Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
jAffi vAmttuui

Vol. 62, No. 13

CAUED REACTION. NOT SOLUTION

Disruptive Conduct Rules
Get Regents Full Approval

K H

i ms mmm
CHESTER FERGUSON
... complete autonomy

CSBP Plans Legislative Lobby
To Pass'Beneficial Legislation

By SAM PEPPER
Alligator Sports Editor
The Council of Student Body
Presidents (CSBP) Thursday
disclosed plans to incorporate as
a non-profit organization to
form a legislative lobby at
Tallahassee.
The goal of the corporation
would be to provide an effective
lobbying network that means
business not an amateur
operation, said UF Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd.
Shepherd said the lobby
would not only act to obstruct
the passing of such legislation as
the recent campus disruption
and drug abuse laws, but would
also work on passing legislation
beneficial to students.
A similar corporation of
student body presidents in
Pennsylvania was instrumental in
passing a bill that abolished a
state sales tax on textbooks, he
said.

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The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
In a marathon three and
on-half hour meeting in the
Reitz Union Friday afternoon,
the Board of Regents took on
items ranging from campus
disruptive conduct to a report
on quarter system reform.
In adopting new regulations
on disruptive conduct as
directed by the state legislature,
the regents, in town for the
UF-FSU dash Saturday, decided
that more specific guidelines
were needed.
The first porposal at the
boards Sept. 5 meeting was

Alternatives to that type of
lobby included:
Using an already established
lobby that would work for the
council on a part-time basis, or;
Hiring someone (possibly a
student) who could act as liaison
between the legislature and the
council.
Council Chairman Steve
Anderson of the University of
South Florida said a competent
law student could serve as the
liaison.
Initial cost of incorporating
the council is a S3O filing fee for
the charter.
The charter of the
corporation would confine
membership to student body
presidents of higher education
institutions in Florida, as well as
entitle the organization to draw
leases and sue.
However, to operate a lobby
on a professional baas, a system
of financing must be derived
that would absorb such expenses

University of Florida, Gainesville

considered vague as to what
constituted disruptive
conduct.
The rules now read that
anyone specifically impeding or
interfering with the rights of
others to enter, use, or leave any
campus facility, service or
scheduled activity will be liable
for appropriate disciplinary
action. The former proposal
read that anyone obstructing the
normal processes and activities
essential to the functions of the
university community would
be liable.
The one other point revised
reads that deliberate
interference with academic

, HBHHf
I pF Jfl
CHARLES SHEPHERD
... means business"
as transportation, an expense
which Shepherd foresees as
being a major one.
Shepherd also recommended
the council study similar
programs such as those in
Pennsylvania and Virginia which
are generally considered to be
well-financed.

freedom and freedom of speech
of any member or guest of the
university wffl mean possible
prosecution. The original code
said that only deliberate
interference with the rights of
others would constitute an
offense.
Steve Anderson, chairman of
the Council sos Student Body
Presidents said that while he
realized the regents* hands were
tied, the council would like to
go on record as saying that we
dont feel that a disruptive
conduct code as such in
principle is necessary.
Anderson did say, however,
he thought the revision was
much more acceptable than
the former proposal.
The code seems to be much
more of a reaction than a
solution, he said.
Regents chairman D. Burke
Kibler, of Lakeland, said that
the report from the system-wide
quarter calendar study
committee of students, faculty
and administrators would be
taken under advisement, and be
given to the regents* curriculum
committee for further study.
The quarter system study
committee was appointed last
year by Chancellor Robert
Mautz and last spring took a
survey of professors, students
and administrators for opinions
on what they thought right or
wrong with the quarter calendar.
Os the changes proposed by
the report, these are included:
Adjustment of a majority of
courses to four and five hour
credits on bases other than class
contact hours, increased
flexibility in the requirement of
the number of instructional days
per quarter per academic year,
and increased budgetary support
for the summer quarter.
In a discussion on selecting
regents architects, Regent
Chester Ferguson, of Tamp,

Who Will
Reiga As
Sweetheart?
No blondes this year in the Homecoming Sweetheart finals.
Selected yesterday as finalists in the beauty contest were Mary
Palmour, Walda Williamson and Janel Overholt The Homecoming
Sweetheart will be announced at Gator Growl ( Oct 17.
PETE KNOCKE

Monday October 6 x 1969

HE*'^
Jk
STEVE ANDERSON
... more reaction than solution
immediate past board chairman,
angrily went on record saying
the process was inadequate.
The cabinet recently, acting as
the reorganized Board of
Education, tried to strip the
boards authority in this area. It
said that the board still has
recommending powers. The
cabinet retains the final
approval.
Atty. Gen. Earl Faiicloth has
ruled, however, that the board
still has recommending powers.
The cabinet retains the final
approval.
But Ferguson exploded,
saying the board not only needs
full autonomy in this area, but
also complete autonomy in all
matters.
This board must become
autonomous or it ought to be
abolished, he said. Higher
education has got to be
defended and supported, and
Im not making qualms about
it.
BOARD OF REGENTS
voted Friday afternoon to
file suit in federal court for
rights to Galorade ... page 2
Classifieds 11
Dropouts 6
Editorials 8
FSU News .4
Letters 1.9
Movies 10
Sports 12



Page 2

!, The fhorida Alligator) MondaV, October 6y'hfcb'

FRED PARKER
... presented proposal

Fundless Groups Plead Unfair

(EDITORS NOTE: This Is the first in a series of
two in-depth articles on the 1969-70 UF student
body budget and the problems surrounding it.)
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs student body budget was passed by the
Student Senate over a month ago, but several of the
17 groups left without funds are still crying not
fair.
We need the funds, or well cease to exist, says
Coach John Wittig, whose Debate Society requested
$14,000 and received nothing.
Under the guidelines set up by the senate Budget
and Finance Committee, the group is ineligible for
funds because they are an academic competing
group and had received a large percentage of the
student fees which were benefiting only a very few
members of the student body.
The committee suggested the groups that fall into
this classification seek funds from the academic
area to which their competition relates.
We went to the speech department, Wittig said.
Their budget requests were due last October, and
they had no way of anticipating our need.
The group is presently circulating petitions and
waiting for a hearing with the budget committee
tonight.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd told
the senate at its Sept. 23 meeting he would approve
removing the criteria from the Emergency
Contingency fund, if the senate wants to reconsider.
A bill was passed this summer tightening the
restrictions on use of the contingency funds. Any
requests for money from the fund must meet several
standards:
The emergency must have been unforeseeable
at the time budget requests were due.
The request cannot be for funds which were
denied the group by the senate.
The request cannot be for a convention or
meet for which the group didnt realize it would
qualify.
t The group must show it needs the funds in
order to remain in existence as a functioning

THE FLORIDA QUARTERLY
- AT BOOKSTORES SOON
I HI-. FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building. University of Florida. Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.53 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or *urn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

l Regents Approve Gatorade Rights Suit

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
The Board of Regents voted Friday afternoon to bring suit in
federal court to decide the rights to the formula of super thirst
quencher Gatorade, developed by UF renal medicine Prof. Robert
Cade while researching kidneys and body fluids.
The regents also will ask the court for a declaratory decree that all
rights to the use of the name, Gator, in commercial products be
reserved by the UF.
Co-defendants to be named in the suit will be Cade and 12 others in
Gatorade Trust plus Stokely-Van Camp, producers and marketers of
the controversial drink.
The Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW), which
sponsored Cades research at the time he invented Gatorade, will be
given the option to enter the case either as co-defendant or
co-plaintiff with the regents.
HEW has claimed it has the rights to the drink, but UF, saying Cade
was using its facilities at the time, also has claimed rights. The
department will be asked first to file suit as co-plaintiff, if it refuses,
the regents will name the agency as co-defendant.
Regent Fred Parker of Tallahassee, an attorney, presented the
lawsuit proposal after he said several meetings with HEW, Stokely-Van
Camp and Gatorade Trust came to no avail.
The department (HEW) has made no response as of yet, Parker
said, and I personally think that it is not going to make a response

organization.
The group must have all the burden of
justifying its request.-'
At Tuesdays meeting of the senate, Shepherd
said, the senate will be asked if they want to use the
$10,629 in the contingency fund for the groups
petitioning for funds.
I will only approve this step, he said, if the
funds allocated are not considered part of the
budget.
I dont want to have these groups come back
next year and ask for money simply because they
were in the budget this year, he said.
Only groups which received no funds at all should
be considered, he said, and the senate should stick
to the budget guidelines set up by the budget
committee.
The budget committee decided last Monday it
would not recommend passage of the bill.
We just dont have the money, Jim Reinman,
head of the budget committee said.
If the entire contingency fund were abolished to
give these groups the amount they need, it would
leave nothing for emergencies for the rest of the
year, he said.
Its true, Shepherd said, that we would be left
without money for contingencies, but its not an
impossible situation.
If any great emergency came up, Shepherd said,
the money in the reserve funds could be used.
The total amount in the reserve fund $152,000
must be budgeted by January, because the
amount will have to be justified to the legislature,
Shepherd said. Os this amount, $48,000 is already
allocated to Norman Field handball courts and
operating expenses.
The remaining $104,000 cannot be used to fund
the student groups, Shepherd said, because it has
been pledged for the redevelopment of Camp
Waubuig.
The money in the reserves was frozen last
Wednesday, Shepherd said, because were ready to
begin construction at Wauburg. None of the money
can be touched until we know exactly how much
we need for the project.
The money cannot be spent until it is approved
by the senate.

I 1 m
something new
has been added to the
ARREDONDO ROOM
en/oy delicious food and see the now fashions.
THE SHOW BEGINS OCT. 7 AT 11:30 a.m.
4th floor Reitz Union
nnnnnnmi

until weve settled our controversy with Gatorade Trust.
HEW in no instance will agree to release rights on such inventions :
to the inventor, and only very seldom will it release rights to the 5
university Parker added.
We have had no response from the Gatorade Trust, although its :
been almost nine months now since my last real conference with
them, the regent continued. They do not show me any apparent :
interest in making an attempt to settle our differences with them. :j
Parker said there are two vitally important things in the Gatorade £
controversy concerning not only UF but also the university system as :
a whole. :j
The first, the regent said, is the UFs interest in the product because ?
it reflects on the regents policies in the way the board handles :j:
inventions by its employes, and because it obviously may have $
tremendous commercial success and mean a lot of money. |
If we have a valid claim on that money, then were not doing our i?
job as the Board of Regents, Parker said. $
The second point in the conflict, he said, was the commercial use of $
the name Gator in products. $
The name on such products as Gatorade implies UFs consent or t\
sponsorship of the product, he said.
Parker said this point has serious implications for the future since $
Stokely-Van Camp has trademarked several products with the name 5
Gator in them. £
A patent counsel in Washington, he said, has noted since the UF $
and its nickname Gator are so widely known, that the name on $
commercial products implies license. !:

By BRENDA PCUEnT7
USHERING IN FOR THE YEAR. UF Cicerones will meet at 8:30
tonight in Lounge 123 of the Reitz Union.
IN SELECTING NEW ARMY BUDDIES: The annual fall A.iny
Sweetheart Rush will be held tonight from 7 to 8:30. Any freshman,
sophomore, or junior girl with a 2.0 average is invited to come to the
second floor of the Military Building. School clothes should be worn
and refreshments will be served.
STUDENTS DOING SOMETHING (OH, REALLY?): The Student
Peace Union is sponsoring an SDS meeting Tuesday at 8 pan. in room
362 of the Union.
Tickets On Rise
So Are Appeals

Traffic tickets are still on the
rise, but student appeals are,
too.
Lieutenant V.K. Holliman of
the University Police
Department reported 101 traffic
tickets issued within the
twenty-four hour period starting
noon Wednesday.
This brings the total number
of tickets issued since Sept. 22
close to the 2,500 mark.
The Student Traffic Court
received five more appeals
Thursday against questionable
traffic tickets, according to Bob
Wattle, chief justice, showing
that approximately five per cent
of the tickets are being appealed
by students.
The appeals will be examined
at the session in Honor Court
starting Tuesday at 8:15 p.m.
Because of the large number of
appeals turned in, the Traffic

Court has appointed another
session on Oct. 14.
The next regular session will
be Oct. 21, with one following
every second Tuesday.
MtNI-roSTR
jm about Ruses ft*
' s@em,




Experimental College Offers Karl Marx Course

The Karl Marx Memorial Singing and Drinking
Society is among the courses offered by the Florida
Experimental College this fall.
Registration tor courses starts today. Eighteen
courses are being offered at a charge of $1 per
course.
Persons interested in taking course work at the
college, which is held off-campus and is
non-accredited, should contact the course
instructor.
The following is a list of courses, instructors
names and telephone numbers.
9 Intelligent Motorcycling Joseph Tamez,
376-2924.
9 Draft Counseling Bruce Ergood, 392-2677.
Seminar In Womens Liberation Judith
Brown, 3764775.

