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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
[ BUT POLL WORKERS NEEDED
SG Ejection Slate Complete, Qualifications End

By DON YOKEL
Alligitor Staff Writer
The slate of senate candidates
for the Oct. IS general election
is official as of Monday
provided there are no further
challenges to the candidates for
not meeting election
requirements, Kevin Davey,
Student Government secretary
of interior said.
Filing for senate seats dosed
Thursday at S :30 pjn.
Davey was notified Monday
that seven senate camfidates
statement's of election
qualifications had been purged
by the UF Office of Academic
affairs; errors of fact were found
in statements made by students.
The area in question was the
place of residence of the
candidates. An investigation into
the matter by Davey showed
that Tigert*s records were wrong,
and the students statements
were right.
Everything is okay now. We
dont expect any more problems
' with students satisfying election
requirements,** Davey aid.
An area of concern last week,

Atl AwtiiitUL

Vol 62, No. 14

v.. &drv m v ' '' '' ..' < *5 ' \
ORAnrri
Indoor tree carving? Something like it This is a typical desk, in a
typical room of a typical building at UF. Besides, maybe the course
was boring...

Its Mets Against Orioles In World Series

I Investigation Over HHB I
J Everything is okay now. We dont expect any more I
8 problems with students satisfying election requirements. SSI '}
Kevin Davey 8
| SG Secretary of Interior Jmm 1
I KEVIN DAVEY I

he said, was the registration of
candidates as members of Focus
or First Parties who had not
checked with the leadership of
the parties involved before
registering.
There were about eight of
these students who were purged
by the parties and are no longer
in the race.
SG is now looking for people
to work at the polling places on
election day.

The
Florida Alligator
?
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Jeff Estes, SG's director of
elections, said Monday that he
needs about 80 students to work
at the polls.
We are paying SIJS an hour
for students who want to work
full or part-time during the
election, he said.
Students who are interested in
working for SG during the
election should contact Davey or
Estes at the SG offices in room
305 of tiie Reitz Union.

University of Florida, Gainesville

COMMITTEE RECOMMENDS
Easing Up On Decals
Awaits OConnell OK

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Writer
Traffic and Transportation
Committee Monday passed a
recommendation removing
restrictions concerning
unregistered vehicles on campus
except between the hours of
7:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. The
recommendation is subject to
approval by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
The recommendation will be
effective immediately upon the
presidents approval.
The recommendation will
allow vehicles without decals to
be driven and parked on campus
outside of the restricted hours
and on weekends.
The committee also
immediately dealt with problems
that have arisen with their
resolution.
The number one effect,
said Arnold Butt, chairman, is
that this eliminates the necessity
of a border zone decal, All it
entitles a student to is the

Also, students who will not be
here during the election, can
vote by absentee ballot which is
available at the union and must
be completed and returned to
the secretary of interior by Oct.
10, Estes said.
Students who are vieing for
senate seats this fall, along with
their party affiliation and Irving
area designation, are listed
below:
In Murphree area,

privilege of driving and parking
on campus during the same
hours which are now open to all
vehicles.
The border zone problem was
partially solved by a resolution
to designate the Fraternity Row
area and permanent parking lots
immediately adjacent to it as an
all-decal zone. This area, and
also the wooded lot south of the
Law School would then be
available for students with
border zone decals.
The Law School lot is already
an all-decal zone.
Discussion was brought up on
the question of refunds for
students who do not use the
newly designated facilities.
These are students who
purchased decals for driving on
campus after 3:30.
A decision on refunds to these
students has been delayed.
James Glassbum, mayor of
Flavet 111, brought a resolution
before the committee meeting
concerning the grievances of the
Flavet residents about the
vehicle registration fee.

representing First Party, is
Daniel D. Eckert, Inn Barry and
Richard Maney. Focus Forty
candidates are Rob Teston,
Arthur Heyman, and Brace
Benedictson. George Kent Is
running as an independent hi the
Murphree senate race.
Hume and Graham areas;
Susan Jacobs, Stephen Williams
and Jean Loranger (first). David
Brown, Tom Gibson and Bob
Benin (focus). Culver Spencer
and Edward Collier
(independents).
Broward and Rawlings areas;
Joyce Miller and Debbie Irwin
(first), Cheri Adltinson and
Marion Cohen (focus).
Tolbert area; DJ. Snapp and
Lou Tally (first), Ed Kay lor and
Melanie Graham (focus).
Twin Towers; Mayer Becker
and David Dowling (first),
Barbara Yagman and John
Adams (focus).
Jennings area; Dottie Hamblin
(first), Nancy Kram (focus), and
Rick Dobbins (independent).
Yulee; Ginny Culbertson
(first), and Jan Reese (focus).
Fla vet Village; Ajai Vir Jain
(SEE 'ELECTION' PAGE 2)

Tuesday October 7, 1969

We live on campus and rent
our home from the University.
We cant understand why we
have to pay to park by our
home, said Glassbum.
He argued that many married
students were hardship cases and
could not afford the fee.
In a family situation, a car is
a necessity, he said.
The committee has postponed
any decision on the married
students problem.
The Gator
GATORADE INVENTOR
Cade calls Gator
trademark ownership lawsuit
ridiculous page 2
Classifieds .11
Dropouts 6
Editorials 8
FSU News 2
Letters 9
Movies 11
5p0rt5....... 13
Whats Happening 6



Page 2

.. *.V fi- *"* nvr. % /
V IN Florid. AWfrtor. TiMday, Octobm 7. VHP

Cade Not Contacted About Gatoradeouit

By DAVE OSIER
AMiftor Staff Writer
Dr. Robert Cade, the UF medical research
professor who invented tantalizing thirst-soother
Gatorade, said Monday he has yet to be contacted
about a Board of Regents lawsuft naming him as a
co-defendant with 12 others of Gatorade Trust.
The regents Friday decided to bring suit in
federal court to determine who has the legal rights
to Cade's miracle formula for the controversial
drink.
But, Cade did say he thought it was a ridiculous
contention that UF or the regents or anyone owns
the name Gator *' used on commercial products.
Regent Fred Parker of Tallahassee suggested and
the regents approved that the court also should be
asked for a declaratory decree saying that all rights
to the name be reserved by UF.

Mayor Cites
UF Needs
By JEFF BREIN
Alligator vfiiuav
Concerned about mediocrity
in education, Dade County
Mayor Chuck Hall toured the
UF campus Monday and had
some sharp words of criticism
about the present funding of
Florida universities.
The 51-year-old mayor, now
in his second term in office,
toured the UF campus after a
brief meeting with UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
The Miami Democrat who has
his eye on the next Florida
gubernatorial race, cited what he
calls tiie suffering university.
Hall said, Almost every
faculty member and dean on this
campus complained that they
hadn't the proper funds to
effectively operate their
departments.
This university is suffering,
its just not fair, he said.
Hall called UF the finest
university in the state, and
promised students he would
institute a new source of

AS
nows
from...

ELECTIONS: Tomorrow is election day at Florida State. Students
will vote for some 77 student government seats from among some 160
candidates.
MORATORIUM: Student Body Vice-President Wayne Rebinas
announced Monday that he would assume the position of chairman of
the local Vietnam Moratorium Committee.
Rebinas announced the increased support for the Oct. 15
moratorium by university students, faculty, clergy and various
academic departments.
BOOKSTORE: The Seminole Cooperative Planning Board, a
student-faculty committee which has been investigating the possibility
of establishing a cooperative bookstore on campus, today issued a
statement indicating that it was not satisfied with the universitys
proposals concerning the bookstore operation.
The proposals made earlier this year introduced a five per cent
discount on all textbooks sales and wiped out faculty and staff
discounts.
BONDS: A major problem facing Florida is the financing of
revenue to expand its higher education facilities to provide for
enrollment.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.53 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of paymentsfor any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

TERMS OWNING 'GATOR

jttj
Jg m I 1
Jr IV
'
CHUCK HALL
... UF is suffering"
revenue, specifically for state
universities if he ever became
Florida's governor.
The ex-college professor and
newspaper editor spoke briefly
with a class on American
democracy during the tour
Monday and completed his
afternoon by talking to Student
Government officials and
watching a Gator football
practice.
Hall refuses to say hes
definitely in the race for
governor but remarked, Id be
awful surprised if I didnt run.

jfcpfsu

The name on such products as Gatorade implies
UF's consent or sponsorship of the product, he said
at the board's meeting here Friday.
Parker said this point has serious implications for
the future since Stokely-Van Camp, producers and
marketers of the beverage, has trademarked several
other products with Gator in them.
The regents lawsuit will also name Stokely-Van
Camp as a co-defendant in the case, along with the
Department of Health, Education and Welfare
(HEW), if the U.S. agency decides not to enter as
co-plaintiff with the regents, which is the
department's first choice.
Cade said at least 15 or 16 businesses in
Gainesville use Gator in their names.
More than 500 companies in the entire state also
use the name, the professor added.
Let them go ahead and sue, he said.
Parker contended at the meeting that HEW had
not responded to his pleas for settlement because

Election Slates Announced
By Parties, Residence Areas

||fBOMPA6E OHE^
(first), and Thoman Darby
(focus).
Diamond and Schucht Village;
Daniel Ponce (first), and Pete
Philbrook (focus).
Corry Village; James Magee
(first).
The following are off-campus
First Party candidates: Ronald
Smith, Bruce Pockey, Buzzy
Underhill, Stewart Hershey,
Dave Reddick, Marsha
Madorsky, Steve Campbell, Jay
Howell, Phil Sheehe, Ken
Finns Get Found
HELSINKI ln burglary
cases, Finnish police get their
man more often than any other
police in Europe, according to
Police Chief Fjalar Jarva.
Jarva said statistics show
Finland solves 52.6 per cent of
its burglary cases. Austria was
second with 38.2 per cent.
Holland, Italy, West Germany,
England, France, Sweden and
Denmark solved less than 20 per
cent.
Witnesses
Requested
Anyone who recalls seeing
a student assaulted outside of
Gate 14 after the UF-FSU
football game Saturday,
please contact Lt. Gene
Watson at the University
Police Department.

Thursday, October 9 at 8:00pm
in the Reitz Union Ballroom..admUsion 50<
UnivpXih/ h^.m 0 F n tr ta9 & ,P ra 9. Vogue, Twig, Mr. Anthony's Originals,
RegX, SuSwtt *' Peacock Cherr V' s Silverman's, Geiger's,
Sponsored by the
' ir j Wavmeitz Union^

PIDICULOUS CONTENTION

the regents had not cieareu up its amerences with
Gatorade Trust.
Cade disagreed saying, Parker hasn't requested
HEW to move, if he would maybe they might do
so.**
Parker said he hadn't heard from Gatorade Trust,
of which Cade is a member, in the nearly nine
months since his last real conference with them.*
A patent counsel in Washington, the regent said,
had noted since Gator" was widely identified with
the university, the name on commercial products
implies license.
Cade said Gatorede's reputation has made UF
even more widely known since it came out
nationally.
A member of the medical staff just returning
from Southeast Asia, he said, had spread the
word around when introducing Gatorade to people
there.

Anderson, Mike Davidson, Ralph
Nobo, Robert Shaw, Alfred
Fernandez, John Weyer, Riiss
Calhoun, Jim Commander, Jim
Rdnman, Bill Harrell, Faith
Tulino, Jay Scott, and John
Cosgrove (first).
Focus Party off-campus
candidates are James C. Wallace,
Stephen G. Latiff, Rodney S.
Margol, Ronnie Sachs, David

NSA Controversy
On Senate Agenda

Each member of the Student
Senate has received a copy of
the Report on the 22nd National
Student Association (NSA)
Congress and is expected to be
prepared to discuss it tonight.
There will be further
discussion on an act to repeal all
legislation concerning NSA and
on the NSA charter
disassociation resolution.
Both pieces of legislation were
tabled at last weeks meeting of
September 30 so the senate
could get more information
about NSA.
Student Body Vice President
Walter Morgan attended NSAs
national Congress in August and
has recommended that UF drop
from NSAs membership rolls.
Also on the agenda is the
introduction of a new bill, an
agreement between student
government and Alpha Phi

McGrill, Marvin E. Chavis, R.
Bruce Mitchell, Edward Boze,
Joan Speigel, Amy Fairdoth,
Tom Blackman, Barbara Stahl,
Audrey Smith, Steven Rokeach,
Andy Greenberg, Doug Henson,
Joey Thompson, Larry Green,
Betty Tompkins, Toby
Goldstein, Randy Atwater,
Jimmy McLean, and Skip
Campbell.

