Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
|No Kirk-OConnell Conflict, Weimer Says]

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STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... as usual

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Vol. 62, No. 19

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WANNA COOKIE? TOM KENNEDY
Ducks can be facinating especially to an 18 month old toddler.
Christian Bartholdt went duck chasing Monday at the Reitz Union
Pond. Seems as though he really had a good time.

IF REPORT IS ACCEPTED
Late Registration May Be Computerized

By DAVE DOUCETTE
Alligator Managing Editor
Students participating in late registration will be sectioned by
computer, if a report to be given to the Office of Academic Affairs
this week is accepted.
In its final report, the Ad Hoc Committee on Registration
Procedures recommended wrap-up registration be handled on the
computers because at this stage, students now have very little
choice of class hour and they experience great difficulty in
discovering what is open so as to arrange their own schedule.
The committee believes this group of students will be materially
assisted in obtaining the courses they need (if not the desired hours)
by computer sectioning and that there should be a resultant
reduction in drop and add activity, the report said,
Under this proposal students who are processed by computer
during wrap-up registration will still be able to use current drop and
add procedures to accommodate job conflicts or other special needs.

SG ELECTIONS WEDNESDAY

Over Vietnam Moratorium Day

Any inferences that UF President Stephen C.
OConnells position on Wednesdays Vietnam
Moratorium is in conflict with the stand of Gov.
Claude Kirk have been denied by the Presidents
office.
It is a mistake to build a conflict between the
governor and OConnell, said Rae 0. Weimer,
special assistant to the president.
The purported conflict has arisen from
OConnells sanction of anti-war discussions in UF
classrooms tomorrow. The governor has urged
students to ignore the moratorium and not disrupt
any regularly scheduled classes.
OConnell stated that all functions of the

The
Florida Alligator

University of Florida, Gainesville

EFFECTIVE WEDNESDAY
Parking OK After3:3o
For Unregistered Cars

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF administration has
backed down from its policy of
denying students with
unregistered cars the right to
park and drive on campus
outside of restricted hours and
has promised full refunds on
parking fees if necessary.
Effective Wednesday, cars
need not be registered if they
are driven on campus outside of
the restricted hours between
7:30 a.m. and 3:30 pjn., Vice
President for Business Affairs
William E. Elmore said Monday.

A table of the maximum number of students who would be
sectioned in wrap-up registration included in the report estimated
that nearly 6,000 students were processed in the fall, but during
each of the other three quarters only about 2,000 are processed.
The committee also discussed the order in which students are
registered and agreed that the current system (from high to low
grade average) should be retained unless there is a dear indication
from the student body that some other ordering is desired.
The committee considered at length the possibilities of
complete computer scheduling, although it was aware that a shift
to such a procedure in the immediate future would be impossible
because of the time necessary to do the systems and programming
work.
It is also undesirable at this time because of the degree to which
it would limit student choice.
The committee was made up of students, faculty and
administrators, under the chairmanship of University College Asst.
Dean J. R. Dunkle.

University will go on as usual and classes will be
held as scheduled on Gentle Wednesday.
However, in those courses where the issues
relating to Vietnam are pertinent, the faculty
member has the traditional freedom to have
discussion on it as he has on any other day,
respecting always the right of the students to be
instructed in the course material for which they
enrolled, OConnell added.
I dont know who made the interpretation that
this (OConnells statement) is in conflict (with
Kirks), Weimer said. I believe some one must
be reading into it.

Any students, faculty or staff who no \
longer need to have a decal because of this
regulation change will be granted a full \
cash refund. ttHBBRH
William E. Elmore, |
Vice President for Business Affairs
HHHHB

Any students, faculty or staff
who no longer need to have a
decal because of this regulation
change will. be granted a full
cash refund, he said.
The change is a result of the
Traffic and Transportation
Committees Oct. 6
recommendation, which
included a request that the
Fraternity Row area and
adjacent parking lots be
designated all-decal zones.
This change was also given
approval by the administration,

22*
*" Wm&k l
CLAUDE KIRK
... says the same
.. -t& v t& :r ' j

Tuesday, October 14, 1969

because fraternity men who
had the wrong area decal
needed to park at the houses
for lunch, Elmore said.
The dirt lot south of the
Spessard L. Holland Law Center
and the law centers main lot
are also designated all-decal
zones.
These lots will not require
any decal outside of the
restricted hours, he said.
Refunds will be granted at the
University Police Station on Oct.
20,21 and 22 only.

PEACE CORPS and VISTA
recruiters are on campus
this week page 4
Classifieds .. 9
Dropouts 4
Editorials 6
Entertainment 5
FSUNews 3
Letters 7
Movies 9
Orange and Blue 8
Sports 10



.The Florida Alligator.Tunday, October 14; 1969

Page 2

Parties S/ing WSfTElecfions On Horizon

irr >
w
m
MARVIN SYLVEST
steins tactics

Nixon Wont Alter
Moratorium Policy

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon Monday
reaffirmed his vow not to be
swayed by nationwide antiwar
demonstrations Wednesday.
Giving in to the protesters
would invite anarchy, Nixon
said.
The President said he
ardently joined with Americans
working toward peace, but that A
he already was following a
careful course on the road to
peace* after drastically
changing the policies of the
Johnson administration.
The White House released a
letter Nixon wrote to a
Georgetown University student
who had written to the
President complaining about his
Sept. 26 news conference
statement that under no
circumstances whatever will I
be affected by the Oct. 15
Vietnam moratorium.
First, there is a dear
Growl Seats
Will Go Early
The east stands in Florida
Field will be open to Gator
Growl patrons Friday night
except for seating reserved for
the Gator Band and participants
in the skits.
The event will be free to
the students but they better
come early to get seats, said
Randy Williams, director of
Gator Growl.
Entertainment will be
provided by three high school
bands and drill teams for those
coming early. Pre-Growl starts
at 7 p jn.
The south stands will be
dosed for the fireworks display
and the north end zone is
reserved for the high school
bands.
The entire west stand area is
reserved for alumni, faculty and
staff, homecoming staff,
honored guests and banquet
guests.

THK FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator i$ entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Offieeat'Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
comiders objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will riot be responsible for
move than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next

Sylvest Warns Trick
The campaign tactics of First Party spokesman
Marc Glick fall into the political trick category,
Marvin Sylvest, Focus Party senate minority floor
leader charged late Thursday.
First Partys founding father (Glick) has found
it necessary to fall back on one of the political
tricks for which he is so well known labeling
anyone who disagrees with him a negativist,
Sylvest said.
He said that what Glick fears most is the
negative reaction of the student body to legislation
he helped unload on students who were not here
this summer.
Sylvest said Focus Party introduced legislation
last summer only to have it squashed by
majority party senators.

distinction between public
opinion and public
demonstrations, Nixon wrote
sophomore Randy J. Dicks.
To listen to public opinion is
public demonstrations is
another.
If a President... allowed
his course to be set by those
who demonstrate, Nixon told
Dicks, he would betray the
trust of all the rest. Whatever
the issue, to allow government
policy to be made in the streets
would destroy the democratic
process.
White House Press Secretary
Ronald Ziegler said Dicks* letter
was selected for reply from an
unspecified number of letters
complaining about Nixons
news conference statement.
The Wednesday protests, the
President wrote Dicks, will tell
us that a great many Americans
are deeply concerned about the
war; that some of these
consider U.S. participatioi
immoral; that many want UJS.
troops withdrawn immediately
and unconditionally.
The question is whether, in
the absence of any new
evidence or any new arguments,
we should be turned aside from
IS THERE MTEIMSEnT
LIFE ON TELSTAR?
A

HIT OPPOSING PLATFORM. TACTICS

Charges Dropped Against
Brooksville Free Press Editor

By CHRIS WHEELER
Alligator Staff Writer
Charges against Gary Wheeler
were dropped Monday in
Brooksville Municipal Court
when it was learned he had
obtained a license to print his
Hernando Free Press.
Wheeler, a senior at
Hernando High School, had
been arrested at a shopping
center Sept. 19 for distributing
his anti-war newspaper without
an occupational license.
He cited too much
publicity and his parents
objections as the reasons he did
not contest the charges. His
father bought the license for
him one week before the case
was scheduled to go to trial.
Because of the nature of the
situation, his arrest was
considered by the Alligator
editors to be a serious violation

CHEVROLET PROBLEM?
SEE GODDING & CLARK
GODDING & CLARK
0 ~wr o o J Cl cr 378-2311
2nd AVfc 2nd St SE

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1
-mjj.. 5:
RICHARD NIXON
... holds ground
a carefully considered course.
To abandon that policy merely
because of a public
demonstration would ... be an
act of gross irresponsibility on
my part.