Russian Fighter Lands
At Homstead Air Base

HOMESTEAD AIR FORCE
BASE, Fla. (UPI) A Cuban air
force pilot flying a Russian built
MIG 17 fighter landed at
Homestead Air Force Base near
Miami Sunday and promptly
asked for asylum.
Air Force authorities said the
plane was detected on radar 90
miles east of Key West, as it
approached the big air base
where President Nixons plane,
Air Force One, was waiting to
return Nixon to Washington.

Govt Pays Widow
For Missing Husband

SAIGON (UPI) The U.S.
government has paid the widow
of the alleged victim in the
Green Beret murder case $6,473
as full compensation for the
disappearance of her husband,
U.S. Embassy officials
announced Sunday.
The widow, Mrs. Phan Kim
lien Chuyen, said she understood
the payment to represent the
U.S. Armys portion of total
compensation and that she
expects further reimbursement
from the embassy.
The embassy announcement,
however, made it clear that the
equivalent of $6,473 paid to her
in South Vietnamese piastres
was the total compensation to
be made for the disappearance
of her husband, Thai Khac
Chuyen.

Sanders
frted
BRING ftT BRING
COUPON U COUPON
Eday coupon special^^^^^^^l
Kile I
SNACK Hu I
REG. 85< I
M
BRING COUPON OWVWW%pi
n,

'SING, DRINK AND REMEMBER MARX

The MIG took no hostile
action and proceeded directly to
a landing at Homestead, the Air
Force said in a statement. The
Cuban pilot requested asylum
and it has been granted.
The MIG landed at about
12:25 p.m., EDT. The pilot was
not identified.
The Air Force said the
embassy of Czechoslovakia,
which represents Cuba in the
United States, had been
informed of the incident.

Eight members of the U.S.
Armys Special Forces, or Green
Berets, were charged with
involvement in the murder of
Chuyen, but he was described
only as missing in a letter to the
widow and the embassy
statement announcing payment
of compensation.
The charges against the Green
Berets were dismissed last week
by order of Army Secretary
Stanley Resor in Washington.

t rnw W* representatives
A
George Corl Phil Tarber
[ Skip Lujack Mel Ward
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
PREMIUM DEPOSITS DEFERRED
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN

9 Art; Prospective Drawing Bob Sokol,
372-3173.
9 Sensitivity Training for Volunteer Services:
working in low income areas Ken and Mary
LeDonne, 372-0155.
9 Humanizing Technology: learning how to get
around mechanized, routine living when working in
the applied arts Pericles Ctonas, 372-2220.
9 Basic Sewing Phyllis Hellstrom, 376-2646.
9 Encounter Group (for normal neurotics)
Hank Gooch, 376-8044.
9 Dog Obedience Training Charlene Taft,
392-3461.
9 Basic Marxism: a study of the work of Karl
Marx and its significance for change in our society
David Smith, John Sugg, and Steve Fahrer,
378-9291.

The embassy was requested
to inform the Cuban authorities
that the plane will be made
available for return to Cuba,
the Air Force said.
A White House spokesman at
Key Biscayne, where Nixon has
been vacationing this weekend,
said the President was made
aware of the landing. Nixon
was scheduled to leave
Homestead AFB about 9 p.m.
Sunday for the return flight to
Washington.
Sundays defection was the
latest of several flights to the
United States by Cuban pilots.
Growl Tryouts
Set Tonight
Gator Growl Skit tryouts
will be held this evening at 8
p.m. on Florida Field track.
The 3-5 skits that are
selected will be performed
Oct. 17 to help kick-off the
homecoming festivities.
Skits will be judged on
humor, general audience
interest, adaptability to
Florida Field, presentation
and* originality.

9 Science Fiction: exploring the entire field
David Mead, 376-0808.
9 Encounter Group: a semi-structured group
utilizing verbal and nonverbal techiniques including
psychodrama Chuck Reiner, 378-9653.
9 Religion: an investigation of religious feeling
Fred Castor, 378-9795.
9 Karl Marx Memorial Singing and Drinking
Society David Smith, 378-9219.
9 Black and White Encounter Group Rev.
Thaxton Springfield, 376-7539.
9 Readings In Contemporary American
Literature Judith Tedards and Peggy Stephens,
378-9752.
9 Chess Ed Fisher, 376-9456.
9, The Fourth Way: a journey beyond the drug
experience R. Perlmutter, 376-7539.

I PEOPLE 111 VM THEIS Hll
Trintyin-BECKUM OmCHNS
22 West University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Phone 376-3516
UCC STUDENTS:
Good times with Jean Hardy and
Dan Beardsley at these times and
places:
Tues 6PM at the College Inn
Wed Noon at Reitz Union Cafeteria
and 10PM at Anthonys (921 W.Univ)
JUjap
FOOTBALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 n Mens or Ladies Wear I
EXTRA $lO H wilier is |irl
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will win
Saturday, Oct. 11 Estimate total yards to be gained by
Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Team
Army vs. Notre Dame
C Auburn vs. Clemson
Cornell vs. Princeton
Florida vs. Tulane
Mississippi vs. Georgia
No. Carolina vs. Air Force
a Ohio State vs. __ Michigan St.
= Penn State vs. West Va.
Tennessee vs. = Georgai Tech.
Ij Vanderbilt vs. LJ Alabama
Total Yards Gained by FLORIDA I I
Winner's Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry Blank.
Entries must be deposited in U shop by Fri., Oct. 10 §
In case of tie, prize will be divided equally among winners. |
WINNERS NAMES TO BE POSTED IN: I
fhr nitiersitj> S>ljop I
1620 West University Avenue University Plaza §
signature; I
ADDRESS I
CITX STATE I

J

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator. Monday, October 6,1969

'Come & Get It*
At Lost-Found
Blend eight pairs of mens underwear with 2,000 car keys, simmer
for five minutes in a tuba mouth piece. Add four pledge pins and a Phi
Delta Theta pin, sift in three pairs of contact lenses. Garnish with 100
pairs of eye glasses, bajce for two years.
What do you haye? One Excedrin Headache, Number 32, or
more specifically, a few of the unclaimed items in the UF Lost and
Found department, Room 130 of the Reitz Union.
Most people never check our office when they lose anything.
Consequently, articles pile up, except for umbrellas on rainy days,
Joe Stewart, staff assistant for union functions and head of Lost and
Found said.
He went on to note that State law prevents us from selling the
items or giving them away. We would like to give the Lions Club the
eye glasses after holding them for six months, but we cant. Theyre
State property until claimed.
Lost and Found recently changed from a Student Government
project to a Union Public Functions project. Although Student
Government no longer controls the office, it continues to finance it as
a convenience for students. Open hours for the office are Monday
through Friday, 4 6 pjn.
Attempts will be made to promptly collect lost articles from the
entire campus, including the libraries, classroom buildings and campus
police station, Stewart said. In the past, such articles were often
shoved under counters or placed in the backrooms of these buildings
to gather dust.
When a lost item is accompanied by some means of identification,
notices will be sent informing the owner of the location of his
property. In all other cases, records will be kept of when and where
the item was found to facilitate the eventual return of the property.
If anyone has an urgent need to look through the articles in Lost
aid Found during off hours or on weekends, the clerk at the
Information desk in the union will open the office for them, Stewart
said.
The new Lost mid Found office will be the depository for articles
found in aH areas of campus except for the Health Cotter which
operates its own Lost and Found.
Each passing day adds something new to the pile of articles in the
department office. Already hundreds of keys of all kinds, 10 picture
LD.s, a flute, two dissection kits, jewelry, books, and a teething ring
all eagerly await their owners. What if you were a teething ring,
forlorn, without a babys mouth to surround you? The Lost and
Found may prove to be one of the loneliest places around.

news
from...;

STRIKE After a noontime
rally on FSLPs Landis Green
Friday, approximately 200
students marched to the Elberta
Crate and Box Co. in support of
the workers three-week old
strike. The workers are
demanding increased wages,
fringe benefits, better working
conditions and a retirement
plan.
LOSS Commenting on the
loss to the UF, Seminole Coach
Bill Peterson stated that he felt
his calling of the game was
worse than last year. Peterson
also gave credit to the great pass
rush put on quarterback Bill
Cappleman and the hard-hitting
Gator linemen.
MORATORIUM The
Vietnam Moratorium scheduled
for Oct. 15 continued to gain
support over the weekend.
Fifteen members of the clergy
associated with FSU signed a
KrTMin lTOrpITf" 111 -

!>..
UsKmi

petition strongly supporting the
day of protest. At its faculty
meeting Friday afternoon, the
history department also passed a
carefully worded statement of
support.
Professional Tennis
Instruction Available
Pro-ARMI NEELY
call: 378-6812

Pizza, inn &&-
Now you can enjoy America's
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Pizza prepared from a secrete
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ARTICLES PILE UP
... something new each passing day

Plaque Goes
To Turlington
In honor of 20 years of
service to the state, community
and UF, Student Body President
Charles Shepherd presented
State Rep. Ralph Turlington,
D-Gainesville, with a plaque of
appreciation Saturday.
Turlington received the award
at a pre-game luncheon for the
UF and FSU student
governments and the Council of
Student Body Presidents.
Mentioning the many
compliments the legislators had
for the UF student body at
Legislative Appreciation
Weekend and his own interest in
UF students, Turlington said
Sunday he greatly appreciated
the expression of the student
body in awarding him the
plaque.
Bruce Boudreau,
Administrative Assistant to
Shepherd, said since Turlington
had done so much for UF in the
legislature, it would be a good
gesture to honor him.
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A SPECIAL 10 WEEK EVENING COURSE TO HELP
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Class sessions will be two hours in length.
The first hour of each session will consist of
a group discussion on topics such as the
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Helping Services on
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Textbook Reading Speed Memory Improvement and
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The second hour of each session will be devoted to
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FACULTY AT THE READING LAB AND CLINIC
CLASSES EVERY TUES NITE 7-9 PM STARTING
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s P nsor ed by the reitz union and the reading clinic __
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DETAILS INTRICATE
Homecoming: A Machine

