Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
I?aCi
AM Annin*.

Vol. 62, No. IS

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DOUG CASE
TRAVELING BEAUTIES

UF's Homecoming Sweetheart candidates made
the first of a series of promotional tours Tuesday
with a flying trip to Tallahassee. After a chat with
Gov. Claude Kirk, the three girls met members of

;W*VW*>V#YAViV.%V#W#VV^*V#VAVA%V.V.%VAV.WAW?KWXO:OX<*:
{Feeding Sweet Tooth
IMore Expensive Now
$: you have a sweet tooth, be prepared to spend more money
:j:j feeding it.
:!: Candy prices have been raised in all campus shops, vending
§ij machines and most off-campus drug stores.
:g R.A. Kendzior, assistant director of the main Campus Shop
and Book Store at the Hub, said the price of lifesavers is now
:$ seven cents, with fruit flavors up to 10 cents.
Steve Johnson, service activity supervisor, said his men are
ijij now removing 10 cent candy from the vending machines on
:§ campus and are putting in 15-cent bars.
§i He said it is almost impossible to get a 10-cent bar from the
Mars Candy Co., and most of the other candy companies are
raising their bars to 15 cents.
The size of the candy bar will increase with the price,
Johnson said.
| He said the price of gum in the vending machines is now 10
K; cents but students get eight pieces of gum instead of the usual
ji|: five.
jg McCollum Drug Co. East is charging seven cents for lifesavers
iv or two for 15 cents. Gresham Drug Store is charging eight cents
i-j: for lifesavers. Eckerd Drugs have not as yet raised their prices
jij: for candy, but Eckerd officials indicated their stores will follow
$: suit shortly.
!i.*.*.-.w.VAWV.V.V.VVVAVA AVAV.V. .VAV.VA A.V- # X:*:*X*>>>>>>>XO:<
NO MAJOR POSITIONS OPEN
Sylvest Predicts A 'Low Key Campaign

This falls campaign to fill 40 senate seats Oct. 15
will be a low echo of the thunder waged by the two
rival parties last fall.
While political patronage was at stake with the
election of Union Board can appoint
plums like chairmanships for projects, one party
spokesman noted) in 1968. There are no big
issues this year because there are no major
positions in the offing, both sides agree.
Most of the issues are almost lackluster, said
Marvin Sylvest, Minority floor leader for Focus
Party.
It will be a low key campaign, he said.
As it appears the two core issues evolving are the
budget and UFs involvement with the National
Student Association.
Focus maintains organizations should have been
given a years notice before the drastic cut, and
further feels that the budget should not have been
done at all in the summer while the organizations

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

the state cabinet Today they'll be on their way to
Cypress Gardens. From left are Walda Williamson,
Mary Palmour, Kirk and Jane! Overholt.

werent present.
First Party contends its course is the only one
possible with the money it had to work with, said
George N. Seide, majority whip.
The National Student Association was a big
mistake without referendum to the student body,
Sylvest stated. Focus Party wants to withdraw UF
membership.
First Party is going to try and steer on the course
it started last spring.
What were doing now is implementing the
proposals we had in the spring, like grade appeals,
abolishing required physical education, and a
pass-fail system now in its infancy, Seide said.
Some of the big fraternities are siding with Focus
Party this Fall, although First claims 20 to Focus 6.
TEP, Delta Chi, Pi Lams, ATO, Phi Delts, and
Betas have opted with Focus, Sylvest said.
Although in the minority with fraternities,
Sylvest said Focus is trying to attract a substantial

University of Florida, Gainesville

Senate Votes Withdrawal
From NSA Membership

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
With surprisingly little
disagreement die Student Senate
voted to withdraw from the
National Student Association on
the bills first reading Tuesday
night.
Passage of the second reading,
scheduled for next Tuesdays
senate meeting, would
disaffiliate UF from the
controversial organization.
Student Body Treasurer Jim
Roll told the senate that UF, as
a member organization, could be
held responsible for any
outstanding debts incurred by
the financially unstable student
group.
We have no business
affiliating with an organization

FROM CAMPUS
Bill In House
To Ban SDS
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The Higher Education Committee of the
Florida House voted Tuesday to bar the radical Students for a
Democratic Society from state-supported colleges and universities.
In a 7-4 vote, the committee approved a bill by Rep. Donald H.
Reed Jr, R-Boca Raton, instructing the Board of Regents to allow
only recognized student groups* to use campus facilities.
Vice Chancellor Phil Ashler said the regents have already issued
regulations accomplishing the same purpose: He also said the
legislature should not mandate a procedure for the regents.
But Reed replied that a Board of Regents regulation does not have
the same weight in court as a law.
His bill states that the rules and regulations shall prohibit the
administration of an institution in the university system from granting
approval to a student group such as the Students for a Democratic
Society which advocates the overthrow of the government through
violence or the disruption of normal processes of the university.
The presidents of Florida State University and UF refused
recognition to SDS last year, but the group has remained active at
both campuses.
I would consider any property of the university, even the grass,
included Reed said.
Im not a Fascist... but I believe in a little bit of suppression of
groups which advocate violent rebellion against authority.

which runs their finances like
the NSA, Senator Stewart
Heishey said. Florida doesn't
need to be linked with a group
like this.
Walt Morgan, vice president of
the student body, told the
senators that if the UF remained
affiliated with the NSA it would
cost the students another $l5O
by January, 1970.
He said this was due to a
revamping of the national
organizations charter presently
underway which would divide
the association into regional
groups assessed by size.
At the same time, the senate
voted to table a bill which would
reverse the votes of UFs six
delegates at the convention until
complete reports on the votes

number of independents, especially new faces.
There are many in the party who are inexperienced
in campus politics, Sylvest said.
Neither said expects a large turnout.
This campus is extremely apathetic when it
comes to voting, Seide said.
I can't see anyone who doesn't vote complain
about a damn thing, he added.
. Sylvest predicted about 3,000, if that, to turn out
for this Falls senate elections.
Record Arrives
The Freshman Record has arrived.
The Record, containing pictures of all UF's
entering freshmen, will be available in room 300,
Reitz Union, between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m.

Wednesday, October 8, 1969

are received.
Senator George Sidney, a
delegate to the convention this
summer in El Paso, said this
(SEE *NSA' PAGE 2)
THE RATHSKELLER nay
be on its way out. A special
committee will study the
Rats problems . .page 6
Classifieds 13
Dropo Jts 6
Editorials 8
Entertainment 14
FSU News 3
Letters 9
Movies 13
Sports 16



Page 2

Jhi £lor£l Alligator, Wadnesday, October B.IBW'

University Committees Get
More Student Members

This year there will be more student members of
university committees than ever before if the 60
existing openings are filled.
We are working now on getting all student
openings filled, Bruce Bordreau, administrative
assistant to Student Body President Charles
Shepherd said.
Shepherd submits his recommendations for
openings on these committees to the Student Senate
and UF President Stephen C. OConnell for
approval.
Gail Merein, co-ordinator of university
committees said Charles Shepherd submitted his
recommendations for student members of the
Union Board of Managers late Tuesday.
The Union Board of Managers will have a student
majority of seven members, plus a student
chairman, Shepherd recommended Budget Director
John Englehardt for that position.
The only other committee to have a student
chairman will be the Waubutg Development
committee. Shepherd will recommend Mel Sharp,

FEW PAY FINES
Traffic Ticket Total Rises

By PHYLLIS GALLUB
Alligator Staff Writer
A total of 2,681 traffic tickets
have been issued since Sept. 22,
but only 55 1 students had paid
their fines as of Friday.
Friday, 143 tickets were
given. No tickets were issued
over the weekend.
Students pay fines in the
Student Traffic Court office in
the Reitz Union. $1,113 was
collected there during the first
week.
During the week of Sept. 29,
$741 was collected.
Faculty, staff and visitors pay
their fines at die University
Police Station. Approximately
S6OO has been collected at the
station, according to officer
John Fletcher.
He was unable to estimate
how many people had paid their
fines.
It was announced if tickets
were not paid within 72 hours,
the violator would be arrested.
However, there have been no
arrests so far.
Persons who have not paid
within the alloted time period

Es BOM MSI OMEj
report was expected at any time.
Just because we voted to
disaffiliate from the oiganization
does not necessarily mean the

T UFt REPRESENTATIVES
hfizj Jim Bartlett John Potocki
6 George Corl Phil Tarver
Skip Lujack Mel Ward
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Unhr. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
PREMIUM DEPOSITS DEFERRED
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN
THK FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June. July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

NSA Ties Cut

will be sent a warning letter
advising them they have 48
hours in which to pay their
fines, Fletcher said.
At that time we will issue a
warrant for their arrest, he said.
The police department is
behind right now, but eventually
we will catch those who dont
pay, he said.
If a student wishes to appeal a
ticket, he must post bond, which
is set at the amount of the
ticket.
He then fills out a contest
sheet for the court. Counsel is
generally not needed, but may
be present if the student desires.
The individual is assigned a
court time. If he does not
appear, he forfeits his bond.
Seventy-three students have
submitted appeals. Twenty of
these were scheduled to appear
Tuesday at 8:15 pjn.
Points assigned for traffic
violations will -be accumulated
from September to August this
year for the first time.
In the past, points were built
up from January to December.
Six points within a year make a
student eligible to lose his

things we voted for should be
nullified, Morgan said.
He said the senates no vote
on reversing the stand of UFs
delegates should have no affect
on the second reading of the
disaffiliation bill.

graduate assistant to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, for that, according to Merein.
This year, each committee with student
members will have a student co-ordinator, Miss
Merein said.
The co-ordinator will submit a one page synopsis
of the meeting. In that way, it will be possible to
determine who is attending and participating in
meeting.
Those who are not, can be replaced, she said.
Appointments are made for a two year term.
However, appointments are reviewed at the end of a
year, Merein said.
Interested people should apply at the SG office in
the Reitz Union. All students in good standing who
will not graduate before June, 1970 are eligible,
Bordreau said.
.There are 74 university committees of which 35
will now have student members.
The five committees to have student members for
the first time are space unitilization, admissions,
petitions, university budget and junior college
admissions.

privilege to register a car, Bob
Wattles, chief justice of the
student traffic court, said.
The change was made because
students tended to assume they
would start with a clean record
at the beginning of a school
year, Wattles said.
We made the change at this
particular time because we felt
with the new traffic system
there would probably be more
tickets given, Wattles said.
He said this new traffic
system was necessary because of
the growing number of cars on
campus this year.
Its unfortunate they had to
pick a system with so many
bug?, but we will work it out
soon, Wattles said.
MMU-POSTBI
CHICAGO
FoR the annual
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Thursday, October 9 at 8:00pm
in the Reitz Union Ballroom..admission 50{
Colony Shop, Donigan's, Stag & Drag, Vogue, Twig, Mr. Anthony's Originals,
University Shop, Franklin s. Golden Peacock, Cherry's, Silverman's, Geiger's,
Regalia, Susan Scott '
Sponsored by the
iliP- MMpi m mm 1 j / Wayne Reitz Union

GYM SEATING
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oi ** O ? O.
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Dill mmmmmmmmmm |Mhb
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CLOSED CLOSED
STAGE

SEATING CHANGES
Because of the change in seating capacity of Florida Gym, the
locations of differently-priced seats have been rearranged, Alan
Howes, general chairman of Student Government Productions, said
Tuesday. Tickets for the Donovan concert Friday night are marked
with the newly arranged areas, such as "main floor west front" and
"east lower bleachers rear" to clarify seat locations.
China Sends USSR
Major Peace Plans
HONG KONG (UPI) Communist China Tuesday announced
major proposals to the Soviet Union aimed at defusing the Sino-Soviet
border crisis, including withdrawal of troops from trouble spots and
resumption of negotiations. Peking said there was no reason for war.
A government statement broadcast by Peking radio said Moscow
liad agreed to new border talks in Peking at die level of deputy foreign
ministers, and that a date was now under discussion.
The statement advocating peaceful coexistence said the proposals
grew out of the meeting in Peking Sept. 11 between Premier Chou
En-lai and Soviet Premier Alexei N. Kosygin.
A Moscow dispatch by UPI correspondent Henry Shapiro, Tuesday
quoted authoritative sources as saying the talks would begin in Peking
on Oct. 20, and that the Soviet Union would be represented by its top
diplomatic troubleshooter, First Deputy Foreign Minister Vasili V.
Kuznetsov.
The Peking statement indicated that increasing tensions at several
points along the 5,000-mile frontier between the two giants had made
nuclear war a very real possibility, and implied that the Soviets were
threatening preventive assaults against strategic Chinese areas.
The Chinese statement said the Peking regime had developed
nuclear weapons, but only for self defense.
Both sides have lost troops in major border battles this year.
Fighting erupted in March on the Ussuri River between Siberia and
Manchuria, and on the Sinkiang-Kazakhstan frontier in Central Asia in
August.
The Soviets claim there were 488 lesser incidents along the border
between June and mid-August.



