR Office
Furniture Co., 620V2 S. Main St., Call
376-1146. (M-lOt-24-c)
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For information call or write Carmel
Distributors 3701 SW 18 St.
376-6989. (M-10t-17-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)
FLORIDA
STATE THEATERS
it **
CENTER 1
RING OF BRIGHT WATER
2
2 CENTER 2
+ MONTEREY POP
FLORIDA £
\ "FUNNY GIRL >
2:00 & 4:00
I RED PM qX I
MIGHT jV
8-10 PM Mk
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

fjajjjriV / 11 frjjfflwmwM
WHY
PATRONIZE
GATOR
r
ADVERTISERS?
There are lots of good reasons. They are a special
group of people, who advertise in our Gator be because
cause because they like doing business with UF students,
they deal in the goods and services that we spec specifically
ifically specifically want, and they know this is the best way
to get their message across to us. Most of all,
their advertising contributes to The Alligator's
success, so they are as much a part of The Alli Alligator
gator Alligator gang as the editor and the staff. If we, the
students, are the backbone of the university news newspaper,
paper, newspaper, then the advertisers are the life's blood.
So do business with them. They're on our side.
STARTS "V
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The
Florida
Alligator

MORE SATIRIC JIBES

Few Pats-On-The-Back
At Political Law Skits

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
Amidst Homecoming's many
annual pat-on-the-back sessions,
politicians lined up to receive
their share of satire and
fun-poking Saturday at the John
Marshall Bar Association skits.
It was no holds barred as the
politicians became the object of
laughs in dots depicting their
activities as seen by the College
of Law actors.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, President Richard M.
Nixon, Georgia Governor Lester
Maddox and many state
politicians received a generous
amount of the saucy jibes, but
O'Connell proved himself in the
spirit of things.
He portrayed himself as a
beanie-topped, shallow
university president who, when
faced with arrest by Alachua
Pants For
The Lady?
WASHINGTON (UPI) The
Census Bureau said Monday a
1968 survey showed about 11
per cent of the families in the
United States were headed by
women.
The report said that of
60,446,000 families in the
nation, 5,273,000 were headed
by females.
These included 3,949,000
white families and 1324,000
minority group families.
Seedy Statistic
LEXINGTON, Ky. Tobacco
seeds are so tiny that a level
teaspoon will hold
approximately 26,000 of them.
However, one seed, properly
cultured, will grow a seven-foot
(riant.
CANT AFFORD
A
PROJECTOR?
RENT ONE
FROM
A A
iA ifk
dinduft
v W wI Br
I (ailiu SHOTS I
1232 W. UNIV.
376-7657 |

9 SR B
mam- mi. Bm mm,
w I Mmmmm I mm-: :KH|:Hh: : : %
i mW m m mm I Mlllilli ll l

County Sheriff Joe Crevasse,
would only say, Hi, Im Steve
OConnell.
The Gator Growl skits Friday
night were puritanical compared
with the bawdy jokes and
personifications at the outdoor
drama on the Reitz Union
lawn.
The opening remarks, made
by a combination priest-rabbi,
set the tone of the morning:
Amen, brother! I smell the
breath of deemon bcker and
pokechops (shades of the ahumu
barbecue) on this crowd. Lawd,
let the light shine down on all
these bald heads and red necks.
The warning did no good, for
the daring lawmakers stayed
around to view their political
roasting.
The politico who was the
shows highlight wasnt there to
see himself assassinated aid go
to his reward.
Governor Maddox stood at
Heavens gates, calling I done
right, Lawd, I done right by the
white folks. I done right by the
po black folks. An Im glad to
be in your presence, Lawd. Do
you hear me, Lawd?
From behind the stage, a huge
crane lifted the Lawd in the
form of a blade man dressed in
white robes over the stage.
Ah hear you, white boy! he
said.
A woman law student
thanked former UF President J.
Wayne Reitz for proving a
farmer could be a university
president and OConnell for
showing the UF didnt even need
a president.
Congressman Sam Gibbons
received a special award for
'fiMi:
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Webster's New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration shewing U.S. time
zones, youli find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time yor owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1700 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore

singlehandedly writing 150,000
tons of Japanese shipping four
freighters and one tanker in
San Francisco lay in 1962.
A shiftless Nixon was escorted
to the stage by a motorcycle
guard and was asked if he
thought Teddy Kennedy would
he a probiam in rite 1972
election.
I think that bridge has
already been crossed, he
saavtiai.