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writar
(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second part of a
series on UFs Homecoming.)
The most impressive characteristic about the
Homecoming Machine is the intricate network of
details, and legwork behind a smooth and colorful
operation.
A good example is the installation of the huge
speakers and amplifiers in the stadium for Gator
Growl.
Because the amplifiers would either block the
audiences vision if they were too near the
bleachers, Growl Director Randy Williams has
arranged to place them on a tower.
The whole speaking assembly, weighing close to
900 pounds, will be hauled up to the tower piece by
piece via block and tackle.
None of this can be started until Wednesday of
Homecoming Week.
To set up the Growl Equipment before then
would kill the grass Williams said.
And while the audience is filing out Friday night,
the whole works must be removed immediately, and
the grass watered and mowed before the game
Saturday.
The fluid operation of tedious but essential
details is not the only major problem of
Homecoming.
Financing weighs heavy.
Only a fraction of the student body funds are
used in the budget. Donations, particularly from the
Alumni and Athletic Associations, and the
Presidents fund, usually help out.
Contributions from private businesses have
always been counted on but are becoming more
scarce as the effects of inflation set in.
Other organizations offer services in place of
money.
The City of Gainesville, for instance, supplies
telephone poles, and installs them free of charge for
Homecoming decorations.
A new source of financing tried this year is the
selling of ad space in the Gator Growl program,
which, at 32 pages, is the largest it has ever been.
Next year, ad solicitations, as well as the slogan
contest will start in January, making the official
worktime on Homecoming almost ten months.
Homecoming 1969 has a few changes besides the

Nominations
Upcoming
The Alumni Council
appointed a five-member
nominating committee Saturday
to select candidates for president
of the organization.
The committee will make its
report at the annual meeting of
the council, Nov. 15. The
executive council will vote then,
according to William Bumper
Watson, Jr., director of alumni
services.
Members of the committee
are Robert Lynch, of
Gainesville; William Henry, of
Bartow; Homer Hooks, of
Lakeland; James Kynes, of
Tampa; and Paul Shelley, of
Tallahassee.

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large Growl program. Abolishing the traditional
Coronation Bail is one.
We didn't make that much money on it,
Special Functions Chairman Dave Jackson said.
I thought kids who have no place to go on
Saturday night, particularly dorm residents, should
have a free dance, Jackson, an independent
himself, said.
In a survey Jackson conducted over the summer,
the idea of a street dance was turned down in favor
of one in the Reitz Union. Instead of the formal
atmosphere of Jimmy Dorseys orchestra, the dance
will be casual, and feature the Tropics, a hard rode
band.
Adding to new ideas for 69 is the train trip,
induding a reserved club and two passenger cars for
fans and alumni. At the cost of S2O for a round trip,
passengers can board the Gator special, come for the
weekend, and rent cars for $7 a day.
Football, B-B-Que, and Growl tickets could be
ordered through the Alumni Events division, as a
package deal with the train trip.
If we reserved motel rooms for them, wed be a
travel agency, Alumni Event chairman Dan Ponce
commented.
He admitted later that motel rooms would be the
most difficult task, if not an impossible one.
Rooms are reserved four months in advance since
you couldnt get a room reservation two months
ago, according to Ponce.
One thing that the staff hopes is changed for
1970 is the Homecoming date, which was set much
too early.
The date also fell on the same as Florida A&M
Universitys Homecoming, preventing their band
from performing here as they have in the past.
In spite of the frustration and the school breaks
spent working instead of vacationing, those involved
in Homecoming would do it again.
Homecoming is probably a good time to get
involved, and make contacts with student leaders
and administrators, one worker said, also pointing
to the frings benefits like good Growl tickets, and
bloc seating with Florida Blue Key at the game.
But most important, he feels, is the personal
satisfaction.
As another staffer expressed it: You cant
imagine the thrill of sitting over a program, or
parade, and hearing the laughter that you helped
produce.

Only the Strong survive
Out of the hundreds of West Coast bands that
were formed during the last few years, only a A
handful have gained national recognition. You can
understand why. It takes a group that is both
musically and personally strong to overcome the
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Page 5



Page 6

L TH* Florida Alrtgatdr.'MoMdayt October 6,1969
r/ Ms t't r. f r f f t > v.v v -*

Sweethearts
Rush Today
The annual fall Army
Sweetheart Rush will, be held
Monday, from 7 to 8:30 pan. It
will be held on the second floor
of the Military Building.
Any freshman, sophomore, or
junior girl with at least a 2.0
average is urged to attend.
Refreshments will be seived
and school clothes should be

worn.
BSU TELLS SIGMA CHI
Whites Lack Awareness

By MIKE SMITH
Alligator Correspondent
The communication gap between black and white
students closed somewhat last week as a
seven-member panel from the Black Student Union
spoke at the Sigma Chi fraternity house.
The BSLPs presence was due, at least in part, to a
recent apparent misunderstanding between several
members of the BSU and the fraternity.
In an effort to dear up this misunderstanding, the
fraternity invited the BSU to speak on black
problems and their causes.
One of the biggest problems seems to be the
lack of awareness on the part of the whites
concerning black heritage, Sam Taylor, BSU
minister of information, said.
The BSU believes 95 per cent of the white
students know little, if anything, of black history or
culture. Without this knowledge, it is impossible to
understand what makes the black think and act a%
he does.
The blade person seeks social separation from the
whites, Taylor said. This does not mean physical
separation, but instead refers to social values. In the
past blacks valued straight hair, blue eyes, and all
the other things which blacks are not bom with.

Workers Undecided
About Legal Action
No decision has yet been readied by the UF plants and grounds
woikers or their attorney, Richard Jones, to bring legal action against
the university over contested parking fees.
The UF workers feel it is illegal for an employer to charge employes
for paiking space.
I dont know if the case is coming to court. Neither I nor the
plants and grounds workers have made a decision.
If we do detide to contest the parking fees, we will have to decide
by what (legal) vehicle.
Jones explained that due to the high legal expenses involved, it may
be inadvisable for the workers to challenge the fee even though it is a
matter of principle.
There will be a decision made within a week or 10 days according
to Jones.
FASHION
ZODIAC
Fall Fashion Modal* Escorted
By Groves Bast
Thursday Oct. 9 BOO pm
Raitz Union Ballroom
Admission 5 10, the quarterly cometh

THE DROPOUTS

(SrJA SH

/ MAIL-BiliNG IS A HABIT ] >
V IWPICATiNS "TEMSION ,vv
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However, now the blades have a quest for black
pride. They now say, If we have kinky hair, then
why be ashamed of it? Let our hair be something
that we can take pride in as blacks.
As far as fraternities go, blacks are more
interested in starting organizations of their own,
rather than joining the existing fraternities. They
believe they will lose their identities if they join a
white fraternity. The blacks dont believe the
existing fraternities are doing all they could to
rectify the wrongs in our sodety.
On the subject of rioting, Taylor said, Blacks
have less to lose than to gain by rioting.
He said buildings burned in riots are almost
always either empty or owned by wealthy
businessmen who refuse to hire blacks or give them
fair treatment.
The blacks who live and work in these buildings
reach a point where they just dont care anymore,
Taylor said. In order to be oppressed, the blade
must cooperate. The black rationalizes that he has
so little at present that he has nothing to lose, and
burning buildings strikes out at his oppressor. This
action is primarily a psychological gain and serves as
a source of unity which the blacks need to get what
they believe is rightfully theirs.

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OUTSTANDING COUPLE POSES
Rice Annual Features Nudity

HOUSTON (UPI) Two
students chosen .by their fellow
seniors as the most outstanding
seniors in last springs graduating
class at staid Rice University will
appear nude in the 1969
yearbook, a school official has
verified.
The students are Marilyn
Penelope Johnson, 22, of
Quincy, 111., and Dennis Rex
Bahler, 22, of Lafayette, Ind.
They were both members of
Students for a Democratic
Society and political activists on
campus last year.
The publication of the
yearbook, which normally
would have been distributed in
the spring or summer, was held
up by the publisher until he
received written guarantees
against liability for invasion of
privacy. The yearbook will come
out next month.

Reapportionment Author
Studies Gov't Changes

By Alligator Services
The UF professor who drafted Floridas
reapportionment plan currently is studying how
changes it caused in the membership of the
Legislature have affected state government.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer, chairman of the
Department of Political Science, says preliminary
findings show that for the last two sessions the
Florida Legislature has been more responsive to
urban needs than during previous terms, but just as
tight with the public purse strings.
The Republicans and suburban Democrats
elected since reapportionment turn out to be just as
opposed to new taxes as the old rural group, Dauer
said.
The new lawmakers have reflected urban thinking
in passing laws dealing with zoning, urban renewal,
state reorganization and a rechartering measure
which permits cities and counties to consolidate
their functions.
In areas of equal concern to urban areas but
costing money such as highways, edication and
public services there have been no major changes
in state legislation, Dauer added.
Co-director of the project is Dr. Elston Roady,
professor of government at Florida State University.
John R. Todd, a UF professor of social sciences also
is participating in the research.
Dauer noted that the influence of political parties
has increased markedly since reapportionment,
especially in the 1967 session of the Legislature. It
is an open question whether this change was due to
redistricting, he added.
On one hand, Republican gains in the Legislature
have come largely from areas of the state which

IN THE OCTOBER
The Fight For the President*
Mind And the Men Who
Won It by Townsehd Hoopes
The Oakland Seven by Elinor
Langer
The Young and the Old:
Notes on a New History by
Robert Jay Litton
... and, Dan Wakefield on
The Great Haircut War
at your newsstand now

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gained representation due to redistricting. On the
other hand, Gov. Claude Kirks election victory was
statewide and therefore unaffected by redistricting.
It is possible Republican lawmakers benefited
simply from a Republican shift in Florida voting
patterns rather than from redistricting, Dauer said.
The researchers are investigating differences in
legislative membership, political party activity, roll
call voting, lobbying activity and legislative output
during the two sessions prior to reapportionment,
1963 and 1965, and the two sessions following it,
1967 and 1969.
The study, sponsored by the National Municipal
League, covers five states Florida, Georgia,
Micchigan, New York and Virginia. The three
Florida researchers are responsible only for this
state.
Lobbying activity in Florida has changed since
reapportionment, but it has not diminished, Dauer
said. There is less money spent on wooing legislators
while they are in Tallahassee and more emphasis
given to influencing them at hte local level.
One reason for this is that rural legislators were
from areas of the state where few interest groups
had local representatives, Dauer explained. The
easiest way for a special interest group to contact
such a lawmaker was through a lobbyist in
Tallahassee.
In urban areas where special interest groups do
have representatives, these local contacts often can
be effective in winning support from the
Legislature. This is especially true, Dauer said, if the
interest groups representatives contributed money
and effort to the legislators election I __

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Mefrd*yv.Ocfber6t 1969. ,T,h>Fkirtte AHigpter,