Omega service fraternity to
establish a campus book
exchange. This contract would
cover the period from August
15,1969 to August 14,1970.
MNU-FOSTO
CHRISTIAN
SOLDIERS
fc



POVERTY*
i ;.v*'
To Them
A Way
Os Life

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of a series on poverty in
north central Florida. Staffer
Dave Osier interviewed several
poverty-stricken families in that
area while on tour with public
health officials last spring. He
focuses on Gilchrist County as
indicative of rural poverty iii the
area around Gainesville.)
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
Thirty miles west of
Gainesvilles corporate limits, an
area characterized by rapid
urbanization, there lies a rural
poverty pocket, and although it
is not an extensive one,
population wise, the poverty is
hard core, entrenched, as an
integral part of the culture.
Still, the poverty is not
unique. The area apparently is a
model, an unwilling pacesetter, a
representative of whats taking
place in most of rural north
central Florida.
With a declining population of
2,900 in an area of 339 square
miles, Gilchrist County lies in
decay.
Until 1925 it was the western
arm of its present neighbor,
Alachua County. It separated
then, by legislative act. And,
now while Alachua prospers,
Gilchrist faces a test of survival,
for its people, for its economy
and for its very existence.
The county represents the
plight of most of its neighbors in
slash pine and scrub oak
landscaped north Florida: Not
enough people, too much
unfertile land, unsuitable for
crop farming, and no major
industry. Although officially
there are nine inhabitants per
square mile in Gilchrist, most of

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its people crowd into Trenton,
the county seat, which boasts
1,000 residents. Most of the land
remains untended, uncultivated,
except for several tree forests
planted for pulpwood.
There is a boundless
emptiness to the countys
countryside. It passes through
you as your car speeds over the
rolling country landscape. Not a
house, not a person, is in sight.
A few cows and horses graze
casually on vacant, green,
curving fields, not bothering to
glance up at the intruding
visitor. The scene is lonely,
serene.
For all of this lonely vastness,
this serenity of rural Florida,
poverty is not hard to find. Its
products lie obscured from view
just around the bend of a rutted,
sandy country path. The
highway driver passes by
quickly, occasionally wondering
whats at the end of those
winding trails, but seldom
troubling to find out. Its victims
sit on the front porch of a lone
shack in the middle of an
uncultivated field, and live in a
small town Negro slum area,
interlaced by muddy, gutted
clay roads, where, in some places
inhabitated shacks emerge,
overgrown by junglelike vines
and shrubs.
The poverty life is a harsh,
mean one, which plays no
favorites. The family is white. Its
12 members, a widowed mother
and her five younguns plus
her sister and brother-indaws
brood of four, sleep on three
litter scattered beds. Their
four-room tar-papered cypress
clapboard house sits just off a
dusty dirt road near the countys
second largest town, Bell. A
chicken yard outside is the
playground after school for the

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children, aged nine months to 14
years. The house has no
bathroom. The necessities of life
are carried on either in the
near-by woods or in a little-used
ramshackle open-air privy. The
brother-in-law earns the familys
sole income by finding
occasional work hauling lumber
for pulpwood.
No one in the family will say
how much money is taken in,
but the uniform, expressionless
look on the childiens faces says
it quietly. It is the look of
hunger. They do not cry out at
their plight, it is away of life.
One barefooted youngster of
about seven chews a wad of
tobacco, perhaps to quell his
empty pain. Another chases a
hen around the yard, and the

others, dirty-faced and raggedly
clothed, tag along. They play,
they romp, but noticeably, they
do not smile.
Gilchrist County does
subscribe to the U.S.
Department of Agricultures
surplus commidity program.
And, besides offering regular
medical care and home visits, the
countys health department once
a month in Trenton holds a
clinic under the State Board of
Healths Maternal and Infant
Care program (MIC).
This means there is some
relief available for the indigent.
Once or twice a month the
family drives to Trenton to pick
up commodities and attend a
health clinic other than MIC. Its
lucky. Health personnel say

Tuday. October 7,1960, The Florida AMgetor,
* m _ a .4 ... 'y . i'i :

others probably dont make it
for lack of transportation. Even
more may not know about the
health or commodity programs.
In an area as thinly populated
as Gilchrist, communication is
poor, even with school and
home visits by health and USDA
officials.
The average number of people
at a MIC clinic session is 10 to
15 for expecting mothers and 13
to 15 for small children.
We dont want any more
than that, says Mrs. Evelyn
Townsend, the countys chief
health nurse. Thats about as
many as we can handle very
well. We try to hold it down.
(Next: A look at MIC and
health care.)

Photos
By
Tom
Kennedy

Page 3



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, October 7,1969

Page 4

> > 4 f f r ** *
questions &
COfVS&UJTER :
ans we rs*** 3 ** p?; *** -\a

Good News: Well, almost. The
Parking and Transportation
Committee met Monday, and
will meet again next Monday
with several possible major rules
changes up for approval. Well be
pointing out how these changes
could affect you in each of the
answers in todays questions
while we tell you what the rules
are until things change.
Q. Quoted from Tuesdays
Alligator: For unregistered cars
belonging to students, streets of
this campus are verboten. Woe
be the unwily student who has
the audacity to bring his
unregistered auto onto his
campus and is caught. Notice
that nothing is said about the
alumni who bring their
unregistered cars onto our
campus.
All one had to do Saturday
morning was lode out of a dorm
window to see the profusion of
cars parked illegally on this
campus in inconspicuous places
such as the drill field or the grass
in front of Tolbert Area. Ill be
damned if I saw anyone of those
cars ticketed or told to move to
a legal parking area. Instead, I
saw droves of alumni calmly
drive up over the curbs, unload
their well-stocked trunks, and
proceed with their picnics.
Since parking is obviously a
problem on this campus, why
not charge a small fee to use
such areas as the drill field as a
parking lot during football
season? The revenue from this
enterprise could go to lowering
the registration fee for the
students who are allowed to
have cars in this country. Most
likely though, the administration
will close its eyes to this
situation and emphatically
reiterate that there is no such
thing as selective law
enforcement on this campus.
(Whatever happened to Lavon
Gentry?) Mike Rinkel, 2UC.
A. We dont know what
happened to Lavon Gentry.
Remember, we answer parking
questions. o*kay? Now, to get to
the question. First, under rules
changes now before the Parking
and Transportation Committee

FREE PIZZA
Good
October 7 and 8
From The
Bzzaiim
Free 8 Cheese Pizza
With Purchase of
One Pitcher of Beer
8-11 PM
316 S.W. 16th Ave. 376-4521

any car would be allowed to
drive and park on campus,
sticker or no sticker, after traffic
control hours. That change
would, of course, make almost
everything the alumni are now
doing legal. Until such changes
are made, there is another
answer to your question. Briefly,
as weve said in the past, visitors
to this campus are permitted to
park here. This is what is
allowed during football
weekends.
Alumni should not be parking
in the areas you describe and
there is no excuse for their doing
so. However, the tremendous
pressure on police during
football weekends makes it
impossible for them to enforce
all the rules as stricktly as they
desire. Also you might
remember that some day, with a
little bit of luck, you too will be
an alumnus.
Q. 1 have two questions
regarding the parking situation:
t I park in a commuter lot on
campus and understand the
exorbitant parking fee was to
pay for the campus bus system,
which would serve commuters
from the outlying areas.
However, I have been unable to
get on the bus several times; Ive
been turned away because the
bus is filled with dormitory
residents. Whats the purpose of
the buses? Are they for everyone
on campus to use? If so, how
come only those with cars must
pay the fees to support the
system? If the buses are for
commuters, how about issuing
some sort of pass? If for
everyone, how about lowering
our parking fee and letting
everyone else share in supporting
the buses?
In the rules and regulations
booklet given me, I note under
Section 111, Part D, No. 6, that
Designated Student
Government officials will be
eligible for restricted area decal
during his period in office
without paying an additional
fee. What is this!?
I would like to know what
officials names, if possible
have restricted area decals. Are

they not capable of walking like
the rest of us lowly students?
How come they are not treated
as other students and given
eommuter, etc. decals whic
they deserve? And how do they
rate not having to pay the extra
fee, when even the president and
faculty members must pay? Did
Student Government officials
write some of the rules
namely, this one, giving
themselves choice parking
places? They may be busy and
have their meeting, but so does
everyone else. 7EG student.
A. Wow, those are some
questions.
First things first. The buses on
campus are for the use of
everyone. However, it is now an
acknowledged problem that
many people are not paying to
support the bus system and
making good use of it just the
same. Your suggestion that a
pass system be instituted will
probably be studied by the
Parking and Transportation
Commission. In the meantime
Parking and Traffic Coordinator
Lee Burrows tells us that he has
requested one extra bus on the
Blue Route, running full time, to
begin operating this week. He
has also requested an extra bus
for the Orange B Route to be
run during the hours of peak
use.
Currently six buses are
running on campus. This is the
maximum the contract calls for.
If Burrows has his way there will
be a full seven and one half
buses running on campus
before long. You might also be
interested to know that Burrows
is thinking about running a
special bus to the Gainesville
Mall and downtown Gainesville
in the afternoons. This bus ride
would probably cost 25 cents.
Yout" second question has an
answer. The Student
Government officials who are
eligible for restricted area passes
number 18 people. This includes
the president of the student
body, honor court chancellor,
vice president, treasurer, editor
and managing editor of the
Alligator and others holding
major executive offices. If youll
send us your address, well send
you the complete list.
Anyway, contrary to what
you may think, these people
have a lot more to do than
attend a few meetings. The
parking authorities deem it
essential that they have no
trouble getting around campus.

IF YOU ARE AN
ENGINEERING SENIOR...
Each day we challenge
interested in an exciting career our engineers
with excellent opportunity for advancement to find be,,er way *

In fact, we find it rather
surprising that you are upset
because some courtesies have
been extended to fellow
students who represent you.
Considering the fact that these
students are in school, just as
you are, it seems inequitable to
charge them $25 to park whde
serving you. Hence, special
passes have been issued to them
along with the $lO decals they
pay for.
Oh yes, students did have a
part in writing the new parking
and traffic rules. They will have
a part in changing the rules too.
Thats what Student
Government is all about, you
know, students representing
student interest.
Q. I will be graduating and
leaving Florida in December
1969. Will I get a pro-rated
refund on the registration of the
parking fee I paid? Phil
Marcoux and others.
A. No decision has been
reached on this question yet. No
plans had been made to issue
such refunds but the rules may
change. Youll know by the end
of the quarter.
Q. Will the cars
unregistered of those that
park in the lot beside the music
building and adjacent areas to
attend football games be
ticketed? Will my unregistered
car be ticketed if it is parked in
the lot beside the music building
after 5 p.m. the day before the
football game (or any other time
outside of control hours )?
Stanley D. Harris.
Sham*Modeling
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Visitors to campSTforiS
events are allowed to par L
unregistered cars here under the
visitors parking provisions of the
campus parking regulations The
great number of vehic les
entering campus for these events
makes it impossible to issue
these visitors special permits.
Hence, the rules are relaxed
during the few hours before
during, and after the period an
athletic event is in progress
Second, and weve said this
many times before, you cannot
operate a car anywhere on this
campus at any time unless the
car is registered.
chances are that if you park an
unregistered car on campus after
control hours you will be
ticketed. Os course, there is no
guarantee that you will be
caught every time.
Now, if the Parking and
Transportation Committee
approves some proposed
changes, the answers to your
questions will be more to your
liking. Under the proposed
changes anyone could park on
campus with any car not bearing
a sticker at any time after traffic
control hours.
If you have a question about
parking, the Answerman will be
happy to answer it. Send your
question to him c/o The Florida
Alligator, Reitz Union, Campus.
And if you're a commuter
looking for a place to park,
remember that a lot has been
opened for you across from
Tolbert Area on the spot where
the old hanger once stood.
THE SWINGS
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
just $s Thats all it costs for our Special
Introductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
flying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
GAINESVILLE MUNICIPAL
_ AIRPORT
B WALDO ROAD



CIO, Others Protest Student Senate Fund Denial

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last in a series of two articles
on the 1969-70 UF student
body budget and the problems
surrounding it.)
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The list of UF groups denied
funds in the 1969-70 UF student
body budget is a long one, and
Student Government and
Student Senate officials are
hard-put to explain their reasons
for the cutbacks.
The Council of International
Organizations (CIO) is one of
the groups currently protesting
the senates denial of their fund
request.
In a petition submitted at the
senates Sept. 23 meeting, the
group asked for restoration of its
request because its activities,
including International Week
and International Review, are
open to all students on campus
without restriction.
The CIO was denied its
request because it is a special
interest group and its programs
benefit only the members of
that specific group, the Senate
Budget and Finance Committee
contended.
If the bill releasing the
contingency fund is passed by
the senate, there is a Chance the
amount needed for Itemational
Week $ 1270 will be given to
the CIO.
I felt that of all the programs
denied funds, Shepherd said,
one of the most beneficial is
International Week.
Sentiment runs against the
CIO in the senate, Reinman
contended, because they have
the worst reputation of any
organization for financial
dealings with the student body.
The total amount available for
budgeting $293,000 is
approximately the same as last
year, Reinman said, but there
were 17 newly chartered
organizations requesting funds.