I TO THE MAN OF CRITICAL TASTE I
... there is something special about the good looks,
and comfortable fit of our natural shoulder suits.
He knows it is the proud effort of master craftsmen
who have tailored these suits with infinite care to
reflect the highest standards for a lasting quality
appearance. These suits are available in subtle
stripes and plaids as well as solid tones in regular,
short, long and extra long. Make your selection now.
Nottingham suits from $89.95
Norman Hi/ton suits from $135
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I Number 6 Main Street South I
I THE HOME OF HICKEY-FREEMAN CUSTOMIZED CLOTHES I

Ted Remley
Entertainment Editor
"""

Page 12

Chamber Orchestra
Concert Tonight
Gainesvilles chamber orchestra, The Florida Sinfonietta, will
present a concert tonight in University Auditorium at 8:15.
The sinfonietta includes a nucleus of UF faculty members aided by
students and musicians from the Gainesville community.
In its second season, the group is conducted by Edward Troupin,
music director of the University Symphony Orchestra.
This evenings program will open with the Symphony No. 85 in
B-flat Major, by Franz Joseph Haydn, a graceful, lilting work with the
nickname, La Reine.
The Serenade in D Minor, by Anton Dvorak, scored for
woodwind instruments and the lower strings of the orchestra will
follow.
The Elegy for Small Orchestra, by Alvin Etler and the Concerto
Grosso in C Minor, Opus 6, No. 3, by Archangelo Corelli will round
out the program.
No admission will be charged.

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 21,1969



iPQIC AT GENERATION GAP
Growl Emcees Symbolize Timely Theme

By TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor
Starting with an impressive
display of patriotic emotion and
using a peacenik-type mass
gathering as a finale, Gator
Growl presented a message this
year.
V ice-President Lester Hale
began Growl with a Ceremony
of Allegiance. Reading from
the preamble of the United
states Constitution while the
band played America in the
background, a mood was set that
was to be questioned later in the
evening.
Perhaps symbolic of Growls
theme were the two emcees.
Dutch Schaffer, a West-coast
long-hair, and Tom Kennington,
a crew-cut straight, worked
together to provide a transition
for the various forms of
entertainment during the
evening.
Schaffer, a KYA Radio Disc
Jockey in San Francisco, is a
bearded mod dresser that
provided a striking contrast to
Kennington from WPDQ Radio
in Jacksonville in his Botony
500 suit.
Underneath the beard and
fancy material is found a unity
between thses two individuals.
Although representing two
seemingly conflicting elements
in society both Schaffer and
Kennington are brothers of Phi
Kappa Tau fraternity and
members of the same generation.
Almost all the short blackouts
that were spotlighted on the
Lost: Artistic License
ROVANIEMI, Finland
Angry artists are planning to sue
the police chief of this polar
town for damaging a piece of
sculpture they had erected.
The police chief ripped off
allegedly pornographic pictures
from Swedish magazines that
had been attached to the
sculpture, made of a shovel, an
axe, leather mittens and brushes
stuck in the sand.

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field with the generation
gap that has always plagued
college students.
A father who cant even
remember his sons name downs
an extra dry martini while
lecturing on the evils of pot.
And a mother is relieved when
she learns her 14 year old son
was arrested on a traditional
beer drunk rather than a
narcotics charge.
The skit included in the
program also contained several
social comments between laughs.
Sigma Kappa Sorority and
Kappa Sigma Frathemitys
2001: The End of the World
was the first skit of the program.
A motley crew of survivors
escaping on a space ship from an
exploding Earth had to be
rescued by Albert from an irate
Tarheel kick.
Trivia 599 by Graham
House was next with a professor
taking on a stadium sized class
to discuss everything from the
first football game to the love
bug problem that plagues
Gainesville each year.
Perhaps the third skit, a
takeoff on Hair, by the Pikes
and KDs captured best the idea
of the Growl program. With a
hippy-cop confrontation taking
on football game overtones, the
conflict is analyzed and found to
be without cause. The lawmen
and even Tom Suede are
converted to free thinking in this
second-place winning skit.
The competition winners
presented a more traditional
Growl skit. Using a Laugh-In
type format, Alpha Chi Omega
Sorority cut fellow Greeks while
commenting on current topics
with statements such as The
Kappa Sigs are self-employed
and deal in a product.
Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity and
Delta Delta Delta Sorority
placed third with Standing on
the Comer. A Lampost family
trips off stage in the year 2525
after going over 1969s
important events.
The pep rally was the