MARC GLICK
... refutes Focus

Â¥ $
V V
v v
I SMC Condemns Statement f
I 1
jj President Stephen C. OConnells refusal to call off classes jj
jj Wednesday for the Vietnam Moratorium has been condemned :jj
jjj by the Student Mobilization Committee. (SMC). ijj
8 SMC said the homecoming parade which is pre-empting :jj
X classes on Friday is taking precedence over the Wednesday jjj
§ moratorium. The moratorium is more a part of the ;jj
8 educational process than a Homecoming' parade, the SMC ;j;
jj: release stated. 8
jj; SMC said all of its purposes and actions have been jjj
!: misinterpreted by OConnell. Indicative of this is OConnells ;jj
| endorsement of Student Governments Gentle Wednesday, |
jjjj which SMC says is not the true nature of the moratorium. jj
jj The moratorium is an effort to bring out into the open jj
jj: the illegal and immoral nature of this war aggression, the jjj
jj; SMC said. If this is a democratic society as we claim, then it §
jj is imperative that the people should let the leaders know jjj
$ where they stand.
I

of the right guaranteed by the
First Amendment.
Raul Ramirez, editor of the
Alligator, said he and other
editors did not necessarily agree
with Wheelers philosophy, but
they supported him because
he should be allowed to
express his views.
If Wheeler had been
convicted, he could have faced
a possible maximum penalty of
60 days in the county jail and
SSOO fine. The city attorney,
Ronald H. Mountain, had
indicated that the charges
would probably be dropped if
he bought the license before
Mondays court date.
The Hernando Free Press will
continue to be published, but
under the editorship of his two
partners, David Musser and
Kevin McClure. The two fellow
students had helped Wheeler in

Glick Countercharges
First Party spokesman "Marc H. Glick Monday
labeled the Focus Party platform unrealistic and
unresearched.
If they had bothered to check into initiating a
book cooperative, they would realize First Party
already tried to start one, he said.
UF is a state institution and the state can not
go into that type of direct competition with
private enterprise, Glick said.
Refuting a Focus Party statement charging First
Party with spending too large a portion of student
fees on Student Government productions, Glick
suggested the minority party look a little deeper.
A little research would also show how much
SG Productions mean to the campus, which is
absolutely void of entertainment except for the
Rathskeller.

his first edition. Wheeler said he
would like to write for the
publication but that it
depended on whether his
parents would give their
approval.
When asked over the
telephone if he would have
initially printed the Free
Press if he had known the
consequences, Wheeler said,
yes, but I have been told to
answer no.
Tickets Still
On Sale
Homecoming tickets will
be on sale today from 1
p.m. until 8 p.m. If any
tickets are left they will
again be available at the
ticket office Saturday from
10 a.m. until 2 p.m.



Demonstrators Hanoi Emissaries?

WASHINGTON (UPI) Backers of Wednesdays
nationwide antiwar demonstration were denounced
in Congress Monday as emissaries of Hanoi.
Administration supporters fought back against a
wave of congressional opposition to current
policies in Vietnam, urging the nation to unite
behind President Nixon. In the Senate,
Republicans introduced a resolution demanding
the Hanoi government negotiate in earnest. Some
suggested that Americans fly the flag and carry
hurry up Hanoi banners.
In the House, key members threatened to block
a planned all-night antiwar debate coinciding with
the Wednesday moratorium.
Rep. Wayne Hays, D-Ohio, said if necessary he

NO SPACE WALK SCHEDULED
Soviets Plan Space Station

MOSCOW (UPI) Three
spaceships carrying seven Soviet
cosmonauts spun around the
earth Monday in the biggest
mass orbital flight in history.
Informed sources said it was
the first step in the eventual
construction o a permanent
space station.
Veteran cosmonauts Col.
Vladimir Shatalov and civilian
engineer Alexei Yeliseyev rolled
Soyuz 8 into orbital rendezvous
with its two sister spaceships
Monday. Soyuz 6 with two
cosmonauts was launched
Saturday and Soyuz 7 with
three aboard joined it on
Sunday.
The announced program
neither confirmed nor denied
reports that the seven
cosmonauts would carry out
experiments for the
construction of a permanent

news ; llte fc ,_
lrem...JWP l feul
i
COMPUTERS U.S. Air Force has offered a new computer
system to the FSU Tandem Accelerator Laboratory, pending
approval by the state cabinet and accepted by the DOR. The
computer will be used to collect and analyze nuclear physics data
obtained in experiments with the Ban deGraff particle accelerator.
SUIT Two FSU students won a recent appeal presented before
the Housing Appeals Committee concerning refund of their housing
deposit, after both had vacated their Mabry Heights residence. In
the appeal, the two charged that the university had misrepresented
the quality of university housing conditions and that they had taken
inferior housing while under the impression that it was equal to
other university operated housing.
MORATORIUM FSUs observance of the Nationwide Vietnam
Moratorium begins at 8 p.m. with a candlelight march around
campus. Starting at midnight, an all-night vigil will be held on
Landis Green where various campus leaders will participate in
reading a list of the Vietnam war dead.
FREE PIZZA
Good
October 14 -15
From The
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Free 8 Cheese Pizza
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station in outer space.
Yeliseyev appeared to
confirm the reports in preflight.
interview, when he said the
cosmonauts would check
engineering solutions of future
orbital stations. Yeliseyev was
one of two spacewalkers who
transferred between Soyuz 5
and Soyuz 4 in a five-hour
linkup last January, the last
previous Soviet manned
spaceflights.
Although Soyuz 6 and Soyuz
7 carry cosmonauts who have
been trained for space walks,
Yeliseyev said there would be
no transfer of crews, indicating
the re-entry modules of all
three spaceships would return
to earth.
Soyuz 6 does not have
docking equipment but carried
tools for experiments in the
welding of metals in space.

would singlehandedly break up the designs of a
few self-appointed emissaries of Hanoi to keep the
House in session and make it appear the House is
on the side of Hanoi.
Any member probably could thwart plans for
the all-night debate simply by demanding a
quorum call requiring 218 members to be present,
a sometimes difficult feat even in daylight hours.
Rep. Abner J. Mikva, D-111., demanded to know
whether Hays was including him in his pro-Hanoi
charge.
No, Hays said, I think youre just an
unwitting tool just loaning yourself to their
design.

Informed sources said Soyuz 7
and 8 presumably could link up
if their mission required it.
Shatalov. who commanded
Soyuz 4, was named
commander of the group
flight, indicating coordinated
programs would be carried out.
Until Soyuz 8 was launched
at 1:28 p.m. 6:28 a.m. EDT
Monday from the Baikonur
Space Center in Central Asia,
the other two spaceships while
in near-identical orbits appeared
to have been carrying out
various research tasks
independent of each other.
It was the first time in space
history that either the Soviet
Union or the United States had
three manned craft aloft at the
same time and the first time
more than four men had been
in orbit simultaneously.
SUPPORT
OCT. 15
Moratorium
BRING THE TROOPS HOME
POWER TO THE PEOPLE
- DJN, Class of'69
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
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Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any I
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Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time I
zones, you'll find 48 clear def- I
initions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic I
uses, such as time of ones life. I
In sum. everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved I
and used by more than 1000 I
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Thirty-four senators joined in backing a
resolution submitted by freshman Sen. Robert
Dole, R-Kan., urging the North Vietnamese to
negotiate in good faith and end their demand for
an American surrender.
Senate Republican leader Hugh Scott, Pa., asked
students, Whose side are you on? and suggested
they change some of their antiwar placards to read
Hurry up Hanoi.
Despite the emergence of criticism against the
moratorium, it continued to pick up support.
Sens. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., George
McGovern, D-S.D., Thomas J. Mclntyre, D-N.H.,
and Claiborne Pell, D-R.1., all endorsed the
moratorium, providing it is peaceful.

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TtfMday, October Ift.9p9, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 3



Page 4

i The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 14, 1969

Union Offers
Two Hour
Free Parking
The Reitz Union
management has dropped the
25 cent fee for the second hour
of parking in the Union lot. All
other fees for additional hours
will remain the same.
We felt the lot was not
getting 100 per cent usage,
said William Cross, assistant
director of the Union.

Peace Corps, VISTA Join Forces

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Assistant News Editor
Peace Corps and VISTA are recruiting together this week for the
first time at UF.
Representatives of the two government-sponsored organizations
are emphasizing volunteerism, rather than competing with each
other. TheyTl be here through Friday, speaking to classes and
talking to students at tables on the ground floor of the Reitz Union
and in front of the College Library.
We dont want to get into an argument about the merits of
either group, said Pete Skinner, Peace Corps representative. Some
people think we shouldnt be in other countries until we solve our
own problems. We can point them to the VISTA representative.
The arrangement will also benefit VISTA, believes Tom Semler,
VISTA representative. When you walk up to somebody and say
lm from VISTA, many people dont know what it is. He thinks
Peace Corps reputation will attract more interest in the domestic
volunteer organization.
Semler and Skinner, organizers of the recruitment program here,
are both returned Peace Corps volunteers and ex-Marines. Semler
spent two years in the Dominican Republic and was at UF last
spring as Peace Corps recruiter. This year he joined VISTA. Skinner,
who attended Florida State University, was in India for two years.
Peace Corps representatives will include returned volunteers Clem

10-Cent Candy Still
In Vendina Machines

Not all vending machine
candy prices will rise to 15
cents, Ralph Glatfelter, Student
Government secretary of
consumer affairs, said Sunday.
The Alligator reported last
Wednesday that candy prices
have been raised in all campus
shops, vending machines and
most off-campus drug stores.
Outraged students demanded
Glatfelter investigate why.
Vending machines will have
an equal distribution of 10 and
15 cent candy, Glatfelter said.
Mars Candy Co. is the
leader in putting out the 15
cent candy, but its worth it
because the size of the candy is
also increasing.