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RESTORATION OF INTERNATIONAL WEEK REQUESTED

The total amount requested this
year was $450,000.
We had to cut off $160,000
somewhere, and we had to set
some guidelines, he said.
The committee decided on
two basic guidelines: student
fees should be used for those
programs which offer activities
and/or services which extend to
the entire student body and the
application of the guidelines
should be consistent.
Some of the areas the
committee refused to fund are:
out-of-state trips.
Seminole pictures.
meals and food of any
kind.
0 miscellaneous requests.
Our main goal was
consistency, former Senate
Majority Leader Marc H. Click
said. If we were inconsistent at
all, it was in funding the Billy
Mitchell Drill Team and the
Gator Guard.
A subjective decision had to
be made at this point, he said,
and we can justify it.
These two groups represent
the UF to the taxpayers of the
state, he said.
Course and Teacher
Evaluation received a larger
amount in funds this year,
because of an expanded program
which includes a booklet
evaluating the program.
It was the feeling of the
senate, Reinman said, that
without the booklet, the other
$7,000 we spend on them would
be worthless.
The Florida Coed, an
introductory booklet for
freshman girls was eliminated
from the Association of Women
Students (AWS) budget. It has
been used to explain the nearly
non-existent freshman
restrictions such as dress code
and curfews.
Its now a useless
publication, Reinman said,
AWS couldnt justify its
existence, and neither could
we.

1 DEPTH I
REPORT |
| 1
?..>>>v.x.;v;vX'Xv/A*Awivli'.vS
The trip was made last
February by then Student Body
President Clyde Taylor, then
Treasurer Phil Burnett, IFC
President Steve Zack, SG
Productions Director Alan
Howes, then Director Lee Terry
and IFC Treasurer Miles Wilkins.
Zack, Terry and Wilkins were
funded through IFC, but SG
provided $504 for the rest.
The prupose of the trip was
listed as a booking trip for the
year 1969-70.
I can only speak for IFC as
to the necessity for the trip,
Zack said.
As president, Zack had to sign
the final agreements, Wilkins was
financially responsible for the
bookings and Terry helped in
finding acts, Zack said.
Another trip was made this
August by Click and Howes. SG
provided them with $212 plane
fare and $6 a day for hotel
expenses, or a total of $248.
The purpose of this extra trip,
Howes said, was specifically to
book Hair.
We mailed out
questionnaires, took two polls
and ran clip-out coupons in the
Alligator asking for students
opinions, Howes said. The
response was overwhelming, so
we felt the trip was warranted.
The budget provides for two
delegates to be sent to New

( NEXT EPISOPE OF yEAH.w HERE AM I ? ]§|Bf||j
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Sm. probably workimg av> q yw ke not anywhere
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HOW CAN YOU BE IN TWO PLACES

York next year at a cost of
S2BB.
Two Florida Blue Key
programs, Dialogue and the
Second 100 Series, were
eliminated from the budget tliis
year. Neither of these was a
success, Reinman said.
Project Surge, a statewide
student lobbyist movement, was
also left without funds this year
at the suggestion of former
Student Body Vice President
Charles Harris, originator of the

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movement.
Surge is still in the
organizational state, Reinman
said, and they dont yet need the
money to hire a lobbyist.
The senate is asking that
tentative budget requests for
1970-71 be submitted by Oct.
24, instead of in the spring
quarter.
We hope to get the budget
worked out before next
summer, Reinman said.

Page 5



>, the Fkjrida AHigaior, Tuesday,'October 7, 1969

Page 6

M| V'/ f C ** *' * *' *
Requests Due
For Transfer
Transfer students from lower
to upper division, from one
undergraduate college to another
or to the Graduate School will
receive applications in the mail
shortly. Those wishing to make
the change and not receiving the
form can report to room 33,
Tigert Hall and fill out an
application. Deadline is Oct. 16.

Former Army Provost Marshall
Charged In Stolen Gun Sales

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
former Army provost marshal
obtained hundreds of
confiscated firearms from police
departments in Kansas City and
Chicago and sold them for
personal profit, a Senate
investigator charged Monday.
Lt. Paul Duellman of the
Chicago Police Department
testified that Maj. Gen. Carl C.
Turner even arranged to obtain
some of the guns while he was in

WHATS
HAPPENING
By BRENDA ftC CBT7
WAY DOWN, BENEATH THE COPY: Getting into the spirit of the
Donovan show, this staff writer makes a gallant appeal to all you
slightly mellow yellow (ugh!) publicity people. Yes, I mean all of you
people responsible for promoting your organization. So you dont
trust a free deal, eh? Okay, go ahead and dont send in your news
releases this reporter would rather write than fight (double ugh this
time).
NO PUSSYFOOTERS PUSSYFOOTING: Fall fashion models will
be escorted by Graves best in the seasons top performance. Catch the
Fashion Zodiac this Thursday at 8 p.m. in the Reitz Union Ballroom.
OOPS: Right day, wrong week. The Hillel sponsored Teach-In on
the plight of Soviet Jewry is scheduled for this Thursday night at the
Hillel center, beginning at 8.
Communist Black Militant
Holds Disputed Class Anyway

LOS ANGELES (UPI)
Angela Davis, UCLA assistant
philosophy professor, a blade
militant, and an admitted
Communist, went ahead with a
lecture on black literature
Monday despite a ruling that no
students attending will get
credit.

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Chicago to command federal
troops called there during last
years civil disturbances.
Duellman said Turner, now
retired as the Armys top
policeman, came to the station
in full uniform to request
confiscated firearms for police
museums in Washington and for
training of U.S. Army personnel.
The guns were placed on a
large table, Duellman said, and
the general would select which

There were 161 students
signed up for Recurring
Philosophical Themes in Black
Literature, but well over 1,000
persons were seated in UCLAs
largest auditorium when the
miniskirted Miss Davis, 25,
walked onto the stage.

ones he wanted. We thought
they would be turned over for
training purposes.
As Army provost marshal,
Turner commanded the troops
called to Chicago in April, 1968,
to quell the disturbances
following the assassination of
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
Phillip R. Manuel, staff
member of the Senate
investigations subcommittee
which is conducting a probe into
alleged service club scandals,
charged that Turner sold the
weapons instead of taking them
back to Washington.
Manuel said Turner took some
of the confiscated weapons
normally they would have been
destroyed and sold them to a
gun dealer in North Carolina.
Turner retired from the Army
and was chief of U.S. marshals
with the Justice Department
until recently when he resigned
as a result of the service club
investigations.
An Army investigator last
week said Turner may have had
some personal involvement in
the 1967 attempt by Sgt. Maj.
William O. Wooldridge, prime
target of the probe, to smuggle
several cases of liquor from
Vietnam to the United States
aboard Gen. Creighton W.
Abrams plane.

slfe.. i -, v K; V-.
; Kv BKfarv. v*fi§|S:
m. ll< atf hUH!wI il ''
What else is there to say ?
Donovan in Concert
Friday October 10, in the Florida Gym
Two shows: 7pm and 9:30 Tickets $2.50 and $4.00
0n Sale "sponTred'h S*'? Uni n B X office & the R *> Bar.
P ored by Student Government Productions

BY HOWARD POST
* 'q*
/probably) j,
c t*t k u.*4 **i** *. '**
UCC STUDENTS:
Good times with Jean Hardy and
Dan Beardsley at these times and
places:
Tues 6PM at the College Inn
Wed Noon at Reitz Union Cafeteria
and 10PM at Anthony's (921 W.Univ)
STUDENT INSURANCE
ENROLL NOW!
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Student and Spouse premium $41.75
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Student and Children $41.75
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You May Pick Up Brochures And Enrollment Forms
From The Places Listed Below Or Mail Them To
McGriff-Scarborough & Assoc.
McGriffScarborough & Associates
115 NE 6th Ave. Ph. 376-8393



Education Is His No. 1 Concern

ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Features Editor
From student to professor to administrator, education has been the
new UF executive vice presidents most serious concern for the major
part of his 67 years.
Dean of the UF graduate school for 18 years until he retired last
year, Dr. Linten E. Grinter said the responsibilities of the executive
vice president are not entirely definable. It depends upon the
university president and the background of the individual.
Grinter is particularly concerned about governmental involvement
in higher education.
Financial support always brings influence. The influence of the
federal government on the undergraduate level could indicate the
direction of thought. This is less possible on the graduate level because
the studies are more specialized, and the students are more mature,
more politically aware and more independent.
Grinter favors the states assuming financial responsibility for
undergraduate programs because the state is closer to the people.
You get immediate viewpoints from the people themselves and from
local and county governments.
In Washington the beaurocracy is larger and more imperial. An
f PROFILE
idea can be more influential if it comes directly from the government
than if it comes from 50 individual states. They all dont think alike.
The new executive vice president sees the UF as a university which
is rapidly expanding its academic scope.
The UF started a land grant school. Its first emphasis was
agriculture and engineering but it has been broadening continuously
for 35 years, Grinter said.
From the original studies of"engineering and agriculture, Grinter
explained, UF introduced the biological and physical sciences. The
social sciences followed and the humanities came along last.
Even though his own background is heavily entrenched in
engineering, Grinter advocates a good academic balance of humanities
for the students of sciences.
I dont believe you can have a strong institution until you have
strong departments in the social sciences and humanities they are
essential to society.
Grinter said contrary to the popular conception of engineers and
scientists in general, during his time in the UF graduate school he
found that faculty committees of scientists were more willing to vote
money to the humanities than the professors of humanities were
willing to vote for themselves
Each group is impressed with what its opposition does with its
funds,
Grinter said that national agencies are slowly granting more funds
to the humanities and social sciences are receiving more financial
support for research than they ever have before. But sciences still rank
highest in monies allocated for research.
Topped with longish, straight-back silver-white hair, with roundish
gold-framed glasses on his nose, smartly dressed in a cocoa-brown suit
with a baby-blue shirt, 6 foot 3 inch Grinter seems neither the
prototype university professor nor politico administrator.
He received his B.S. in engineering in 1923 from the University of
Kansas and his M.S. and PhD. from the University of Illinois in 1924
and 1926 respectively. Grinter worked as an engineer for the
Standard Oil Company, taught civil engineering and mechanics and
was vice president of the graduate school of Illinois Institute of
Technology before becoming dean of the UF grad school in 1952. He
has written seven bodes and scores of articles in his field.
WHOS WHO
and
HALL Os FAME
applications
due
October 10, 500 pm
applications may bo picked up
and turned in at
Student Publications
Room 330 J.W. Reitz Union

EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT GRINTER

In January of last year he assumed the position of executive vice
president, having been asked by UF President Stephen C. OConnell to
serve until a much younger man is chosen one about 40-45.
Reading, writing and math and history are Grinters main interests.
I took one summer off and took four advanced practical math
courses just for fun. And I read a lot of history. I dont see how
anyone can work in the present until he understands the problems of
the past, he said.
When another man is found to fill the office of executive vice
president, Grinter plans to go into fulltime consultant work. He has
already been appointed chairman of the National Society for
Engineering Education of the National Science Foundation for the
next three years.