ON PARKING ISSUE
Panel Discovers Information Gap

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
A student panel studying parking problems on campus Monday
reported a serious information gap exists between the Traffic and
Transportation Committee and the student body, along with a lack of
immediate goals to check mounting traffic problems.
The student commission, assigned by Student Body President
Charles Shepherd to investigate problems of parking and traffic
thrashed out traffic fines, the Towers parking space, and shuttle buses,
with UF Traffic and Parking Coordinator Lee Burrows.
One of the biggest problems is the information gap, Harvey
Alper, student commission chairman, said.
Its ridiculous, everybody seems to be making up the rules as he
goes along, he said.
The lack of initiative of the traffic committee to come up with
clear cut interpretations of the rules has led to selective law
enforcement, Alper indicated.
You should be the one, not the police chief, to interpret the rules,
and tell the students what they mean before the police start enforcing
them, Alper told Burrows.
Before anyone knew what the rules were, police were handing out
1 BACKGROUND REPORT i
000pOOWOOtOOOOOOGQOOOOOMwMMwnlMIT
parking tickets like flyers, Carol Sanger, a member of the student
commission, said.
Burrows said earlier he had little authority without the committee s
backing when it came to major decisions. But he indicated the
committee was going to be taking the initiative more in the future.
Its hard to make regulations, our first meeting consisted of
nothing but semantics, Burrows said.
The student commission confronted Burrows with some problems
for which no immediate action, or goals seem to be in right.
One concerned the students who paid fines for violations which
were ruled void a few days, or weeks later.
Its not fair, these students should be able to get a refund, Alper
said.
The Transportation and Traffic Committee delayed action Monday
on this matter.
If students are allowed to appeal for a refund on this basis, student
government will have to set a deadline on appeals, Bob Wattles, Chief
Justice of Traffic Court, said.
It wouldnt be right for a student to appeal a violation in Spring
for violation made in Fall quarter, Wattles said.
Three converging situations that could turn into what Alper termed
a catastrophe if not dealt with soon, involves the area of the
campus police station across from Towers.
The parking lot for the Florida State Museum should be
constructed this year where the old police station sits now. The
station will be moved to the old commuter lot.
No one knows when this will begin.
Construction for the new police station hasnt been started, and the
Museum will welcome an estimated 250,000 visitors a year.

news 1
from...

UNION BOARD: In an emergency meeting Wednesday, the FSU
Union Board voted to seek the status of an independent campus
organization through a change in the student body constitution.
Board member Mike Halloran said since the board serves the entire
university community, we see no reason why we should remain
exclusively under student government control.
MORATORIUM: The FSU administration has indicated that it will
adopt an official hands-off policy on the Vietnam Moratorium now
planned for Oct. 15.
According to university sources, the plans for calling off classes
should be left at the discretion of students and their instructors.
ELECTIONS: A record turnout is expected for FSLPs fall election,
according to commissioner Bill Harris. The elections, being held
today, will name new class officers, senators and AWS officials.
~/ S r livG* r
WITH
CHUCK CONLON
and the
"10:30
TONIGHT
9 PMTIL
9hmvfiligMeb
I 9jcmu}e
Vv /I IN. W. 10th AVE.
yuuuuumnnmmrrr*

3fMiH^su

There is just no money for any parking facilities rijght now. Money
hasn't been appropriated for any construction since July I, Burrows
said.
In the meantime, Towers residents need parking space. Alper
suggested the lot across from the police station be used for that
purpose.
Multi-level parking facilities were ruled out for the near future.
It costs $2,060 for each parking space in a garage, Burrows said,
adding the maintenance was three times as much than for a simple
ground lot.
A partial solution to the money problem was recommended by
commission member Carol Sanger.
All the violation money should be pooled into a fund for new
parking facilities, so the students can see what is being done with
their money, she said. At present, campus parking violation money
goes into a student loan fund.
Not only should student violations, but faculty and staff violations
should come under the university traffic court, she said. At present,
even faculty violations of campus parking rules come under the
jurisdiction of the Gainesville courts.
The amount of fines were attacked at the same time. $5 is okay
for not buying registration, but for a first or second parking offense, it
is too much, Sanger said.
Snags in the shuttle bus routes were also discussed.
The commission recommended more buses in the prime hours of 11
a.m. and 2 p jn., and the posting of routes, both in the paper and the
bus stops. There is also a question of who can use the buses.
There are six buses running now, one more is being added to the
Blue Route, and another half route will serve Cony Village, Burrows
said.
An afternoon bus route from the campus to the Gainesville Mall
was discussed, but put aside for other priorities.
Alper was surprised at the low turnout for the parking commission
meeting, which was announced in the Alligator, but he did not take it
as an indication of no problems.
You wont hear an uproar on this campus, but large mutterings,
he said. People dont know who to go to, but they complain all the
same.
The student commission meets next Monday to hear reports on
how rules can get changed, a better fine system, and possible parking
solutions for Towers residents.
Chief Shuler will be present to discuss problems.
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Film Tonight
Football fans whod like to
continue savoring the
satisfaction of Florida's 21-6
whipping of Florida State last
week can see filmed
highlights of the Florida Field
sellout. The Alachua County
Alumni Club is sponsoring
the film at the Reitz Union
Auditorium, tonight at 7:30.
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, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday/OctobwB.l9§

Page 4

Is UFs Honor Court Fair?
Oct. 15 Vote Will Decide

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Honor Court Chancellor Craig
Lawrence wants the students*
opinion of his courts severity
and fairness in its handling of
student cheating, stealing and
passing of worthless checks.
These are the areas of
jurisdiction over which the court
under extraordinary
circumstances, can order the
expulsion from the university of
a convicted student.
Lawrence has received the
approval of the Student Senate
for his proposal to place six
questions concerning the
operation of the court on the
Oct. 15 general election ballot.
Areas of concern on the
Honor Court referendum include
whether or not penalties are
severe enough for convicted
offenders of the student code;
whether or not the student
understands what the penalties
are for offenses, and if a
nine-man Honor Court panel is
preferred to the six-man jury
now used by the court.
Presently, the court selects
at random from a panel of
upperclassmen from all
Russian Dropped
HELSINKI In the early
1900 s, Finnish, Swedish and
Russian were official languages
of Finland.
Swedish was dropped in 1914
and reinstated in 1917, when
Russian was dropped.

ADVERTISEMENT
8
392-2097

I Thursday is Ladies Night at the Rat
I No cover Charge for Coeds
I Live Entertainment by
I The Frank Fabiani Trio
I in
I Jazz Beat
I lmported Beer Festival
-50 c-
Reduced prices on such fine brews as San Miguel, St. Paul, Tuborg

| Wednesday
I Greek Night
I Free Popcorn
I and Discount on Beer
I Saturday
I Tulaae-florida Listening Potty
| 2:00 til 5:00
I Plus Plus|
| Plus| The Frank Fabiani Trio
I I 8:30 til 2:00

I Wednesday Thursday Friday
I Those students attending the Donovan Show will receive a
I discount on all beer at the Rathskeller, Wednesday through Friday,
I upon showing their ticket to the show.

/ I, i
fig
CRAIG LAWRENCE
wants student view
undergraduate colleges, a jury
of six students to hear cases
where the defendent pleads not
guilty according to the UF
Student Handbook.
Penalties range from a severe
remprimand to expulsion, and
may include up to 20 penalty
hours and up to one-year
suspension from the UF.

Boo k, Record Sale Today
Thousands of used books and a large collection of records go on
sale this morning at 15 S.E. Ist Avenue on the south side of the
square in downtown Gainesville at the annual four-day sale sponsored
by the Friends of the Library.
There are usable up-to-date text books, as well as fiction,
biography, foreign language grammers and dictionaries, mysteries and
hobby books at bargain prices.
The sale will be open until 9 p.m. and from 9 a.m. until 6 p.m. on
Thursday, Friday and Saturday.
Proceeds from this sale will be used to buy new books for the
Gainesville Public Library.

JXatfe&ellet News
U. of F. Faculty Club, Inc.

Penalty hours are hours added
on to the students total
required number of hours for
graduation.
In the area of cheating,
regulations state that a student
may be given a failing grade in
the course involved instead of
or in addition to the other
penalties.
Lawrence has said if the
students vote for a change in the
court, then Student Government
would investigate proposals for
changing the present system.
Oct. 12 is the first trial date
for the court this year. Five
cases are being carried over from
spring quarter.
Lawrence is concerned that
the court keep the number of
backlogged cases to a minimum.
He has suggested that if the
.court gets behind in its handling
of cases, trials could be held at
the law center as well as in the
courts offices on the third floor
of the Reitz Union.

Friday
Show Your Stub
Discount on all beer for students
attending Donovan Show Plus-
Live Entertainment by
. The Frank Fabiani Trio
Monday
Rats Night Out
See Laugh-In in Color at the Rat.
TGIF prices from 8 til 9 during
Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In ____

B igMMMMMHM|
1 s
MESSAGE FROM TIM
Despite UF's Centrex telephone system installed last November,
some guys still find that contacting their girls is next to impossible.
Little Hall's walls here served double duty as a chalk board for a
grafitti scribbler.
~

ADVERTISEMENT
392-2097



Clinic Brings Care To Mothers And Infants

TOM KENNEDY
SHE GETS HELP
... learning to care for her baby
: '*;/.' ~...
Focus Party Hits
Summer Senate
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writers
The student senates minority party Focus Party late Monday
charged First Party with holding a free reign summer quarter over
Student Government legislation causing some organizations to be
crippled this year because of a lack of funds.
Tom Infantino, Focus Party chairman, said You can do anything
you want during the summer if youre the party in power.
He said organizations that were not around during the summer
were left out in the cold when it was time to consider their budget
requests for the new school year.
At least a years notice should have been given before they cut the
funds completely out from under an organization. Many organizations
arc without funds to operate even on a minimual basis.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd last summer told the SG
Finance Committee and the treasurer to get the students governing
house in financial order.
Guidelines were set down to eliminate funding of organizations
which did not offer activities to most of the student body. Also,
out-of-state convention trips were reduced to a minimum by the
senate.
Infantino said that organizations which were completely left out of
the funding process should be given a new hearing by the senate.
However, he said that he does not advocate giving organizations
everything they ask for. w
Theres an impropriety in their system of allocating funds, he
charged.
They give funds to groups which they support, like the spring arts
festival, and take away from the symphony orchestra.
The senate reduced the orchestras request for soloists by 53,000
during its summer budget session, he said.
In another area of student funding, Infantino said that student fees
totaling $ 11,452.52 are being used to fund teacher evaluations.
This should be done by the university, and not at the .expense of
the students.

IN POVERTY-STRICKEN GILCHRIST COUNTY

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second m a senes
on poverty in north central Florida. This installment
focuses on health care and the Maternal and Infant
Care program.)
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Gilchrist County health department is
housed in an old, run-down frame residential home.
Outside it looks ramshackle, but inside, though
paint is peeling from the walls in treatment and
waiting rooms, it is clean and as sterile as possible.
The floors are bare with some ripped linoleum
covering. There is little privacy. During an early
morning clinic, babies squall and cry and scream.
Expectant mothers with babes in arms patiently
slump down in thread-bare and torn couches and
unmovingly wait their turn. Older children scramble
about adding to the ever present chaos.
The county has no doctor. The health
department shares its doctor, who makes regular
visits, with several other counties which suffer a
similar lack. For State Board of Healths Maternal
and Infant Care clinics, however, a pediatrician from
the programs main office in Gainesville, aided by
obstetrics and gynecology interns and residents
from UFs medical school, come to Trenton, the
county seat and largest town, site of the health
department, to see patients.
At the same clinic an MIC nutritionist counsels
mothers on their eating habits and outlines a diet
for them and their children. A social worker takes
care of welfare problems. Together, they are a
traveling team, making regular visits to counties on
their circuit.
MIC covers 13 counties in north central Florida,
which are known for their widespread poverty
conditions. It holds 47 clinic sessions a month in
this 10,000 square mile area, and last year made a
patient visit for every mile.
The program is funded with matching money
from the Department of Health, Education and
Welfares Childrens Bureau. Since its inception in
1966, MIC has been hailed as a model for 55 similar
programs across the nation, because it is the only
multi-county project operating.
The program works closely with those families
who are U.S. Department of Agriculture surplus
commodity recipients. Commodities are mostly
canned goods and non-perishable foods in either
powdered form or packaged in preservative. To get
the right nutritional value out of them, they must
be prepared specially. MIC has initiated cooking
classes in individual homes working solely with
commodities, to show women the correct methods.
Its a hard task, and the classes are poorly attended.
Kathy Neff, an MIC nutritionist, explains that she
is faced with restructuring a peoples whole culture
of traditional eating habits. When setting up a diet
for a family, she runs headlong into ignorance and
complacency.
As of last spring, there had been only three
cooking classes through MIC in Trenton diving tire
past year, though in other counties the number may
be a little higher.