Page 7



Page 8

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday. Octobar 6.1969

The
Florida
Alligator

The price of freedom

is the exercise of responsibility

WASHINGTON lt is possible that if Richard
Nixon were J6hn Kennedy or Dwight Eisenhower
he might be able to make his middle view on
Vietnam a salable commodity.
But the trouble is that the President has so
thoroughly exhausted the old political trick of being
in the middle of the road that when he does try to
take a position as on Vietnam he sounds not as
though he were seriously recommending a course of
action for his countrymen to follow but as though
he were scoring another point in a campaign debate.
It is clear, for example, that the President cannot
support the proposal of Sen. Charles Goodell,
R-N.Y., to make the end of 1970 the deadline for
American troops to withdraw.
He cannot do this because it interferes with his
plan to hold on in Vietnam with decreasing vigor
but with determination until Hanoi agrees to the
kind of fig leaf he thinks he needs as the price of
total withdrawal.
A Kennedy or an Eisenhower might be able to
sell the country on this plan, which is a position,
after all, that might be made popular by a forthright
stance.
Mr. Nixon chose to dispute Goodell, but not
head-on, as a man might who had a plan he wanted
to sell. He chose instead the slippery argument that
the Goodell plan might prevent him from getting
the troops out even before the end of 1970. It was a
curious debating trick, intended to make the
President sound a little more Dovish than Goodell.
And it was followed at once by the declaration that
he would support the Thieu government, which
made him a Hawk again.
It is an old practice of American politicians to
denounce the extremes and seize the middle ground.
Theodore Roosevelt was a champion at the
technique. But it is successful as it was with
Roosevelt only when the middle position actually
represents a strong belief between two real
extremes.
Mr. Nixon has mastered the technique, but not
the beliefs. Take, for example, his press conference
remarks on school integration.
We need to have a middle course between two
extremes, the President said. Then he defined one
extreme as those who want instant integration
and the other as those who want segregation

Hats Off To Coach Graves

MR. EDITOR:
Nice guys finish last! Leo
Durocher, 1967; Brent Cox,
1969.
Now after taking this
philosophy, bad guys
Durocher and Cox stand on the
losing side of things while nice
guy Ray Graves is riding the
wave of the most potent Gator
team in eons.
Os course I am referring to
the brilliantly written letter of
Mr. Brent Cox, the infamous
armchair quarterback of U of F.
His letter titled Talent wasted

Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Mary Toomey Janie Gould
Assignment Editor Editorial Assistant Assignment Editor
Helm Huntley Anne Frmdman
Assistant News Editor Feature Ed,tor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz
Union. Phone 392*1681, or 392-1683.
Opinio pv mi km tfc* Florida Alligator are those of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.*'

The Barren Middle

Raul Ramirez
Editor-1 n-Cf
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

at Miss, game on October 2
attacked Gator Rays
OFFENSIVE tactics!!
Now that is a mighty brave
undertaking from a fan who
cant even spell John Reeves.
Os course, the Gators through
two games have only scored 106
points and amassed 1084 total
yards. Im sure any college coach
would be up for ridicule of his
offensive knowledge with these
measly statistics!
But Mr. Cox decided it was
his duty to rap the last quarter
strategy of Gator Ray running
the ball when you have a 41-21

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

forever. The President made it clear that Jie stood
in the middle. But hundreds of thousands of school
officials throughout the nation are now deprived of
any direction whatever. Having been told by the
Supreme Court 15 years ago that the policy of the
nation was desegregation, they are now told by the
President that if they insist on obeying the law they
are extremists.
Frank Mankiawicz Mankiawicz_
_ Mankiawicz_ Tom Bradon
On inflation, too, the President carefully paved
two sides of the road in order to predetermine
where the middle would be. No serious economist
believes that the way to halt inflation is to
jawbone, as the President defined the extreme.
There is a sizable body of economists which
believes that the President cannot cure inflation by
monetary controls alone; that he must invoke wage
and price controls, at least in specific areas. But Mr.
Nixon made it sound as though the way to be in the
middle of the inflation argument is to recognize the
futility of speechmaking. Here again there is no
belief showing.
So the country doesnt really know what the
President believes about school integration or what
he believes about inflation. How then is the country
to assume that he really has a belief about Vietnam
that he is not merely trying to put himself in the
middle so that no matter what happens it will not
be the fault of Richard Nixon?
The middle of the road is a fine place, but as
James B. Weaver, the Populist candidate for
President in 1892 and the first American politician
to use the phrase, remarked of it: The trouble with
the middle of the road is that nothing grows there.

Alt
A \Mhim

lead! Preposterous! Why any
coach in the nation would have
his signal-caller filling the air
with footballs! So what if a
Bulldog intercepts and turns the
momentum around! We can just
throw some more passes! And
with a 12 point lead with 60
seconds to go, why not throw
the ball? Theyd have to score
twice to catch up!
Mr. Coxs reasoning is
definitely not that of a winning
gridiron coach. With a 20 point
lead and a sound running game,
any coach would have stuck to
the ground. A record-breaking
performance doesnt amount to
a hill of beans if its in a losinc
effort.
Mr. Cox seems to be one of
those fair-weather fans who is
never satisfied even if his team
turns a predicted losing one into
a winning one.
Ill bet Gator Ray will be
thinking of all those Mr. Coxs as
he takes his victory rides off the
field this season.
Our hats should be off to
Coach Graves. And lets hope he
has ten such rides this season.
JIM COLE

EDITORIAL
Speed Reform
(EDITORS NOTE: The following editorial is reprinted
from the Washington State University student newspaper,
the Daily Evergreen. Although some of the points
mentioned in it do not apply to the UF, we feel its overall
meaning is very much alive on our campus.)
Upperclassmen and graduate students can well remember
the recent changes which have started WSU on the road
from being a socially archaic institution, clinging to the
principal of in loco parentis, to an institution which
concerns itself primarily with academics and social change.
Upperclassmen have seen women students status change
from fourth class to only about second class. Women are no
longer required to wear dresses on campus at all times and
some may now stay out a few minutes past the time the
library closes.
However, with the present womens hours and
off-campus living restrictions, the institution continues to
brand women students with second class status.
Advanced students have witnessed the struggle and
eventual success of the implementation of the Black Studies
Program. They have yet, however, to see the realization of
the entire Ethnic Studies Division which should include
Indian and Mexican-American studies in the curriculum.
Upperclassmen have seen overt and institutionalized
racism eliminated from greek constitutions. More subtle,
but just as effective racism continues in greek houses,
however, as is apparently shown by the persistently small
number of minority students admitted by greeks.
Continuing students have even witnessed administrators
who have listened to the charge of double jeopardy. The
philosophy of in loco parentis seems to be diminishing
somewhat, but the discipline committees proposed revision
is so minute as to be insignificant.
Advanced students have even heard questions concerning
the academic status of ROTC on campus. However, all
formal discussion, as that presently conducted by the
Educational Policies Committee, remains behind closed
doors.
Last years students viewed the struggle of the
Experimental Education Program and the High School
Equivalency Program and the eventual expansion of both
programs this year.
The expansion, however, was due almost entirely to
student and private efforts since funds have been slashed by
the government.
Indeed, such accomplishments are encouraging and
should be applauded, but the snails pace by which
academic and social reform on campus is accomplished must
be accelerated by the new and continuing students. Only in
this way can the university emerge from its past role of
emphasizing social etiquette and WASP standards to an
institution which is primarily concerned with academics and
social change.

jls 4,^H
|Sj 9



There is no hope
for the complacent man

Bits & Pieces
Pennies Os Gold
By Bill King

Ive heard that Dion was so
bad Friday night that Abraham,
Martin and John all rolled over
in their graves.
For those 170 plus Hume Hall
residents who tried to sit in the
Hume block for the FSU game,
but got cut out go sit
someplace good.
Those outdated athletic cards
can still come in handy. They
make great paper airplanes at
football games.
A directory to Florida state
colleges and universities:
FSU Changed girls college
found in central Tallahassee.
USF Four year junior
college found in north Tampa.
F A&M Spirited place to be
and found in central Tallahassee.
FTU Or the same to you,
Buddy! Found in Orlando.
UF Nice Diace to get drunk
and found in Gainesville.
To have some fun in the
dorms collect all those gross
roaches and mail them in
quantities of rive thousand to

UF Loses In Ticketing

MR. EDITOR:
Much as I hated to admit it, I
was forced to concede (to my
FSU date) that her school is
superior to mine in at least one
respect the vital area of
football ticket distribution.
As one of the losers in my
seating-blocs forced date ticket
raffle, I had to tell my date,
who had travelled 150 miles
from Tallahassee, that we
wouldnt be watching our teams
play on Saturday.
I cant understand why, after
50 years of football games here,

Our Aim.. Get The Troops Home Now

MR. EDITOR:
This is AN OPEN LETTER
TO THE FACULTY:
The war goes on ... almost
45,000 Americans have
died .. Americas tragic
misadventure seems as far from
being over as ever. The President
has stated categorically that he
will not be responsive to public
opinion against the war. The
recent 25,000 man troop
withdrawal is a mere token,
designed more to silence dissent
than to provide a meaningful
basis for negotiations.
We are the Student
Mobilization Committee to End
the War in Vietnam. We
represent a national organization
whose aim is to bring the troops
home from Vietnam NOW. We
want the killing to stop. To this
end, were organizing on college
campuses across the nation.
Youve probably read
something about our work in the
press. Were planning a national
student strike on Nov. 14 and a
massive March Against Death
in Washington on Nov. 15. In
addition, we are coordinating
our efforts with another national
group, the Vietnam Moratorium
Committee and, locally, with
Student Government, and calling
for Vietnam Day Oct. 15. We
will have several activities going

Dr. Riker at the division of
housing.
Ive heard that Charlie
Shepherds sheep are loose and
trapped in a Reitz Union
elevator.
Is our country really ready for
self-government?
The question to be asked is
how did Playboy find out that
the Florida co-ed is
promiscuous? 1 doubt if it was
by telephone interviews.
Is it true that only because
Charlie Shepherd lost his athletic
cards that the system for getting
football tickets was changed?
It costs more to pollute water
than it does to unpollute.
A Funk and Wagnalls is a
standard college dictionary not
for use in the home, office, or
Berkley.
Answer-of-the-Week is: Only
do it during months with the
letter R in them.
Imagine this:
Charlie Shepherd pregnant.
Nixon in sandals.

the Athletic Department and the
Student Government ticket
committee dont yet have some
rough idea of the number of
date tickets a typical UFFSU
game requires. It seems that the
limit of 5,000 date tickets set by
the committee turned out to be
tragically insufficient; and that
at least some of the 21,966
student tickets allotted were
tragically wasted.
What happens to the student
tickets that are not taken
advantage of by all 21,966
fee-card-holding students? If
these leftovers are made

on here on campus. It will be a
day of discussion and debate, of
thought and contemplation.
We hope to renew our hope
and determination to make it
known to the Administration
that the people of the United
States want the war ended now.
We have support from a broad
spectrum of the intellectual,
scientific, and political
communities. A recent ad in the
New York Times which
supported the Oct. 15 action
was signed by Senators Goodell,
Hatfield, McCarthy and
McGovern. It was also signed by
John Kenneth Galbraith, Caesar
Chavez, Richard Goodwin,
Reinhold Niebuhr, Maurice
Eisendrath, Joseph Duffey,
Adam Walinsky, George Wiley,
Paul Schrade, Fannie Lou Hamer
and Dr. Benjamin Spock.
We need your participation
and your contributions. You
have been paying a terrible price
for the war -a double price. In
addition to your taxes, you must
pay the price of watching
students being sent to Vietnam
to be used as cannon fodder.
WE NEED YOUR HELP TO
GET THE MEN WHO ARE
THERE HOME AND TO MAKE
SURE THAT NO MORE GO
OVER THERE.
We need SISOO for our fall