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THE DROPOUTS

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IN UF RECRUITMENT PROGRAM

However, Glatfelter said not
all the companies have
increased their prices yet, and
the 10 cent candy is still
available.
SG and the administration
have organized vending machine
committees for every major
living area on campus.
The object of these
committees (volunteer students)
is to hear student complaints or
suggestions about the vending
machines, and then the
committee reports to me,
Glatfelter said.
Students wishing to voice
their complaints personally may
call me at the SG office, he
added.

/Cweu, i WamT to \ 5o?)
I SERENAPE THIS ) J
BEAUTIFUL GIRL-^A-W

Burroughs of India, Sam Owens of Guyana, and Jean Young of
Thailand. An Indian citizen will also be here.
VISTA recruiters are Levi Terrill, recruitment chief, and local
VISTA workers Vince Jolivette, Bill Wegebelen, Jack Edwards, Ken
Ledonne and Mark McGrath.
Both groups are aiming their recruitment programs at upper
division and graduate students.
Any teacher who would like to have a representative from one or
both organizations, should contact the Foreign Student Adviser at
392-1345 or 392-1346.
WHOS WHO
and
HALL Os FAME
application deadline
has been extended to
WED. OCT. 15, 5 pm
applications may be picked up
and turned in at
Student Publications
Room 330 J.W. Reitz Union

ITY F PPG INDUSTRIES representatives will
CAREERS interview at

PPG INDUSTRIES (formerly Pittsburgh
Plate Glass Company) invites you to in*
vest 30 minutes of your time to explore
the challenging career opportunities in
glass, chemicals, fiber glass, and coat coatings
ings coatings and resins. Because of the diversity
of our products, locations, and career
openings, we feel we can offer oppor opportunities
tunities opportunities rivaled by few. Come in and
talk with our representative-he is in interested
terested interested in you and your future.

BY HOWARD POST

/why- CAN'T YOU SET
/ SOITAR UK£ EVERYONE JH |fcTTfiro4rl
l ELSE?
* '*** k Wrt*H *** S. |< Jfaf 1

university or rorioa
OCTOBER 23*24,1969
An Equal Opportunity Employer
jHy
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Cktrm'ModeliHg 7~~
KRTHLEEK PECK ssus&s. !*
CHAM AIM SIIMMPtOVIMINT /
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1018 W. UNIV. AVE. Suita 2
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class ring from,
8 So. Main St.
Gainesville, Florida



The
Florida
Alligator

AGAINST OVER-INDULGENCE
Donovans Drua Stand Isnt What It Seems

By JESSICA EVER INGHAM
Special Alligator Reviewer
' .
Donovan opens tuning,
talking a little, and finally
Jennifer, Juniper, rises out of
the amps with exclamations of
delight from the crowd.
The first part of the show
moves quickly, quietly along.
The audience is happy, smiling,
and obviously charmed by the
thin figure resting cross-legged
on the stage.
Everything seems like a
normal rock concert: the heads
grooving on the hero, the
straights enjoying it because its
the cool thing to do, and a lot
of people just having a good
time because it's such an
enjoyable show.
Then the last song of the
first half, Donovan sings A
Natural High is the Best High in
the World.
There is a noisy response,
largely positive. Those offended
or quite confused sit quietly
wondering whats making
Donovan so adamantly
anti-drug. Most people know
that hes been off drugs for
some time, but the idea that he
was anti-drug is quite a
different thing and thats
distinctly what these vibrations
are.
A lot of clapping and
stomping some whistles and
shouts of alright! by people
who are either so straight or so
drunk they dont know what
theyre doing further seals this
alienation. The closing applause
for the first half is loud, but
less spontaneous.
The house lights go on and
many people, dressed in t-shirts
and bell-bottoms just sit and
H
v > . : ; /
m six
DONOVAN
... surprises his audience
TK VMN6
BAUER SHOP
118N.W. 10th Ave.
DONALD J. DALE
Gainesville Shopping Center
3 Barbers
Hair cut by experts
SHAVE-SHAMPOO
FACIALS
IromE}
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Iby appt. 372-3094 I

py|
m M
DOUG CASE
DONOVANS AUDIENCE IN T SHIRTS AND BELL-BOTTOMS
... now has doubts that maybe he has sold out

talk in low voices. There is
some anger, an idea that hes
sold out, but mostly hurt in
the faces of the crowd.
At intermission I had a
chance to talk to Donovan to
try and find out whats going
on in his head. I cant really
say, because time was so short,
but the things he flashed at
me were less didactic than the
song had seemed.
He smiles, obviously ecstatic
about living. He drinks a lot of
orange juice and talks easily,
carefully about things.
Donovan told us that hed
given up drugs for purely
personal medical reasons. They
were bad for my body. He
looks like a speed freak thats
gone too far, and from his
songs about methedrine it is
easy to see why he stopped. He
looks constructed of paper.

TUESDAY SPECIAL
4:30-7:45 PM
FRIED CHICKEN
TOSSED SALAD OR COLE SLAW 9 9 V
CHOICE OF BREAD ~
ICE TEA OR COFFEE
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
VEAL PARMAGIAN
TOSSED SALAD OR COLE SLAW O O A
CHOICE OF BREAD M V
ICE TEA OR COFFEE
P^^rolljiP]
313 W. Univ. Ave.
:15a.m. 2 p.m.
MMmMBMM 4:30 p.m. 8 p.m.

Psychological reasons are
for weak people. You can
straighten that sort of thing out
in time, but your body
He says hes in good shape
now. One is terrified imagining
what he used to look like.
Watching the second half of
the show he sang more songs
about drugs. In one of them, a
talking melody, he spoke of
how he found himself
evolving.
Theyve never taken me
anywhere I couldnt get to in
time. Drugs were holding me
down and nothing, he added
prophetically, is going to hold
me down.
I dont think he meant by
any of it that he called drugs
evil or bad only that the
drug thing in itself can be a
hang-up. After all, drugs can be
regarded as media to an end,

Tuesday, October 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

and when that end is obscured
by the media youve lost
something you could have had.
Everyones going to admit
that massive amounts of drugs
are bad for your body like a
massive amount of anything is

I Jt A' Picasso
I peace I
I the design shop I
I 3448 w. university ave. I
WE HAVE JUST
ONE WORD FOR
ENGINEERING
GRADUATES.
Opportunity.
to become deeply
involved in earth's last frontier, the ocean.
Opportunity to apply all your abilities to
a wide range of challenging assignments in
shipbuilding, nuclear propulsion, nuclear power
generation, and heavy industrial equipment.
Opportunity for advanced degree or
research work with leading research centers
and universities.
And opportunity to enjoy one of the
country's most pleasant living and vacation
areas.
Find out about immediate career opportunities for:
Mechanical Engineers Naval Architects
Electrical Engineers Nuclear Engineers
Marine Engineers Civil Engineers
Industrial Engineers Metallurgical Engineers
See our representative on October 14,1969
He'll be interviewing at the Placement
Office and will answer your questions about:
THE OPPORTUNITYCOMFANY
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AND DRY DOCK COMPANY
NEWPORT NEWS. VIRGINIA 23607
A MAJOR COMPONENT OF TENNECO INC
An equal opportunity employer. U. S. Citizenship required.

Ted Remley
Entertainment Editor

and thats when It starts
obscuring the end and the
system breaks down.
I dont think he was saying
that anyone should not use
drugs at all, but only advising a
moderation,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. October 14, 1969

The
tti j Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette /js
loriaa Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor IjffiCgEgy
Alligator \g|P'
The price of freedom Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
is the exercise of responsibility Executive Editor News Editor
| Staff Writings
(Lets Vote For Sweetheart!
I I
X
By Ted Remley. ....^

Bo Thagard and the members of Florida Blue
Key running Homecoming should re-consider the
present method used to select the Homecoming
Sweetheart.
Last year, for the first time, the students were
allowed to vote for their Sweetheart.
Since elections happen to fall the day before
Homecoming this year and the voting machines
and their staffing are deemed too expensive to
hold a special election the committee-type
selection was re-implemented. A little originality
and effort on FBKs part might have allowed the
student body to participate again.
Its only natural that more interest is inherent
in a contest that 20,000 Gators participate in,
rather than just a few judges who arent even UF
students.
In thinking about this recommendation to make
next years Homecoming staff, Thagard could also
consider changing the present system of selecting
the three finalists.