ON CIVIC CENTER
Commission Hears Report

The Alachua County
Commission, the Gainesville City
Commission and UF should
form a committee to discuss
making a joint project of a
proposed civic center, the
county commission was told
Tuesday.
The county commission
received copies of a civic center
feasibility study Tuesday
afternoon from Finley Cannon,
chairman of a civic center study
committee.
Copies of the study, made by
First Research Corp., will be
made available to UF, the
commission decided.
We entered into a voluntary
agreement with Walter Matherly
(UFs director of planning) to
consult with each other,
Cannon said. We agreed the
two researches should be done
s i
independently.
Cannon recommended that

the commission study the meet both needs.
report, form a committee with It would be foolish for the
the city to discuss the center, two groups to go their separate
and then form a joint committee ways when one center could
with UF to discuss what would solve both needs, Cannon said.
Alumni Train Special
Seeking Passengers
The UF Alumni Train Special, scheduled to bring visitors from all
over the state into Gainesville for Homecoming weekend, needs
passengers.
Originally designed to provide an easy form of transportation for
returning alumni, the train is now available for anyone who wants to
ride.
The train, starting in Miami, will pick up passengers in Hollywood,
Fort Lauderdale, Deerfield, Delray Beach, and West Palm Beach. The
roundtrip ticket costs S2O, and all passengers will be bussed from
Waldo to Gainesville. Arrangements for car rentals can be made by the
Blue Key office in the Reitz Union.
We expected a large response, but have received only 25
reservations, said Bob Moore, chairman of publicity and promotions
for Homecoming. Any student who wished to reserve a train ticket
for a date or parents is urged to call the Blue Key office
immediately.

Optobar 8. 1988. !***** AlHgator.

But, the classes are held in town, women in
outlying areas either dont know about them or
they cant get into town to attend. At that,
however, the average attendance is usually three or
four.
A Florida State Board of Health pamphlet lists
the kinds of Food for a healthy mother and baby.
It is just one of a myriad of circulars and charts and
booklets on proper nutrition, handed out by MIG
workers.
But, not always are these foods available to low
income families especially those in rural areas. In
addition, the eating habits Miss Neff is talcing about
sometimes present formidable blocks in making her
nutrition lectures successful. The patented nutrition
guidelines do not seem to reflect the peculiarities of
a rural culture and economy.
MIC concentrates on infants and expecting
mothers. But these eating habits, although they are
more noticeable among this group, reflect the rural
cultures years of environmental isolation.
Laundry starch, clay, sand and road tar are parts
of the rural diet in some cases large parts of it.
One mother says a snack for her consists of a box of
laundry com starch and a soft drink.
It fills me up, she explains. My friends eat
clay, too, just like kids pick up sand to eat while
playing.
(Next: Diet and disease in poverty areas.)
tOM KENNEDY
THE CHILDREN OF POVERTY
... products of rural culture

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 8.1969

Page 6

Rathskeller
May Close
By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
The fate of the Rathskeller
will be decided Nov. 20 in a
meeting of student leaders, UF
Administration and Rathskeller
officials.
Joe Hilliard, chairman of the
board of the Rathskeller, may
recommend it be dosed.
Hilliard said the purpose of
the Rathskeller is to provide a
place for* students, faculty and
staff to communicate.
If I feel this purpose is not
being fulfilled I will recommend
the Rathskeller be closed
down,* he said.
Hilliard said student response
has not been what it should be.
The student body Tickled
and is not taking advantage of
the opportunity to
communicate,* he said.
Financial stability is not
enough reason to keep the
Rathskeller open in the future,
Hilliard contended.
Robert Allison, business
manager of the Rathskeller,
predicted the Rat would
break even financially at the end
of this quarter. However, an
SB,OOO loss incurred last year
must be made up throughout the
three quarters of this year.
Allison blamed last years
ending in the red on the
Rathskellers winter quarter
opening. He said Servomation
Inc. warned that campus
businesses should expect profits
in the fall quarter, breaking even
in the winter and losses in the
spring.
Unforseen expenses such as a
cash register and a piano were
also responsible for our losses,
Allison said.
The Rathskeller Fraulein
waitresses were dropped at the
beginning of the spring quarter
as an alternative to raising beer
prices. Allison does not forsee
the Frauleins* return.
Allison said this quarters
Dion show was a money-maker
and the take exceeded Dions
guarantee.
The main sources of revenue
for the Rathskeller include
membership fees (raised to $2
this year), cover charges for
special shows and the sale of
beer.
Hilliard is quick to point out
that the purpose of the Rat is
not to sell beer.
Donovan Sets
May Sell-Out
The two performances by
Donovan scheduled for this
Friday are proving to be an
apparently successful venture for
Student Government
Productions.
Both the Gainesville Record
Bar and the Constans Theater
ticket office where the tickets
are being sold are swamped with
requests for tickets. Friday was
the last day that $4.00 tickets
for the 9 p.m. performance were
available. Only about 20 tickets
are remaining sos the 7 p.m.
show.
However, plenty of $2.50
tickets are still available for both
performances.
Alan Howes of SG
Productions said if ticket sales
continue at this rate, both
concerts will be sell-outs. If this
happens the sale of tickets will
meet all costs of the production.

THE DROPOUTS
aw J*.
N&K.& W/p

L J *O%
Jr
m ' ~

\ \ %
\ X w. \
fc* *%
Venture: r
Use a love call
to count bacteria. \
^V

The lampyridae beetle family.
Delight of small boys. Biological
light bulb. And prime source of
raw material for another Du Pont
innovation.
Luciferase, an enzymatic protein
with intriguing properties, obtain obtainable
able obtainable only from fireflies. Luciferin,
an organic molecule also found in
fireflies, but synthesizable. Adeno Adenosine
sine Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), a common
energy-yielding substance found in
all living cells.
Those are the three main ingre ingredients
dients ingredients in lampyridaes love light.
And because ATP is common to all
living cells, university researchers
discovered they could produce an

/WW do You \
/ VO WHEN YOU ) Jftt
( RUN OUT OP £&m
\ FiaJOERNAILS? j
§3^

artificial glow by mixing luciferin
and luciferase wherever life is
present.
Noting that phenomenon, Du Pont
scientists and engineers went on
to develop it into a practical ana analytical
lytical analytical system. Correlating the in intensity
tensity intensity of the artificial "glow with
the amount of ATP present in
bacteria, they designed a means of
measuring the reaction.
The result is the luminescence
biometerthe first really basic im improvement
provement improvement in bacteria-counting
methods since the time of Louis
Pasteur. Rather than waiting days
for a culture to demonstrate growth
density, a doctor or technician can

I
Du Pont Company J
i Room 7890, Wilmington, DE 19898
Id like your latest information on opportunities at
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BY HOWARD POST
~
/ we're MoT permtttep \
ITO PISCiOSE THAT )S\
iNKXM/mONTO //o%
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-1

now get a digital readout of bacteria
concentration in a matter of minutes.
Other potentially lifesaving uses
for the biometer are being sug suggested
gested suggested every daysuch as diagnos diagnosing
ing diagnosing metabolic rates, enzyme de deficiencies
ficiencies deficiencies and nerve damage.
Innovationapplying the known
to discover the unknown, inventing
new materials and putting them to
work, using research and engineer engineering
ing engineering to create the ideas and products
of the futurethis is the venture
Du Pont people are engaged in.
You can become one of them,
and advance professionally in your
chosen field. See your Du Pont
Recruiter. Or send us the coupon.

fflll UIINT)
Ventures for better living.



PAID NO INCOME TAX ON PROFITS
Ex-Mai. Gen. Admits Selling Seized Guns

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Retired Maj. Gen. Carl C. Turner
admitted* Tuesday he took
several hundred guns seized by
the Chicago and Kansas City
police departments, sold the
cream of the crop for about
$2,000 and pocketed the
proceeds.
Turner, fornjer provost
marshal, the Armys top police
official, also acknowledged he
never paid income tax on his gun
sale profits, which he estimated
at $6,800 for the past five years.
But to the obvious
amazement of senators,
spectators and reporters, Turner
insisted during three hours of
testimony that he did nothing
wrong.
He sat ramrod straight,
thumped the table, wagged his
finger at his Senate interrogators
and appeared outraged at many
of their questions.
The bald, brassy Turner,
portrayed himself as an avid gun

Nixon Anti-Inflation Fight
To Cause More Unemployment

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Treasury Secretary David M.
Kennedy conceded Tuesday that
the administrations
anti-inflation fight is going to
put more Americans out of
work. But he refused to say just
how much more joblessness the
administration would tolerate.
Theres no question as you
slow the economy there will be
changes in the unemployment
patterns and some increases,
Kennedy told a House-Senate
joint ecomomic subcommittee.
But under questioning,
Kennedy refused to estimate
how much more unemployment
there would be or where the
Nixon administration would
draw the line at permitting
unemployment to gain.
I cant give you a figure
because that would be touted all

WHOS WHO
and
HALL Os FAME
applications
due
October 10, 5:00 pm
applications may bo picked up
and turned in at
V
Student Publications
Room 330 J.W. Roz Union
THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
- AT BOOKSTORES SOON

....... ./../
V
hobbyist and philanthropist who
lectured the Boy Scouts, gave
guns to an Army museum, and
fixed firearms for friends. He
said he accepted about SOO
weapons from the Chicago and
Kansas City police chiefs only
with their understanding that
the guns were for him, not the
Army.
Philip R. Manuel, a
subcommittee investigator, said
Conlisk and Kelley told him that
Turner got the guns by
promising they would be used
for Army training and an Army
gun museum.
Turner, 56, a master

over the housetops and that
would cause us complete
embarrassment, Kennedy said.
Former Vice President Hubert
H. Humphrey Monday repeated
a Democratic charge that the
Republicans were willing to
sacrifice jobs to cool down the
economy.
He quoted a new Labor
Department report of a 4 per
cent unemployment rate in
September the highest
one-month gain in nine years.
Kennedy noted that before
the Vietnam War, 4 per cent
unemployment was a level we
were trying to achieve not
avoid.
Is 4 per cent unemployment
acceptable? Sen. Jacob K.
Javits, R-N.Y., wanted to know.
In the present circumstances,

o
parachutist who retired from the
Army last November, also
acknowledged he lost his new
civilian job as chief of U.S.
marshals in the Justice
Department last month as a
result of the subcommittee
investigation and a parallel probe
by the Army.
Turner also has been accused
of using his provost marshal
position to cover up evidence
that Sgt. Maj. William O.
Wooldridge, then the Armys top
enlisted man, headed a
worldwide gang of crooked
career sergeants.
Turner also acknowledged he
got about 200 guns from an
illegal shipment of 5,000 new
pistols seized by federal agents
at Fort Bliss, Tex. He said the
local provost marshal knew of
his interest in firearms and
offered them to him.
He acfcnowledged two checks
totaling $1,957 for 23 guns he
sold to Pine State gun shop,

it is acceptable, Kennedy
replied.
How much more will you
accept? Javits asked.
Whats the red light?
I couldnt very well give you
a figure, said Kennedy.
There is no magic figure,
You look at all the indexes.
Is there any figure beyond
which you will not go? asked
Sen. William Proxmire, D-Wis.
We will strive for
unemployment at the lowest
possible level consistent with
price stability Kennedy said.
Sen. Stuart Symington,
D-Mo., asked if the
administration was planning for
a recession as away to handle
inflation?
No, replied Kennedy, we
are watching these things to
make sure that does not
happen.

ID JOHNSTON \
"PHOTOGRAPHY
sam and carol yn
ANNOUNCE THE
OPENING OF THEIR NEW
iV-S-yr.* portrait studio j
l 1915 NJf. 13th ST. I
Across From I
PHONE I
We Cordially Invite Every One To Visit Our Beautiful New
Studio At This Convenient Location. Take Advantage Os Our
Special Offer During
GRUB owe MB OCT. 13 Urn n I
! yPORTRAiTsTmN^I! |
I ill AT NO CHARGE 111 I
i1 J) Black & White Sitting with Proofs and mj j
]\ £ No Obligation to Buy By ij i
jj & Appointment October 13 j
..J
You Will Be Pleased To Know That We Have a SATISFACTION

Fayetteville, N.C., whose owner,
Earl Reddick, faces federal
charges of violating the 1968
Gun Control Act. Turner said

Thirsty Tims
TONfTE
4:30-700
A U DRINKS 1/2 PRICE!
TBISSTT
S STUDENT INSURANCE
ENROLL NOW!
SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT
THE DEADLINE FOR ENROLLMENT IS OCT.II
COVERAGE
Year-round coverage
Pays infirmary expenses
§ Hospital and doctor bills
PREMIUM
Student premium $19.65
Student and Spouse premium $41.75
Student, Spouse and Children $63.25
Student and Children $41.75
Optional Maternity S4B additional
Optional Major Medical $5 per person additional
You May Pick Up Brochures And Enrollment Forms
From The Places Listed Below Or Mail Them To
McG riff-Scarborough & Assoc.
McGriffScarborough A Associates
115 NE 6th Ave. Ph. 376-8393
-

Wednesday, October 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

these were the cream of the
crop from the assortment given
him by Chicago and Kansas City
police.

Page 7



t. The Florida AlUgUor.fWimday. QctolMr, Iff#

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility

I sHF .v-vy -x^.s:^?^>i\ > .': v ~:~- v s
p, I x ,' ' 'sflMMligiffi!iffilgSPMpwa^HM^^
Kl
Is This Fair?