The Alligator only one day a
week. (Utopia)
Florida with a new gym.
The SDS disbanned.
Dion in the Rat. (ick)
Ed Sullivan hip.
Parking on campus.
The fighting Gators 10-0.
Make pennies valuable. Make
them out of gold.
For all you professors who
intend to run for the most
popular professor on campus
during the winter qurter
remember what happened to
Ken McGill.
Notice to Brent Cox: (Who
wrote the letter to the Alligator
condemning the judgement of
Gator Ray in the Mississippi
State game) Mac Steen is looking
for you!
The USSR threatened to bury
our grandchildren and I think
thats right neighborly. I think
the least we could do is threaten
to educate theirs.
Postage stamps cause tongue
cancer.

available for public sale, I can
better understand why date
tickets are always gone so soon.
As I write this letter, I am
hoping that the Fightin
Gators make a better showing
on the field than the Athletic
Department has made in the
ticket office:
JOHN ROCK, IMD

LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters must be typed signed and
double-spaced and should not exceed 300 words in length. A writer's
name may be withheld from publication only if he shows just cause. No
letters signed with a pseudonym will be accepted for publication. The
editor reserves the right to edit all letters in the interest of space.
Addresses and telephone numbers must accompany all letters.

actions but we are asking for
more than financial help. We
need your time and active
support. We need help on our
working committees,
organization, publicity and
finance.
We call on you, as teachers, to
support the Oct. 15 moratorium.
We ask that you suspend your
normal activities on that day and

STUDENT MOBILIZATION COMMITTEE
1 NSA Membership I
i MR. EDITOR: %
% I
Tuesday night the student senate will vote on what I consider
{a very important piece of legislation repealing UF :v
membership in the National Student Association (NSA).
v Due to the great deal of discussion on campus concerning UF
ij: membership in the organization I feel that it is very important
# the voice of the student body be heard.
For this reason I urge all students, especially constituency S
I living off campus to call me Monday evening and discuss our |
membership in NSA. My telephone number is 378-6586.1 look :|S
g forward to discussing NSA legislation with all interested |
$: students. >:
8 $
DAVE REDDICK, 4JM
. \v l' : : *
'Poor Mr. Navarro
Was Overdramatized

MR. EDITOR:
Was Mr. Greer attempting to
appeal to the readers
sympathies in his recent article
Brave Young Gangsters? By
isolating and overdramatizing a
single event, and through
argumentum ad misericordian,
Mr. Greer seemingly is seeking
justification for the retainment
of capital punishment. His
emotionally laden words,
however, do little to enhance the
effect he evidently strove for.
We should not have assumed,
as was implied by Mr. Greer,
that poor Mr. Navarro lies to this
very day, cold and dead on the
pavement, but rather that his
remains have been collected and
a decent burial administered.
Also, his continual referral to
the shedding of tears for Ramon,

Monday, October 6,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

to participate in a
university-wide debate and
discussion about the war. We ask
you to encourage all students
enrolled in your classes to
suspend their normal activities
on that day and join us on the
Plaza of the Americas.
More information can be had
by writing SMC, Box 13107,
University Station.

in life, death, and incarnation,
appears to have been an attempt
to evoke feelings of personal
grief within us.
Evidently, this paved the way
for his ultimate objective; to
move us to deep mourning and
sympathy for Ramon, and
conceivably for ourselves in the
future.
Consequently, it is my
opinion, that had Mr. Greer
relied more heavily on factual
and objective evidence, and less
on passionate and emotionally
bound statements, he
undoubtedly could have
presented a more valid and
thought-provoking case.
MARC KUPERMAN, 4AS
Question
MR. EDITOR:
The question the campus is
still asking: Who was Ramon
Navarro?
JAMES COMANDER, 4ED

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, October 6,1969

Page 10

| WCampus; Crier |
|£ I \L SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT #

One of the most valuable and beneficial programs offered students at the University of Florida is the Student Health Insurance Plan. This
program is now in its thirteenth year, providing students and their families away to avoid unexpected and burdensome medical expenses.
Especially designed for students, the entire program has been updated this year in order to bring its benefits into line with the rising costs of
medical expenses. As a result of hard work, sound planning, and research by students, physicians, and insurance experts, a program has been
produced which provides sound medical coverage at a very reasonable premium.
In addition to the basic policy offered is the option of major medical coverage and thus a genuine insurance plan.
The program covers students from this fall until next, whether in school or during vacations. There is a program for coverage of student wives
and children as well as the standard single student policy.
Students of the University of Florida may enroll for the insurance benefits effective at home, at school, or while traveling 24 hours a day
throughout the year. All full fee paying students and their dependents are eligible. Eligible dependents are spouse and children over two weeks
and under nineteen years of age.
If you withdraw from school your insurance will continue for the full period for which you have paid your premium. However, if you
withdraw from school to enter military service, the insurance will terminate on the day you withdraw and a pro rata refund of premium will be
made on written request.
You may pick up brochures and enrollment forms at the Infirmary, Student Government, or IV* cG riff-Scar borough & Associates, or call
376-8393, and abrochure will be mailed to you.
For coverage beginning this quarter through September 11,1970, the premiums are as follows:
Student
Student, Spouse and Children 63.25
Student and Children * .75
Optional Maternity (additional premium) 48.00
Optional Major Medical 5.00
per person
NOW HEAR THESE
ARE YOU QUALIFIED FOR A UNIVERSITY COMMITTEE ?
Probably the most distinguished and honorable committee a UF student can serve on in student government is a University Committee.
These committees are composed of mature, cognizant students willing to devote time, knowledge and research to achieve goals directly
beneficial tO'UF students.
If you are interested in filling one of the many, diverse capacities available in your student government, please visit our offices soon on the
third floor of the Reitz Union.
Join the other proud UF students who have already made their move ... the move to student government, your best bet on this campus.
LOVE BUGS AND DONIGANS AID GATOR LOAN FUND
I bet the face of your car is blemished with LOVE-BUGS ... clogging your car's throat and nose, blinding its vision. Clear up your car's face
with a Neighborhood Hurricane Car Wash cleansing job. The office is at 616 N.W. 13th St.
Gator Loan Fund will be given one penny for every gallon of gas sold at Neighborhood Hurricane Car Wash during October, thanks to Dave
Davis, owner of the car wash and Gator supporter.
Donigan's clothing store, 1123 W. University Blvd., is selling UF glass tankard mugs with the UF seal and football schedule on the mug. They
sell for $1 and all proceeds go to the Gator Loan Fund. Thanks again to Bill Donigan, another devoted Gator fan.
BUDGET REQUEST DEADLINE OCTOBER 24
Any organization wishing to request funds from student government for the 1970-71 fiscal year, must submit a budget request to room 305
of the Reitz Union by October 24,1969.
A strict request format must be followed. Sample requests may be picked up in the Treasurer's office. Any questions... contact John
Englehardt, budget director, in the same room.
ATHLETIC CARD REFUNDS MUST BE PICKED UP
Refunds of the $5.00 fee for the replacement of the Athletic Card will have to be picked up in the Student Accounts Office in The Hub
between 9:00 A.M. and 3:30 P.M. They will not be mailed due to a lack of sufficient address.

All are invited to dance to the
music of the nationally famous
Tropics, absolutely free, at the
Homecoming Dance in the Reitz
Union Ballroom, October 19, from
9:00 P.M. 1:00 A.M.
Refreshments for the Florida Blue
Key sponsored dance are
compliments of the Union Barber
Shop.

NOW HEAR THIS
STUDENT HEALTH AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE

muSwi
Student Government Productions will present
Donovan in Florida Gym, Friday, Oct. 10. This young
recorder of "Sunshine Superman" and "Mellow Yellow"
is in the midst of his three-month American tour.
Tickets will be available in the Reitz Union Box Office,
for $2.50 and $4.00.

Cabinet Offices 392-1665
3rd Floor Reitz Union


ALL STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CABINET AND STAFF DESIRING
SPACE IN THE CAMPUS CRIER, MUST
HAVE THEIR INFORMATION TO ME
BY WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON, 5:00
OF EACH WEEK IN ORDER FOR IT
TO APPEAR IN MONDAY'S CAMPUS
CRIER.
THANKS,
RONNIE BLOOM
DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS



* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE j
For ale two Lambretta motor
scooters with traitor boot offor. Call
after 1:30 376-1517. (A-St-10-p)
Portable Storoo Soars Sitvertone four
Speakers Asking $lO. Call Paul
372-7122. (A-3MO-P)
SPECIAL ON OFFICE
EQUIPMENT. Limited time only.
Clean, adjust, luborcato A install now
ribbon, back to you in two days.
Hand adding machines $1730.
Electric adding machines $27.50.
Portable typewriters $12.50.
Standard size typwriters $22.50. DO
IT NOW A SAVE. JR Office
Furniture it Equipment Co. Call
376-1146. (A-lt-10-c)
1964 Chevy Belair Power steering
radio heater S6SO. Phone 371-8983
after 6 p.m. (A-st-9-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
50. BuySellTrade-Repair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
1964 Rambler American, R/H,
Standard, Ex. Condition, Many
things new it extras. Very economic.
$450 or best offer. Call Mukherjee:
378-3876. (A-St-11-p)
1966 Suzukisocc motorcycle,
helmet and car carrier. Motor in
excellent cond. Leaving town must
sell immed. S9O or best offer.
378-9465, 57 p.m. (A-3t-11-p)
69 Honda SO almost new 600 actual
miles including helmet and glasses
only $175. CaH 376-6061 after S.
(A-St-12-p)
5-string banjo, Gibson mastertone
rb-250, S2OO firm, includes case. Call
372-3947 between S+7p.m.; also
Bultaco I2scc Race Cycle $350.
Really. These month old pups are
beauties. Three still need to find
good homes. Ma and Pa are both
handsome dogs. Call 379-0111. Free
(A-st-12-p)
i
911 Porsche 1966, 5 speed,
positractlon, konls, mags, radials, roll
bar, racing seat, am-fm-wr, special
heater, headrest, fog lamps, engine
balanced, lightened, polished, high
compression, more, very fast,
smooth, $3950. 371-7766.
(A-2M2-p)
Schnauzer miniature male 4 months
shots wormed 11 generations of
champions AKC Meal pet and
watchdog Sacrifice this adorable pet
for $125.00 or best offer 379-3606.
(A-st-12-p)
67 90cc Honda c2OO perfect for
town and campus call 371-9044.
(A-3t-12-p)
Wedding dress long sleeve size 7
fantastic train SSO. 378-4045.
(A-2t-12-p)
Very good Royal office typewriter.
Very durable, nice print $40.00
Phone 378-9498 after 4:30.
(A-3t-12-p)
Trialer 10*x48 cabana-studio
attached in all student park. AC,
furnished $1750. 376-2184 eves.
(A-10t-12-p)
Harley-Davidson Sprint 250 cc with
book rack 2 helmets only 7,000
miles $375. Call Ken Moore
378-9376. (A-3t-12-p)
For sale Honda 50 only 3200 mi. In
excellent condition can go 50 mph
(downhill) call 373-2563 for
SIOO.OO. (A-st-12-p)
Honda 90 Excellent student
transportation with helmet $165.
Call Cliff, 372-2515 after 5:30.
(A-3t-13-p)
I
Wi \
i w* jm

