Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol 62, No. 9

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UPS ETERNAL SEARCH
"You look that way and I'll look this way and the first to spot a
parking spot yell." UF students aren't the only ones with problems.
Turtles around the Architecture-Fine Arts pond can't find a place to
park either.

Freshmen Scoff At Tradition

By RICHARD GRAY
Alligator Correspondent
The era of freshmen rat caps is apparently at
an end, despite the efforts of UF President Stephen
C. OConnell and Student Body President Charles
Shepherd to reinstate the tradition.
Many freshmen think it was a good idea, but it
wasnt carried out well enough. Other interviewed
felt they didnt want to be subjected to
harassment by upperclassmen.
Georgeana Du Breuil, lUC, said, There werent
enough freshman carrying out the idea. There
wasnt even a decent minority.
Most of the freshman seemed to agree and stood
by the old cliche, nobody else was wearing them.
I went to the third flow of the Union to buy
one, said Chris Weiss, lUC, but they were sold
out. I wouldnt have worn it anyhow, nobody eke
did.
The caps are available at the Hub, the Student
Information Booth, and the third floor of the Reitz
Union as long as the supply lasts. They can be
purchased for sl, the profits going to Gator Loan
Fund. The cost seems to be another factor in the
failure of the rat caps to go over.
Number one, I didnt want to spend $1; number
two, I hate hats; and number three, I think
freshmen are spirited enough already, said Bob
Kershaw, 1 UC. Besides, we dont want to be
subjected to any harassment or punishment our first
few weeks on campus
Ann Woodward, lUC, said, If they really
wanted them to go through, they should have
required us to wear them.

*.- - ,, * . :WV '.<> _ > /'
The
Florida Alligator

HEADS REMAIN BEANIE-LESS

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

Shepherd, one of the advocates of the beanies
said, No one was going to obligate the freshmen to
wear them, we could not obligate them, and I would
not have approved any program if it had been
mandatory.
I taught freshmen last year, and I think they
need an identity here at the university. The idea was
not to harass or punish them, but to set them off as
a group with special needs.
I think freshmen will wear them before they
graduate if they stop and really think about it.
We were at fault in that we were late in
promulgating the idea, late in ordering a sufficient
quantity, and late in laying a sufficient foundation
with the rest of the student body.
Many of the upperclassmen had mixed feelings
about the rat caps. Phil Johnson, captain,
cheerleader said, I think it would do a lot to raise
the spirit of the freshmen and it sort of gives them
an identity.
Bruce Hoffman, 4JM, was in favor of the beanies.
I think it is a reinstatement of a harmless tradition
that could be a benefit to both freshmen and
upperclassmen, that is, to set them apart as
newcomers..
However, many upperclassmen thought the
beanies were foolish or discriminating Linda
Lee, 3JM, felt, there should not be any
discrimination between the classes. It would be
all right if they (freshmen) bought them as a
philanthropic project, and they just bought them to
have. v

University of Florida, Gainesville

IN DOUBTFUI CASES

Parking Commission
Requests Appeals

See Editorial Page 6
By CAROL SANGER
Alligrtor Executive Editor
. .7" '&*'
The newly appointed Student
Traffic and Parking Commission
Monday drafted a resolution
calling for all students who have
received tickets for questionable
parking or operational violations
to appeal their tickets to the
Student Traffic Court.
The commission, chaired by
Harvey Alper, also urged
clarification of the universitys
traffic regulations for students.
The commission is grossly
dissatisfied with the current
situation, Alper, president of
Omicron Delta Kappa, said.
He said the commission plans
to meet with Security Director
Audie Shuler and Traffic and
Parking Coordinator Lee
Burrows within the next two
weeks.
These meetings will be open
to all students and questions can
be submitted through the
student commission in care of
the Student Traffic Court, Alper
said.
Bob Wattles, chief justice of
the traffic court, said all appeals
will be carefully considered. If
the student really did not

The commission is grossly dissatisfied with the
current situation.
Harvey Alper, Parking Commission Chairman

understand the violated traffic
rule, charges will be dismissed.
We urge all students making
such written appeals to
remember their obligation to the
Honor System and to only enter
appeals for instances where they
did not understand the parking
and traffic rules, the
commissions resolution stated.
The commission, consisting
of Jack Vaughn, president of the
Student Senate; Carol Sanger,
executive editor of the Florida
Alligator; Ralph Glatfelter,
secretary of consumer affairs;
Kathy Spellman, secretary of
student affairs; and Bob Wattles,
chief justice of the traffic court,
also plans to meet with the
university's Parking and
Transportation Committee in
three weeks.
The commission will meet
next Monday, Oct. 6, at 3 p.m.
in room 346 of the Reitz Union
to draw up a list of questions for
the 4 pjn. open student forum
with Burrows.
This open discussion session

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Tuesday, September 30, 1969

will be held in room 123 of the
union.
Chief Shuler has been asked
to meet with the commission on
Monday, Oct. 13 to answer
questions on the parking and
traffic problems.
Alper said the commissions
final report should be submitted
to Student Body President
Charles Shepherd by Nov. 1.
Shepherd had asked for the
report no later than Dec. 1.
I Inside
CAMPUS DISORDER
legislation meets with some
opposition among students;
administrators mute .. .page 3
Academics .4
Classifieds 8
Dropouts .4
Editorials 6
Letters .... T 7
Orange and Blue 5
Sports 10



i. The Florida AHigstdr; Tuesday, September 38,1969

Page 2

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PRESIDENT NIXON
stays oJt of issue