L mjr,.rc| Fluted Columns 11
Bless Womanhood
i i By John Parker- ;

Ah! The American woman. Qless her.
Ever wonder what she is really like? (I knew I
could count on you.) Read Ann Landers.
Dear Ann: I just don't know where to turn.
Ive done everything else, and youre my last
resort. My husband has just announced that he
wants a divorce. He has someone else. We have
been married for 12 happy (I thought) years and
have two beautiful little girls who regard their
father as the scum of the earth which he quite
naturally is.
Os course the breaking up of our wonderful
home is the first thing on my mind but something
else is troubling me. I have never held a job before
and quite frankly don't think that Im the type of
individual who would adapt well to earning my
own living.
My husband makes $15,284.21 a year. We
have $4,538.40 in common stock, over six
thousand in preferred. Our two cars are free and
clear and he has a substantial mutual fund, a
whole life double endemnity continuing
endowment life insurance policy paid up, plus
about 22 thou in equity in our house.
My question is this, Ann. How can I be
assured that my two little girls will be able to eat
properly if my personality isnt suited to working
for a living? I know nothing about these money
matters, (signed) Worried In Boise.
Dear Worried: Why that low-life sleaze of a
double-crossing cretin! Honey, I just wish I could
get my hands on him right now. Id rip him limb
from limb for you.
How some men can take the best ffears of a
girls life and just when she starts getting a little
fat take off with some young hussy is beyond me.
Just give a man what he wants and it happens
everytime. You just cant trust those animals.
Anyway, about your question. First, get
yourself a slick lawyer. My latest book, Shaft the
Bastard, should be helpful. It lists the ten highest
alimony winning lawyers in the country for the
past fiscal year, plus an index by cities. You
should be able to find one to suit your needs.
The way I figure it now you should be able to
get the house plus whatever mortgage is due,
about half his salary, most of the liquidated stocks
and policies (depending upon the mutual
ownership laws in your state), plus at least one of
the cars. You may be able to get more if you can

Fraternities, sororities and campus organizations
pay an entry fee of S2O to sponsor a coed in the
Sweetheart Contest. If their entry is not chosen as
a finalist, they get no publicity for their money.
As it now stands, the sponsoring group is given
credit at the preliminary contest when the girls
name is announced by the master of ceremonies.
Few people attend this event.
Perhaps the next Sweetheart Contest chairman
could suggest that the preliminary selection of the
finalists be decided by a campus-wide vote. The
three top entries could be announced and the coed
receiving the most votes would be awarded the
title at Gator Growl.
With this method, sponsoring organizations
would publicize the entry in which they had
invested S2O and give free publicity to
Homecoming. Students would select their
Sweetheart (generating interest in general) and
letting Homecoming Sweetheart for 1970 be
elected by the people she will represent during her
year-long reign.

muster up companion suits for neglect,
mistreatment, battery, etc. but that depends on
your own initiative.
Get in there and get yours, honey!
* *
From her birth she is trained for that position
in THE HOME that will allow her to: live
comfortably with minimum threat to her security;
raise a large litter of screaming, ungrateful brats;
join several garden and bridge clubs where she can
complain to her peers about her precarious
existence; and many years and pounds later, scoot
down to St. Pete to buy a condominium with the
old mans policy and die slowly in the sunshine,
that huge diamond symbol of her accomplishments
glittering triumphantly on her wrinkled hand.
When she comes to college she becomes a real
live Barbie doll.
See Barbie rush back from class to her sorority
house in her worsted wool plaid skirt and Villager
blouse. She is in a hurry to get dressed for a date
with KEN. He is driving his NEW SPORTS CAR
over from his FRATERNITY and they are going
for a spin. Barbie is in a real dilemma. She cant
decide whether to wear her brown corduroy...
You get the idea.
Writer Ambrose Bierce pegged her a long time
ago. He said that women classified men into two
categories: good providers and bad providers.
When you think about the process, the product
isnt so hard to understand. (The sorority is an
intricate part of that process but I can get two or
three good columns out of that, so I shant waste
it with a couple of half-hearted backhands and a
bunch of freshly budding parentheses.)
The male animal is just as culpable, of course.
His game is to cruise around, the predator, getting
what he can while he can until he meets his match
and gets sucked in.
He is not any less ridiculous or insidious in his
game, just more stupid.
For his one big mistake he spends the rest of
his life feeding, housing, and otherwise grovelling
to a younger and somewhat better-educated
version of his mother.
... I have gone at dusk through narrow streets
And watched the smoke that rises from the
pipes
Os lonely men in shirt-sleeves, leaning out of
windows..,

EDITORIAL
One More Day
o
6-
Wednesday, Oct. 15, 1969.
One day.
A moratorium to end a war we should never have
started.
There are those who say this is not the way to untangle
this country from the entangling alliances we have been
warned of since George Washington took the oath as
Americas first president.
And then there are those who say we must try ... and
at this point, try almost anything.
Americas youth are sacrificing their lives daily in a
swamp somewhere... no one knows quite where, for
something . no one knows quite what.
And we say it must end. And end now.
And we say our boys should be brought home. While
there is still a home to bring them to.
And we do not stand alone.
The dying cries of more than 44,000 American Gls
echo behind us. And these cries will echo across the UF
campus and settle on the Plaza of the Americas
Wednesday.
And they will echo across this entire country.
And the country will listen, hopefully not only because
it has to, but because it knows it must. It is time. It is
past time.
This is why we support the Vietnam Moratorium.
And this is why we urge the students of this university
to participate in the moratorium program, and Gentle
Wednesday, on the Plaza Wednesday.
It will be a day to pray. A day to reflect and project. A
day to move and jar the rationale of a foreign policy
drowning in the quicksand of stagnation.
But it must also be a day to show that this protest is
not the voice of the radicals, hippies and commies.
There will be many voices speaking Wednesday, and the
great majority will be voices of concerned and responsible
young Americans.
But too often the voices are lost beneath a cloud of
senseless and irrational violence. And they are not heard.
What is remembered is only what the establishment
wants to remember and to condemn.
If we expect them to listen, we must give them
something to .listen to .. and in away they can
understand.
Our forum will be the Plaza of the Americas... an
open forum with all sides and all viewpoints given the
opportunity to express themselves.
We have something to say.
Lets say it.
But let us not destroy the purpose of the moratorium
with irresponsible and regrettable actions.
Excuse Me, Sir The Pilot Is In The Front Os The Plane!"
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey Janie Gould
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley Anne Freedman
Assistant News Editor. Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reit/
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392 1683.
Opinions expressed in the I loridu Alligator are those of the editors
or ot the writer of the article and not those of the University of florid a.



MR. EDITOR:
It certainly is disheartening
to read that two top politicos
from Focus and First Parties
view the issue in the upcoming
election as lackluster.
In consideration of their
apparent paucity of insight, I
would like to submit some
points of interest that might
serve to fill the issue vacuum.
On September 21 of this

UF Politicos: Lackluster Issues ?
Accept All Blacks?

MR. EDITOR:
I fail to understand the
reasoning behind the
incongruous statements made
by Mr. Larry Jordan in regards
to the B.S.U.
On the one hand, Mr. Jordan
says (and I quote) What we
want is an end to racist
employment practices, more
black students, professors and
administrators, an end to the
racist hiring practice of the
university... He then goes
on to say that We want UF to
take the lead in ending racism
in the city, state and nation.
However, in the following
paragraph he states, Not only
do we want more black
students, we feel every black
that applies to UF should be
accepted.
I for one do not see the

Gilchrist Has A Good Side Too

MR. EDITOR:
I read with interest Dave
Osiers column in the October
7, 1969 edition of the Alligator
and would like to make a few
comments concerning same.
We in Gilchrist County are
aware of poverty on the local
scene and have local programs
combating this problem as
stated by you in your column.
Surely you could have
started this series on poverty
right there in Gainesville,
Florida and taken some pictures
that would have been just as
effective as the large picture of
the (name deleted) family that
would show that poverty starts
at home, where the series of
articles are being printed.
We are proud of our County
and appreciate recognition for
what its worth and feel that we
have potential to grow as has
been stated in charts showing
projections of population in

Take A Look At The Issues, Politicos

year I attended a panel
discussion sponsored by the
Afro-American Student
Association. David Horne, black
graduate student |nd moderator
of the discussion, said that
based on the proportion of
blacks in Floridas total
population, there should be
5,000 black students in a
student body of 20,000. There
are presently about a hundred
blacks here.

point in the above argument. If
it is the purpose of the B.S.U.
to end the perpetration of
racism on this campus, why
turn around and do the same
thing you are trying to
eradicate. By saying that every
black student should be
accepted solely on the grounds
that he has a black skin
establishes a racist policy in
reverse.
If we are working toward a
better and more tolerant
society, setting up quota
systems and making impractical
demands will not accomplish
this. If truly the University of
Florida is to take the lead in
ending racism in the city, state
and nation the foregoing
reasoning will certainly not be
an impetus in the right
direction.
JOEL FLEISCHER, 3ED

1970 and 1975 which shows we
will grow as much as Gainesville
percentage wise at least with 5
per cent.
We have some fine assets in
our county that would make a
real nice feature story for you
to author, and would be proud
for you to come over and we
will show you around. We have
one of the finest Standardbred
Horse farms in the South, bar
none, and the construction of a
multimillion dollar State school
underway at present that will
be open next year.
I think you would be
surprised at the numbers of
people from large cities that
have moved here because we
are the type of community we
are. I am talking about people
that could afford to live
anywhere they wanted to. I can
introduce you to these people
and they will tell you the same
thing.
Your article left me with the
impression that we have a ghost

What are we doing to get
more black students on this
campus? Is whatever we are
doing adequate? Could we be
doing much more than we are
doing? And how much longer
will black students give us to
rectify our enrollment
inequities?
(As I understand it, there is
only one recruitment program
jointly sponsored by Student
Government and the UF Office
of Minority Affairs. This
program will recruit about 40
blacks.)
It would seem that a worthy
student senate candidate might
find an issue here that is quite
OaAjOl
DiAMmT
There is no hope
for the complacent man