I FOR SALE |
October Sale of Typewriters All
must be soldlll 52 Manual
Typewriters from $35 to $135. All
have been cleaned and adjusted and
are in good condition. Most of them
- may be bought for $lO down and
$lO per month. We also rent Electric
1.8.M.'5. Kiser's Office Equipment,
604 North Main Street. (A-3t-13-p)
We have 400 dozen pencils, lead or
color that have regularly sold for 15
cento to 25 cents. October Sale 5
cents. Most all office supplies are
25% to 50% discounted. Kisers
Office Equipment, 604 North Main
Street. (A-3t-13-p)
TV, air conditioner, bike. TV in great
condition: S4O. Air conditioner used
6 weeks: S6O. Mens 3-speed bike:
S2O. Call: 373-2247. (A-3t-13-p)
C-ii Martin guitar. One year old.
$260. Call Doug 373-2454.
(A-3t-13-p)
1950 Metro Step Van... .Camper
equipped 8 ft. stand inside. Runs fine
needs tag and inspection. Cost me
S4OO. Yours for S3OO. 376-9538.
(A-st-13-p)
67 Yamaha lOOcc. Good condition,
only 3600 mi. Best offer. Call
373-2341. (A-3t-13-p)
Must sell! *66 Cutlass in good
condition. Air it power. Call Ed
373-2620. Negotiation price, SI6OO.
(A-3t-13-p)
CAMERA Mamiya 500DT, still in
guarantee. Case, shade, filter, flash,
3X Telex tender, all $125. Zoom
mono prism monocular, S2O.
392-0933; after 6 372-2702.
(A-3t-13-p)
Get some wheels for the quarter.
Honda 90 needs tag, cheap. 376-7402
any time. (A-It-13-p)
D-18 Martin guitar. Year old, in
perfect condition. Call Doug at
373-2454. (A-3t-13-p)
1967 YAHMAHA 50CC. Excellent
cond. Low mileage. Must sell
immediately. SIOO. Call 373-2520,
ask for Bishop, Bart or Dean.
(A-3t-13-p)
Vitaflo fresh veg. juicer, glasses, end
it cocktail tables, silverware, recliner,
TV trays, 4 sp. phonograph, chest,
KAE drafting tools. 372-8735.
(A-st-13-p)
Petting in the dorms! A few homeless
tropical fish at giveaway prices. Used
tanks and equipment. Call 392-2088
or 475-1363 (no toll). (A-2t-13-p)
FOR RENT
Something Really Different A
Reasonable Too. One bedroom apt.
on the Newberry Road across from
the new golf course. Leasure ranch
style living. Big FIRE PLACE for
those cool evenings, fully paneled,
beautifully furnished. Pool, bar-b-que
house, air-conditioned. Water A
garbage collection furnished. Only
$135.00 monthly on 11 month lease.
Call 376-1146 or 376-3900. No pets.
(B-3t-10-c)
3 Bedroom apartment 1 block north
of campus. $165.00. Furnished. 118
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-1 Ot-5-p)

Give it a try!
HL
Jilil? N t\*. >s 1
MON.-THURS.
FRIDAY 6PMMIDNIGHT
SATURDAY 10AM-MIDNIGHT
SUNDAY 2PM-11 PM
J 236 N.W. 7th Avenue at
N.W. 13th St. Burger Chef

Monday, October 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

r'FoTRENT |
Tired of waiting for yours to be
built? Get a 2bdrm in Landmark
Phase I next to the pool now call
378-4589 or 372-6535 and ask about
no. 34. (B-2M2-p)
Immediate occupancy! Female
roommate convenient location call
372-2393 after 5:00 p.m. for further
information. (B-st-12-p)
1 bedr. apt. avail. Dec. 1 Nicely sum.
air-c. pooL SW 16 Ave area slOl/m
for couples only call 372-5221 or
3924929. (B-3t-12-p)
1 Bedroom apartment. 1 Block north
of campus. $125.00. Furnished. 11l
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-10t-5-p)
upper Division A Graduate Students
quite well managed trailer space
available 7 mi. no. of city on 441.
Call Mrs. Tanner. Progress Tra. Ct.
462-1660. (B-St-1-p)
| "wanWd j
Wanted: married couples to
participate in group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives. This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment" experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-st-9-c)
Girl wanted to share 4 bdr AC house
with 5 girls. S3O/mo., 2 living rooms,
family room, big yard, garage, 16 NE
8 St. Call 373-1223. (C-st-11-p)
Up div-grad roommate, new La
Mancha Apt, private bedrm w/
balcony, pool, air, carpet, tv, walk to
school best deal in town
$ 70/mo., util. inc. 376-1125.
(C-3t-11-p)
Male and Female help wanted.
Part-time. Very good salary. Can
arrange hours. Little Larrys, 1225 W.
University Ave. (C-st-11-p)
1 roommate for beautiful Camelot 2
bedroom apt. Clubhouse, color TV,
sauna bath. Rent just S6B. Call daily
after 4. 376-5118. (C-3t-11-p)
WANTED: FEMALE FOLK-BLUES
SINGERGUITARIST with a
versatile 'voice. IF youre serious
about your talent call Doug Olander
at 372-6598. (C-2t-12-p)
HELP! We need one fern, roommate
for nice apt 2 blks. east of campus
SSO mo. Own room. Call Sue or
Leslie 373-2766. (C-st-13-p)
Four friendly want girl to cook in
exchange for good food and good
company. 376-7402. (C-2t-1 3-p)
1. female roommate wanted to share
1 br Univ. Garden Apt. Grad
Student preferred. Call 372-7977
after 6 p.m. (C-St-8-p)
COED to share 2 bedroom Fr.
Quarter apt. Good location. Come by
anytime, no. 65. (C-st-12-p)
Waitress full and part time noon
hours. Must be neat. Good pay.
Apply Kings Food Host 1802 W.
Univ. Ave. P.M. only. (E-st-9-c)
Experienced druntmer needs work.
Call 372-2107 after 6:00. (C-3t-11-p)

Page 11

WANTEdT|
Registered Nurses Needed by
Alachua General Hospital for night
duty. Day nursery provided for your
pre-school age children during the
day while you sleep. Call 372-4321,
exL 227 or apply at the personnel
office, Alachua General Hospital, 912
SW4 Ave. (E-11-lOt-c)
FEMALE INFANTS NEEDED FOR
SPEECH EXPERIMENT. Must be
between 3 A 5 months of age and in
good health. Subjects will be paid
$2.00/hr. for approximately 3 hours.
Call Mrs. J. Bruno or Or. T. Murry,
392-2046. (E-10t-4-c)
Cocktail waitress wanted. No
experience necessary will train.
Full or part time. Dubs Steerroom,
4560 NW 13 St. 376-9175.
(E-10t-1 1-p)
I
Beat the heat. Ride yer dates, dont
walk em. Airconditioned, radio, heat.
2 new tires. 61 Olds FBS. 63 motor.
Only $199 deall! Call Chip
376-9308. (G-St-13-p)
Must sell Rambler American 330.
1965 automatic, radio, heater,
4-door, white walls, extra clean.
Excellent condition, low mileage.
$750. Call 372-2317. (G-st-13-p)
VW SEDAN 1961 New tires not
retreads radio. Has been well cared
for by female owner low mileage,
engine excellent $925. 372-5796.
(G-st-12-p)
Jaguar XKE 67 Conv. all extras A
service records $3695. PH373-1231.
(G-SMO-P)
ALFA ROMEO 1600 Spyder 1966
New Top Good Tires SI3OO Call Ron
at 371-5914 or come by 303 SW 12
St. (G-3t-10-p)
1963 Corvette Stingray Roadster.
327 4 speed new tires paint.
Beautiful condition 51450. Call
376-4913 after 5:00 p.m. (G-IOM-p)
PERSONAL |
x-x-x-x-x-w*}, x -x-x-x-x-x-x-i-x-:-vi?i*;-i, ; ->>!-.
HAPPY HOUR Every night 5:30
6:30 and also 9:00 10:00. 20 cents
for large premium draft. The
Chatterbox, 4551 NW 6 St.
(J-st-13-p)
DID YOU KNOW? The Spanish Main
is moving. Grand Opening Nov. 6th
at 1624 W. Univ. Ave. (Old Johnston
Photography). MEANWHILE were
having a big 30% discount sale on any
and everything in our shop at 105 W.
Univ. Ave. Open till 10 p.m.
(J-lOt-12-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a patriotic
message. Any time, day or night.
LET FREEDOM RING, 16 N.W. 7th
Ave. (J-st-13-c)
I LOST & FOUND
-5
<'X-x-x-x-x.x-x-:-x-x-r.v.x.y.v;*K*;*;*:*;*:-;5-x->'
Lost: Gold watch with black velvet
band. Towers area. Call Barb,
392-1971. Reward. (L-2t-13-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
you choose what you want...
pay only for what you get!
MONDAY
BAKED MACARONI 7Q
& MEAT SAUCE /y C
(All You Care To Eat)
TUESDAY
FRIED CHICKEN 99C
You Care To Eat)
> GAINESVILLE MALL

$ LOST A FOUND |
High School Class Ring lost at
Houston game. Merritt Island H. S.
Reward. Call Jim, 376-9450.
(L-3t-13-p)
Lost red contact tenses case In
Norman Aud. last Monday third row
from back. Phone 392-1533. Reward.
(L-st-9-p)
FOUND Small brown spiral
notebook with religion notes.
Between Yu lee, Broward A tennis
courts. Found Fri. evening. CaH Steve
392-7514. (L-3MO-NC)
| sirvlTceT |
Guitar lessons and repairs.
2 years experience. See Bob Zuber,
c/o Bent Card Coffee House, 1821 W.
Univ. Ave. 376-9531. (M-St-13-p)
Special Ballroom Dance Class. Start
Oct. IS 9:00 p.m. SIO.OO. Six
Lessons. Fran Kessler, 372-1199 or
372-7197 or register at Frans, 1013
W. Univ. Ave. (M-st-13-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Special!*.
Gainesville Machine Shop. CaH
371-0710. (M-St-3-c)
Let Typewriter Specialists Clean your
typewriters at reasonable prices, too.
10% discount with your I.D. Card.
Kisers Office Equipment, 604 North
Main Street. (M-3t-13-p)
RUBY'S ALTERATIONS 1126%
N.W. Ith Street 376-1501. (M-st-9-p)
WASHING STARCHING
IRONING DONE REASONABLE
RATES N.W. Section. CaH 372-1191.
(M-St-9-p)
Photography Bxlo=sl.oo 5x7=.50.
Sororities, Fitts, teams parties,
portraits, portfolios. Can handle any
assignment Call Ronnie Koni
376-6042- fM-St-6-nl
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Opticians at 519 SW
4th Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 379-4410. (m-ts-S-c)
A RACE FOR GLORY,
FOR LOVE AND FOR THE
FUN OF IT!
SHOWS
MMaMifCHKsncsnts 7 : so
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flWWwKcf
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'THE SONS OF KATIE ELDER'*
|9 JOHN WAYNE 1 DEAN MARTIN 1