Prexys Have
Fee Powers
University presidents now
have the authority to collect
fees and charges deemed
necessary and appropriate in the
operation of the university.
These fees include library
fines, testing fees and fines for
lost ID cards.
In the past, the Board of
Regents had permitted, though
not in writing, the university
presidents to assess fees and
service charges when fees are not
specifically established by the
Legislature or the Board of
Regents.

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DR. L.E. 6RINTER
... retired dean

Page 7



Page 8

t, Th Florida AtlHptor, Tuday, October 7,1969

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
R flu l am > rez Dave Doucette
Editor-In-Chief Managing Editor
VM.
A m Carol Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
'S' Executive Editor News Editor
Jk i/hAUM
; y v Staff Writings


:
* : :
Weird Copy


V !

V \
V !
*. :
*.

By Neal Sanders** ;:
A day in the life.
One of the better points of being assignments editor for the
Alligator is the once a week job of going through JM 301 stories.
JM 301 students, or, if you will, elementary reporting students,
turn in some weird copy, but the leads take it all.
Such as:
Im tired of standing around waiting to be raped,said Sue White,
freshman advisor at Broward Hall.
First sprouting wings in 1952 at the University of Omaha, Angel
flight, then called The Sponsor Corps, has spread out in all four
directions.
Contrary to popular beliefs, the Plaza of the Americas is neither
morally or physically hazardous to the students of this university.
Enough? The 301 student still has compassion for his news source,
and attempts to see everthing in that light. The results are amazing.
Overcrowding in campus dormitories has been at least a temporary
condition here on campus for several years.
We will be an exciting team, but very young and inexperienced.
Would you believe there is a campus cop who doesnt like to be
called to duty at panty raids because he sympathizes with the
students?
Sometimes, the leads can be misleading.
The history of the alligator as a UF tradition dates bade seven
years ago when the first alligator was brought here from Silver
Springs.
Some 301 students are real crusaders.
October. The month when millions of people will honor
Christopher Columbus for his discovery of America. The month when
millions trick-or-treat on Halloween night. The month when few
students will vote in fall elections.
Some students just make a gallant effort, at livening up a dead story.
63,000 people will view one of the most exciting games of the
college football season at Florida Field Saturday afternoon. A crew of
900 employees of the athletic department will cater to the hunger and
thirst of these fans.
Later on in the quarter, the stories will get better, and Sunday
afternoon cut sessions will become tedious chores of sifting out which
stories will appear in the paper.
But then, theres always next quarter.
f -if 'iWm >, ;i \
Vs ;; ifi I
jk* |iv

EDITORIAL ; 5 : r i
Three Months Os NSA:
Lets Get Out Now!

Barely three months ago. a Student
Senate made up tor the most part ot
non-elected summer replacements chose to
have Student Government join the National
Student Association.
The move was initiated by Student Body
President Charles Shepherd and engineered
by then Senate Majority Leader Marc Glick.
In the process of joining NSA for one-year
trial period, the senate:
9 Shoved aside a 1968 referendum in
which the student body rejected a proposal
to join NSA by a 2-1 vote.
9 Ignored the protests of scores of
concerned students who were not given a
chance to express their opposition on the
Senate floor.
9 Refused to put the matter upto another
campus wide vote because of a lack of
time.
9 Audaciously disregarded all dissenting
views by discussing the matter for less than
20 minutes before railroading it through.
The main reason offered by Shepherd and
his cohorts for joining NSA was that SG
would get a better look at that organization
from the inside.
We have nothing to lose by joining,
Shepherd said at the time. By a vote, we
can disassociate from any resolutions they
pass.
Now, scarcely three months later.
Shepherd has changed his mind. And he is
asking for that vote of disassociation.
His reasons?

Deadline

Reapportion Senate

Student Senate elections are
just over a week away and as the
campaigning picks up many
people will be screaming about
the bloc voting and the apathy
of students who live off campus.
As it concerns the Student
Senate these two problems are
related. This election will elect
half of the Senate on the basis of
residential areas, which includes
dorm areas and off campus.
Fraternities and sororities are
not included as a separate area
because they are included in
off campus.
Although a majority of UFs
fraternities and sororities are
located on university property,
their residents vote in off
campus precincts.
Fraternities and sororities do
help Student Government and
student activities function, and
in most cases do credible jobs,
despite what many of their
critics think.
But when grouped for
elections with off campus
residents they all but cancel out
any hppe of representation for
the students who live off
campus.
Several years ago a plan for
reapportionment of the Student
Senate to separate students
living in fraternity and sorority
houses from off campus
residents was suggested, but died
a political death.
The best way for this
discrepancy to be repaired is to
separate fraternities and
sororities from other off campus
residents.

This would mean that
students who live in fraternity
and sorority houses would be
voting for and represented by
other students who live in
fraternity and sorority houses.
Likewise, students who live off
campus would be voting for and
represented by other off campus
students.
As it is now, many of the off
campus seats in the Senate are
filled by people who live in
fraternity and sorority houses.
This suggestion is not
foolproof, but it would be better
than the current apportionment,
and perhaps would help get
many of the apathetic students
living off campus interested in
Student Government.
* *
WHATEVER THE
REASONING behind most
students getting dressed up for
football games is, a game played
in weather like the FSU game or

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey Janie Gould
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant Assignment Editor
Helen Huntley Anne Freedman
Assistant News Editor Feature Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business,. Advertising offices in Room 330. Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1 683. \
Pii? n on s. ** *** la the Florida Alligator are those of the dHon
f of th< ***** * he article and not those of the University of Florida.

We have suddenly found out that NSA
isnt worth it.
The cost?
More than SIBOO was spent in sending six
delegates to the NSA national convention in
El Paso, Texas.
Interestingly enough. Shepherd doesnt
really know much more about NSA now
than before he rammed his proposal through
three months ago. w
Shepherd himself had attended NSA
national convention two years ago during his
first term as student body president.
A year ago, SG again sent two student
observers to another NSA national
convention.
Both delegations of observers returned
with the same feeling: NSA -a
disorganized, inefficient and nearly
powerless body has little to offer to the
UF student body. The organization has great
potential wasted by its lack of direction
and responsible student leadership.
Now, suddenly, Shepherd has discovered
that NSA is indeed not worth the effort.
Three months, and SIBOO later, he wants
out.
We agree. Lets get out.
We dont feel the students here want any
part of NSA. But, just to make certain, we
challenge the student senate to place the
matter on a ballot and let those who should
have made the decision in the first place say
the last word: The Student Body.

By Dave Doucette

last years Georgia game destroys
most of it.
In the future, why couldnt
grubby clothes be considered
fashionable wear to rainy
football games?
It would cut down on
cleaning bills the next week.
* *
DONT LET ANYONE tell
you that students at FSU are
friendlier than UF students.
While several editors were in
Tallahassee to deliver several
thousand copies of Fridays
Alligator on their campus, we
spent some time walking across
the campus during a break
between classes.
Few people would
acknowledge a friendly greeting,
let alone look you in the eye as
they passed on the street.
Perhaps they really arent that
unfriendly, but were preparing
for the gloom they felt after
Saturdays game.



War Editorial One-Sided

MR. EDITOR:
Re your editorial in todays
issue of the Alligator, End The
War, it is probably a good thing
for ideas to be exchanged, as
you finally endorsed, but why
cant you be more objective and
accurate in your presentation of
the facts?
Look at your beginning
facts. In the second
paragraph, why didnt you add,
and cannot afford to lose?
In your third paragraph, to
say that the NLF controls 80%
of the country and two-thirds of
the people is absurd. About
one-fourth of the country or less
is under communist control and
over t one-third is under the
control of the South Vietnamese
government the rest is a
gray area where neither side is
strong enough to control it full
time. The ratio of the people is
about the same as the real estate.
In the fourth paragraph it
must be conceded that there is

With All Due Respect...
WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY l
OWLIMO ORCEN. KENTUCKY J
Sptrabr 30, 1969 :
Mr. Editor: ;
Horvwlth la mj thoughtfully oonaldarad reply to Audrey ;
; Walls's lsttsr of September 24: l
vmsm
! Thank you,
J Sm mu :
Dannls Anson
\ . . '...........
Come Now, Idealists
MR. EDITOR:
About that editorial (?), End The War (October Ist Alligator).
The first sentence was a statement of fact. The Vietnam war still
drags on. From there downward you proceeded to give a biased,
unsupported appeal for a disruptive, irrational campus activity which
you should be attempting to discourage.
I suggest that if your objective is to convince the students of this
university that they should abandon their normal studies on October
15th and strike the entire campus on November 14th, you should
consider advising them of what gains they might anticipate from these
actions which would contribute to their current or future well being,
or even in fact, the general welfare of society.
If you will publish the names and telephone numbers the
bonafide members of that philanthropic organization, The
Student Mobilization Committee, perhaps those of us that are
unenlightened as to their objectives and means to be used for attaining
them, could get (pardon the expression) straight answers to our
questions as to why we should join in this movement which you imply
will be to our everlasting benefit.
What are their objectives? To disrupt the normal operations of the
universtiy? To bring our boys home. Come now, are we to believe
that the members of the committee have a deep feeling for our
boys? Watch it Buster. Let those among us who do not want to be
drafted have the courage to freely admit that this is their primary (and
possibly secondary) motive for being against the war in Vietnam. Why
try to convince yourself that some lofty, idealistic motive or
paternalistic feeling for the uniformed masses drives you to these
disruptive acts?
Your editorial exhorted the Student Body President, Mr. Charles
Shepherd to join in this movement. Mr. Shepherd, please do not join
in with the conspiracy of the few. Surely there are numerous vali
objective and rational issues which the students might become
involved in under your leadership.
Before you endorse the actions of the current committee ask t e
editor of the Alligator to connect up objectives of the current
campaign with the objectives of the students of this university which
you were elected to lead.
Suggest to him that he use an objective value system that can be
fully explained and supported without resorting to genera ties,
half-truths and emotionally charged arguments.
EDWIN A. WOOD, 7BA

some corruptness and
undemocraticness in the current
government, but it is certainly
not utterly so. You take far
too much literary license.
In the fifth paragraph no
misconduct has been proven on
the part of the Green Berets and
there can be little doubt that,
were the whole truth to come
out, whatever action was taken
by the Green Berets was
completely justified. Not that
many career men and officers
would do otherwise.
In the sixth paragraph you
speak of how bad the effects are
of defoliation to children,
pregnant women, and lactating
women. How can you possibly
equate this with the effect of
grenades and rifle fire on all
types of men, women, and
children attempting to use
roadways with foliage coming up
to the edge.
It appears, gentlemen, that
you are opinionated and that
you care to present or consider

only the facts which support
only your own thesis. It is really
a laugh to see so many arm-chair
generals and politicians barely, if
quiet, old enough to vote yell
Peace and End the War as if
some good fairy could just wave
a magic wand and make it so.
I can assure you, from
first-hand experience, that no
one wants peace or an end to the
war more than the soldiers and
Marines who are and have been
on the front lines in South
Vietnam but only when we
can be withdrawn under
honorable conditions and there
can be reasonable assurance that
the Viet Cong and North
Vietnamese troops will not move
into the vacuum and slaughter
more people than Hitler ever
dreamed of. And thats pretty
hard on children, pregnant
women, and lactating women
too.
PAT MORGAN, 6BA
Adduct
VIMMt
There is no hope
for the complacent man

Nixon Will Hear Our Protest

MR. EDITOR:
Four years have elapsed since President Johnson
signed the Gulf of Tonkin Resolution and began
to commit large scale combat forces to the war in
Vietnam. To date, we have lost 35,000 men, and the
list of wounded has grown to exceed 210,000
making Vietnam the third most costly war in terms
of lives lost and the second in terms of wounded.
We have spent in excess of 80 billion dollars, not
counting the 2.6 billion that helped the French in
their war or the disastrous effects for the U.S.
economy. All this, and more, incalculably more, in
support of a military oligarchy which, in the words
of Senator Albert Gore, muzzles folk singers who
sing of peace, which shuts down newspapers which
dare to suggest talks with the N.L.F., which locks
up Buddhist priests and politicians who have the
audicity to call for peace.
A year and five months have gone by since
President Johnson announced his withdrawal from
the Presidential race and de-escalated the war in a
move that was largely precipitated by his

B> 1 /tin A
HI' ml I TMB \ i I
I IV T I Lp/
h I % h < ~I y
Sal I TB'T ftyil 4f m\i I
... /o say that the NLF controls 80% of the country and
two-thirds of the people is absurd. About one-fourth of the
country or less is under communist control and over
one-third is under s the control of the South Vietnamese
government the rest is a "gray area where neither side is
strong enough to control it full time.