Facts, Polish, Mr. Tworoger

MR. EDITOR:
I take strong exception to a
statement alleged to have been
made by Mr. Tom Tworoger in
his criticism of lade of funds
for CIO projects. He was
quoted as having said: In small
countries like Ghana and Togo
there may be only 1,000
educated people. Os these,
perhaps five are students at the
UF. I assume he actually said
it.
Mr. Tworoger has chosen
espedally bad examples. There
is only one Ghanaian student on
this campus, no Togolese.
Indeed, the entire
continental mass of Africa is
represented by a mere twenty
ot so students excluding, if
one may, Afro-Americans.
I do not know how Mr.
Tworoger defines education,
but if he is accustomed to
equating it with possessing a
Ph.D. he should do some more

town or ghost county
atmosphere and I disagree with
that. We are small in size but
large in heart and pride, and
like most Alachua countians
would like to see our county
promoted and advertised by the
good as well as the bad.
I was born in Alachua,
Florida and educated in the
schools there and came to
Gilchrist County by choice
myself and have lived in other
places also and have never
found a nicer place to live than
Gilchrist County and am proud
of it.
Please understand that I am
not kicking your article just
because you printed the
poverty side of Gilchrist
County, I just feel that poverty
is on the minor side of our way
of living and we have better
sides to show the public.
D. RAY HARRISON, JR.
TAX ASSESOR
GILCHRIST COUNTY

a bit more than lackluster if
he were willing to look.
Further, we have a
quasi-Fascist legislature in
Tallahassee that seems to think
constitutional means an
evening walk and nothing
else. What is Student
Government going to do if Rep.
Don Reeds stated belief in a
little suppression degenerates
into a raging fanaticism for a
lot of suppression?
Might we have an issue here?
Hmmmm.
Also, we have a Student
Body President who seems to
think that he can at his
pleasure issue statements saying
The UF Student Governments
position on this... without
going through the formality of
letting the elective body that
supposedly represents the
students vote on his sacred
pronouncements.
(I refer, of course, to
Shepherds War Moratorium
encyclical.)
And what about the traffic
and parking situation? Ask a
commuter who has had to
stand up on a shuttlebus or
miss a bus completely because
it was full of free-riding

thinking. By any standards,
American or African, the Ghana
population in particular has a
large proportion of literate,
erudite, and, more important,
sensitively perceptive members.
I realize Mr. Tworoger has
good intentions in his plea for
better foreign relations.
Unfortunately, international
representation at the student
level in this University is
anything but balanced. Not,

GILCHRIST COUNTY POOR
... is birth control the solution?
Provide Contraceptives

MR. EDITOR:
The following letter concerns
Dave Osiers story on Gilchrist.
I have been convinced for
some years that the provision
of contraceptives and
sterilization would do more
than anything else to improve
the state of the impoverished in
our country, besides helping
control the population

Tuesday, October 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

freshmen and sophomores
about the traffic and parking
issue.
His reply wont be
lackluster, I assure you. In
fact, his answer is likely to be
quite colorful probably
turning the air blue.
Furthermore, a reflective
senate candidate might even, in
a burst of creativity, place
something on his platform
about certain requirements for
admission to UFs law, medical,
and graduate schools.
Specifically, I have been told
that a person who serves a
prison sentence for the crime
of being conscientiously
opposed to war is categorically
denied admission to the law,
medical and grad schools as a
felon. If this is true, it is
grossly unfair, and Student
Government should do
something about it.
In short, gentlemen, there are
confronting this campus issues
which can be described in
considerably weightier terms
than lackluster if youre
willing to pull you head out of
the sand long enough to find
them.
DAVID CHAFIN, 3AS

however, that any law says it
should be.
I recognize also that
overstatement is a medium for
getting attention, but I draw a
distinction between rational
exaggeration and a damaging
and undiplomatic employment
of facts and figures.
MATTHIAS U. IGBOZURIKE
(Ph.D student in Biogeography)
(Native of Biafra)

explosion which we cant
survive much longer.
As newspaper men you could
do a great deal to make evident
these needs as you see them,
from time to time. What good
are we doing by providing
maternal and baby care when it
is birth control which would
make for a happier family.
W.L. FRAZER

Page 7



The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 14, 1969

Page 8

> j > . t * #

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

1969 STATE SCHOLARSHIP
EXAMINATION will be given
Oct. 14 at 8:30 a.m. in the P.K.
Yonge Laboratory School
Auditorium. The exam is for
1969-70 nursing scholarship
loans. Application forms and
information may be obtained
from the College of Nursing,
Room H-101, Teaching Hospital
and Clinics or from the County
School Superintendent.
Eligibility requires each
applicant to be a bona fide
resident of Florida for at least
one year.
ART EXHIBITION: The
University Gallery hopes to
originate an exhibition of
original works (not
reproductions) of art from the
private collection of University
faculty members. The Gallery
would like to obtain a list of
original works which might be
available for loan to such an
exhibition. .Faculty members
interested in submitting works
for consideration should furnish
the Gallery with the following
information by April 1, 1970:
Name of artist (or culture); date
of execution; medium (painting,
drawing, prints, photography
and sculpture); size; value;
photograph of work (when
available). All works loaned to
the Gallery will be insured at full
value and returned in
approximately six weeks. For
further information call
392-0201.
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the Speech Screening
Requirement before being
admitted into the Advanced
Professional Sequence, or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE
400, and the elementary block.
English and speech majors do
not take the test, as SCH 201 is
a required course in all of their
programs. Appointments are
now being made in Room 124
Norman Hall.
FULBRIGHT-HAYS GRANT
information for seniors and
graduate students concerning
overseas study 1970-71 is
expected at the International
Center around October 15th.
Deadline for submitting
applications has been put back
to December Ist.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
for approximately $3,200 per
year for two to three years are
available for male citizens of at
least junior standing and
between the ages of 18-24 as of
Oct 1, 1969. Interested persons
may apply to Professor A.A.
Murphree, 202 Anderson Hall,
before Oct. 22.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I
.voure tfaf \
9gV jf Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... \^ 7 /(S-^Zy
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, .#X- /
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your c 9- fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole r*
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories!

Administrative Notices

MID-TERM TESTS: All
students taking the courses
listed below are expected to
take the test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
CSS 111 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, October
21, at 7:00 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with
(A) report to Floyd 104 or
106; (B) to Little 101 or 109;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to
Little 113, 121, or 125; (F) to
Little 201, 203, 205, 207; (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217. or 219;
(H) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227. 233, 235, 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matherly 102, 105, 108,
111, 113, 115/116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson 104,
110, or 112; (P-Q) to Floyd
108 or 109; (R) to Flint 101,
102, 110, or 112, (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Anderson
2,4, 5,7, 18. or 20; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
CSS 112 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Oct. 21,
at 7:00 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with (A-L)
report to Peabody 1,2, 4,7,
10, or 11; (M-Z) to Peabody
101, 102, 112, or 114.
CSS 115 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, Oct. 21,
at 7:00 p.m. in Peabody 201,
202, 205, 208.
CHN 251 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Oct.
22, at 7:00 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with
(A) report to Floyd 104 or
106; (B) to Little 101 or 109;
(C) to Leigh 207; (D-E) to
Little 113, 121, or 125; (F) to
Little 201, 203, 205, 207; (G)
to Little 213, 215, 217, or 219;
(H) to Little 221, 223, 225,
227, 233, 235, or 239; (l-L) to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14, or 16; (M)
to Matherly 102, 106, 108,
111, 113, 115, 116, 117, 118,
or 119; (N-O) to Anderson 104,
110, or 112; (P-Q) to Floyd
108 or 109; (R) to Flint 101,
102, 110, or 112; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Anderson
2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
CHN 252 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Wednesday, Oct
22, at 7:00 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with
(A-L) report to Peabody 1,2,
4,7, 10, or 11; (M-Z) to
Peabody 101, 102, 112, or 114.
CLC 141 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Tuesday, October
23, at 7 p.m. Students whose
last names begin with: (A)
report to Floyd 104 or 106;
(B) to Little 101 or 109; (C) to
Leigh 207; (D-E) to Little 113,