Selective law enforcement b very much alive on
the UF campus, as evidenced by the above pictures.
Friday, the car shown above, bearing a Board of
Regents identification tag, was parked in the circle
in front of the J. Wayne Reitz Union... in a
tow-away zone. The campus police were called. A
few seconds after thb picture was taken, a campus

ill j
,*JIB| \ BipW I H|h
w! y^C!lg r^ *'* r : < M

Partisanship Over Vietnam May Help Nixon

WASHINGTON For a chance to reverse what
appears to be a growing tide of national opinion
against the war in Vietnam, President Nixon can
thank an unintended mistake by none other than
the chairman of the Democratic National
Committee.
Until last week, congressional debate on Vietnam
had been bipartisan. Sharp words of dissent voiced
by Republicans Sens. John Sherman Cooper,
Charles Percy, George Aiken and Charles Goo dell
were no better chosen than those of Democrats
George McGovern, J.W. Fulbright, Albert Gore and
Gaylord Nelson, but they rang in the White House
with a deeper and more disturbing sound.
The Vietnam Moratorium scheduled on the
nations campuses for Oct. 15 was about to get the
support off the campus of a sizable portion of
the Democratic and GOP Establishment in the
Senate and House. Now, the President has a chance
to muffle them, and it was Sen. Fred Harris
(D.-Okla.) who mistakenly gave it to him.
Sen. Harris is a relatively recent opponent of the
war, although he called for an unconditional
bombing halt last year before the Chicago
convention while serving as Hubert Humphreys
campaign chairman. Now, after Chicago, he is
convinced the Democratic Party cannot afford
another such split on the war issue and he is also
convinced that a firmer and faster timetable is
needed for withdrawal.
So Harris gladly attended a semi-secret meeting
last week in the Vandenberg Dinning Room at the
Capitol. Present were about 20 senators and
representatives, including some newcomers to the

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

policeman came by, casually glanced at the Regent
automobile, and drove on. Seconds later, a young
lady hurried to remove the vehicle and park it on
the Union parking lot Below, a non-official vehicle
was parked in the same circle, and law enforcement
went to work. What about it. Chief Audie Shuler?

Frank Mankinwicz-
Tom Bradon
4>
anti-Vietnam cause. Plans were made by members in
both parties for a strong showing on the floor of
both houses on Oct. 8, one week ahead of the
Moratorium. It was to include speeches and the
introduction of special resolutions calling for faster
withdrawal. It was also to include support for,
among other things, a Republican-sponsored
resolution in the House calling for repeal of the Gulf
of Tonkin Resolution by which Lyndon Johnson
claimed legality for the war.
But after the meeting, Harris met with reporters,
and gave it as his opinion that the Vietnam
withdrawal should go faster. He said the President
had twice indicated his hope that the Clark Clifford
timetable for withdrawal by the end of 1970 could
be speeded up, and that it was time to hold the
President to it. When a reporter asked Harris if he
thought it was time to take off the gloves on

editorial
Censorship!
Garv Wheeler is an outspoken 17-year-old senior at
Hernando High School in Brooksville. He is described by his
principal as exceptionally bright/;
Wheeler is now facing up to 60 days in jail and a SSOO
fine He has been suspended from school for short periods
of time He has been confined to study hall during the
duration and received 0 grades during the length of such
suspentions. He has been thrown in jail.
His purported crime?.
Distributing a newspaper without an occupational license.
He was arrested after allegedly violating a city ordinance
which prohibits the operation of a business without the $25
license.
His business?:
A crudely-printed four-page, letter-size publication.
His printing facilities?:
A mimeograph machine at the home of a fnend in a
nearby community (not even inside the Brooksville city
limits.)
His real crime?:
To voice ideas which are unpopular in the
ultra-conservative community of Brooksville ideas of
equality, of peace. To have a mind of his own and have the
character and fortitude to express his ideas. To trust an
ancient document apparently forgotten in Hernando county
which guarantees every citizens right to freely express his
ideals
According to the St. Petersburg Times, Wheeler had been
selling his newspaper at three for 25 cents.
That might make him technically responsible.
Brooksville City Attorney Ronald H. Mountain says,
Theres no intention to persecute him. Mountain added
that the charge would probably be dropped if Wheeler
purchases the $25 occupational license before his trial.
So five Alligator editors have offered to jointly purchase
Wheelers occupational license, although we seriously
question the ordinances constitutionality.
And we demand in the name of human decency that the
city of Brooksville and the Hernando County School Board
restrain themselves from any further harrassment of
Wheeler.
Although we fear that justice and freedom of expression
are dead in Brooksville, Florida.
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey Janie Gould
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley Anne Freedman
Assistant News Editor Feature Editor

Vietnam, Harris said yes, it was.
That tore it. Within a few hours, Rep. Gerald
Ford had sent every GOP House member a letter,
warning against undercutting the President. The
President himself using the Johnsonian style for
the first time seized the occasion of a combat
decoration ceremony to attack his critics, and the
matter had become, for the Republicans at least, a
partisan issue.
There it rests. The question now, according to
anti-Vietnam congressmen, is whether Harris
mistake will cause Republican Doves to draw back
from what their constituents are telling them.
The Democratic Doves are standing fast. They are
telling their wavering GOP colleagues that if they
yield now to party leadership and withdraw their
resolutions, it will be they who are making Vietnam
partisan, and not the Democrats. If Harris erred,
they argue, dont add to the error by reinforcing
partisanship.
It may have some effect. Rep. Pete McCloskey
(R.-Calif.) and Donald Riegle (R.-Mich.), f r
instance, are sticking by their Tonkin Gulf repealer,
but others are running scared.
. special election in Massachusetts in
which a flat-out Democratic Dove, in a district
composed equally of blue-collar workers and
silk-stocking suburbanites, handily defeated a
Saltonstall in a district held by the GOP for 30
years, makes its own point. Rep. Allard Lowenstein
(D.-N.Y.), who mastermined the dump Johnson
movement last year, called the Massachusetts
election the New Hampshire of 1969. He should
know, v



Admu
Cum
'DiMtrit
There is no hope
for the complacent man

Withdrawal Plan

MR. EDITOR:
This is an open letter to the
Student Mobilization
Committee:
Congratulations on your
resolute stand against the war
and all your helpful suggestions
for the D Chief Executive. To a
soldier, crouching in a foxhole
during a mortar barrage, theres
nothing quite so comforting as
to know that, somewhere on the
opposite side of the earth, a
student is slowly walking in a
circle, carrying a STOP THE
KILLING placard.
... Bring the troops home
from Vietnam NOW is a
wonderful piece of practical
foreign policy. It resembles, in a
distorted and overdramatized
way, the only reasonable
alternative open to the President
after three years of bloody
stalemate.
Im certain Mr. Nixon is
impressed by the March Against
Death and similar efforts to

Gator Band Regrets

MR. EDITOR:
The Gator Band regrets the
action of students sitting in the
fraternity section during last
Saturdays football game with
F.S.U.
Leftovers
MR. EDITOR:
While depositing my tray on
the conveyor belt in the Reitz
Union Cafeteria, I was appalled
at the vast quantity of uneaten
food that, I learned, becomes
garbage. It is sad that so many
people can afford to be wasteful
while others go hungry. Besides
being uneconomical, it is extra
sewage to be treated, a waste o*
natural resources and an
injustice to the less richly
endowed.
KEARNEY BOURGEOIS
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
Be typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
Not be signed with a
pseudonym.
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld
only if writer shows just
cause. The editor reserves the
right to edit all letters for
space.

Try A Bicycle

MR. EDITOR:
The problem of parking on
campus appears to have created
a considerable amount of sound
and fury. Some of this has
appeared in the Alligator. Your
question and answer article last
was quite interesting. One
possible answer to several
questions as to how to get from
one place to another on the thecampus
campus thecampus more quickly was not
even suggested. They could ride
bicycles.
I recently visited the
University of California at Davis
where traffic regulations are very
strict. There is no through traffic
or any other automobile traffic
in the main part of the campus.
The streets are narrow, quiet and
not smelly. Only pedestrians and
bicycles are there. The streets
and buildings are lined with

remind him of what he has to
do. He might be more
appreciative if some of the
young radicals would get
together and draft a Withdrawal
Plan that would deal effectively
with his principal concerns:
Keeping U.S. sympathizers
in South Viet Nam alive
Executing an orderly
withdrawal with a minimum of
U.S. losses
i Leaving the present South
Vietnamese government in a
position such that it can at least
defend itself for a few months.
Writing this plan would be a
grim job for most peace
marchers. They have already
decided to ignore the third item.
Unless they chose to scrap the
first also, they would soon be
accused of selling out to the
Establishment, as their plan
would begin to look disturbingly
similar to what is being done
right now.
808 WISE, 7AS

During halftime when the
F.S.U. band was on the field
trying to entertain the students,
the grateful students of the
University of Florida were
showing great disrespect as they
played toss the student up the
stands. As a result of the game
by the students in which many
people got hurt, almost the
entire crowd watched the
students game and made a noise
loud enough to disturb the
performing F.S.U. Band. Since
so few people watched the
halftime show the F.S.U. Band
felt very unwelcome here.
As a member of the Gator
Band, I know how much hard
work goes into the preparation
of a halftime show. We practice
four days a week after classes, in
the rain, and try our hardest to
entertain the students. The
bands from the other schools do
the same.
The Gator Band appreciates
the spirit and support that the
Florida students give them when
they perform. When we travel to
other schools we would like the
same support.
I hope in the future that the
students will take out their
frustrations by cheering for our
team. Please show a little respect
for the visiting band so that they
will return again to entertain us.
MIKE LEVIN, 2UC
GATOR BAND MEMBER

bicycle racks and special paths
lead to the dormitories. There
are about 15,000 students there.
Some 1,500 bicycles are
registered with nearly that many
not registered. Since a fraction
of the bikes were ridden by the
fairer sex wearing miniskirts, the
scenery was delightful.
The campus cannot
accommodate all the cars the
students and staff would like. It
is time therefore, to stop playing
games. Alternatives are possible,
be they busses, bikes, or both, or
something else, but they will not
work well unless cars are
completely banned. Now is the
time for the Alligator, students,
and staff to decide what is best
and fight for it.
WENDELL N. STAINSBY
PROFESSOR OF PHYSIOLOGY

Speaking Out
Better Off Without P.E.?
By D.K.Stanley

As one who took some
lumps at the recent University
Senate meeting and who has just
read the Editorial Think
Young I hope you will allow
me space for some reflections.
The idea of thinking young
is good, but not too young.
Your masthead bears the
motto the price of freedom is
the exercise of responsibility. I
would quote Mr. R. Heath
Larry, Chairman of the Board of
U. S. Steel Corporation when he
said in giving a commencement
address you and your
generation have so many more
years to live in this world than
have I and mine. So consider
carefully, in your interest, how
this may best be lived.
It does not matter now how
the move from mandatory to
voluntary physical education
came about. What is important
to the young men and women
on this campus is that they

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fitif 77* is Isnt My Car, Officer, Its My Lunch Pail!

understand what has come about
in terms of their own personal
lives.
In the twenty-three years of
the existence of the College of
Physical Education and Health
the objective has been to serve
rather than to require; to use
judgement and experience but
certainly not to ask that youth
give up any of its energy and
idealism.
The faculty of the College has
always been interested in the
personal development of the
student in providing him with
knowledge of his physical status;
some health knowledges and
understandings; and sufficient
skill to provide participation in a
Lifetime Sport.
Over the years the faculty has
been interested in competencies,
not credit per se. The
graduate will be judged on
performance and not necessarily
a list of credits.

WfedfMfday, October 8, 1969, Ttwf tor ida ANtgrtftr,

I shall conclude these
thoughts by quoting a few
authorities; and while these men
are not young, certainly their
opinion is to be respected:
A a letter to Dean Doty
November 18,1968, from Dr.
Jas. Satterwhite, University
Physician... It was with
distinct sadness that I read
the article on the Student
Government resolution on
Physical Education.
a letter to EX. Cameron,
Director Athletics, Duke
University from Dr. Wm.
Anlayn, Duke University,
Medical Center, I
understand Physical
Education is under scrutiny
with regard to the
undergraduate curriculum.
There is no doubt in my mind
that regular and corrective
physical education is an
important endeavor for
physical and mental well
being. It is with considerable
thought that I would endorse
that the course be
mandatory.
to Dr. D. J. Fluke,
Chairman, Curriculum
Revision Committee, Duke
University, from Dr. E. S.
Orgain, Director,
Cardiovascular Disease
Service, Duke University,
Medical Center, I would
strongly urge that physical
education as a required
course not be dropped from
the University Curriculum.
§ Dr. Paul Dudley White
renowned cardiologist states
in part, I find that there is a
gross error now being made in
various places to reduce or
even omit compulsory
physical education.
It is little short of criminal to
educate our young people
mentally only to have than die
early of heart attacks or strokes
- because of neglect of physical
health.
So there you have but a
fractional part of the material
that was presented to your
Senate Sub-committee last year
- and again 1 repeat your own
axiom the price of freedom is
the exercise of responsibility.
I sincerely trust that we shall
not see a diminishment of
physical education activity on
this campus.

Page 9



Page 10

i Dm Florida ANiaator WadiMndav Octobv 8.1808

- -f-
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MAAS BROTHERS
Wet and wonderful in
this slicker coat-dress of
crinkle paten leather by
Jonathan Logan. No matter
what the weather, you'll be
fashion right... from Maas
Brother's Junior Terrace
Department. Modeled by
Brenda.