* i
Tuesday, October 7, 1960, The Florida Alligator,

humiliating defeat in the New Hampshire primary at
the hands of Senator Eugene McCarthy and his
youthful legions. If one reads the rhetoric only aad
omits the names, it is difficult to know that LBJ is
not if command still.
Approximately two weeks from today, Americas
college youth will be called upon once again to
demonstrate and articulate their demands that the
troops be brought home NOW. Not by the end of
1971 or some other hypothetical date, but NOW!!
Time means the lives of more young Americans
(about 150-200/week as of late) and their deaths
will be shrouded in the meaningless words of
politicians.
If President Nixon has managed to retain even Hie
slightest capacity for moral judgement during die
course of a particularly de-humanizing political
career, he cannot avoid hearing and considering our
colective voice of protest. The participation of
students, faculty, and (sic) administrators in the
October 15th Moritorium will help to make the
voice heard. Its a long way to the White House.
RUSSELL TAYLOR, 3AS

Page 9



V Tito Florida ftWpor,.Ttmday, 0*66*7; 1996
Ofc. .mm-*

Page 10

FOOTBALL TICKETS
October 6,1969
MEMORANDUM:
FROM: Lee Greene
Secretary of Athletics
RE: Football Seating for Homecoming
STUDENT BODY STATUTES: 51007.31 (I),
A 10% increase in total number of tickets over the largest previous request shall be the maximum
allotment for Homecoming for any one organization/*
Accordingly, utilizing the FSU game as a base, the numbers listed here represent the total number of Seats available to a particular organization, inclusive of date
tickets. (The rotation order is posted to the left of the organization.)
There are 6,500 date tickets allotted for Homecoming. 60% (3914) go to group seating; 40% (2586) go to the windows for general distribution. Date tickets
allotted for group seating are divided among the blocs on a strict ratio basis. At windows, the tickets are placed on a strict first come, first serve basis.
As there will be a card section for the Homecoming game in which law students, medical students, and married villages will sit, a reduction in size has been
made in the overflow blocs for these groups.
The number of date tickets for Vandy and Kentucky will be 4,000. The bloc groups will return to their regular size for these games.
Homecoming Dates
Bloc
Fee cards in Wednesday, October 8 GATE 13
Tickets picked-up by Friday, October 10
Be sure you have an appointment to turn in your cards and to pick up your tickets. If you do not, please
call 3924)656 and set up an appointment,
Window Tickets
10 Windows will be open:
Monday, October 13 2:30 PM. 8:00 P.M.
Tuesday, October 14 1:00 P.M. 8:00 P.M.

. ... ....... X .. _ . .
LIVING AREA BLOCK No. 1
* '" C
1. Tolbert 330, including 86 date tickets
2. Schucht 75 20
3. Jennings 220 57
4. Flavet 200 52
5. Diamond 75 20
6. Murphree 395 103
7. Hume 330 85
8. Graham 3 30 86
9. Scholarship House 30 8
10. Corry 100 26
11. Towers 220 57
12. Yulee 220 57
Card Section (New Area) 1300 338
ORGANIZATIONS BLOCK No. 2
1. Lutheran Student Association 60, including 16 date tickets
2. American Pharmaceutical Assn. 55 14
3. Am. Institute of Chem. Eng. 55 14
4. Sigma Pi Sigma 90 23
5. Poultry Science 70 18
6. Ag. Economics 50 13
7. Inter-Vanity Christian 40 10
8. American Nuclear 88 23
9. Florida Playen 100 26
10. Baptist Student Center 130 34
11. Medical Students 220 57
12. Student Assn, for Health and P.E. 154 40
13. Protestant Univ. Movement 60 16
14. Forestry Club 88 23
15. UF Veterans Club 96 25
16. Law School 350 91
17. Newel Entomological Society 66 17
18. Delta Sigma Pi 88 23 *
19. Luso-Brazflian Club 33 9 **
20. Meat Glee Club 88 23
21. Benton Counci 660 172
22. Afro-American Student Assn. no 29
23. Scabbard it Blade 44 11
24. MBAClub 110 29
25. University Fellowship 22 6
26. Gamma Theta Epsilon 66 17
27. B'nairith 60 16 M
28. Latin American Club 80 21
29. Contiacton & Bulden 110 29
30. Circle K 88 23
31. Catholic Students 242 63
32. Phi Alpha Theta 50 13
33. Collegiate Living Organization 88 23
34. Vegetable Crops Round Table 40 10
35. Georgia Seagte 120 31
36. Alpha Chi Sigma 88 23 **
37. Student PubHcations 55 14
38. Campus Advance 60 16 M
39. ALA 110 29
40. Stu. Ann. for Health & Hosp.
Administration 60 16 *
41. Alpha Kappa Pii 88 ** 23
42. Endogenous Rhythems 40 10 '*

IFC BLOCK A BLOCK No. 3
1. Phi Gamma Delta 275, including 72 date tickets
2. Sigma Chi 330 86
3. Sigma Alpha Epsilon 300 78
4. Pi Kappa Alpha 420 109
5. Tau Kappa Epsilon 155 40
6. Sigma Phi Epsilon 275 72
7. Phi Kappa Tau 285 74
8. Sigma Nu 265 69
9. Theta Chi 200 52
10. Tau Epsilon Phi 440 114
11. Phi Kappa Psi 65 17
12. Pi Lambda Phi 285 74
13. Pi Kappa Phi 240 62
IFC BLOCK B BLOCK No. 4
1. Alpha Gamma Rho 132, including 34 date tickets
2. Lambda Chi 286 74
3. Kappa Alpha 286 74
4. Beta Theta Pi 297 77
5. Delta Chi 275 72
6. Delta Sigma Phi 154 40
7. Kappa Sigma 194 50
8. Delta Tau Delta 264 69
9. Phi Delta Theta 363 94
10. Alpha Epsilon Pi 330 86
11. Delta UpsQon 220 57
12. Alpha Tau Omega 396 103
13. Chi Phi 230 60 **



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
For sale two Lambretta motor
scooters with trailer best offer. Call
after 1:30 378-8517. (A-st-10-p)
SPECIAL ON OFFICE
EQUIPMENT. Limited time only.
Clean, adjust, lubercate & install new
ribbon, back to you in two days.
Hand adding machines $17.50.
Electric adding machines $27.50.
Portable typewriters $12.50.
Standard size typwriters $22.50. DO
IT NOW A SAVE. JR Office
Furniture A Equipment Co. Call
376-1146. (A-BMO-C)
GunsGunsGuns Inventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
GERTS a gay girl ready for a whirl
after cleaning carpets with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-It-14-p)
Want a hot board, but can't afford?
My own design. 72'* 18" wide
spooned flat bottem 2 Call
373-2237. (A-14-3t-p)
YASHICA D 2V* tlr camera leather
case and many accessories. Great
working condition. SSO. Price firm.
Call Bob at 378-7479. (A-14-st-p)
Unused set of bar-bells, still in
original wrapping $25; Bahama Bed
Couch, 2 mons. old S4O; Bath Rm.
carpet A matching curtains $10; call
after 6pm, 378-0935. (A-14-3t-p)
Montgomery Ward 2.3 cu ft. refrig,
walnut finish. Excellent condition.
Used three months. 372-6463. Call
between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m.
(A-14-St-p)
For an out-of-sight light show on
stage or in your apt. now available
Color Organs, Strobe lights from $25
and $45 New 376-2389. Student.
(A-14-3t-p)
1964 Rambler American, R/H,
Standard, Ex. Condition, Many
things new A extras. Very economic.
$450 or best offer. Call Mukherjee:
378-3876. (A-st-11-p)
69 Honda 50 almost new 600 actual
miles including helmet and glasses
only $175. CaH 376-6061 after 5.
(A-st-12-p)
5-string banjo, Gibson mastertone
rb-250, S2OO firm, includes case. Call
372-3947 between 5+7p.m.; also
Bultaco 125 cc Race Cycle $350.
Really. These month old pups are
beauties. Three still need to find
good homes. Ma and Pa are both
handsome dogs. Call 378-0118. Free
(A-st-12-p)
Schnauzer miniature male 4 months
shots wormed 11 generations of
champions AKC ideal pet and
watchdog Sacrifice this adorable pet
for $125.00 or best offer 378-3606.
(A-st-12-p)
Very good Royal office typewriter.
Very durable, nice print $40.00
Phone 378-9498 after 4:30.
(A-3t-12-p)
Trialer 10x48 + cabana-studio
attached in all student park. AC,
furnished $1750. 376-2184 eves.
(A-10t-12-p)
Harley-Davidson "Sprint 2Socc with
book rack + 2 helmets only 7,000
miles $375. Call Ken Moore
378-9376. (A-3t-12-p)
For sale Honda 50 only 3200 mi. In
excellent condition can go 50 mph
(downhill) call 373-2563 for
SIOO.OO. (A-st-12-p)
Honda 90 Excellent student
transportation with helmet $165.
Call Cliff, 372-2515 after 5:30.
(A-3t-13-p)
CAMERA Mamiya 500DT, still in
guarantee. Case, shade, filter, flash,
3X Telextender, all $125. Zoom
mono prism monocular, S2O.
392-0933; after 6 372-2702.
(A-3t-1 3-p)
Vitaflo fresh veg. juicer, glasses, end
A cocktail tables, silverware, reclmer,
TV trays, 4 sp. phonograph, chest,
KAE drafting tools. 372-8735.
(A-st-13-p)
Petting in the dorms! A few homeless
tropical fish at giveaway prices. Used
tanks and equipment. Call 392-2088
or 475-1363 (no toll). (A-2t-13-p)

FALL LEAGUES
Interested in Joining a
MONDAY 6:30 pm or
WEDNESDAY 9:oopm
BOWLING LEAGUE ?
OCT. 8, 7:OOpm room 362 UNION
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA 392-1637_

for sale I
D-18 Martin guitar. One year old.
Call Doug 373-2454.
(A-3t*l3-p)
1950 Metro Step Van Camper
equipped 8 ft. stand inside. Runs fine
needs tag and inspection. Cost me
S4OO. Yours for S3OO. 376-9538
(A * 3-p)
'67 Yamaha lOOcc. Good condition,
only 3600 mi. Best offer. Call
373-2341. (A-3t-13-p)
Must sell! '66 Cutlass in good
condition. Air A power. Call Ed
373-2620. Negotiation price, SI6OO.
(A-3t-13-p)
D-18 Martin guitar. Year old, in
perfect condition. Call Doug at
373-2454. (A-3t-1 3-p)
FOR RENT
LARGE 1 bedroom furnished
apartment walk to campus SIIO.OO
Year lease 378-8122 or 376-6652
after 6:00 p.m. (B-14-St-p)
Something Really Different A
Reasonable Too. One bedroom apt.
on the Newberry Road across from
the new golf course. Leasure ranch
style living. Big FIRE PLACE for
those cool evenings, fully paneled,
beautifully furnished. Pool, bar-b-que
house, air-conditioned. Water A
garbage collection furnished. Only
$135.00 monthly on 11 month lease.
Call 376-1146 or 376-3900. No pets.
(B-3t-10-c)
Immediate occupancy! Female
roommate convenient location call
372-2393 after 5:00 p.m. for further
information. (B-st-12-p)
3 Bedroom apartment 1 block north
of campus. $165.00. Furnished. 118
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-1 Ot-5-p)
1 bedr. apt. avail. Dec. 1 Nicely furn.
air-c. pool. SW 16 Ave area slOl/m
for couples only call 372-5221 or
392-2929. (B-3t-12-p)
1 Bedroom apartment. 1 Block north
of campus. $125.00. Furnished. 118
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-10t-5-p)
WANTED f
1 or 2 Female Roommates for AC 2
bdrm. duplex. 2 blocks behind
Norman Hall. $36.25/mo. + util. 906
SW 6 Ave. 376-7611 or 376-1853.
(C-1 4-st-p)
Wanted: married couples to
participate in group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives. This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-st-9-c)
Girl wanted to share 4 bdr AC house
with 5 girls. S3O/mo., 2 living rooms,
family room, big yard, garage, 16 NE
8 St. Call 373-1223. (C-st-11-p)
Male and Female help wanted.
Part-time. Very good salary. Can
arrange hours. Little Larry's, 1225 W.
University Ave. (C-st-1 1-p)
yye need one fern, roommate
for nice apt 2 blks. east of campus
SSO mo. Own room. Call Sue or
Leslie 373-2766. (C-St-13-p)
Four friendly want girl to cook in
exchange for good food and good
company. 376-7402. (C-2t-13-p)
COED to share 2 bedroom Fr.
Quarter apt. Good location. Come by
anytime, no. 65. (C-st-12-p)
| HELP WANTED
:^w....;.;.;.:.:-x.:.:.:.v.v-x*x x-w.Nv;-;-; x*:-fti
Cocktail waitress wanted. No
experience necessary will train.
Full or part time. Dubs Steerroom,
4560 NW 13 St. 376-9175.
(E-10M1-P)
Waitress full and part time noon
hours. Must be neat. Good pay.
Apply King's Food Host 1802 W.
Univ. Ave. P.M. only. (E-st-9-c)