BLUB BULLETIN

121, or 125; (F) to Little 201,
203, 205, or 207; (G) to Little
213, 215, 217, or 219; (H) to
Little 221, 223, 225, 227, 233,
235, or 239; (l-L) to Matherly
2. 3,4, 5,6, 7,8, 9, 10, 11,
12, 13. 14, or 16; (M) to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117, 118, or
119; (N-O) to Anderson 104,
110, or 112; (P-Q) to Floyd
108 or 109; (R) to Flint 101,
102, 110, or 112; (S) to Walker
Auditorium; (T-V) to Anderson
2,4, 5,7, 18, or 20; (W-Z) to
Walker Auditorium.
CLC 142 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, October
23, at 7:00 p.m. in Peabody
205.
CLC 143 MID-TERM TEST
will be given Thursday, October
23, at 7:00 p.m. Students
whose last names begin with
(A-L) report to Peabody 1, 2,
4,7, 10, or 11; (M-Z) to
Peabody 101, 102, 112, or 114.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career
Planning Center, Room G-22
Reitz Union, two weeks in
advance. Companies will be
recruiting for December, March
and June grads unless indicated
otherwise.
OCT. 20: PENINSULAR
LIFE INSURANCE CO.;
LEVITT AND SONS, INC.;
SQUARE D CO.; THE
GENERAL TIRE & RUBBER
CO.; UNION CAMP CORP.
Research & Development;
ETHYL CORP.; CHICAGO
PNEUMATIC TOOL CO.
OCT. 20 & 21: ALLIED
CHEMICAL CORP.
OCT. 20-24: E. I. DU
PONT DE NEMOURS & CO.
OCT. 21: HEWLETT
PACKARD CO.; TRUST CO.
OF GEORGIA; SCHLUM SCHLUMBERGER
BERGER SCHLUMBERGER OFFSHORE
SERVICES; SOUTHERN
RAILWAY SYSTEM; THE
WILLIAM CARTER CO.
OCT. 21 & 22: U.S.
ATOMIC ENERGY
COMMISSION.
OCT 22: AETNA LIFE AND
CASUALITY CO.;
UNIVERSAL OIL PRODUCTS
CO.; COOPERATIVE
COLLEGE REGISTRY.
OCT. 22 & 23: HUMBLE
OIL & REFINING CO.
GENERAL NOTICES
WOMEN'S ALUMNI
BANQUET and reception will
be held on Oct. 17 at 4:30
p.m. in the Reitz Union
Ballroom. All coeds are invited
to attend and tickets may be
purchased between 35 p.m. in

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND / E^E^ E
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVI

Room 312 Reitz Union or by
calling 372-3806 or 376-2129.
LAMBDA GAMMA PHI
pre-vet busines meeting and
surgical demonstration has been
planned for Tues., Oct. 14,

Campus Calendar

Tuesday
October 14
World Series on T.V., 122
Union, 12:00 5:00 p.m.
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00 & 4:00 p.m.
Homecoming Work Party,
Catholic Student Center,
7:00 p.m.
Air Force Dames Fashion
Show, Maas Brothers, 7:30
p.m.
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
End of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C, D, &
B Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Law Dames Wine Tasting Party,
Arrendondo Room, 8:00
p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Young Democrats,
Vietnam r Mobilization Day
Debate, 346 Union, 8:30
p.m.
Wednesday
October 15
World Series on T.V., 122
Union, 12:00 5:00 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Fencing Club
Meeting, Florida Gym, 6:00
p.m. All Fencers Welcome.
Univ. of Fla. Veterans Club
Meeting, Rathskeller, 6:30
p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Program Office, "Dialogue with
a Thelogue", Abel Rahman,
'The Islamic Religion", 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 356 Union,
8:00 p.m.

7:30 p.m. at the Veterinary
Science Dept. (3860 SW Archer
Road). All persons interested
are invited to attend. For
further information call Leland
Simmons at 378-3548 or Dr.
Hines at 392-1841.

Thursday
October 16
World Series on T.V., 122
Union, 12:00 5:00 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Homecoming Work Party,
Catholic Student Center,
7:00 p.m.
Football Films, Union Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
End of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Dames
Association, Arts & Crafts,
Flavet Rec. Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Friday
October 17
Homecoming Parade, University
Avenue, 1:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Cape Fear",
Union Aud., 5:30, 8:00 &
10:30 p.m.
Homecoming Pre-Growl, Florida
Field, 7:00 p.m.
Gator Gorwl, Florida Field,
8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE OFFICE
- OFFICE Memebership,
$2.00



* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

vuSvK'i'iaafisfi*
| FOR SALE I
Matching 6 oak dining room chairs,
red velvet lova scat, rocking chairs.
Odd chairs, antiques and oddities.
6110 S.W. 13th St. to S. Closed
Sunday. (A-15-7t-p)
HONOR APPLE concession for sale,
student only, excellent part-time
income, need automobile. Call after
spm 371-s>ol, (A-IS-st-p)
GunsGunsGunsInventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466*3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
Trailer 10x4f + cabana-studio
attached in all student park. AC,
furnished $1,750. 376-2184 eves.
(A-10t-12-p)
Schooler full race cam for Honda
S9O, S2O, megaphone $6, hodaka
piston $5, Honda S9O dirt bike
$ 100/Best offer see Dinnis 1247
NW 12th Ave. (A-3t-17-p)
Lake front and lake view lots 30
min. east of Gainesville skiing and
fishing REASONABLE TERMS.
Call evenings 376-8760. (A-It-17-p)
Tempest 66 V 8 two door power
brake Hurst on floor new clutch new
Michelin tires. Excellent cond.
376-7133. Flavet 3 after 5 p.m.
SI2BO. (A*2t-18-p)
USAP regulation uniforms, virtually
new, blues, S2O, khakis, $5, raincoat,
$5, 2 dress hats, $5 each. Call Hank
at 376-8044. (A-st-18-p)
Honda S-90 1 year old. 1,200 miles
still like brand new. Excellent
condition. Includes good helmet too.
Only S2OO. Call now 373-1754 for
Mike. (A-st-18-p)
Mobile Home, 12x60\ Furnished, 3
BR, cent, air cond., washer, utility
shed, close to campus. $4500 or best
reasonable offer. 376-0921.
(A-3t-18-p)
Garrard turntable + 3-piece stereo
(Lafayette). 3 yrs. old originally
$450. Leaving town. Best offer, call
376-0228 between slo p.m. Good
shape. (A-st-17-p)
Gain weight fast. Increase your
energy output manyfold. Pure SOY
powder $ 1.00/lb. yeast $2.00/lb. for
free delivery call 376-6042.
(A-15-5 t-p)
14000 BTU Air conditioner.
Coldspot, 6 months old. 3 year parts
and service guarantee. $365 new. Wil)
sacrifice for $250. Call 378-8381 PM.
(A-3t-18-p)
Disgruntled architect selling out!!
Leroy lettering set, SSO. 7 pen
rapidograph, $lO. A sllO value,
sold together, $55. Call 373-2305,
5-7. (A-3t-17-p)
Olympia portable typewriter,
Spanish keyboard, tabs, halfspacer,
5 years old, good condition. Original
price $l3O, now $75. 372-3747.
(A-3t-19-p)
Used Modern Furniture. Couch
Coffee and End Tables. Lamp 2
Chairs $75. Call 373-2498.
(A-3t-19-p)
Compact Refrigerator. Four years
left on guarantee. Small freezer
compartment. Perfect condition.
Excellent for the person living in
small quarters. Asking SBO.
373-2227. Ask for David.
(A-st-19-p)
Stereo Sound of Music Beautiful
walnut cabinet, 2 speakers, new
$l3O, must sacrifice $75.
EXCELLENT condition. 378-0531.
(A-3t-19-p)
NOW PLAYING
7:15 & 11:30
the
KILLING Os
SISTER GEORGE
Starring:
Beryl Reid & (x)
Susannah York
. PLUS at 9:45 ONLY
THE GAME
IS OVER
with:

£;#>>x*:x.x.x.viy;yx'x*x"x*x*x.x.x.x.v.:£
| FOR RENT i
y. : :
Peter Pan Motel, WMliston, Fla. 20
mins, from Gainesville. Reservations
available for homecoming weekend.
Call 528-3941. (B-st-18-p)
Town and Country Motel. Under
New management. Air cond. TV 11
miles Gainewille Highway 301 S
Waldo Call for homecoming
reservations 468-6448. (B-15-Bt-p)
One Bedroom apt. for rent. SBO
mo., water included. One block
from campus. Call 372-9855 or
come by 102 N.W. 15th Street.
(B-3t-19-p)
Upper division A graduate students
quite well managed trailer space
available 7 mi. no. of city on 441.
Call Mrs. Tanner Progress Tra C.
462-1660. (B-St-1-p)
Modern Studio Apt. 1 or 2 people
fully equipped. Air cond., 3 blocks
from UofF. 80/mo. 303-21 NW 17
St. Call 376-8061 or 372-1338.
(B-st-18-p)
WANTED
Coed wanted to share 2 br
Landmark Phase II apt. Poolside,
ac, dish washer, maid. $46.25/mo.
Call Gail, Barbara, or Ranette.
372- (C-st-17-p)
Female roommate for 2 bdr. Village
Park Apt. $42.50/month. Well pay
Oct. rent and provide transport. Call
373- (C-st-19-p)
Wanted: married couples to
participate in group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives. This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment" experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-5 t-9-c)
1 or 2 male roommates for fully
furnished Hawaiian Village 2 bdr. apt.
Rent just S6O/mo. rent subject to
considerable discount if occupancy
can be immediate. Call 378-4208.
(C-st-1 6-p)
Law student wants girl to cook in
exchange for food and good
company. Stop by 1716 NW 3rd
Ave. apt. 25 between 5 and 8
p.m. (C-st-16-p)
r help WANTED ]
LISTENERS WANTED. Will pay
$2.00 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Mary,
University Extension 2-2049 between
8 and 5 only for appointment.
(E-10-18-p)
HELP WANTED: TTS tape punch
operator. Student wife preferred but
will consider student who can work
regular schedule at least 20 hours per
week. Experience desirable but will
consider person with good typing
ability (60 wpm or better). Good
pay. Regular hours, no Saturday.
Storter Printing Co., 1024 S. Main
St., Phone 376-2658. (E-2t-18-p)
Ad salesman for on campus
publication. Leads furnished liberal
commission. Call 378-6006 between
5 and 6 p.m. (E-4t-1 9-p)

mtzsaznmrm
/ mssmn \
f 1 r. ! :*<* hf 1
/ FOLLOW THE CROWD! \
\ Davi^Hemmings -Joanna Fettet n J
X/The Bert Howe in London 1 /
0 ENDS TODAY 0 /
"ME NATALIE" yf
IWfIICP'X
VIXEN. \
NO ONE UNDER 17 ADMITTED \