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STAG AND DRAG
Janey models the perfect
pants outfit from Stag and
Drag for all those parties.
The outfit features
see-through lace for those
that are daring!

y m
/ II /

DON/GAN'S
John Meyer "speaks your
language" in this outfit
from Donigan's. The body
sweater features the latest
fall c010r... gorse, and
tops herringbone pants.
Speak out with John Meyer
from Donigan's. Modeled
by Suzann.

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mm : mk l^lllP^
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SIL VERM AN'S
A touch of the gypsy
accents this dose-fitting
crepe "Edwardian" dress.
Wear as a shawl, a mantia,
or toss it around the waist
over pants! A perfect dress
for homecoming parties, or
frolics. Modeled by Ingrid.



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Mt ja ta/Mon fui!
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%sfy *X < // -','t^:6 / y/s
Jfl I

FIGURE FAIR
Knock about in our
acetate print culotte with
an empire waist line and
built-in-bra. Wonderful for
patio parties. Sizes: pet sm,
med . price, $14.00.
Modeled by Sandi.

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leSi BhU^

SEAR'S
Come rain or come shine
Sharon is fashion right in an
all weather coat spiced with
bands of brightly colored
ribbon found in Sear's
Junior Bazaar.

TWIG
Pat sets the pace for fall
in this slinky knit one piece
with elasticized waist. The
"slinks" are in ... and in
stock at Twig.

WodnMday, October 8, 1960, Tha Florida AMfatbr,

'l* "£ 1 ~* 1 ** *. 1 -, jfl m
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mftm TwmmtsmnammmK.
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SUSAN SCOTT
Tunic tops are here to
stay. This deep plum tunic
f/ys over slithery pants to
show the flowing, feminine
lines. Modeled by Lynn.

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fashion layout by... joyce gehrke
photography by ... mathem and o'neal

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October, 8,1969

STUDENT GROUP MEETS

Crisis Service Organizing

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Staff Writer
A small group of students interested in meshing
the student suicide and crisis prevention service with
a similar one under the direction of Dr. Richard
McGee, met with the associate directors of the
professional center Friday.
Miss Joyce Beuerlein, of the Suicide and Crisis
Intervention Center, outlined the role students
could play in the service, especially in dorm areas.
The service will strive for face-to-face contact
with those seeking aid and students can be trained
to offer assistance to others in their dorm areas, she
said.
In the event that a student under great stress and
having a personal crisis phoned the center at night,
the call could be relayed to a resident in that area
who would immediately go to the distressed student
and help him. This would tend to eliminate the
embarrassment to the student of a psychiatrist being
sent to the dorm at night.
Students are very much needed in dealing with
other students in dorms, sorority or fraternity
houses. The student in the crisis situation would
know that word would not get out about the
problem and would be more comfortable in relating
to another student, Miss Beuerlein said.
Recruitment of students and others from the
community to work for the service is scheduled to
begin this week.
Volunteers will attend a series of lectures, films,
discussions and undergo some psychological testing

WRUF Features
'Long-Hair Music

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writr
What do the Rolling Stones
and Mozart have in common?
They both play long-haired
music, which is the name of
WRUF-FMs newest Radio
Center program.
In a harmonious fusion of
music from jazz to hard rock to
symphonic orchestras, DJ Alan
Penchanskys new show is on the
air every Saturday from 9:30 to
10 30 p.m.
My program might go from
electronic to rock or sonatas,
and then perhaps to hard blues,
Penchansky said. Its
interesting to juxtapose music.
In one hour of time I might go
from the Gregorian Chant to
Led Zeplin.
Penchansky, a vision of long
hair and casual clothing, speaks
as rapidly as he plans to spin
discs in the radio station.
Radio has got to do what
people at home cant do.
The average person has only
one record player and the
records just cant be switched as
quickly as I can do it. I have
four turntables, which can play
at the same time. This blend of
music is something that the
people cant do.
In fact, blending is what
Penchansky plans to do in the
future. In at least one program
he plans to use two recordings of
live concerts, complete with
applause. One is of pianist
Vladimir Horowitz and the
other, singer Otis Redding. While
the applause is going on for one
MODERN SHOE
REPAIR SHOPS
W2OW.UNtV.AVE.
IMM
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performer he will switch the
record over to the other. The
effect is that they appear to be
on the same stage together.
I am fascinated by the whole
realm of recorded music. I
would like the works that I place
together in my program to pose
questions for the listeners as well
as myself, Penchansky said.
The first show, Saturday, was
an eclectic madhouse.
Im particularly interested in
new recordings. Most radio
stations are three years behind in
their sounds.
Not giving any reason for his
action because he doesnt give
reasons for anything he does,
Penchansky said the second
program will bring two worlds
together. It will fuse the music
of the Mothers of Invention and
Charles Ives.
Slumped against the wall on a
stool, the regular Wednesday
night announcer said his
program Long-haired Music is
similar to a program he did for a
Miami station, WEDR, three
years ago.
Penchansky said it was the
first underground radio program
Miami had.
Wendy Winkler, director of
the Radio Center, said, I have
ultimate confidence in Alan that
Long-haired Music will be
entertaining and enlightening as
well as totally unpredictable.
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Volunteers will try
V
to make face to face
contact with crisis
victims.

to prepare them for crisis intervention and suicide
prevention. Students who will assist in the dorms
will receive the same training as those staffing the
phone lines.
The only qualification is interest, said Miss
Beuerlein.
Everyone who volunteers will go through the
training, she continued. If youre not suited,
youll find out soon yourself and drop out.
You will feel competent in taking calls after the
training, Miss Beuerlein said, but people who
cant cope realize it.
Miss Beuerlein, former director of a crisis center
in Nashville, describes the work as fascinating
interesting. What is a crisis to one person is not for
another. The greatest satisfaction is in helping
someone over a traumatic period in their life.

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Well send you the $1.69 size of Playtex t
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You get more than two months supply free.
Theres no other tampon like Playtex tampon was always inch of you.
Playtex. Outside, soft and silky, more absorbent. Actually 45% Once you try it, we think
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In every lab test against the to you. Flowers out, fluffs out, and get more than two months
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FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3.321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
I Dont Believe Everything You Read! I
I COME TO THE "TEACH-IN" ON SOVIET I
1 JEWERY. FIND OUT WHAT'S REALLY 1
I HAPPENING IN TODAY'S WORLD. SPEAKERS: J
| Prof. James Morrison of Political Science Dept. |
§ Rabbi Michnel Mouson I
I LISTEN ... REACT .. .& DISCUSS ... The
| plight of Jews behind the IRON CURTAIN. |
(FREE COFFEE & DONUTS)
I Be At HILLEL, Thurs., Oct. 9, 8 PM I
I Ph. 372-2900 I



CLASSIFIEDS

Wednesday, October 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator.

* 1
FOR SALE I!
Jr,
Let Typewriter Specialists Clean your
typewriters at reasonable prices, too
10% discount with your I.D. Card
Kiser's Office Equip. . 604 North
Main St. (M-3t-13-p)
We have 400 dozen pencils, lead or
color that have Regularly sold for
15c to 25c ... October Sale sc.
Most all Office Supplies are 25% to
50% Discounted. Kiser's Office
Equipment . 604 North Main St.
(A-3M3-P)
October Sale of Typewriters All
must be sold!!! 52 Manual
Typewriters from S3S to $125. All
have been cleaned and adjusted and
are in good condition. Most of them
may be bought for $lO down an.d
$lO per month. We also rent Electric
1.8.M.s Kisers Office
Equipment ... 604 North Main
Street. (A-3t-13-p)
Bugeye Sprite $325. Good mech.
condition. 65 Barracuda, $550 cash.
Flavet 3 Apt. 253-s. Come after 6
p.m. Must sell immediately.
(A-1 5-4 t-p)
Garrard turntable, speakers; mens
bicycle; next to the best king
trumpet made, paid $365 will accept
best offer around $175 Phone
378-4151 after 5. (AIS-3t-p)
1967 YAMAHA 50CC. Excellent
cond. low mileage must sell
immediately SIOO. Call 373-2520,
ask for Bishop, Bart or Dean.
(A-3M3-P)
67 90cc Honda c2OO new clutch and
tires perfect for town and campus.
Call David 378-9049. (A-15-4t-p)
Gain weight fast. Increase your
energy output manyfold. Pure SOY
powder $ 1.00/lb. yeast $2.00/lb. for
free delivery call 376-6042.
(A-1 S-st-p)
1967 Camaro, excellent condition,
new polyglas tires, 327 automatic
transmission, power steering SIBSO.
1402 NW 30 St. 378-7173.
(A-15-st-p)
Honda S-90 1967 $125. Call
372-9410 ask for Bennie Georgia
Seagle Hall. (A-15-3t-p)
One complete darkroom outfit for
sale. SIOO. Call 378-4775 after 5
p.m. (A-15-3t-p)
Sears 106 cc Motorcycle only 8000
miles S2OO, full helmet and visor
$lO, EICO 35 watt stereo power
amp. SSO. (A-IS-4t-p)
Matching 6 oak dinningroom chairs,
red velvet love seat, rocking chairs.
Odd chairs, antiques and oddities.
6110 S.W. 13th St. 9 to 5. Closed
Sunday. (A-15-7t-p)
HONOR APPLE concession for sale,
student only, excellent part-time
income, need automobile. Call after
spm 378-5908. (A-15-st-p)
SPECIAL ON OFFICE
EQUIPMENT. Limited time only.
Clean, adjust, lubercate & install new
ribbon, back to you in two days.
Hand adding machines $17.50.
Electric adding machines $27.50.
Portable typewriter* $12.50.
Standard size typwriters $22.50. DO
IT NOW & SAVE. JR Office
Furniture & Equipment Co. Call
376-1146. (A-BMO-C)
G u nsGunsGuns Inventory over
450. Buy-SellT radeR epair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
CAMERA Mamiya 500DT, still in
guarantee. Case, shade, filter, flash,
3X Telextender, all $125. Zoom
mono prism monocular, S2O.
392-0933; after 6 372-2702.
(A-3t-1 3-p)
Honda 90 Excellent student
transportation with helmet $165.
Call Cliff, 372-2515 after 5:30.
(A-3t-13-p)
Want a hot board, but cant afford?
My own design. 7'2" 18 wide
spooned flat bottem 2 Call
a, 373-2237. (A-1 4-3 t-p)
YASHICA D 2V tlr camera leather
case and many accessories. Great
working condition. SSO. Price firm.
Call Bob at 378-7479. (A-14-st-p)
Unused set of bar-bells, still in
original wrapping $25; Bahama Bed
Couch, 2 mons. old S4O; Bath Rm.
carpet & matching curtains $10; call
after 6pm, 378-0935. (A-14-3t-p)
FLORIDA
STATE THEATERS^
CENTER 1 LAST 2 PASS
MIDNIGHT COWBOY^
CENTER 2 LAST 2 PAYS
1 THE LOVE BUG
5
4. FLORIDA
* LAST 2 DAYS f
% "2 INTO 3 WONT
V **
********

f FOR SALE
,V
* #
Montgomery Ward 2.3 cu ft. refrig,
walnut finish. Excellent condition.
Used three months. 372-6463. Call
between 5:30 and 7:30 o.m.
(A-14-st-p)
For an out-of-sight light show on
stage or in your apt. now available
Color Organs, Strobe lights from $25
and $45 New 376-2389. Student
(A-14-3t-p)
u-ie Martin guitar. One year old.
$260. Call Doug 373-2454.
(A-3M3-P)
1950 Metro Step Van. . .Camper
equipped 8 ft. stand inside. Runs fine
needs tag and inspection. Cost me
S4OO. Yours for S3OO. 376-9538.
(A-st-13-p)
'67 Yamaha lOOcc. Good condition,
only 3600 mi. Best offer. Call
373-2341. (A-3t-13-p)
Must sell! '66 Cutlass in good
condition. Air & power. Call Ed
373-2620. Negotiation price, SI6OO.
(A-3t-1 3-p)
Vitaflo fresh veg. juicer, glasses, end
& cocktail tables, silverware, recliner,
TV trays, 4 sp. phonograph, chest,
K&E drafting tools. 372-8735.
(A-st-13-p)
Very good Royal office typewriter.
Very durable, nice print $40.00
Phone 378-9498 after 4:30.
(A-3t-12-p)
Trialer 10x48' + cabana-studio
attached in all student park. AC,
furnished $1750. 376-2184 eves.
(A-10t-12p)
Schnauzer miniature male 4 months
shots wormed 11 generations of
champions AKC ideal pet and
watchdog Sacrifice this adorable pet
for $125.00 or best offer 378-3606.
(A-st-12-p)
For sale Honda 50 only 3200 mi. In
excellent condition can go 50 mph
(downhill) call 373-2563 for
SIOO.OO. (A-st-12-p)
69 Honda 50 almost new 600 actual
miles including helmet and glasses
only $175. Call 376-6061 after 5.
(A-st-12-p)
5-string banjo, Gibson mastertone
rb-250, S2OO firm, includes case. Call
372- between 5+7p.m.; also
Bultaco 125 cc Race Cycle $350.
Really. These month old pups are
beauties. Three still need to find
good homes. Ma and Pa are both
handsome dogs. Call 378-0118. Free
(A-St-12-p)
D-18 Martin guitar. Year old, in
perfect condition. Call Doug at
373- (A-3t-1 3-p)
1964 Rambler American, R/H,
Standard, Ex. Condition, Many
things new & extras. Very economic.
$450 or best offer. Call Mukherjee:
378-3876. (A-st-1 1-p)
FOR RENT
SUBLET efficiency apt. at College
Terrace from Oct 12. Concession on
security deposit 378-2221 or meet
Ghosh 11 9 College Tr. (B-15-3t-p)
Town and Country Motel. Under
New management. Air cond. TV 11
miles Gainesville Highway 301 S
Waldo Call for homecoming
reservations 468-9448. (B-15-Bt-p)
Something Really Different &
Reasonable Too. One bedroom apt.
oh the Newberry Road across from
the new golf course. Leasure ranch
style living. Big FIRE PLACE for
those cool evenings, fully paneled,
beautifully furnished. Pool, bar-b-que
house, air-conditioned. Water &
garbage collection furnished. Only
$135.00 monthly on 11 month lease.
Call 376-1146 or 376-3900. No pets.
(B-3t-10-c)
Immediate occupancy! Female
roommate convenient location call
372-2393 after 5:00 p.m. for further
information. (B-st-12-p)
NOW SHOWING
A RACE FOR GLOW!
FOR LOVE AND FOR THE
~ NOFm SHOWS
PMUMOUNT PCIURES PRESENTS 7:50
kek ANHAKjxs only
FIFWcTk# F
tolfcfcjos&ja**
HMnaar/wwGW
th! sons OF KATIE ELDER-
UO^^VAVJJfEjMDEANJjjIA^mMj