The
Florida
Alligator j

OHHb wHHHpp
TOM KENNEDY

Gator Defense A Nightmare For FSUs Offense

I Kazoo Power I
PEPPERmwM
Like a swarm of buzzing locust, 10,000 kazoos invaded Florida
field and left the Florida State Seminoles with a 21-6 defeat.
The locust descended on the Seminoles first with 13:18 left in the
first half the result, Bob Coleman jarred the ball loose from FSITs
Bill Cappleman and Bob Harrell recovered.
The buzzing picked up again with 11:32 left (this time the locust
plague seemed to be intensifying). Harrell demonstrated more kazoo
power as Cappleman lifted himself up off the ground 11 yards behind
the line of scrimmage.
Eight minutes later John Reaves connected with Carlos Alvarez for
a TD to put tiie Gators out in front for keeps despite a determined
effort and a touchdown by FSU.
The kazoos, however, seemed to have more effect on the defense
rather than the offense.
The highly criticized unit that gave up 34 points to Houston and 35
points to Mississippi State held the Seminoles to six points and minus
18 yards rushing.
However the critics didn't bother comeiback Steve Tannen, I
dont think anybody around here knows how to read a newspaper
anyway. Nobody listens to the press.
The press may not hare bothered him, but members of the
Seminole team did.
Whenever they would bring me down on a return or when we
would line up close to their bench, they would yell, How does it feel
AB- American, how does it feel.'
It got to me at first, Tannen said, but after a while I would just
look back and say it feels good, we're ahead.
Head Coach Ray Graves attributed the success of the much
improved defense to the pre-game changes in the line up.
We switched Harrell and Jack Youngblood to give more heigth to
tile middle of the line. Originally we had planned to blitz six men,
however it later became unnecessary as the front four were getting
through practically every play, Graves said.
That's what beat them, he added. Their offensive line couldn't
protect Cappleman.
FSU Coach Bill Peterson agreed with Graves.
Their defense just beat our heads in, he said.
If anybody lost the game for us it was me, I sent in some real bad
plays, Peterson continued.
One of those plays was the decision to go for two points after the
Seminole's lone touchdown, late in the first half.
I wanted to take a 8-7 lead into the dressing room at halftime, he
said. No one has ever gotten ahead of the Gators and we felt the one
point advantage might have made a difference in outcome.
Again on this two point conversion attempt the kazoos or rather
the lack of them played a role in the Gator defense.
Cappleman called time once to ask for silence, and when the play
started he threw the ball clear out of the stadium.
And as for the victory it just might have been those kazoos.
Mets Out-Club The Braves

ATLANTA (UPI) The New
Yot k Mets, cashing base hits like
they were afraid they were going
out ofstyle, dubbed the Atlanta

GATOR

Braves 11-6, Sunday to move
into a commanding two-game
lead in the best-of-five national
league playoffs.
. + 4k 4 MM 'A. 4. :*

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I w nH T m&m v
PHIL BANNISTER

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SAM PEPPER
Sports Editor

!, The Florida ANigdor. Monday. Ootakar 6,1908

Page 12

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CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
'

TOUCHDOWNS
Tommy Durance (above)
dives over the pile to score the
Gators final touchdown at the
opening of the fourth period,
while Carlos Alvarez (left) takes
second TD toss from
quarterback John Reaves.
(Photos by Phil Cope & Tom
Kennedy)



Everyone s Talking About UF Defense

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Assistant Sports Editor
Talking about the Gators
defense ... a defense that held
Florida States offense
to just six points.
Meanwhile, the Gator
offensive machine, although
stalling and spinning its wheels
in the soft footing, did manage
to roll up three touchdowns on
wet and soggy Florida Field to
provide the UF with a 21-6
victory over bitter state rival
FSU.
Everyone was talking ... and
Florida fans were happy and
talking the most. FSU people
just walked around, with their
mouths hanging open, unable to
speak.
The Gators mystery defense,
the same defense personnel-wise
that gave up 34 and 35 points
respectively to Houston and
Mississippi State and then turned
around and shut down FSU*s
potent attack forces, has the
students, ahumri, opposing FSU
coaches and future Gator
opponents taftln*.
Talking about how the
rightin Gator defense stopped
the Seminoles* famed Green Bay
Packer sweep and held the *Nole
ground attack to a minus 19
yards.
Talking about how the UF
defensive unit completely
demolished the FSU men
physically and mentally with
their constant pass rush and
tough hard tackling. Plays such
as the goal4ine stand early in the
first quarter on the Gator
one-yard line, hte blocking of
FSlfs field-goal attempt and
finally the break-up of FSIPs
two-point conversion try after
their only touchdown.
People were talking about
how the Gators forced the
Seminoles into giving up the
football on fumbles by just plain
knocking the hell out of their
ball-carriers.
And no one forgot the three
crucial interceptions
everythings crucial in a UF
FSU match.
But most of all, people were
going out of their minds over the
playing of the front defensive
four of ends Bob Coleman and
Robert Harrell and tackles Jack
Youngblood and Robbie Rebol.
The front four dumped FSUs
All-American quarterback
candidate Bill Cappleman for a
net total loss of 91 yards.
Were really playing
together, its just been great
coaching them, said head
defensive coach Gene Ellenson,
who was grinning and talking to
himself after a quiet week.
Ellenson then received the game
ball from defensive back Steve
Tannen.
It was great pride on their
part (the defense), Ellenson
said, that was responsible for
their great effort. Theyre all for
the team.
It wasnt lack of effort,
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defensive captain Tom
Abdelnour said, but mistakes
that hurt us before. We played
today like we should have been
doing all year.
The efforts of Harrell,
Youngblood, Ghesquiere, Rebol,
Mike Palahach, and Ted Hager
more than prove Abdelnours
point.

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PHIL BANNISTER
CAPPLEMAN DROPPED
Bob Harrell catches Seminole quarterback Bill Cappleman behind
the line for a loss of 11 yards. The Gator defense held the Seminoles
to minus 18 yards rushing.

FLORIDA
STATE THEATER |
CENTER 1 3rd BIG Welk
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a. CASSETTE TAK EQUIP.
IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL
378-8933
CLICK CAMS?A STORES
t Climb aboard
...e S.S. Winnjammer* £
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to £A
L Midnight jj
i Bernie Sher //
f at the Organ on Thundey, Friday & Saturday
j Oysters & clams on the half shell f* I
Michelob on draft >0
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty A
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton. Manager 1/
. . 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. 4 fl
Reservations Accepted t V \

UF FANS HAPPY AFTER

Harrell, besides smashing
Cappleman for several big losses,
fell cm two fumbles caused by
hard-charging teammates,
including Youngblood, who
traded positions with Harrell.
The switch proved to be very
beneficial as both players got to
Cappleman several times and
constantly caused him to break

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his timing and execution.
Ghesquiere, a 200-pounder
from Pensacola, intercepted one
pass and recovered one fumble,
besides doing his normal job at
linebacking.
Another important switch was
that of split-end Hager over to
defensive comer-back, a position
Hager has played before. Hager

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Monday, Octdbar 6,1969, The Florida AMpator,

grabbed a probable touchdown
out of the hands of FSUs big
6-foot-6, 209-pound Kent
Gaydos in the Gator end-zone.
Rebols fumble recovery and
pass rush and Palahadis
interception were other
outstanding efforts of the UF*s
NEW DEFENSE.

Page 13



Page 14

, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday. Octobar 6,1969

ORIOLES LEAD PLAYOFF, 2-0

Morions Hit Beats Twins

BALTIMORE (UPI) Dave
Boswell, knocked out by
manager Billy Martin in a July
brawl, was lifted by Martin in
the 11th inning Sunday and Curt
Motton greeted his successor
with a single that gave the
Baltimore Orioles a 1-0 victory
over the Minnesota Twins in the
American League playoffs. \
The victory provided the
Orioles with a 2-0 lead in the
best-of-five playoffs and the
scene now switches to Minnesota
on Monday where Baltimore
needs only one victory to gain a
berth in the World Series.
Dave McNally, who won the
final game of the Orioles 1966
World Series sweep, pitched a
brilliant three-hitter to gain the
triumph and didn't allow a hit

Top 20 In Action
NEW YORK (UPI) How the United Press International top
20 major college football teams fared this weekend.
1. Ohio State defeated Washington 41-14.
2. Penn State defeated Kansas State 17-14.
3. Arkansas defeated Texas Christian 24-6.
4. Texas defeated Navy 56-17.
5. Southern California defeated Oregon State 31-7.
6. Oklahoma was idle.
7. Georgia defeated South Carolina 41-16.
8. Purdue defeated Stanford 36-35.
9. Missouri defeated Michigan 40-17.
10. UCLA defeated Northwestern 36-0.
11. Michigan lost to Missouri 40-17.
12. Tennessee defeated Memphis State 55-16.
13. Michigan State lost to Notre Dame 42-28.
14. Florida defeated Florida State 21-6
15. Louisiana State defeated Baylor 63-8.
16. Stanford lost to Purdue 36-35.
17. Alabama defeated Mississippi 33-32.
18. Wyoming defeated Colorado State 39-3.
19. Kansas State lost to Perm State 17-14.
20. Florida State lost to Florida 21-6.
Cross Country Team
Takes Daytona Meet

Despite the efforts of Florida
State's Ken Misner, the UF's
cross country team swept the
Daytona Beach Invitational Run
Saturday. n.
UFs Made Bir, a freshman,
and John Parker, a senior, led
the Gator runners to a lop-sided
23-67 win over nearest
competitor FSU. Bir finished
second and Parker third in the
five-mile run.
Placing high for the Gator
cindermen were A.W. Smith,
who was ninth, Steve Akinson,

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over the last seven innings. The
Twins have just seven hits in the
23 innings the first two games
have lasted.
Boswell, who allowed seven
hits and gave up seven wales,
was constantly in trouble but he
managed to blank the Orioles
until Martin decided to pull him
in favor of Ron Perranoski with
two out and two on in the 11th
inning.
EUie Hendricks, a lefthanded
hitter who batted for Andy
Etchebarren in the ninth and
walked, was due to face the
righthanded throwing Boswell
when Martin called on
Perranoski, a lefthander who was
the losing pitcher Saturday
although he allowed just four

10th, and Frank Betts, who was
11th.
The St. Petersburg Times
said that FSU was supposed to
have the best cross country team
in the state, captain Parker
said. But we just crushed them
with our depth.
The Gators travel to
Charleston, S.C. today to rim
small Baptist College. The first
home meet for the Gators will
be Oct. 20 against powerhouse
Tennessee.

hits in 3 2/3 innings of effective
work.
Baltimore manager Earl
Weaver countered Martin's move
by sending up Motton, a
righthander, to hit for
Hendricks. Motton, who batted
.303 this year in 89 at bats, hit a
liner to right center that just
cleared the glove of second
baseman Rod Carew, who leaped
for the ball.
Boog Powell, one of the
slowest runners in the majors,
was on second and centerfield
Caesar Tovar tried to make a
play at the plate. But Tovars
throw was up the line and went
by catcher George Mitterwald as
Powell bowled him over and
scored the winning run.
A crowd of 41,704 (the first
time the Orioles have drawn over
40,000 this season but still far
short of the 52,000-seat capacity
at Iv'emorial Stadium) roared as
Motton came through with the
deciding hit.
MODERN SHOE
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1620 W. UNIV. AVE.
3794316
AND
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379-6211
SOLESATTACHEDHEELS
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in 1
Does it really work?