Tuesday, October 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

| HELP WANTED
Registered Nurses Needed by
Alachua General Hospital for night
duty. Day nurjery provided for your
pre-school fse children during the
day while you sleep. Call 372-4321,
ext. 227 or apply at the personnel
office, Alachua General Hospital, 912
SW 4 Ave. (E-11-10t-c)
: yxw-:-x->xxxBiiiftftaooowccwcwK
AUTOS
#*XX.XWS*XC-XiS4C4W4S
Plym. Sport Satellite 1966 air
conditioning, radio, bucket seats,
power steering, excellent condition
inside A out 39,000 mi. Call
378-7872. (G-2t-14-p)
911 Porsche 19 66, 5 speed,
positraction, konis, mags, radials, roll
bar, racing seat, am-fm-sw special
heater, headrest, fog lamps, engine
balanced, lightened, polished, high
compression, more, very fast,
smooth, $3950. 378-7766.
(G-2t-12-p)
6 7 COUGAR. Air conditioning,
automatic, power steering and
brakes, sport console. Good
condition. Call Paul 372-7122.
(G-Bt-10-p)
Beat the heat. Ride yer dates, dont
walk em. Airconditioned, radio, heat.
2 new tires. 61 Olds FBS. 63 motor.
Only $199 deal!! Call Chip
376-9308. (G-St-13-p)
Must sell Rambler American 330.
1965 automatic, radio, heater,
4-door, white walls, extra clean.
Excellent condition, low mileage.
$750. Call 372-2317. (G-st-13-p)
VW SEDAN 1966 New tires not
retreads radio. Has been well cared
for by female owner low mileage,
engine excellent $925. 372-5796.
(G-St-12-p)
Jaguar XKE '67 Conv. all extras A
service records $3695. Ph 373-1231.
(G-SMO-P)
1963 Corvette Stingray Roadster.
327 4 speed new tires paint.
Beautiful condition 51450. Call
376-4913 after 5:00 p.m. (G-10t-6-p)
PERSONAL
Flying Hawks Club Flight Instruction
$7.00 solo, $12.00 dual for club
members free ground school. 5 min.
from campus Stengel 376-0011.
(J-10t-5-p)
LET IT HANG OUT IN PRINT!
Custom made personalized bumper
and door stickers. You write the
message we print it. All subjects:
politics, sex, etc. $1.50 each 4 for
$5.00. Send copy and check or
money order to: Bumperstickers,
P.O. Box 99, Perrine, Fla. 33157.
(J-6t-1 1-p)
Thursdays Heavenly Hash. Sign up at
the Baptist Student Union before
noon on Thursday. Dinner 5:30,
Vespers 6:15. (J-41-1 3-p)
SIGN UP FOR INFORMAL RUSH
Monday thru Friday 1-sp.m. at the
Panhellenic Office 315 Reitz Union.
(J-st-14-p)
FREE COMPUTER DATING
INFORMATION! Write Nationwide
Dating Service, 177 10th St. N. E.,
Atlanta, Ga. 30309. (J-14-st-p)
Co-eds your unsightly facial hair can
be removed forever E. Dwyer
Electrologist 20yrs experience
372-8039 A flawless complection can
be yours. (J-2t-10-p)
HAPPY HOUR Every night 5:30
6:30 and also 9:00 10:00. 20 cents
foi large premium draft. The
Chatterbox, 4551 NW 6 St.
(J-St-13-p)
DID YOU KNOW? The Spanish Main
is moving. Grand Opening Nov. 6th
at 1624 W. Univ. Ave. (Old Johnston
Photography). MEANWHILE were
having a big 30% discount sale on any
and everything in our shop at 105 W.
Univ. Ave. Open till 10 p.m.
(J-1 Ot-12-p)
NOW SHOWING
A RACE FOR GLORV,
FOR LOVE AND FOR THE
FUN OF IT!
SHOWS
- mi*** '' fit>tV y 50
ONLY
lEMCOIORV PMWVISION* A PARAMOUNIPICUM SS*
PLUS 10:15 ONLY
"THE SONS OF KATIE ELDER"
i JOHN WAYNE t DEAN MARTIN 8

Page 11

jy - jl- r
f J*.*.*-*.* ^"**'i* *****
j[ PERSONAL |
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message. Any time, day or night.
LET FREEDOM RING, 16 N.W. 7th
Ave. (J-st-1 3-c)
% LOST & FOUND \
>
Lost: Gold watch with black velvet
band. Towers area. Call Barb,
392-8971. Reward. (L-2t-13-p)
High School Class Ring lost at
Houston game. Merritt Island H. S.
Reward. Call Jim, 376-9450.
(L-3t-1 3-p)
iQO 01 j We4iWS9WW^X-:-x-x-r-:-v--.-
| SERVICES |
RUBYS ALTERATIONS 1126%
N.W. Bth Street 376-8506. (M-st-9-p)
FLORIDA
STATE THEATERS
* *<*
CENTER 1 LAST 3 DAYS
COWBOY
Â¥ M
3SCENTER 2 LAST 3 DAYS
5 THE LOVE BUG
%
+ FLORIDA
LAST 3 DAYS £
* "2 INTO 3 WONT
** GO"
********

Hzzaion
Lunch Special
11 AM-3 PM
8 Pizza %&
,*** 1.08 ffl
Beverage
'U. /I NOW SHOWING"
Patty Dukes best since
PjrrrSH W she got an award for
1 1 L The Miracle Worker I
Patty Duke WKKBkJU -Ean wuson > !>> B|
- 1 iIMI I firTVMl^Hlfll
NO ONE UNDER 17 1.1 lIM 1 M 1111 Li 11 lT^
ADMmTD^^SBBSSS9
at
MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
you choose what you want...
pay only for what you get!
corn TUESDAY SPECIAL
FRIED OOa
chicken yy C
ALL YOU CARE TO EAT V '""
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
JUMBO CHOPPED 0 A
STEAK OoC
WITH MUSHROOM GHAVY
AND YELLOW RICE
mjO\ GAINESVILLE MALL |§
>^Wy[^J^*^SHOPPINGCENTEF^^^|

o Q" 1
Need a date for homecoming, any
weekend, etc? COMPUTER date can
help. Application fee this week for
females will be only SI.OO.
(M-14-st-p)
Tennis racket restringing free pick up
and delivery M $ R Tennis Services.
375-2409. (M-22t-1-p)
Learn to fly smin from campus
Best Instructors Best Airplanes
Best Ground School t Beit DEAL
Flying Hawks Club Stengel Field
3760011.(M-10t-2-p)
GUITAR LESSONS AND REPAIRS.
2 years experience. See Bob Zuber,
c/o Bent Card Coffee House, 1626 W.
Univ. Ave. 376-953. (M-St-13-p)
Special Ballroom Dance Class. Start
Oct. 15 9:00 p.m. SIO.OO. Six
Lessons. Fran Kessler, 372-1189 or
372-7197 or register at Frans, 1013
W. Univ. Ave. (M-st-1 3-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)
Photography Bxlo=sl.oo 5x7=.50.
Sororities, Frats, teams parties,
portraits, portfolios. Can handle any
assignment Call Ronnie Kora
376^042^^
I RED PM o X
NIGHT jV
8-10 PM Bm
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA



Page 12

!, The FtavWe ANifrtor, Tuesday, October 7, IMP

and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS will be given
Nov. 1. The last day for receipt
by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, N.J., 08540
is Oct 8 for application of $lO
fee for reading knowledge
examinations in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
Registration fees increase $3
after Oct. 8 and up to closing
date of Oct. 15.
ATHLETIC TICKET CARDS:
Any student who paid $5 for a
duplicate athletic ticket card
must pick up their refund at the
Student Accounts Office in the
Hub between 9:00 a.m. and
3:30 p.m. daily.
FULBRIGHT-HAYS GRANT
information for seniors and
graduate students concerning
overseas study 1970-71 is
expected at the International
Center around October 15th.
Deadline for submitting
applications has been put back
to December Ist.
UNITED STATES ARMY
FIELD BAND AND SOLDIERS
CHORUS will present a free
concert Monday, October 13, at
8:15 p.m. in University
Auditorium.
PRSSA: Public Relations
Student Society of America will
hold its introductory meeting
Tuesday, Oct. 7, at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 122, Reitz Union.
RHODES SCHOLARSHIPS
for approximately $3,200 per
year for two to three years are
available for male citizens of at
least junior standing and
between the ages of 18-24 as of
Oct. 1, 1969. Interested persons
may apply to Professor A.A.
Murphree, 202 Anderson Hall,
before Oct. 22.
ART EXHIBITION: The
University Gallery hopes to
originate an exhibition of
original works (not
reproductions) of art from the
private collection of University
faculty members. The Gallery
would like to obtain a list of
original works which might be
available for loan to such an
exhibition. Faculty members
interested in submitting works
for consideration should furnish
the Gallery with the following
information by April 1, 1970:
Name of artist (or culture); date
of execution; medium (painting,
drawing, prints, photography
and sculpture); size; value;
photograph of work (when
available). All works loaned to
the Gallery will be insured at full
value and returned in
approximately six weeks. For
further information call
392-0201.

GAINESVILLE FLORIOA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION _==3a
ls a f-.BK.n- n. 9 -f%
ur seit \ /
g Why mjss o ut on one of Florida's favorite sports? From
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... /V. #]/ A^Z-7
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, /
? King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole r%
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! c ,

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
Sing-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance.
Companies will be recruiting for
December, March and June grads
unless indicated otherwise.
OCT. 13: INTERNATIONAL
PAPER CO. SOUTHERN
KRAFT DIV. ChE, CE, EE,
IE, ME. DA, USA ENGINEER
DISTRICT-CORPS OF
ENGINEERS CE, EE, MME
Eng. Sci.: B, M. ITT
RAYONIER, INC. ChE, ME,
CE, EE. UNITED AIRCRAFT
CORP. Acctg. ATLANTIC
NATIONAL BANK OF
JACKSONVILLE All majors.
LEGISLATIVE AUDITOR
Acctg. M.A. MONTENEGRO
AND CO. CPA Acctg.
ARGONNE NATIONAL
LABORATORY Chem, Phys.,
Reactor Phys., Phy. Met., Math,
MetE, ME, NE, ChE.
BETHUNE-COOKMAN
COLLEGE No information at
present. F.W. WOOLWORTH
CO. Any Major. PAN
AMERICAN WORLD
AIRWAYS EE.
OCT. 13 & 14: THE TRANE
CO. All engineering.
OCT. 13, 14, 15.
RADIATION, INC. Bus Ad,
Acctg; All engineers.
OCT. 14: VITRO
LABORATORIES EE, ME,
Phys. THE CECO CORP.
CE, BCN, ME, IE, Bus. Adm.
LTV AREOSPACE CORP.
AeroE, CE, EE, ME, Eng. Sci.
GEORGIA POWER CO. EE,
IE, ME, NE. BURROUGHS
WELLCOME & CO. INC. Any
major. CHICAGO BRIDGE &
IRON CO. CE, ME, AE.
CONTROL DATA CORP. EE;
MBA Bus. WEST VIRGINIA
PULP & PAPER (WESTVACO)
- ME, ChE, EE, CE, >E. MBA;
Chem, ChE. NEWPORT NEWS
SHIPBUILDING & BftY DOCK
CO. EE, IE, ME, Engr. Mech.
*
OCT. 14 & 15. FLORIDA
POWER CORP. EE, ME.
TENNESSEE VALLEY
AUTHORITY All majors.
OCT. 15: ARMSTRONG
CORK CO. Acctg., Bus. Adm.,
Lib. Arts, EE, ME, IE, Journ.
R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO
CO. ME, ChE, IE, Acctg.,
Chem. MOBIL OIL CORP.
ChE, EE, ME, CE.
ARMOUR-DIAL, INC. Bus.
Adm., Mkt. CENTRAL
FLORIDA JUNIOR COLLEGE
No information at present.
BRUNSWICK CORP. Acctg.;
Mktg., BSlnd. Rel/Personnel;
Aero & Ind. Eng. ME, EE, Elec.
Physics. R. J. REYNOLDS
TOBACCO CO. Bus., Mgt.