1 FOR RENT |
LARGE 1 bedroom f-.rnished
apartment walk to'campus $ 110.00
Year lease 378-8122 or 376-6652
after 6:00 p.m. (B-14-st-p)
| WANTED I
Male and Female help wanted.
Part-time. Very good salary. Can
arrange hours. Little Larry's, 1225 W.
University Ave. (C-st-11-p)
1 or 2 Female Roommates for AC 2
bdrm. duplex. 2 blocks behind
Norman Hall. $36.25/mo. util. 906
SW 6 Ave. 376-7611 or 376-1853.
(C-14-St-p)
Wanted: married couples to
participate in group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives. This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-st-9-c)
Girl wanted to share 4 bdr AC house
with 5 girls. S3O/mo., 2 living rooms,
family room, big yard, garage, 16 NE
8 St. Call 373-1223. (C-st-11-p)
COED to share 2 bedroom Fr.
Quarter apt. Good location. Come by
anytime, no. 65. (C-st-12-p)
HELP! We need one fern, roommate
for nice apt 2 blks. east of campus
SSO mo. Own room. Call Sue or
Leslie 373-2766. (C-St-13-p)
Need 1-bedroom furnished apartment
December 1 (or soon thereafter). Call
Chris at 378-3518 or Bob at
378-0727. (C-1 S-3t-p)
Wanted energetic, enthusiastic
salesmen for the 1970 SEMINOLE.
Must be willing to work 10-15 hours
per week. Commission basis. Call Bob
Buck at 378-0727. (C-1 5-3t-nc)
HELP WANTED
v -i-iiMiw-g-fiixro'Poooo-notioo&o:
Registered Nurses Needed by
Alachua General Hospital for night
duty. Day nursery provided for your
pre-school age children during the
day while you sleep. Call 372-4321,
ext. 227 or apply at the personnel
office, Alachua General Hospital, 912
SW 4 Ave. (E-11-10t-c)
Cocktail waitress wanted. No
experience necessary will train.
Full or part time. Dubs Steerroom,
4560 NW 13 St. 376-9175.
(E-10t-11-p)
AUTOS
V
v.-:-:-:-:-:-:-!'
Beat the heat. Ride yer dates, dont
walk em. Airconditioned, radio, heat.
2 new tires. 61 Olds FBS. 63 motor.
Only $199 deal!! Call Chip
376-9308. (G-st-13-p)
Must sell Rambler American 330.
1965 automatic, radio, heater,
4-door, white walls, extra clean.
Excellent condition, low mileage.
$750. Call 372-2317. (G-st-13-p)
6 7 COUGAR. Air conditioning,
automatic, power steering and
brakes, sport console. Good
condition. Call Paul 372-7122.
(G-Bt-10-p)
VW SEDAN 1966 New tires not
retreads radio. Has been well cared
for by female owner low mileage,
engine excellent $925. 372-5796.
(G-5M2-p)
1963 Corvette Stingray Roadster.
327 4 speed new tires paint.
Beautiful condition 51450. Call
376-4913 after 5:00 p.m. (G-10t-6-p)
' 178 2434 |> |
Patty Dukes best
shUi9|^k
/ JpROOF OF L \
AGE REQUIRED^C
INTRODUCINGERICAMVINAS VIXEN.
RIISS MEYER'S
VIXEN. I

Page 13

| AUTOS I
Plym. Sport Satellite 1966 air
conditioning, radio, bucket seats,
power steering, excellent condition
inside & out 39,000 mi. Call
378-7872. (G-2t-14-p)
1960 VW Blue Sedan good running
condition radio $275. Call 473-4709
Keystone Heights going into service
must sell. (G-15-6t-p)
1967 Camero Rally Sport bucket
seats radio console 4 new tires power
steering 327 automatic yellow/biack
vinyl top. Call 373-1761. (G-15-2t-p)
vvX*Xv!vS... v.XwXAv/X'l'V..v.-'.vXviv/
PERSONAL
>. *.
Thursdays Heavenly Hash. Sign up at
the Baptist Student Union before
noon on Thursday. Dinner 5:30,
Vespers 6:15. (J-4t-13-p)
SIGN UP FOR INFORMAL RUSH
Monday thru Friday 1-sp.m. at the
Panhellenic Office 315 Reitz Union.
(J-st-14-p)
FREE COMPUTER DATING
INFORMATION! Write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-14-st-p)
1964 Porsche SC $2700 white gray
interior aircondition stereo tape AM
FM Radio. Call 372-6846. (J-15-st-p)
Needed: Good homes for lively,
affectionate kittens. Litter trained.
Used to children. Call 373-1312.
(J-1 5-3 t-p)
Flying Hawks Club Flight Instruction
$7.00 solo, $12.00 dual for club
members free ground school. 5 min.
from campus Stengel 376-0011.
(J-1 Ot-5-p)
Co-eds your unsightly facial hair can
be removed forever E. Dwyer
Electrologist 20yrs experience
372-8039 A flawless complection can
be yours. (J-2t-10-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message. Any time, day or night.
LET FREEDOM RING, 16 N.W. 7th
Ave. (J-st-13-c)
DID YOU KNOW? The Spanish Main
is moving. Grand Opening Nov. 6th
at 1624 W. Univ. Ave. (Old Johnston
Photography). MEANWHILE were
having a big 30% discount sale on any
and everything in our shop at 105 W.
Univ. Ave. Open till 10 p.m.
(J-10t-12-p)
HAPPY HOUR Every night 5:30
6:30 and also 9:00 10:00. 20 cents
foi large premium draft. The
Chatterbox, 4551 NW 6 St.
(J-st-1 3-p)

FALL LEAGUES
Interested in Joining a
MONDAY 6:30 pm or
WEDNESDAY 9:oopm
BOWLING LEAGUE ?
OCT. 8, 7:OOpm room 362 UNION
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA 392-1637
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
you choose what you want..
pay only for what you get!
WEDNESDAY
JUMBO CHOPPED
STEAK
WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY O f
AND YELLOW RICE
THURSDAY
BOAST TURKEY _
DRESSING, CRANBERRY SAUCE I Jk
CHOICE OF POtATO W 7
GAINESVILLE MALL

nnn 'i
We welcome 24 wonderful new
pledges to Sigma Kappa Sorority.
(J-15-3t-p)
iXXvV.v.v.'.v.v/X-XvX'XvXX.XvX'X.XX.X
LOST & FOUND I
*:
High School Class Ring lost at
Houston game. Merritt Island H. S.
Reward. Call Jim, 376-9450.
(L-3M3-P)
Found one Chiwawa-type dog in
Floyd Hall. Green collar Tallahassee
Tag no. 7993 Ph. 378-7286 anytime.
(L-1 5-3t-nc)
Lost 1:30 AM Fri. Hume Library
area of McCarty Black pup 35 lbs
with a choke chain + flea collar.
White spot on chest answers to Ben.
Reward. 392-1730. (L-15-3t-p)
1 SERVICES ji
y//x<-x/x/.VK Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Optician at 519 SW 4th
Ave across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE will type your manuscripts
professionally and in good form. Call
today for an appointment
376-7160. (M-15-9t-p)
Need a date for homecoming, any
weekend, etc? COMPUTER date can
help. Application fee this week for
females will be only SI.OO.
(M-14-st-p)
Learn to fly Smin from campus
Best Instructors Best Airplanes
Best Ground School Best DEAL
Flying Hawks Club Stengel Field
3760011. (M-10t-2-p)
GUITAR LESSONS AND REPAIRS.
2 years experience. See Bob Zuber,
c/o Bent Card Coffee House, 1826 W.
Univ. Ave. 376-9538. (M-st-13-p)
Special Ballroom Dance Class. Start
Oct. 15 9:00 p.m. SIO.OO. Six
Lessons. Fran Kessler, 372-1189 or
372-7197 or register at Frans, 1013
W. Univ. Ave. (M-st-1 3-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-St-3-c)
Babysitter Rhone 376-6517. 3311
NW 30th Place. (M-15-It-p)
Photography Bxlo=sl.oo sx7= .50.
Sororities, Frats, teams parties,
portraits, portfolios. Can handle any
assignment Call Ronnie Koru
376-6042. (M-st-8-p)



The
Florida
Alligator

Wwu^^f 0 ---

By TED REMLEY
Entertainment Editor
4
Its another football weekend, and what better way to spend it than
attending a football game. But at $6 per ticket?
There is plenty to keep Gators busy on campus this weekend but
many UF students would like to take a trip to Tampa. Some want to
just get away from the campus for awhile and others are true Gator
fans.
Its the money that will keep most Gators at home this Saturday.
Alachua County Alumni Club will again be showing Gator football
highlights Thursday evening in the Union Auditorium.
This week the feature is Gators Kazoo FSU. Admission is free
and the film starts at 7:30 p.m.
Hombre starring Paul Newman and Fredric March will be the
Union flick Friday and Saturday. Shows are at S:3O, 8 and 10:30
both evenings.
Student Government Productions will bring Donovan to Florida
Gym Friday night for two shows (if enough tickets are sold). If not,
there will only be one performance at 8:15 p.m.
Tickets are now on sale for $2.50 and $4. Quite expensive
compared to last years prices, but you know how inflation is.
Lets see, if you take your date for the weekend to Donovan Friday
night and the football game against Tulane in Tampa Saturday,
admissions alone could come to S2O. Gas, meals and extras could
make this the most expensive weekend of the quarter, including
Homecoming! Thank God Gator Growl is still free.
The faculty is planning an Oktoberfest fling in the Arredondo
Room Saturday evening. If any students happen to sneak in, let me
know how our teachers party and what theyre really lice.
At 7 and 9:30 pm Sunday in the Union, the University Film Series
will present a triple feature. Lon Chaney will star in the Hunchback
of Notre Dame, Valentino will love his way through Blood and
Sand and Knight on the Trial will star William S. Hart. Admission
is 50 cents.
Hope you enjoy a listening party Saturday.
1 The
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?!vSvs^?Bv?^Tffffffy^^vS^w?^v!?Tr!!!%vnv!v!vr??!Ts%vs!s^!!s-!^?^T!!^S^svS?RTsss^
B BBr B B 181 hUK BbJb
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ESQUIRE SPONSORS
Student Film Contest Opens

Esquire Magazine is sponsoring the first annual
Esquire College Film Festival.
The contest is billed as, an annual activity
designed to focus attention on student film-makers
and their yearly productions and to encourage, the
fast growing study and practice of Cinema Arts in
the nations higher institutions of learning.
The judges are well-known in the film-making
industry of today. They are Roman Polanski, Andy
Warhol, Gene Youngblood, author-critic of the Los
Angeles Free Press and Peter Goldfard, 26 year old
producer-director of NBCs Experimental Theatre
and a graduate of UCLAs Theatre Arts.
Other equally famous judges include Peter

AN EXCLUSIVE SERVICE
FOR STUDENTS! gW
"THE INSURED COLLEGE RING
YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED
WHILE IN SCHOOL AGAINST ... mJBEM
LOSS OR DAMAGE BY THEFT. ROBBERY,
BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE.
LOBS OF STONE FROM ITS SETTING. \ 3
ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE. \
IREGISTERED CERTIFICATE WITH EVERY
HATCHER'S JEWELERS
2 EAST UNI V. AVE 376-6892
ART t JOURNALISM SUPPUB
DARKROOM SUPPIKS
Ag CASSETTE TAPE EQUIP.
IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL
V 378-8933
CLICK CAMERA STORES

jR> The Best Things
mu\ la In Life Are Free!
\VL 1/ ** Y OU CCin rece ve
Florida's Best Newspaper
absolutely free for 6 weeks.
subsaiptiorfto imra'')
BEST NEWSPAPER^^^
The Complete Newspaper, recommended mos+ by
teachers and professors.
First Six weeks are free. You pay just 65c a week thereafter
for guaranteed delivery service. Offer expires October 1 5.
j STUDENT SPECIAL |
Circulation Department
St. Petersburg Times
P. O. Box 1121
B St. Petersburg, Florida 33731
Please start Guaranteed Home Delivery of The Times
to
I (Please print name)
| at Apt
I Address City J
I agree to subscribe to The Times for a period of at least 17 weeks with the I
understanding that lam to receive the first 6 weeks absolutely free. Thereof-
Iter I agree to pay the Carrier-Salesman at the rate of 65c a week. lam not a |
subscriber at the present time. | (

| Signed

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 8,1969

Page 14

Bogdonavich, director-writer of experimental films,
Les Goldman, producer and academy-award winner
of animated films, Jacob Brackman, 25 year old
film critic for Esquire, and director Steven Speilberg
of Universal Pictures, a few years ago himself a
student film-maker.
There will be SSOO first prize in each category:
dramatic, documentary, animated and experimental.
Other special recognitions will be awarded.
Details concerning the contest can be obtained by
writing Esquire Magazine College Film Festival,
Beverly Hills Studio, 9336 West Washington
Boulevard, Culver City, California 90230.