If you've ever resorted to NoDoz* at 4 a.m.
the night before an exam, you've probably
been disappointed.
NoDoz, after all, is no substitute for
sleep. Neither is anything else we can
think of.
What NoDoz is is a very strong stim stimulant.
ulant. stimulant. In fact, NoDoz has the strongest
stimulant you can buy without a prescrip prescription.
tion. prescription.
Caffeine.
Whats so strong about that?
If we may cite The Pharmacological
Basis of Therapeutics: Caffeine is a
powerful central nervous stimulant. Caf Caffeine
feine Caffeine excites all portions of the central
nervous system. Caffeine stimulates all
portions of the cortex, but its main action
is on the psychic and sensory functions.
It produces a more rapid and clearer flow
of thought and allays drowsiness and
fatigue. After taking caffeine, one is ca capable
pable capable of more sustained intellectual ef effort
fort effort and a more perfect association of
ideas. There is also a keener apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation of sensory stimuli.
Very interesting. But why take
*T.M.1969 Brlmtol-Myrs Co.

Gator-Tulane Game
Almost At Sell-Out
TAMPA A sell-out has been predicted for the Oct. 11
Florida-Tulane game in Tampa Stadium by James W. Kynes, president
of the Florida West Coast Bowl Association, sponsor of the game.
Kynes made the prediction following the Gators record-shattering
defeat of Houston in the season opener. Some 30,000 tickets have
already been sold in the 46,000-seat stadium.
There are many good seats still left, Kynes said. Florida fans are
looking forward to seeing native Tampan John Reaves and the
exciting brand of football played by the Gators.
AD seats are $6 each and may be ordered by mail by sending check
to Florida West Coast Bowl Association, Box 3342, Tampa, Fla.
33601. Mail orders must include a 50 cent mailing charge per order,
regardless of size,
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Student Special |
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NoDoz when you can get caffeine in a
cup of coffee?
Very simple. You take'NoDoz all at
once i nstead of si ppi ng coffee for 10 mi n nutes.
utes. nutes. And if you take two NoDoz tablets,
the recommended dosage, you get twice
the caffeine in a cup of coffee.
Two tabletsisn't that likely to be
habit forming? Definitely not. NoDoz is
completely non-habit forming.
Which means its safe to take
whether youre cramming at night. Or
about to walk into an 8 o'clock class. Or
driving somewhere (even though youre
rested) and the monotony of the road
makes you drowsy.
One last thing you should know
about NoDoz. It now comes in two forms.
Those familiar white pills you take with
water. And a chewable tablet called
NoDoz Action Aids*. It tastes like a choc chocolate
olate chocolate mint, but it does everything regular
NoDoz does.
And if youve managed A
to stay awake this
thats quite a lot.



Canes Retaliate For 23-13 Victory

MIAMI The University of
Miami Hurricanes found a
football team they could beat
Friday night, but they werent at
all sure of it at halftime.
In fact, a disheartened Orange
Bowl crowd of 37,038 saw
North Carolina State strike for
10 points in the second quarter
and arrive at the intermission
with a 13-10 lead.
But quarterback Lew Pytel
and his offensive troops
knuckled down to business in
the second half and scored three
of the first four times they had
the football for a 23-13 victory.
VANDY NORTH CAROLINA
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
Sophomore quarterback Johnny
Swofford threw three
touchdown passes and tailback
Don McCauley crossed the goal
line twice to lead North Carolina
past Vanderbilt 38-22 Saturday.
Swofford completed scoring
passes of 12 yards to end Tony
Blanchard, 29 yards to
McCauley and 41 yards to
wingback Lewis Jolley, giving
the Tar Heels their first win of
the season.
Vanderbilt was stopped by a

Baby Gators-Auburn
Open Frosh Season

The Florida Baby Gator
football team opens a four-game
slate for 1969 when they travel
to Auburn to meet the Tiger
Pups at Cliff-Hare Stadium,
today.
Head freshman coach Jack
Westbrook will carry a 44-man
squad that includes 31
scholarship athletes and 13
tryouts. The roster includes 39
Florida players and one each
from Georgia, New Jersey, Ohio,
Oklahoma and Texas.
Nick Nichol, a 64,200-pound
quarterback from Dallas, Texas
is expected to lead the Gator
attack. The backfield includes
Leonard George, a 5-11,
180-pounder from Tampa at
tailback, Duane Doel, a 6-0,
180-pounder from Plantation at
fullback and Richard Lazzara, a
5-11, 180-pound speedster from
St. Petersburg at flanker.
With only 31 players on
scholarship we are lacking depth
in many areas, said Westbrook.
If we suffer any key injuries we
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rugged North Carolina defense
until the closing minute of the
first half when third string
quarterback Denny Painter, a
converted center playing in his
first game, completed a 49-yard
touchdown aerial to
Commodores taliback Doug
Matthews.
GEORGIA
ATHENS, GA. Fullbacks
Bruce Kemp and Julian Smiley
produced three touchdowns
Saturday and seventh-ranked
Georgias defense overwhelmed
South Carolinas offense as the
Bulldogs won 41-16.
Smiley scored twice for
Georgia, once on a six-yard

could have quite a problem on
our hands.
Freshman football is so
unpredictable, he said. We
spend the entire pre-season
practice working against the
varsity and using our opponents
formations, so we dont spend
much time working as a unit.
BeAt
HILLEL
Thursday
I BPM I
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum. everything you want to
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This dictionary is approved
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GATOR OPPONENTS HOW THEY FARED

scamper in the first quarter and
again for Georgias final
touchdown on another six-yard
plunge.
Kemp, who gained 142 yards,
scored on a two-yard run early
in the fourth quarter. Georgia
halfback Dennis Hughes ran in
from three yards out late in the
second quarter after Kemp
brought the play down from the
Georgia seven.
AUBURN-KENTUCKY
AUBURN, ALA.
Sophomore quarterback Pat
Sullivan passed for four
touchdowns and a veteran
Auburn defense limited
Kentucky to a field goal
Saturday as the Tigers clobbered
the Wildcats for a 44-3
Southeastern Conference win.
Kentucky, which upset
Mississippi 10-9 last week, made
its lone score on a 37-yard Bob
Jones field goal.
Sullivans first bomb to Terry
Beasley came in the first five
minutes of the game. Defensive
Holy Toledo
Jack Dempsey won the world
heavy weight championship by
stopping Jess Willard in three
rounds July 4, 1919 at Toledo,
Ohio.

I Why engineering students graduate to Lockheed.
Progress is a matter of degrees. But, that's only the beginning. At Lockheed Missiles
and Space Company, we're working on wideworld... otherworld... upperworld... and I
subworld projects. We're pretty high on space... we've got Agena and other
extremely advanced programs to prove it. And, when it comes to ballistic missiles,
Polaris and Poseidon show an arc of triumph. We think deeply, t 00... consider our
deep submergence vehicles, for example. And, just to show you our feet are solidly
on the ground, we're working on advanced land vehicles. Information? Business,
government and industry get it out of our systems.
LMSC has been in the sea... on land... in the air... in space... and now, we're com- I
ing to your campus. We'd like to talk to you about coming to LMSC. Contact your place placement
ment placement office for an appointment. Our interview team will be on campus October 10.
Move up to Lockheed.. .or move over for those who do. ls an interview is incon inconvenient
venient inconvenient at this time, write to: College Relations Coordinator, P.O. Box 504, Sunnyvale, I
- California 94088. LMSC is an equal opportunity employer.
LOCKHEED
MISSILES S SPACE COMPANY
A GACHJP DIVISION OP LOCKMEEO AIACAAET COAPOAATION
Deep Submergence Twister
Rescue Vehicle (Advanced land vehicles)
y
Olher .dwLa space
JbWv mm ir&v
ifioj iui w j w v-w

back Don Webb intercepted a
pass and returned it to the
Kentucky 24.
HOUSTON MISS. STATE
HOUSTON Sophomore
quarterback Gary Mullins threw
touchdown passes of 54, 42 and
12 yards to split end Elmo
Wright in the second quarter
Saturday night to lead the

I FREE BEER
I DUBS
| EVERY MONDAY 9-10 AND 12-12:30
Gator PAWN SHOP
GUNS
( LOANS ) CAMERAS
RADIOS & TVS
BUY-SELL-TRADE
"W specialize in Gator-Aid
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575

v e. \ i / i/* i v *
Monday, October 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator, I

University of Houston to a 74-0
victory over Mississippi State.
It was the worst defeat in the
Bulldogs 70-year history.
Fullback Ted Heiskell scored
two touchdowns on runs of one
and 25 yards and running bade
Jim Strong scored another on a
nine-yard run before the
Houston second team took over
in the third quarter with the
score 45-0.

Page 15



Page 16

i> The Florida Alligator, Monday, Qctobar O. 1000

The All-American food! STEAK
ff .. : .^Mijjjjjjj^L
rr
J I PLAYER of the WEEK "Congratulations to
the Player of the Week
1 Come get your FREE
STEAK DINNER
2445
| Just South of sh Underpass Take Out
Textbooks-New and Used
Architectural Equipment HOME
I Art Supplies 1 uppl e Robert Harrell WITH DINNER
I CfrnrJw Inm nc The first defensive player to win 'Player of the Week'
I y ampS is big number 77 Robert Harrell for his outstanding
IC II S I efforts in the UF's 21-6 victory over arch-rival Florida I
The Gator front four, led by 221 pounder Harrell, jjflTflk
Mascot Stationary constantly kept the heat on FSU's Bill Cappleman, I
causing him to fumble several times, two of which
Film and Develooina Harrell recovered at critical times for the fightin' Gators.
I Harrell & Company dumped Cappleman 12 times for
Service a net total loss of 91 yards. They harrassed Cappleman
to the extent that FSU's execution and timing was
MONDAY PDI nA V fi Q completely broken down at times.
/V\UINI/AT- iKIUAT 0-0 Harrell, a sophomore from Jacksonville, personally
SATURDAY 919 dumped Cappleman for losses of 11,12 and 16 yards, to H j v R^^BBBBJa
I highlight his excellent defensive performance. Jpy I
I A FREE, Living color Poster of this handsome Son-of-a-gun can be I
C l lf | :::::: =555 yours for the askin 8 at an V of the Four WISHBONE Locations.
jjx ft 2 ? While you're there, you might want to pick up some of the plump,
V uicy Fried Chicken t* l3l made the Captain what he is today.
BRANCH STORES-MEDICAL CENTER, BROWARD, ~/,
| TRI SHOP, TOWBS, AND THE UNION | .J ISBSSSS.