BLUB BULLETIN

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS
OCT. 15 & 16: SEARS,
ROEBUCK & CO. Any major.
* GENERAL TELEPHONE CO.
OF FLORIDA Eng.; Math,
Bus., Acctg., Mkt.
OCT. 15, 16, & 17:
CORNING GLASS WORKS
Eng & Sci.
OCT. 16: DEPARTMENT OF
COMMERCE CE, Marine
Eng., EE, ME, Naval Arch.,
Acctg. Bus. Adrrt. JORDAN
MARSH Bus. Adm.
CHEVRON OIL CO. CALIF.
CO. DIV. CE, ME, ChE, M:
CE. NAVAL SHIP SYSTEMS
COMMAND Physicists, EE,
ME, CE, Chem.
GOODYEAR TIER &
RUBBER CO. ME, ChE, IE,
Chem, CE. AMERICAN
HOSPITAL SUPPLY CORP.
All majors. Permanent U.S. visas
required. AMERICAN
ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEM
EE, ME, CE.
* Indicates U.S. Citizenship
Required.
GENERAL NOTICES
GAMMA BETA PHI
SOCIETY, the only
co-educational honorary service
organization on campus, will
hold a membership drive and
social Thursday, Oct. 9, at 7:30
p.m. in Room 123 of Reitz
UNION BOX OFFICE:
"Donovan" Tickets: Two shows
i£;00 & 9:30 p.m., $4.00 &
$2.50 for each show.
Rathskeller Membership,
$2.00

UF LIBRARY SCHEDULE
V
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library Bam 11 pm Bam- 11 pm 2pmll pm
Research Library Bam 11 pm Bam 11 pm 2pmll pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am spm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Special Collections 8:30 am spm 8:30 am l2 N
Architecture 8< Fine Arts Library dam spm
Arch, & Fine Arts Building 7pm lO pm Bam l2 Npm lO pm
Chemistry Library Bam 5 pm*** §am -12 N 2pm- & pm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm-10 pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Education Library
341 Norman Hall Bam 10:30 pm** 9am spm t 2pm 10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Bam- spm 9am -12 N 2pm- spm
410 Engineering Building 7 pm 10 pm 1 pm 4 pmtt 7 pm 10 pm
Health 8t Phys. Ed. R. R Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm-10 pm Bam -12 N 7pm-10 pm
Health Center Library
Med. Sci. Bldg. LlO2 8:30 am -12 M 8:30 am spm 2pm l2 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall Bam 11 pm Bam spm 7pm ll pm
Journalism & Communications R. R. Bam 5 pm***
Stadium 337 7pm-10 pm Bam -12 N Closed
Law Library
Law Building ,Bam 11 pm Bam-11 pm 8:30 am ll pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School
Library) Yonge Bldg. F Bam 4pm Closed Closed

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Tuesday
October 7,1969
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00 and 4:00 p.m.
Catholic Student Center
Homecoming Work Party,
7:00 p.m.
Student Bridge Club, Duplicate
Bridge, 150 C, D, A, & B,
Reitz Union, 7:00 p.m.
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
end of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 361
Union 7:30 p.m.
Public Relations Student Society
of America Meeting, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Citrus Club Meeting, 118 Union,
7:30 p.m.; Slide Program on
European Fruit Industry.
Pi Mu Epsilon Meeting & Film,
"Let Us Teach Guessing",
355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Self Defense Lessons for
Women, Union Ballroom,
7:30 p.m.
Wednesday
October 8,1969
.j-
Univ. of Fla. Fencing Club
Meeting, Florida Gym, 6:00
p.m., All Fencers Welcome.
Student Association for
Childhood Education Meeting
& Reception, 346 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
118 Union, 8:00 p.m.i
MENSA Meeting, 357 Union,
8:00 p.m.

Thursday
October 9,1969
Graduate Council Meeting, 235
Tigert Hall, 1:30 p.m.
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Homecoming Work Party,
Catholic Student Center,
7:00 p.m.
Sailing Club Meeting, McCarty
Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Society Social,
123 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Ju-Jitsu Club Meeting, South
End of Gym, 7:30 p.m.
Football Film, Union, Aud.,
7:30 p.m.
Program Office Fashion Show,
Union Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Hillell Foundation "Teach In",
Hillel Center, 8:00 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association Meeting, 349
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 347
Union, 8:30 p.m.i
Latin American Club Meeting,
150 C & D Union, 8:00 p.m.
Friday
October 10,1969
Union Movie, "Hombre", Union
Aud., 5:30, 8:00 & 10:30
p.m.
SGP: "DONOVAN", Florida
Gym, 8:00 p.m.



The
Florida
Alligator

ALIKE ON AND OFF THE FIELD
Fans Compare Reaves With Spurrier

Florida sophomore
quarterback John Reaves is three
years away from fair comparison
with 1966 Heisman Trophy
winner Steve Spurrier but a web
of coincidence ties these two
together in the minds of Gator
fans.
Reaves walks like Spurrier,
has the same deliberate coolness
on and off the Field and the
same absolute faith in his ability
and the ability of his teammates.
I guess my first strong
interest in any one school over
another came from listening to
what Spurrier was doing and
Holy Cross
Cancels Out
WORCESTER, Mass. (UPI)
The president and athletic
officials at Holy Cross College
cancelled the remainder of the
schools 1969 football season
Monday when doctors said the
entire varsity squad had
hepatitis.
Rookie head coach Bill
Whitton, who also was stricken,
called the eight schools
remaining on the schedule to
inform them of the situation.
The Crusaders dropped their
first two games of the season.

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Because no matter which look you choose, your beard still grows. Mi
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Its pop-up trimmer will keep your whiskers and sideburns
shaped the way you want them. The 3 floating heads will /
shave the parts of your face you want shaved. And inside
the floating heads are 18 self-sharpening blades that^:- : ;
shave as close or closer than a blade every day. With-/^- /
out nicks or cuts. The Norelco unique rotary action w
keeps the blades sharp while it strokes off whiskers. \
Every time you shave. \
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the Rechargeable will let you do it anywhere. For up to J/ /
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shaves per charge asany o t h errechar gea b |e Even on a beard likeyours.
Look them over. The choice is yours.
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from watching him do it at
Florida Field. Reaves says. He
was the greatest and I used to
imagine myself doing what he
did on a football field for
Florida.
It is natural that such an
influence caused Reaves to

... wVk mm .. \
c ,-jt
, WL.y -4. wXEh
rIF 4m J
%f|g m *,#£&*** #:> :
# 1 bP^bBV
iA mamm
BR 1 B
'w'y ;t J ji-*./;
PHIL COPE
SOPHOMORE ACE JOHN REAVES
... linked with the "Spurrier style"

unconsciously pick up manv of
the Spurrier mannerisms. He
even wore No. 11 at Tampa
Robinson High School, the
number Spurrier made famous
and which was retired after the
1966 season.
Spurriers first collegiate pass

SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

came in the 1964 opener against
SMU, a dazzling 56-yard
completion to halfback Jack
Harper. Reaves first attempt
was a 70-yard connection with
flanker Carlos Alvarez, good for
the first touchdown in the 59-34
romp pver previously
seventh-ranked Houston.
However, that first
completion by Spurrier turned
out to be the longest he would
ever throw for the Gators. It is
Teach-In
Soviet Jewry
Thursday 8 PM
HILLEL
Professional Tennis
Instruction Available
Pro ARMI NEELY
call: 378-6812

WE H AVI JUST
ONE WORD FOR
ENGMEERING
GRADUATES.
Opportunity.
/T,, 7 to become deeply
involved in earth's last frontier, the ocean.
Opportunity to apply all your abilities to
a wide range of challenging assignments in
shipbuilding, nuclear propulsion, nuclear power
generation, and heavy industrial equipment.
Opportunity for advanced degree or
research work with leading research centers
and universities.
And opportunity to enjoy one of the
country's most pleasant living and vacation
areas.
Find out about immediate career opportunities for:
Mechanical Engineers Naval Architects
Electrical Engineers Nuclear Engineers
Marine Engineers Civil Engineers
Industrial Engineers Metallurgical Engineers
See our representative on Tuesday, 10/14
He'll be interviewing at the Placement
Office and will answer your questions about:
THE OPPORTUNITY COMPANY
NEWPORT MEWS SHIPBUILDING
AND DRY DOCK COMPANY
NEWPORT NEWS. VIRGINIA 23607
A major COMPONENT OF TENNECO INC
An equal opportunity employer. U. S. Citizenship required.

Tuesday, October 7,1969, The Florida Alligator,

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor

here Florida coaches hope
similarity ends.
John had a great start and
we hope he can keep it up, says
Florida Head Coach Ray Graves.
There arent too many
quarterbacks around who can
throw the ball as far, as
accurately as he can. I dont
think we would be giving away
secrets to say the bomb is going
to be a prominant part of our
attack this year.
A$E
Pledges:
Welcome to your
new home!
We love you
Your Sisters


Page 13



I, The Florid* AfHgbtor, Tuesday October 7. f969'

Page 14

BIRDS CAPTURE PENNANT

Oriole Hits Kill Minnesota

By ED SAINSBURY
UPI Sports Writer
MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL
(UPI) Paul Blair lashed five
hits and batted in five runs
Monday to highlight an 18-hit
assault by the Baltimore Orioles
which overwhelmed the
Minnesota Twins 11-2 to sweep
a three-game playoff and win the
American League pennant.
The sweep gave the Orioles
their second championship in
four years and sent them into
the World Series against the New
York Mets with a 7-0 record in
post-season games. In 1966
Baltimore swept the series in
four straight games against the
Los Angeles Dodgers.
Blairs performance, and a
four-hit game for left fielder
Don Buford, made the game an
easy task for pitcher Jim Palmer,
fast and wild throughout the
game, who scattered 10
Minnesota hits for the victory.
Palmer was pitching downhill
after the second inning, in which
Brooks Robinson doubled, Dave
Johnson reached base when
Tony Oliva dropped his fly ball
for an error, and Elrod
Hendricks doubled to drive in
both runners. Then Buford
singled to score Hendricks and
give Palmer a 3-1 cushion.
Blair doubled in the fourth
inning after a triple by Mark
Belanger and a walk to Buford
to score both runners and make
it 5-1 for the Orioles, and he
batted in his third and fourth
runs in the eighth with a homer
after Buford had singled for his
fourth hit.
In the ninth Blair capped
another three-run inning for the
Orioles with a double which
scored Belanger from first base.
It was a rejuvenating show for
both Blair and Buford. Blair
went into the game with a
l-for-9 record for the first two
playoff games, both victories for
the Orioles on their home field,
while Buford was 0-for-9 in the
same two games.
They had help from
everybody .else in the starting
lineup in taking picks on seven
of the 10 pitchers on the Twins
staff. Every starter for the
Orioles except Palmer had at
least one hit, and eight of the 18
hits went for extra bases.
Belanger had a triple,
Hendricks two doubles, and
Brooks Robinson and Buford
each doubled.
Only two of the Twins
pitchers managed to escape
without allowing at least one
CRANE Iffll
IMPORTS |j 111
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville
hold on
were coming

. ... I
The Florida Quarterly
We only did it for you.