Tuesday, October 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

§ HELP WANTED 1
Four-year-old subjects with normal
vision needed for visual research. $3
for 1 hour. Call' 392-3031. Visual
Sciences Laboratory. (E-st-16-c)
Registered Nurses Needed by
Alachua General Hospital for night
duty. Day nursery provided for your
pre-school age children during the
day while you sleep. Call 372-4321,
ext. 227 or apply at the personnel
office, Alachua General Hospital, 912
SW4 Ave. (E-11-10t-c)
Cocktail waitress wanted. No
experience necessary will train.
Full or part time. Dubs Steerroom,
4560 NW 13 St. 376-9175.
(E-1 Ot-11-p)
vx.x.x.x.y;yxy:yxwx'x-x.x-x-x.x.x;svv
I AUTOS t
V i
ttx-X'XwXvXvx-x-X'X-X'X'X.x.svX'X-x-:-.*
67 Cougar, XR7, 390ci, 4 barrel, 4
speed, posi-traction, front disc, wood
panel dash, leather bucket seats, just
inspected. 372-5698. (G-st-18-p)
61 Ford new tires brakes safety
inspected. $l5O or best offer. Call
Bruce, 378-1682, MF, 5:307:30
p.m. or see 3000 SW 31 Terrace, Lot
73. (G-2t-1 8-p)
Custom built Dune Buggies sl6OO
includes top, bucket seats and wide
oval rear tires Bo Berry 2-7443.
(G-It-18-p)
Foreign student leaves country. Must
sell 2 month old 1969 Pontiac
Tempest with only 3000 miles. Will
take any price. Call 378-3820, 121
or after 5. (G-2t-18-p)
1961 Corvair Monza, S2OO, 4
speed stick, radio, bucket seats,
excellent mechanically, body not so
good, good dependable
transportation. Call 378-6594.
(G-2t-18-p)
Porsche immaculate classic body
style, original leather interior, many
options like chrome rims, wood
steering wheel, more, excellent.
378-5645. (G-st-18-p)
MUST SELL 67 Cougar light blue,
automatic, air-conditioned, other
extras. Good condition, best offer.
Call 372-7122. (G-st-18-p)
67 CORVETTE. Low mileage, 427
glass and cloth top, air, AM/FM,
radio, new radial tires, etc. Must sell
at sacrifice. Call 378-3687.
(G-3t-18-p)
1967 Camero Rally Sport bucket
seats radio console 4 new tires
power steering 327 automatic
yellow/black vinyl top call
373-1761. (G-15-2 t-p)
VW6B Like new. Still under wtty.
sunroof, rad, heat, lub. rack, ets.
$1650 seen between 3+6pm daily on
US 441 3mi so. of Williston cutoff at
white house on comer across street
from Prairie View Apts. (G-st-16-p)
For Sale: 1963 VW air-conditioned
$595. Call Jim 378-0162 after 5:00
p.m. (G-3t-17-p)
| PERSONAL |
1964 Porsche SC $2700 white gray
interior aireondition stereo tape
AM FM Radio Call 372-6846.
(J-15-st-p)

Page 9

I PERSONAL I
Want to learn to fly? No club
membership dues. Just economical
flying $9.00 solo $13.00 dual
Phillips Flying Service 495-2124
after 6:00 p.m. (J-10t-11-p)
COED: Private room with fire place
and meals in exchange for cooking
for five serious students!!! Only
serious apply. Call 378-3742.
(J-11-19-p)
-
Co-eds, ypiir unsightly facial hair can
be removed forever. E. Dwyer.
Electrofogist. 20 yrs. experience.
372-8039. A flawless complexion
can be yours. (J-2t-10-p)
Bass Player needs work. Five years
experience. Will play most anything.
Equipment puts out 400 watts.
Hours are quite flexible. 372-2777.
(J-st-1 8-p)
Unique Homecoming Favors!
Stuffed animals with transistor
radio ... Call Neal at 373-2437 or
376-8304 .. TODAY. (J-It-19-p)
Graduate engineering student needs
friendly 1-2 UC date for football
games and homecoming. Please write
box 13117, university station, soon.
(J-3t-19-p)
DID YOU KNOW? The Spanish Main
is moving. Grand Opening Nov. 6th
at 1624 W. Univ. Ave. (Old Johnston
Photography). MEANWHILE were
having a big 30% discount sale on any
and everything in our shop at 105 W.
Univ. Ave. Open till 10 p.m.
(J-1 Ot-12-p)
£;xy.x.x.-.v.". .-.xx-:-:v:-x-x-x-x-x-x-x-xx*x-x
! LOST & FOUND I
x 5
X*X*X*X*X B X*XX-X*X-%%V.*X*X # X-X-X*X*XX.> #
Lost Nikon photomic tn serial no.
6906662.43-86 Nikkor zoom lens.
D. Glantz box 22-0415. 392-8237.
Reward for return or send the
film. (L-3t-17-p)
Lost: Brown WalleL In back of the
Hub. Reward. No questions asked.
Call Susan, 392-8513. (L-3t-18-p)
FOUND: Happy Birthday
Charm/Thor 2-13-69. Saturday, Oct.
4 near Stadium. Call: 378-9542.
(L-3t-18-nc)
Found unwelcome guest, mother
Siamese and 5 new-born kittens. No
collar. Please call 378-4068 after
6:00. (L-3t-1 7-p)
/ CENTER I \
j KING OF BRIGHT %
I WATER
! CENTER II \
\ MONTERYPOP f
V FLORIDA /
\ FUNNY GIRL #
*^:00&4:00**

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
* ENJOY THESE SPECIALTIES
TUESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
'A BROILED CHICKEN
Yellow Rice $1.09
WEDNESDAY
LUNCH AND DINNER
PORK CUTLET PARMESAN
Tomato Sauce and Spaghetti
* /PT/Y-'jD GAINESVILLE MALLg|
Y

fSERVICESf
Lum to fly smin from campus
Bast Instructors Bast Airplanas
Bast Ground School Bast DEAL
Flyin Hawks Club Stansal Field
3760011. (M-10t-2*p)
Volkswagan Parts and Service
Guarantaad Rapairs by SpaciaHst.
GainasviNa Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)
Joys Paint & Body Shop. Students
Special. Gat your car painted now
for $49.95. With 1 year Guarantee.
At 2017 N.E. 27th Ave. You will
find it a Joy to do business with us.
(M-St-19-p)
Need a ride to Miami this weekend?
If you do, call 372*0524 after Sr
p.m. I will be leaving this Thursday
and need passengers to share cost.
(M*2t-19*p)
Clothes washed A dried in the
sunshine $.lO lb. starched A ironed
$.15 a piece. Fast service by
housewife CALL 372-1698.
(M-St-17-p)
Health foods, natural vitamins,
complete line, Hoffman products.
For information call or write
Carmel pistributors 3701 SW 18 st.
376-8989. (M-10t-17-p)
Tennis racket restringing. Free
pickup and delivery. MAR Tennis
Services. 378-2489. (M-22t-1-p)
WHY PAY MORE? Order your
Homecoming corsages, only $2.00.
Call and order your preference of
yellow or white. Carlos, 378-0896.
(M-3t-18-p)
l For those of
you who
never saw a
Quarterly
outside the
library...
The Florida Quarterly
is now being sold in the
Plaza of the Americas
outside the Graduate
Research Library.
You can buy it now
for $ 1.2 5
RED PH d X
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA



Page 10

I, T!*f lA*gator, Tuesday. October 14,. 1868. >

MARK BIR
... finishes third
Bir Leads
Trackmen
In Atlanfa
By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Correspondent
Led by freshman Mark Birs
third place finish, UFs
undefeated cross country team
captured the Atlanta Run
Saturday by an easy margin.
Team captain John Parker
finished behind Bir and
sophomore Jade Nason was one
second behind Parker to give
the Gators a 3-4-5
combination.
Sophomore Johnny Brown
and freshman Benny Vaughn
rounded out the five scoring
runners.
UFs B4eam was unofficially
third in the meet behind the
running of A.W. Smith (16),
Frank Betts (20), Steve
Atknonson (21), Ronnie Nabers
(22), Jade Stewart (30) and
Greg Collins (31).
Bir covered the 5.5 mile hilly
course in 27:12, while Parker
and Nason recorded 27:39 and
27:40. The race included 80
runners from 10 southern
universities.
Western Kentucky was
second, 43 points and Georgia
Tech was third, more than 70
points away.
The Gator harriers are now
4o for the season with the
Daytona Run championship and
dud meet wins over Mississippi
State and Baptist College. The
team travels to Calloway
Gardens for a major test next
Saturday.
They will face possible
competition from Eastern
Kentucky, Florida State and
SEC contender Tennessee.
This will be a good
opportunity to test our strength
against the only team in the
south that can run with us,
Tennessee," said trade coach
Jimmy Hawk" Carnes. I
know that our top three
runners can go with anyone,
but winning the SEC depends
on getting two more runners to
fill in that top five."
UF Kickers
Lose To FPC
Florida Presbyterian College
poured home two goals in the
last ten minutes of the game to
top the UF Soccer Club, 3*l.
Florida opened up the
scoring in the first ten minutes
of play as Hector Camberos of
Argentina put a penalty shot
past the FPC goalie.
Herb Rising of FPC then
scored as the second half was
11 minutes old. Lem Schmid
picked up their second point,
while six minutes later Bill
Chatty scored the final goal.