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Wm al
*
SURVIVORS ESCAPE PROM AN EXPLODING EARTH
... in Kappa Stg-Sqjma Kappa skit presented at Gator Growl

underlying reason for Growl and
probably had a lot to do with
the impressive 52-2 victory over
the unlucky Tarheel foes.
Gator Ray proudly
introduced his undefeated team.
Captain Mac Steens crude
statement added a little discolor
to this part of the program.
The crowning of Walda
Williamson as *69 Homecoming
Sweetheart was an impressive
ceremony with beautiful music
and effective fighting.
As the spotlights centered on
groups of Growl participants
moving together, the emcees
disclosed the theme of Growl.
They emphasized the need for

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parrots and students to try and
understand each other as
hundreds of Growl participants
waved a peace symbol to the
audience.
The traditional fireworks
display ended Growl in a
sparkling manner.
Randy Williams and staff of
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Page 13



The
Florida
Alligator ;

UF Quarterback Back Os The Week

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ND TIME FOR REAVES

NEW YORK (UPI) Oklahomas Steve Owens
and sophomore quarterback John Reaves of Florida
are the years first repeaters in the United Press
International Backfield of the Week.
Included among the nations big four on Sept. 20,
those superlative touchdown producers have been
selected again for their mighty deeds last Saturday
with Ed Marinaro of Cornell and Mike Adamle of
Northwestern filling the other two slots in the top
quartet.
Reaves and Owens accounted for eight
touchdowns between them. Reaves threw four
scoring passes against North Carolina and Owens
scored four times against Colorado in a 42-30
victory.
Ivy Leaguers rarely make the top four, but you
cant gloss over Marinaros five-touchdown blast
against Harvard on runs of 41, 1, 12, 2 and 1 while
piling up 281 yards rushing. Adamle scored only
once against Wisconsin but logged the ball a total of
316 yards.
Gary Baxter of the Air Force Academy was high
among the contending quarterbacks with two
touchdowns passing and two running in a whopping
60-13 victory over Oregon. He and Reaves were the
only four-touchdown quarterbacks of the week.
Seven others accounted for three touchdowns in
major games with Colorados Bob Anderson and
Oklahoma States Bob Cutburth accomplishing the
feat in losing games. Anderson scored three against

SAM PEPPER CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor Assistant Sports Editor

Page 14

Oklahoma; Cutburth ran for one and passed for two
against Missouri.
Mike Cavan of Georgia passed for three against
Vanderbilt, Dave Holman of Utah State matched
that against Army, Bill Cappelman of Florida State
passed for three against Tulsa. Kent Thompson of
Miami, 0., and Cincinnatis A1 Johnson also weighed
in with three scoring passes. 7
While Marinaro and Owens were the top scorers
among the running backs last weekend, four others
scored three touchdowns and another scored 14
points on two touchdowns and a conversion pass
reception.
Levi Mitchell of lowa ran 46 and nine yards for
touchdowns and caught a 21 scoring pass in a 35-31
loser against Purdue. Mack Herron of Kansas State
ran for three against lowa State and Daryl Doggett
of Southern Methodist did it against Rice.
Larry Robertson of Rutgers, a sophomore fillin
for an injured regular, scored three times in a 20-6
win over Navy. Nebraskas Jeff Kinney scored twice
and caught a conversion pass, personally outscoring
the Kansas team in a 21-13 victory.
Jim Otis of Ohio State, the old reliable blaster of
the No. 1 Buckeyes, scored a pair of touchdowns
against Minnesota and rushed for 138 yards. Larry
McCutcheon of Colorado State went for 182 yards
and two touchdowns against West Texas State.

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 21,1969



v" .*/* *** *' t VQ* v J*-* '.l
SOPHOMORE DO-n-ALL
Clark Gators Mr. Flxit

By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Sports Writer
Harvin Claik was walking
from the UFs practice field the
other day, dressed in his football
uniform, when he stopped near
the Gators locker room.
Just a second, he said,
noting that split-end Paul
Maliska, who minutes before had
left the dressing room, was
having difficulties with his car.
Im the team mechanic.
Coach Ray Graves calls Clark,
a sophomore do-it-all,
versatile.
But Graves doesn't mean that
Clark can use a screwdriver,
pliers or wrench equally well.
Ray has football in mind.
We could use him at any
position, Graves said. Weve
worked him all over ... at four
or five positions. And as I lode
Dorm Basketball
Deadline Friday
The last day to sign up for
independent football or
dormitory basketball is Friday at
5 p.m. All students interested
are encouraged to visit the
Intramural Office, room 229,
Florida Gym, or call 392-0581.