PENNANT
RACE
L
run, Tommy Hall and Joe
Grzenda, and each pitched to
only two batters, getting both
out to pitch the Twins out of
jams.
Bob Miller, a 5-5 pitcher for
the season on whom manager
Billy Martin gambled in the

(Dff (3 feDfifUGoO Bdl]?
...put it on paper!
Coke wont J
make the quiz easier,
make the lines shorter,
make the weather better,
make your blind date taller or
make your draft board forget you.
Coke just makes them go a little bit better.
;
Come on man shine a new light looking at Coca-Cola. Go ahead...
on sub J e £t- Views are changing grab a Coke and lay the words on
and Warren Greene of Auburn Uni- us! If your ad is chosen to be pub pubversity
versity pubversity has created a new ad for |j S hed, well lay $25.00 on you.
our good friend... Coca-Cola. But Whoknows? You may be $25.00
its not just a bright idea, its richer. And, if nothing else, youre
Warrens impression of our prod- bound to enjoy the Coca-Cola,
uct and that s important to us. What When your bright
about you? idea for Coke is on
How do you see Coke as part paper, mail it to: RJHijf
of your jday? Why not take a few College Newspaper A&SP [nm
moments to design an ad for us? J 0 p n Drawer 1734 I
Show us your own unique way of Atlanta, Georgia 30301

keep alive game, couldnt
finish the second inning and was
charged with the loss.
But nobody that Martin could
pull out of the bullpen could do
much better and he had to hit
for both Hall and Grzenda
before they could go more than
2-3 of an inning in an attempt to
muster some runs and get back
in the game.

aMMMMAMMMMMAMAAAAAM i
new
o the
ROOM
viII present an
lions. Come and
ihions.
a.m.
lion

II GATOR SHORTS 1
Now that the UF battle with Florida State is done with for this
season, at least football-wise, the Gators can settle back down to earth
again.
Ive never seen a team so mentally high for a game as we were for
FSU, Coach Ray Graves said. Now we must fight the let down.
Senior quarterback Jackie Eckdahl incurred a shoulder separation
in the FSU game, and will be out three to four weeks. Eckdahls
injury was somewhat of a freak as he was in the game for only three
plays and only hit once.
Sophomore John Schnebly was moved up to number two
quarterback and Tom Kennell moved to number three quarterback
from the B-squad.



Purdue s Phipps Heisman Contender

By STEVE SMILANICH
UPI Sports Writer
NE W YORK (UPI)
All-America football memo:
Mike Phipps, newest of
Purdues seemingly unending
string of top grade quarterbacks,
is firmly establishing himself as a
strong contender for the cove*
Heisman Trophy presented
annually to the nations best
college football player.
Phipps, following in the
footsteps of such former Purdue
standouts as Bob Griese and Len
Dawson, headed the United
Press International
Backfield-of-the-Week for his
Alumni Fiesta
Set Saturday
A big entertainment show was
announced for Futbol
Fiesta-Dos! prior to Saturdays
Florida-Tulane football game in
Tampa Stadium.
The Fiesta will be held in A1
Lopez Field from 11 a.m. until
1:30 p.m. and will offer fans a
break from the expected
pre-game traffic jam, a delicious
luncheon, more than an hour of
entertainment and a giant pep
rally. Sponsored by the
University of Florida Alumni
Club of Greater Tampa, it is
open to the public. All tickets
must be ordered in advance;
none will be sold at the door.
Highlighting the
entertainment will be The Class,
featuring recording star Cathy
Lea, the Plant High German
Band, the UF Fightin Gator
Band and the Gator varsity
cheerleaders.

LEARN TO READ FASTER
A SPECIAL 10 WEEK EVENING COURSE TO HELP
YOU READ AND COMPREHEND BETTER.
Class sessions will be two hours in length,
The first hour of each session will consist of
a group discussion on topics such as the
following:
Selection of a Major Concentration and Study
Environments
Helping Slices " Examination Skills
the College Campus
Textbook Reading Speed Memory Improvement and
And Comprehension Review Techniques
Time Use and Study Notetaking and Listening
Schedules Skills
The second hour of each session will be devoted to
individual work and practice in areas of weakness
and/or interest. Students will be tested during the
first session in the areas of reading spee
comprehension, vocabulary and attitudes, ac
students activities in this second hour will be in
relation to his own needs and not necessarily to t ose
of the entire group.
ALL CLASSES TAUGHT BY UNIVERSITY
FACULTY AT THE READING LAB AND CLINIC
CLASSES EVERY TUES NITE 7-9 PM STARTING
OCT 7 IN RM 363
FEE FOR ALL TEN CLASSES 555.00
sponsored by the reitz union and the reading clinu

p
UTJtitggi' %>p
in
v.Xwv.y
m,
%%
m
role in the Boilermakers
thrilling 3635 triumph over
Stanford.
Selected with Phipps were
Glenn Dumont of Little
American International, Archie
Manning of Mississippi and
Robert Newhouse of Houston.
Phipps isnt exactly a
newcomer to the Boilermakers
but he missed three games last
year because of an ankle injury
and fell below the pace of the
previous year which stamped
him as one of the Midwests
outstanding sophomores.
The 6-3, 206-pound senior
threw five touchdown passes,
the last one with 3:03 remaining
in the game, in addition to
hitting teammate Greg Fenner
with a two-point conversion
which gave Coach Jack
Mollenkopfs team its third
straight win of the season.
The confident Boilermaker
signal caller hit on 28 of 39
passes, including the last 12 for
429 yards a single game school
record.
Dumont carried 29 times for
297 yards and caught an 86 yard
pass in a losing cause as his team
suffered a 2719 loss to
Amherst.

UPrS BACK OF THE WEEK AWARD

Newhouse scored twice and
rushed 245 yards in 23 carries as
Houstons free-wheeling offense
moved into high gear in
smothering Mississippi State
74-0.
Manning was superlative in a
losing cause, scoring three times
and passing for two other TDs
in his teams 33-32 loss to
Alabama. The Ole Miss
quarterback completed 33 of 52
passes for 436 yards.
Several other quarterbacks
turned in outstanding
performances Saturday. They
included Rex Kern of
top-ranked Ohio State, who led
the Buckeyes past Washington.
The Mr. Cool of the great
Buckeye squad accounted for
267 yards and scored twice as
Ohio State rolled up a 4114
triumph.
Other quarterbacks enjoying
tremendous success were Fran
Peterson of Vermont who threw
five TD passes as his team upset
Northwestern 3931; and Jim
Plunkett of Stanford, who
connected for four scoring
passes in Stanfords loss to
Purdue.
Pat Sullivan had a four TD
passing performance for Auburn
While Jerry Dunne of Idaho
State, Gary Mullins of Houston,
Joe Thiesmann of Notre Dame,
Steve Olson of Idaho and Chuck
Ealey of Toledo all produced

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three touchdowns through the
air.
Other standouts the past
weekend were Arkansas split end
Chuck Dicus who caught TD
passes of 73 and 63 yards;
running backs Clarence Davis of
Southern California with 181

SORORITY
INFORMAL
RUSH
SIGN-UP
MONDAY FRIDAY
1:00 5:00 pm
Panhellenic Office
Room 315
Reitz Union

Tuesday, Qptober 7,,A999, The fjAUiga tor,

yards; Mickey Cureton of UCLA
with scoring runs of 61 and 75
yards in his teams romp of
Northwestern; the three
touchdown and 16l yard effort
by Bob Anderson of Colorado
against Indiana and sophomore
halfback.

Page 15



Page 16

I, TVn Florida ANiptor, Tuesday, October 7,1900

Mess Take National League Pennant

By VITO STELLINO
UPI Sports Writar
NEW YORK (UPI) The
Amazin* New York Mets,
continuing to defy logic and
tradition, swept to the National
League Pennant Monday with a
74 victory over the Atlanta
Braves on a pair of two-run
homers by two obscure singles
hitters Ken Boswell and
Wayne Garrett
Boswell hit just three homers
this year and Garrett had only
one, but their timely homers
were typical of the hits the Mets
got all year when they needed
them as they won the National
League playoffs with three
straight victories over the Braves.
The Mets, who had never
finished above ninth before this
season but won 100 games while
winning the Eastern Division
crown, will not play in the
World Series starting this
Saturday.
The MetsBraves series was
supposed to match the Braves'
hitting against the Mets
pitching. But while each of the
Mets* starters failed to finish, the
Mets scored a total of 27 runs in
die three games and banged out
37 hits.
Gary Gentry was the Met
starter who failed Monday but
Nolan Ryan came on and
stopped the Braves on three hits
one a two-run homer by
Orlando Cepeda in the fifth
inning over the last seven
innings to get the victory.
The two-run homer by
Boswell gave the Mets a 3-2
lead in the fourth, which was
wiped out by Cepedas two-run
homer in the fifth. But Garretts
two-run blast gave the Mets a
54 margin in the fifth and
thats all the help Ryan needed
although the Mets added a pair
of insurance runs. Tommie Agee,
who led the dub with 26
homers, also had a solo blast in
the third.
When Garrett threw out Tony
TIME I
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you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
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This dictionary is approved
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Gonzalez at 3:34 pan. EDT for
the final out of the game, the
field was mobbed by many of
the kids in the crowd of 53,195
fans at Shea Stadium.
But since school was in
session and the crowd, studded
with celebrities, was more
subdued than normal Met
crowds during the season, the
post-game celebration on the
field didnt match the wild scene
the night of Sept. 24 when the
Mets clinched the Eastern
Division crown.
It was obvious from the start
that Braves* starter Pat Jarvin
didnt have good stuff. Five of
the first six Met hitters in the
first two innings hit line drives,
but tjie winners didnt score in
the first two innings mainly
because Jarvis speared a wicked
liner by Garrett in the first
inning and turned it into a
double play.
Hank Aarons two-run homer
his third of the series gave

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between computer lab and econ
hurry up bus
Ill be late for class
wonder if Alcoas doing anything
about traffic jams

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the Braves the lead in the first
inning and Tony Gonzalez and
Aaron then led off the third
with a single and a double. When
Rico Carty hit a shot down the
left field line that was just foul,
Manager Gil Hodges decided to
bring in Ryan with a I2 count
on Carty.
Ryan, bothered by ailments
and weekend military duty,
pitched only 89 1/3 inning? this
year with a 6-3 mark. Ryan
struck out Carty on his first
pitch, walked Orlando Cepeda
intentionally and then fired a
third strike past Clete Boyer and
got Bob Didier to fly out.
Now Ryan was in charge, and
it was only a question of how
long it would take the Mets to
get to Jarvis. With Hoyt Wilhelm
not eligible for the playoffs, the
Braves* bullpen was shaky and
manager Luman Harris had to
stay a long time with his starter.
Agees solo homer in the third
cut the deficit to 2-1 and Art

I read somewhere theyre solving
rapid transit problems
and helping explore the seas and
outer space
and working with packaging
and automotive applications
So when I go in
Ill tell it like it isfor me
and theyll tell it like it is isfor
for isfor them

Change for the better
with Alcoa

Shamsky, who had seven hits in
the three games, singled and
scored on the homer by Boswell
in the fourth. Boswell had just
one hit in the first two games,
but it was his first homer since
July 15th so he wound up with
three homers in the regular
season and two in the playoffs.
Ryan led off the fifth with a
single and after Agee flied Out,
Garrett slammed his two-run
homer. After Cleon Jones
doubled, Harris finally had to
pull Jarvis for George Stone.
Jones went to third as Shamsky
grounded out and scored oh
Boswells single, one of three
hits Boswell had in the game.
Jerry Grote doubled in the
sixth and after Bud Harrelson
sacrificed him to third, Cecil
Upshaw replaced Stone. Upshaw
retired Ryan, but Agee got an
infield hit off Upshaws glove
that scored the final run of the
game.
When Ron Santo of the

Straight questionsstraight answers
and they wont care if the
bus is a little late
Get together with Alcoa:
October 10,1969
An Equal Opportunity Employer
A Plans for Progress Company

ALCOA

Chicago Cuba looked at the
Mets infield in July, he said, I
wouldnt play that infield in
Tacoma.
Bui it was the homer by
Boswell, who played 102 games
at second, and Garrett, who
played 124 games at third, that
clinched it for the Mets. Boswell,
originally selected by the Mets in
the free agent draft in 1965, hit
.279 but isn't known as a good
fielder. Garrett, drafted by the
Mets from the Braves'
organization last December, hit
only .218 but is considered a
good fielder.
But that's how the Mets won
it and no one can say that they
cant play this here game.
Unser By Eleven
Bobby Unser beat Mario
Andretti for the U. S. Auto Gub
national championship in 1968
by a margin of 11 points in the
closest finish in history.