Ted Remley
Entertainment Editor

THES WINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
aky...young and old...some Just tor the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $5 That's all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modern low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELSIN THE AIR
GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL
AIRPORT
mmQ waldo road



Donovan
To Perform
Here Friday
By MAGGIE COE
Entertainment Writer
Donovan, the famous Scottish
baUadeer, will appear in concert
Friday in Florida Gym.
Two shows are scheduled, at 7
and 9:30 pm. Tickets are $2.50
and $4 per person and are
available at the Reitz Union Box
Office and the Record Bar.
This is the Student
Government Productions first
experiment with the two-show
idea.
Student Productions could
possibly lose as much as $7,000
if students dont respond, said
Caron Bulkany, Student
Government Productions
publicity director.
Director of Student
Government Productions Alan
Howes has put 8,000 tickets on
sale.
If by Tuesday we dont have
more than 4,000 sold I'm
contacting Donovan and
cancelling one of the two shows
proposed. In that case the show
that will go on will be at 8:15,
Howes said.
We contracted to bring
Donovan here through a
California agency. Student
Productions is guaranteeing him
$20,000 and a percentage of the
house, Howes said.
The guarantee problem seems
to Ue in the fact that the last
three years the seating capacity
has been cut from 8,800 to the
present 4,000, while
entertainment prices have been
increasing.
If we booked a top star like
Donovan for only one show of
4,000 people, wed have to
charge $5 and $6 a seat, said
M iss Balk any. This would
defeat the purpose of SGP (to
bring top entertainment to
campus at low cost), and would
only allow a minute portion of
the university to see Donovan
perform.
To avoid this situation,
weve scheduled Donovan for
two shows. True, its more
expensive, because we might not
be able to fill the house for both
shows, as Im sure we would for
one. But weve been able to
lower the ticket price, and now
almost everyone who wants to,
can see Donovan, and not pay
through their teeth.
Were losing a hell of a lot of
money to make this possible,
but we think Donovan is worth
Oktoberfest
Announced
An Oktoberfest Party is
planned Saturday for UF
faculty, administration and staff.
The Faculty Club, University
Womens Club and Reitz Union
are sponsoring the event.
German buffet, Lowenbrau
and live entertainment will be
the highlights of the evening.
Dress is informal.
Reservations cost $5 per
person and can be made by
calling Mrs. Hancard in the
Union at 392-1674.
Beginning at 7 p.m., the
Oktoberfest will be held in the
Arrendondo Room in theJJniom.
HILLEL
TOMORROW
BPM

i&ja jrp-L-
I BCTVILEHEM
I INTERVIEWS T=i> j
Come as you are!
NOVEMBER 6, 1969
Nows the time to sign up at your placement office for an interview with the Bethlehem Steel Loop
Course recruiter. This could be the start of something big!
And just what IS the Bethlehem Steel Loop Course? Glad you asked! Its our management
development program for graduates with bachelors or advanced degrees.
Bethlehem loopers (150 to 200 every year) spend four swinging weeks at our home offices in
Bethlehem, Pa. Then, primed with information about tne entire corporation and rarin to go, they re report
port report to the appropriate plants or departments for their first assignments. Then, onward and upward!
Where would YOU fit into the Loop Course? Check your degree or the one most similar to it:

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING-Engineering or me mechanical
chanical mechanical maintenance departments of steel plants, fabri fabricating
cating fabricating works, mining operations, and shipyards. Fuel
and combustion departments. Supervision of production
operations. Marine engineering assignments in Ship Shipbuilding
building Shipbuilding Department. Also: Sales or Research.
METALLURGICAL ENGlNEElNGMetallurgical de departments
partments departments of steel plants and manufacturing operations.
Engineering and service divisions. Technical and super supervisory
visory supervisory positions in steelmaking departments and rolling
mills. Also: Research or Sales.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Technical and supervisory
positions in coke works, including production of by byproduct
product byproduct chemicals. Fuel and combustion departments,
including responsibility for operation and maintenance
of air and water pollution control equipment. Engineer Engineering
ing Engineering and metallurgical departments. Steelmaking opera operations.
tions. operations. Also: Research or Sales.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING-Positions in steel plants,
fabricating works, shipyards, and mines. Engineering
and maintenance departments. Supervision of steel steelmaking,
making, steelmaking, rolling, manufacturing, and fabricating opera operations.
tions. operations. Also: Sales.
CIVIL ENGINEERING-Fabricated Steel Construction
assignments in engineering, field erection, or works
management. Steel plant, mine, or shipyard assign assignments
ments assignments in engineering, construction, and maintenance.
Supervision of production operations. Sales Department
assignments as line salesman or sales engineer (tech (technical
nical (technical service to architects and engineers).

WHEN YOU SIGN UP be sure to pick up a copy of our booklet, "Careers with Bethlehem Steel and
the Loop Course. It tells it like it is.
BETHLEHEM STEEL fS
An Equal Opportunity Employer L XT J
/ # f ( . ' >

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERINGSteeI plant, fabricating
works, mining operations, and shipyard electrical en engineering,
gineering, engineering, construction, and maintenance departments.
Technical and supervisory positions in large production
operations involving sophisticated electrical and elec electronic
tronic electronic equipment. Also: Research or Sales.
MINING ENGINEERINGOur Mining Department op operates
erates operates coal and iron ore mining operations and lime limestone
stone limestone quarries, many of which are among the most
modem and efficient in the industry. This 10,000-man
activity offers unlimited opportunities to mining en engineers.
gineers. engineers. Also: Research.
NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS
Graduates are urged to inquire about opportunities in
our Shipbuilding Department, including the Central
Technical Division, our design and engineering organi organization.
zation. organization. Also: Traffic.
OTHER TECHNICAL DEGREESEvery year we recruit
loopers with technical degrees other than those listed
above. Seniors enrolled in such curricula are encour encouraged
aged encouraged to sign up for an interview.
ACCOUNTANTSGraduates in accounting or business
administration (24 hours of accounting are preferred)
are recruited for training for supervisory assignments
in our 3,000-man Accounting Department.
OTHER NON-TECHNICAL DEGREES-Graduates with
degrees in liberal arts, business, and the humanities are
invited to discuss opportunities in the Sales Department.
Some non-technical graduates may be chosen to fill
openings in steel plant operations and other departments.

Wednesday, October 8, 1960, The F lor ids Alligator,

Page 15



The Florida Alligator

RANKED TWELFTH BY UPI
Gators Climb Two Rungs In Ratings

NEW YORK (UPI) Ohio
State maintained its superiority
over a dwindling list of major
college powerhouses Tuesday
when the 35-member United
Press International Board of
Coaches voted the powerful
Buckeyes the top team in the
nation for the third consecutive
week.
Ohio State received 33 of the
35 first place votes cast by the
board to amass 346 points and
easily outdistance Texas, which
rose to second. Southern
California, which received the
other two first place
nominations, moved into third
while Penn State dropped to

m eg*
GATORS MOVE UP IN POLL p HIL COPE
... defensive effort prime reason
UPI Football Ratings
NEW YORK (UPI) The United Press International ratings of the
nations leading major college football teams with first place votes and
won-lost-tied record in parentheses. (Third week).

1. Ohio State (33) 346
2. Texas 264
3. Southern California (2) 228
4. Penn State 197
5. Arkansas 174
6. Missouri 151
7. Georgia 134
8 Oklahoma 116
9. Purdue 88
10. UCLA 70
11. Tennessee 61
12. Florida 32
13. Louisiana State 31
14. Notre Dame 15
15. Alabama 14
16. Wyoming 4

Restaurant
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fourth and Arkansas slipped to
fifth in the listing of only 16
teams.
Missouri, an upset victory
over Michigan, jumped into sixth
place with Georgia holding on to
seventh and Oklahoma slipping
to eighth. Purdue was ranked
ninth and UCLA maintained its
no. 10 ranking to compelte the
top 10.
Tennessee received the no. 11
rating, followed by Florida,
Louisiana State and Notre
Dame, taking no. 14 after
dropping out for a week after its
loss to Purdue. Alabama was
ranked 15th and Wyoming, the
only other team to receive a

fcv/Xv/X'ii
im MB;.;-; ;.:.;.;.;/.
yaN^f

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor

Page 16

vote, was listed as 16th and last.
Ohio State blasted
Washington 41-14 to improve its
record to 2-0 and Texas
trounced Navy 56-17 for its
third victory with a loss.
Southern California boosted its
record to 3-0 by downing
Oregon State 31-7 and Penn
State, second last week, fell to
fourth despite its 17-14 victory
over Kansas State, ranked 19th
last week.
Arkansas beat Texas Christian
24-6 and Missouri ripped
Michigan, 11th last week, 40-17.
Georgia was finally scored upon
but still walloped South Carolina
41-16 and Oklahoma had a week
off.
Purdue nipped Stanford 36-35
on last minute passing heroics by
Mike Phipps while UCLA shut
out Northwestern 36-0.
Tennessee trounced Memphis
State 55-16, Florida beat Florida
State 21-6, Louisiana State

W Give it a try!
IB
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MON.-THURS. 6PMIIPM
FRIDAY 6PMMIDNIGHT
SATURDAY 10AM-MIDNIGHT
SUNDAY 2PM4I PM
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N.W. 13th St. Burger Chef

can GET YOUR
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Lead your own life.
Enjoy it.
Dont let life let you down
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ache. headache. Happiness is as far
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Anacin is twice as strong
in the specific pain re reliever
liever reliever doctors recom recommend
mend recommend most as the other
well known extra strength
tablet.
Anacin may not bend
your mind, but it sure will
get your head together.

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, October 8,1968

r tv
SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor

belted Baylor 63-8, Notre Dame
tripped Michigan State 42-28,
Alabama squeezed past
Mississippi 33-32 and Wyoming
downed Colorado State 39-3.
Five coaches from each of the
seven geographical areas of the
nation comprise the UPI ratings
board. Each week they select the
top 10 teams in the nation with
points awarded on a
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis on
votes from first through 10th.
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Booing Hurts Minnesotas Tony Oliva

MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL
(UPI) A dejected Tony Oliva,
sitting in the Minnesota Twins
dressing room, said if the fans
knew how I feel, theyd stop
booing.
Oliva, who committed two
errors, including a wild throw, in
the Twins* 11-2 loss to
Baltimore, explained that I no
can reach because of trouble
with his right arm.
Oliva said he apparently
pulled a muscle in his arm late in
Sundays game.
I tokl Billy 1 wanted to stay
there, he said. He explained he
couldnt reach higher than his
shoulder.
I think I pulled muscle all
over arm, he said.
The rightfielder, who was
booed by the fans after his bad
throw, added, I think these are
not the fans who usually come
in. They dont usually boo like
that.
Manager Billy Martin

Erratic Baseball Playing
Wont Win Championships

ATLANTA (UPI) The
surprising thing about the
Atlanta Braves was not their
collapse in the National League
playoffs but the fact they
made it that far.'
There were exceptions, of
course, but, on the whole, the
Braves pitching, hitting and
fielding were all unpredictable
this past season and thats no
way to win a championship.
One had the feeling at times
that the Braves were doing it
with mirrors and, if this was the
case, the magician was manager
Luman Harris, the one person
who insisted all along that the
Braves would win the Western
Division title.
Harris magic, and his
reputation as a prognosticator,
went sour in the showdown with
the Mets. Luman, when he heard
that Mets manager Gil Hodges
was talking about a three-game
sweep, snorted, Nobodys
gonna beat us three straight.
Offensively no one Can fault
the Braves in the playoffs,
especially Hank Aaron who
homered every day.
After all, when a major league
baseball team scores four or
more runs in a game, it usually
figures to win. The Braves
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confirmed Olivas injury.
Tony had a bad arm, he
said. He hurt it yesterday and
the shots he received wore off
and the arm started hurting me.
The fiery Twins* Manager was
asked why he used Bob Miller,
f* PENNANT
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ip
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averaged five runs and didnt
come close.
The pitching and the defense
were the Braves villians as the
Mets swept 9-5, 11-6 and 74.
The starters were bombed early,
the bullpen had no stoppers and
there were some atrocious plays
in the infield.
But, look back. The Braves
lost eight out of 12 to the Mets
during the regular season and
only broke even with the Giants,
the team they edged out two
days before the season ended.
Only two pitchers,
knuckleballer Phill Neikro
(23-13) and 6-foot-6 Ron Reed
(18-10), had the sort of records
that win titles. Stocky Pat Jarvis,
the Braves ace in 67 and 6B,
barely held his own at 13-11 and
lefty George Stone, who faltered
down the stretch, was only a
notch better at 13-10.
Biggest disappointment on the
Braves mound staff was veteran
Milt Pappas who was plagued by
various ailments and wound up
6-10.
Even at that, the Braves
probably would have won the
West in a romp if they had had
Rico Carty and Hoyt Wilhelm all
season.
Carty, playing only half a