Student t 1 m nt\ ty I
holding up protest x l 1

Its doing both. And Lucia Mouat of The
Christian Sdence Monitor spent weeks seeing
how the power" of todays undergraduate moves
in conflicting directions.
Sure, she saw protests. Protests against the
policy in Vietnam. Protests against sending a stu students
dents students rank in class to his draft board. Protests
against restricting room-visitation privileges.
But those aspects of campus life have become
somewhat predictable. So Miss Mouat looked
deeper. And saw signs of a more positive applica application
tion application of student power.
At the University of North Dakota she heard
how students had pitched in to help sand-bagging
crews turn back the flooding Red River.
At Carleton she learned that 50 students head
each week for the state mental hospital to cook,
play cards, or visit with the patients there.
Brown University told her there were twice as
many volunteer tutors this year as last. . and
Bowdoins Big Brother project has 42 student

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Winner of three consecutive Pulitzer Prizes... 1967 for International
Journalism and 1968 & 1969 for National reporting.

volunteers compared with only 20 three years ago.
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The Florida Alligator

MALISKA DOUBTFUL FOR UNC
Hager Out With Knee Injury

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
The Gators close 18-17
victory over Tulane Saturday
proved to be costly as the
Gators lost defensive
comerback Ted Hager for at
least six weeks with a knee
injury.
Hagers injury marks the
third defensive back already
this season to be sidelined or
slowed up with injuries. Skip
Albury has been out since the
first quarter of the Houston
game with a knee injury. Steve
Tannen has been hampered all
season after injuring his ankle
in pre-season practice.
Another costly injury to the
Gators is split-end Paul
Maliskas injured ankle and leg.
Maliska may miss the North
Carolina game entirely and the
coaches list him as doubtful
now.
Defensive tackle Robbie
Re bo 1 a member of
Thompsons Terrors defensive
front five, bruised his back but
will return today for practice.
* *
Head Coach Ray Graves said
Monday that because of the
injury situation he will work

Rebuilding Year Predicted
For Bartlett And Cagers

UF basketball coach Tommy
Bartlett and a squad of 17
players open practice on
Wednesday, as the Gators look
optimistically toward the
1969-70 roundball season.
With the loss of All-American
Neal Walk and starters Boyd
Welsch and playmaker Mike
Leatherwood, the Gators face a
re-building year.
Florida returns
All-Southeastern Conference
and third team All-American
Andy Owens at the high post.
Last season the 6-5,
210-pounder averaged 16.1
points a game and added 8.6
rebounds.
Junior Ed Lukco returns at
right wing. Lukco, a six-footer
from Warren, Ohio, averaged
9.9 points a game and was
named to the first team
All-SEC sophomore team.
Bartlett has to look for
newcomers at the low post, the
point guard and the left wing
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tailback Jerry Vinesett at
flanker, Andy Cheney will work
at split-end, Guy McTheny will
back-up Cheney, and Harvin
Clark will take Hagers place at
right comerback.
We dont have the depth to
stand key injuries, Graves said,
this relally concerns me. Well
have several boys working at
two or three positions.
* *
Graves also commented on

GATOR PRESSURE CAUSES FUMBLE
... one bright spot in poor defensive showing

for his 1-3-1 attack. With only
four lettermen returning
Bartlett will seek his talent
from transfers and
up-and-coming sophomores.
Bartletts biggest concern is
replacing Walk at low post and
Leatherwood and the point
guard. The leading candidate
for the low post is 6-10 Gary
Waddell, a sophomore from
Lexington, Ky. Waddell led the
freshman scores last season with
a 20.9 average. Sophomore Dan
Boe, 6-8, wili also get a look at
the low post.
The Gators have no returning
lettermen at the important
guard spot. Leading the list of
candidates for the spot is Tony
Duva, a junior from Fort
Lauderdale.

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SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

Tuesday, October 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Saturdays game and said that
he was dissatisfied with the
performances of Steve Tannen,
Jack Youngblood and Robert
Harrell to mention a few Gators
who had an off week.
We made a lot of mistakes,
Graves said. A lot of aggressive
and young mistakes.
Youngblood and Harrell just
had bad games, theyll be
alright.
Steve Tannen has not played

Duva led the Baby Gators in
scoring several years ago and is
capable of handling the job.
Jerry Hoover (6-0), Jeff
Miller (6-0) and Darryl Ceravolo
(5-10) will also get a long look
at the point guard.
Five or six Gators will be
vying for the vacated wing
position. Lukco has the first
shot at the right wing but may
be pushed for the job. Transfers
Earl Findley (6-7) and Tom
Purvis (6-5) should give the
Gators the added height they
are seeking.
Returnees Robert Agee (6-5)
and Nick Fotiou (6-2) along
with newcomers Cliff Cox (6-6)
and Hal Kelley (6-2) also figure
at the wing positions.

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

up to par, Graves said, because
of his ankle injury and lack of
work on pass coverage. Graves
said he was happy with
defensive back Harvin Clarks
play against Tulane.

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Page 12

!. Th Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 14, 1969

Bear Bryant Warned Tide Os Vandy

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA Alabama cant
say it wasnt warned and by
its own coach yet!
The underdog Vanderbilt
Commodores, marching 92
yards in the closing minutes,
knocked off the Crimson Tide
14-10 Saturday night and
although Bama coach Bear
Bryant was upset, he wasnt
surprised.
The Bear had been fearful
it might happen. He had
cautioned beforehand that the
then winless Commodores are
too good of a team not to beat
somebody soon, and its just
lflcety to be us.
It was one of those games in
which the old bromide about
the game not being as close as
the score certainty held true in
the statistics. The Commodores
amassed 473 yards and 28 first
downs while holding Alabama
to 192 yards and 10 first
downs.
But, at that it took an end
zone interception by
monster-man Chris Hauck and
that long scoring drive for
Vanderbilt to pull it off.
As glamorous a feat as this
first-ever Vanderbilt victory
over a Bryant-coached Alabama
team was, the Commodores
shared the weekend limelight
with the Ole Miss Rebels
25-17 conquerers of
seventh-ranked Georgia.
Archie Manning, the same

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JOHN REAVES CONNECTS WITH ALVAREZ
... leads SEC in total offense

Mississippi quarterback who had
540 yards and five touchdowns
the previous week against
Alabama, passed and ran for
223 yards and two touchdowns
against Georgia.
This, in turn, prompted
Harry Mehre, who has been
coaching Georgia 1928-37 and
Mississippi 1938-45 and
analyzing Southern football for
more than four decades to call
the Ole Miss junior: the best
quaterback I have seen in the
SEC.
Had Manning'stayed out of
the game, we might have won,
said Georgia coach Vince
Dooley. He was the big
difference. Manning was
gang-tackled and sidelined with
about five minutes left in the
first half and didnt return until
late in the third period.

*l cant remember what
happened in the first half, he
said later. When 1 went to the
dressing room at the half, I just
didnt have any control over
my body. I was numb.
They stuck me in a cold
shower and dam near froze me
to death. That brought me
around.
Three Southeastern
Conference teams now have 4-0
records. Tennessee, No. 11
nationally, swept past Georgia
Tech 26-8; 12th-ranked Florida
came from behind in the last
two minutes to edge Tulane
18-17; and 13th-ranked
Louisiana State blanked Miami
Fla. Friday night 20-0.
In other games: Auburn, now
averaging 43 points per game,
crushed Clemson 51-0;
Kentucky edged winless

Virginia Tech 7-6; Mississippi
State, with a healthy Tommy
Pharr throwing three
touchdown passes, beat
Southern Mississippi 34-20;
Tampa beat T-ulsa 31-14;
Memphis State beat Cincinnati
52-6 and Chattanooga beat
Northeastern Louisiana 12-7.
Florida sophomore John
Reaves, who passed for 297
yards against Tulane in addition
to the two-point strike that
provided the winning points
with 2:10 left to play, moved
ahead of Manning in their
battle for SEC total offense
honors.
Reaves now has 1,153 yards
an average of 288 per game to
1,108 for Manning. Reaves also
took over the passing lead as
his 28 completions gave him 82
of 146 for 1,156 yards and 11
touchdowns.
This coming weekends
headliner will be at
Birmingham, Ala., where
Alabama plays Tennessee.
Elsewhere, Auburn will be at
Georgia Tech, Florida hosts
North Carolina, Georgia will be
at Vanderbilt, Louisiana State

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will be at Pitt.
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