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JB9§|9f|§
HARVIN CLARK
... Gator auto mechanic
back, I can see that 1 should
have been playing him more.
Graves no longer has to look
back. Harvin got his starting
opportunity Saturday when the
Gators beat North Carolina.
Harvin played comerback in the
place of hobbling Steve Tannen,
who was moved to safety.
Clark played running back
during his high school career. I
thought Id play that position or
wide receiver here, said Harvin,
who can run 40 yards in 4.7
seconds. But he also played
defensive back.

)
Harvin was in a playful mood
the other day. He enjoyed
tinkering around with Maiiskas
midnight-blue automobile. I
keep everybodys wheels
moving, he said.
Does it miss in high speed,
Paul? he asked Maliska,
pointing to the auto. Before
Maliska could answer, Clark said,
Let me start it.
He hopped in, wearing his
uniform, and it looked very
much like one of those
automobile television
commercials where John Hadl
cruises along wearing his San
Diego Charger uniform.
Let me take a look under the
hood, Clark said, and then did
so. Got a knife, Paul? he
asked, really needing a
screwdriver. Maliska could only
produce a penny. Clark used it
to pry open the encasement
around the spark plugs. You
need points, Paul, Harvin said,
and directed Maliska to one of
Gainesvilles better mechanics.
Now a starter, Claik just
didnt have the time to do it
himself.
Last fall, Harvin had plenty of
time. The freshmen team played
only four games.
Ive messed around with cars
since I was 12, Clark, now 19,
said. I used to live in Titusville
and had my own beach buggy.
You know how those things
are ... you've got to keep them
running.

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GAINESVILLE MALL

UF Number Ten II
In UPI Ratings ||
NEW YORK (UPI) Ohio State came within one point of
unanimous acclamation as the nations no. 1 college football team.
The unbeaten Buckeyes, now 4o, received 34 first place votes and
one second place nomination from the 35-member United Press
International Board of Coaches. The balloting gave Ohio State 349
points, just one off a perfect 350 as the Buckeyes were named no. 1
for the fifth consecutive week this season.
Texas, which received the only first place vote not cast for Ohio
State, was ranked second again with 299 points, while fast-rising
Tennessee moved into third with 224. Arkansas took fourth with 167
while UCLA and Penn State captured the no. 5 and no. 6 ratings.
Missouri was ranked seventh and Southern California fell from third
to eighth. Louisiana State retained ninth and Florida moved into the
top 10 in the no. 10 slot.

NEW YORK (UPI) The 7. Missouri (5-0) 147
United Press International 8. Southern Cal (4o-1) 132
top-ranked maj or college 9. Louisiana State (so) 125
football teams with first-place io. Florida (so) 44
votes and won4ost-tied records 11. Oklahoma (3-1) e 24
in parentheses (fifth week). 12. (Tie) Notre Dame (3-1-1) 21
TEAM POINTS (Tie) Wyoming (5-0) 21
1. Ohio State (34) (4-0) 349 14. Stanford (3-2) 7
2. Texas (1) (4-0) 299 15. Purdue (4-1) 5
3. Tennessee (5-0) 224 16. Georgia (4-1) 3
4. Arkansas (4-0) 167 17. Kansas State (4l) 2
5. UCLA (6-0) 165 18. (Tie) Auburn (4-1) 1*
6. Penn State (5-0) 149 CTie) Mississippi (3-2) 1
UF Soccer Club Falls 2-1
Homecoming for the Florida hooters was a sad occasion as the
visitors from the St. Petersburg Soccer Qub capitalized upon the
UFSC mistakes and drove home two penalty kicks to beat the Gators
2-1.
The UFSC is now sporting a record this season of two wins and
three lost and after so many fine undefeated seasons since 1953 and
an overall record of 122 won 19 lost and 18 tied, Coach Alan C.
Moore and his club are beginning to see the other side of things.
The next game for the UFSC will be Saturday, Oct. 25 at 10 a.m.
on Fleming Field against undefeated Miami-Dade Junior College.

Tymtwy. Octotof 21. 1969, Th> Florkia Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

i.Thfr Florida AUlgitor,Tudy, Octobf 21, ,1969

Heres what your first year
or two at IBM could be like.

Marketing representative Bill Manser,
B.S. in Industrial Engineering '67, is
selling computer systems for scientific
and engineering applications. His
technical background and 14 months of
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ON CAMPUS
NOV. 18,19

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Here's what three recent grad graduates
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t

Doug Taylor, B.S. Electronics
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circuits that will go into IBM
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Soon after his IBM programmer
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And when the finished programs were
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