PULLED MUSCLE CAUSES ERRORS

5-5 for the season, as a starter.
Miller, who gave five hits and
three runs, was lifted after 1 2/3
innings.
I had to go to a stopper to
win the pennant this year,
Martin said.
Who was the stopper? Bob
Miller was one of the best with
my club at that time.
When asked why he didnt go
with Jim Kaat, Martin replied
angrily: The world is fuD of
second guessers. If Miller had
gone in and pitched a one-hitter,
it would have been different.
He returned to Oliva.
I told the second baseman to
play as close as possible to Oliva
because of his arm, Martin said.
He said the fans didnt know
he was hurt and if they had
theyd probably have given him
a standing ovation.
Normally he can catch the
ball and throw it, but he had to
run further so he could throw
shorter, Martin said.

season because of a bad shoulder,
hit .342 and was Atlantas big
gun during a sizzling 17-of-21
close. The 46-year-old Wilhelm
joined the Braves on Sept. 6, and
posted two wins and four saves
in his first seven appearances.
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When asked if the Orioles
were aware of Olivas arm, he
said, how the hell would they
know? However, one writer
said rumors had been circulating
around the Orioles dugout that
Olivas arm was bad.
As for the Orioles, Martin
called them one of the better

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American League teams I've
seen.
I always had respect for
them, he said.
But, he added, managing a
slight smile, You have to say
were the greatest Western
Division club you've ever seen,
right?

Page 17



Page 18

if liH IOtIOH y # VrCTODHT Os lfvv

RECORD SET AT 3-0

Trackmen Extend String

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator CovrMpondant
UFs undefeated cross
country team, fresh from
winning the Daytona Beach
Run, traveled all day Sunday to
Charleston, S.C. to hand Baptist
College a 22-37 defeat (low
score wins).
Top man for UF was
freshman distance star Mark Bir

;\ J JjgF .s&.
. wl Ife
F Jp||afc Hr
8
gJHB rngm
|h x v I
TOM KENNEDY
HARRIERS ENVISION SEC TITLE
... down Baptist College, 2237
Coach Rating Board
Includes Charlie Tate

Here by sections are the
coaches who comprise the 1969
UPI ratings board:
EAST
Bob Blackman, Dartmouth;
Tom Cahill, Army; Rick
Forzano, Navy; Ben
Schwartzwalder, Syracuse; Joe
Yukica, Boston College.
MIDLANDS
Bob Devaney, Nebraska; Dan
Devine, Missouri; Chuck
Fairbanks, Oklahoma; Frank
(Pepper) Rodgers, Kansas; Rod
Rust, North Texas State.
SOUTH
Paul Dietzel, South Carolina;
Vince Dooley, Georgia; Frank
Noward, Clemson; Charles Tate,
Miami, Fla.; Johnny Vaught,
Mississippi.

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who covered the 5.1 mile course
in 25:40. He was followed
closely by sophomore Jack
Nason, junior Don Laene and
freshmen A.W. Smith and Benny
Vaughn. Ronnie Nabers and
Greg Collins rounded out the
top seven.
The harriars ran without the
services of team captain John
Parker and senior stalwart Steve
Atkinson, both of whom elected

MIDWEST
Alex Agase, Northwestern;
Duffy Daughterty, Michigan
State; Woody Hayes, Ohio State;
Ara Parseghian, Notre Dame;
Murray Warmath, Minnesota.
PACEFICCOAST
John McKay, Southern
California; Jim Owens,
Washington; Tommy Prothro,
UCLA; John Ralston, Stanford;
Jim Sweeney, Washington St.
ROCKIES
Eddie Crowder, Colorado;
Lloyd Eaton, Wyoming; Tom
Hudspeth, Brigham Young; Mike
Lude, Colorado, St. U.; Ben
Martin, Air Force.
SOUTHWEST
Frank Broyles, Arkansas;
Hayden Fry, SMU; Frank Kush,
Arizona State; Darrell Royal,
Texas; Bill Yoeman, Houston.

not to miss a full day of law
classes.
The overall strength of this
team is amazing, said track
coach Jimmy Hawk Carnes.
This is the first squad weve
had that could afford to have
three or four runners have a bad
race on the same day and still
win.
When we beat Florida State
at Daytona, two of the top seven
finishers were UF runners who
didnt even count in the scoring.
Because of eligibility problems,
they had to run unmatched.
Carnes noted that the team,
though weary from traveling and
racing showed real spirit
against Baptist.
They were tired but not
down. They ate a determined
group. Thoughts of the SEC
championship and a head battle
with Tennesse are always in the
back of their minds, said
Carnes.
The teams schedule is not
hard to follow. The Atlanta Run
next weekend, races every
weekend for two months and, as
one runner put it, a hundred
big ones every week. Miles, that
is.

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UF Coaches Have Reaves Receiving

By JEFF KLINKENBERG
Alligator Correspondent
In a dramatic move, UF
quarterback John Reaves began

\ TitL, wSSm
GATOR DUO ALVAREZ-REAVES
... coaches switch grid roles
UPI Chooses Gators
By 19 y Over Tulane
NEW YORK (UPI) Second-ranked Texas was listed as a
nine-point favorite over eighth-ranked Oklahoma Tuesday for their
nationally televised football game Saturday.
The rest of the top 10 teams are not expected to have much
trouble, however, as Ohio State is a 19%-point choice to retain its top
ranking against Michigan State and no. 3 Southern California is a
9%-point pick over Stanford.
In other games involving the top 10, Penn State (4) is favored by 13
over West Virginia, Arkansas (5) is not quoted against Baylor, Missouri
(6) is favored by 10 over Nebraska, Georgia (7) is picked by five over
Mississippi, Purdue (9) was three over Michigan and UCLA (10) was
19% over Washington State.
In Friday night games, Louisiana State is eight over Miami (Fla.)
and Southern Methodist is seven over Texas Christian.
Elsewhere in major Saturday games, Air Force seven over North
Carolina, Yale 12 over Brown, Wake Forest four over Duke, Indiana
12 over Minnesota, Virginia Tech six over Kentucky, Pittsburgh 3%
over Navy, Notre Dame 14% over Army, Harvard 14 over Columbia,
Princeton 6% over Cornell, Florida 19% over Tulane, Auburn 12%
over Clemson, Colorado five over lowa State, Illinois one over
Northwestern, lowa 10 over Wisconsin, Kansas State 5% over Kansas,
California 10% over Washington, South Carolina three over North
Carolina State, Alabama 14 over Vanderbilt, and Texas Tech 5% over
Texas A&M.
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LINEMEN CATCH PASSES RECEIVERS THROW

catching passes at practice
Monday in preparation for the
Gators game Saturday with
Tulane.
1 dont exactly have the

speed to be a good receiver,
Reaves said. But if I combine
my moves and tenacity...
Reaves laughed.
Those crafty UF coaches have
been at it again, this week, it
seems. The Gators went through
a light workout perhaps a
reward for their 216 victory
over Florida State Saturday
but the coaches did not want the
players to miss their daily
running.
So in a large scale passing
drill* linemen were throwing
passes and catching them, too.
And even Reaves was expected
to run a few patterns.
He handled himself like a
veteran, and he had things going
against him, too.
Charlie Hood, a sophomore
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tailback, was doing the
throwing. Reaves ran out for a
pass. Throw it over his head,
Charlie, someone yelled. A few
observers thought it might have
been one of the receivers that
Reaves had overthrown last
Saturday.
Hood tried to follow the
advice. But Reaves outran the
ball and snagged it easily.
There were quite a few stars.
Sophomore guard David Peek
caught a pass with one hand and
sophomore tight end Bill Dowdy
amazed onlookers with his
powerful throwing arm. He
wasnt particularly accurate, but
he wobbled a few passes nearly
50 yards.
All linemen dream of passing
or catching passes, said Norm

THE NOW SOUNDS OF I
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
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9 PM 'TIL
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Wednesday, Qetotpr 8, WGO* Tha Florida AH Iga tor.

the bottle and Charlie McCarthy. This
album is one hour of many of Fields
famous routines never before recorded.
The famous Snake Story,The Pharmacist,
Promotions Unlimited, The Temperance
Lecture, and the most poisonous of
the famed Fields-McCarthy feuds.
On Columbia Records*

Carlson, the assistant director of
* athletics and head publicity
man. Besides, its a good way
to get the linemen to run.
Theyre running their tails
off and enjoying it..
Offensive guara Donny
Williams enjoyed ji to an
extent. He was one of the prime
receivers for Hood and caught
quite a few passes, too. He also
dropped his share. Well, he
told a teammate afterward, Ive
got to hang up the old passing
game.
It may work out for the best.
When the Gators do play Tulane
at Tampa Stadium, it will be
Williams job to protect Reaves,
who, alas, will be playing
quarterback.
It could be talent wasted.

Page 19



Page 20

l The
WHITE JERSEYS POPULAR
Gators 'Shed The Blues
'. w< *''vt b ; ' i ' HQ'' \ *;* '4 F- - P-

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Amtant Sports Editor
The Gators* shed the Blues after
last years season and changed to
the present white uniforms with
blue numbers and orange
helmets -a new look for a new
breed team with a perfect 3-0
record.
The uniforms certainly have
been making Gator fans happy,
especially when they are on the
backs of players like John
Reaves, Carlos Alvarez, Tommy
Durrance, Mike Rich, Steve
Tannen, Robert Harrell, Jack
Youngblood, David Ghesquiere,
Jimmy Barr, Ted Hager and Mac
Steen to name a few Gators who
have helped to make the
uniforms popular.
We always change uniforms,
Coach Ray Graves said. And
we got the kind of uniforms the
boys Hke.

Auburn Frosh Drop Baby Gators

AUBURN The Baby Tigers
of Auburn completely stopped
Floridas ground game and
waltzed to a 54-13 football

victory over the Baby Gators at
Cliff Hare Statium here Monday
afternoon.
The Tigers jumped to a 38-0
halftime lead as Auburn
freshman signal caller David
Lyon ran 78 yards on a keeper,
Ralph Brock threw 44 yards to
Dave Beck for a score, and Harry
Unger ran 10 yards for the
Tigers 3 quick scores in the first
quarter.
Early in the second quarter,
Purett hit a 35-yard field goal to
push the Baby tiger lead to 24-0.
Before halftime, Auburn
scored twice again making the
score 38-0. Ted Smith scored on
a 29-yard run and Henry Krage
plunged over from 1 yard out.
After Florida kicked to
Auburn, Brock strode again with
a 45 yard TD pass to John
Simmons.
Florida scored last with only a
second on die clock, marching
60 yards in seven (days. Nichol
TIME
The longest word
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By letter count, the longest
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Richard Giannini, assistant
sports publicity director, said
that the coaches went through
all the statistics and found that
|||| : '- jjpt mm
jyl
COLOR ALVAREZ GONE
... uniform colors change

hit five straight passes on the
drive whilorGeorge put the ball
across the goal line on a

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the Gators had better passing
games when wearing the white
jerseys, which the Gators wore
for only away games.
The Gators will wear the same
white jerseys for all games this
year, Graves said.
Quarterback Reaves, who is
one of the Southeastern
Conference leaders in almost
every offensive department, said
that the uniforms are sharp. But
that it doesnt help or hinder
him in finding his receivers in a
crowd.
If I had my choice, Reaves
said, Id have navy pants and
white shirts with orange
numbers.
With a guy like Alvarez
usually wide open and well
ahead of the defensive backs it
doesnt make much difference
what color hes got on, just color
him gone.

two-yard plunge and Eddy
Moore converted for the last
point in the game.

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Mets An Underdog
In World Series
NEW YORK (UPI) The New York Mets, Hsted as 8-5 underdogs
to the Baltimore Orioles for the World Series beginning Saturday,
took a day of rest Tuesday after sweeping the Atlanta Braves in three
games for the National League pennant.
The Mets will work out again at 11 a.m. on Wednesday and are
scheduled to leave for Baltimore Thursday afternoon at 3:30 pjn.
Few of the Mets were eager to make rash predictions about the
forthcoming series, but one who did was Cleon Jones.
I dont think theres any stopping us, said Jones, the Mets
leading hitter who finished the regular season with a .340 batting
average and hit a rousing .429 in the three-game sweep of the Braves.
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