Objections To PE Elimination
Charged By Prof As Unfounded

Objections to abolishing
mandatory physical education at
UF may be unfounded.
The complaints come from
the claim that substitute courses
in personal development* are
overcrowded. But Dr. Roy L.
Lassiter, who introduced the
resolution before the University
Senate, believes that the claim is
unfounded.
Lassiter said Monday he has
found over 100 courses in art,
drama, speech, music, ROTC,
and PE which could be

Experimental College
Begins Second Year
The Florida Experimental College will be opening their academic
doors for the second year Monday.
However, a brochure listing the names and phone number of course
coordinators is not expected to be ready before Friday, said Chief
Coordinator Dan Beardsley.
The college will again be offering courses to anyone interested in
something a little different.
The courses are designed for those who are tired of the large
university c 1 *ss and are searching for a smaller classroom situation to
stimulate cu osity and creativity.
FEC is ba ed on the idea that each individual has much to offer to
any group situation and should be encouraged to relate his
experiences to the group.
Films, tapes, and photos are used extensively to stimulate the
student in his studies.
Beardsley said Monday all students should have a voice in the FEC
administration so both students and coordinators could better work
hand-in-hand in planning and preparing all activities. This idea and the
fact that the groups consist of few, but really interested students,
lends a unique cohesiveness.
The experimental college is not designed to compete with UF.
Rather it supplements courses already offered on campus. The FEC
brochure lists such different** courses as mind expansion,
Afro-American studies, and Near Eastern religion, all to be offered
this fall.
I [BB MEM MM Ml I
3?Antym-BECKUM OPTICIANS
22 West University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Phone 376-3516
SSSKSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS=SaS=S-=-l
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June. July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions ofvtheir authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.53 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Army Drops Beret Charges As CIA Balks

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Army Monday dropped all
charges against six Green Beret officers accused of murdering a
Vietnamese counter-spy, explaining that the Central Intelligence
Agency (CIA) had refused to let its agents testify at their trial.
Army Secretary Stanley R. Resor ordered the action on
grounds that the six Special Forces officers accused of killing
alleged double agent Thai Khac Chuyen could not get a fair trial
without CIA testimony.
When Armed Services Committee chairman L. Mendel Rivers
announced Resors action on the floor of the House of
Representatives, members broke into applause. About a dozen
congressmen then spoke in praise of Resors decision. None
criticized it.
People in my district, as near as I could ascertain, were
outraged that the thing went as far as it did,* said Rep. Wayne
L. Hays, D-Ohio.

considered personal
development courses.
With this number of courses
offered, Lassiter said he found
no major problems in the
implementation of the
resolution.**
Art Department Chairman E.
E. Grissom had voiced
opposition to the resolution
because his department cannot
handle a large number of new
students.
Lassiter agreed there might be
problems in the art department,

but said this would be only a
minor problem in setting up the
new program.
Lassiter has received no
complaints from other
department chairmen.
Lassiter predicted changes in
the physical education
department that would, in his
opinion, make the present
program more effective and
more appealing to students,
along with a drop in the number
of staff members in the physical
education department in time.
Physical Education and
Health Dean Clifford A. Boyd
said Sunday he did expect
revamping within his department
aimed at making the program
more attractive, but said he
expected no staff cutback until
more definite plans were drawn
up by his college.

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The six men, including the former Green Beret commander
in Vietnam Col. Robert B. Rheault, could have been sent to
orison for life if they had been convicted at their courts martial.
F Two other Green Berets, both enlisted men, against whom
charges had been held in abeyance, were also freed by Resors
r< The secretary said all the men would be reassigned outside
Vietnam. . , ,
Controversial from the start, the decision to prosecute the
men had been appealed all the way to President Nixon by irate
congressmen. _.
At the White House, Press Secretary Ronald Ziegler said as
far as he knew President Nixon had nothing to do with Resors
decision. This is a matter that has remained in the jurisdiction
to which it appropriately belongs, Ziegler said.
Resor did tell Defense Secretary Melvin R. Laird of his
decision before announcing it and Laird concurred with it.

BREAK-INS: Sara Jane Williams, a Tallahassee resident, has been
charged by campus police with a series of break-ins on the FSU
campus, according to a university spokesman. Miss Williams was
charged with 14 counts of breaking and entering during the break
following the summer quarter.
REGISTRATION: FSU registrar William Wharton announced
Friday his tenative enrollment of 16,895, the highest figure in the
institutions history.
ELECTIONS: FSU student voters will be able to obtain specific
pre-election information on all candidates in the upcoming student
body election.
All candidates are required to submit their political views to the
commissioner of elections upon filing their intention to run for office.
This information will be compiled onto a voter information sheet
and distributed to the student body during the week of elections.

Free Conference Set

Anyone interested in
attending the first of a series of
three, four-day, 100-student
conferences, all expenses paid in
Washington D.C., Oct. 23-26, on

issues such as environment,
population explosion, and racial
discrimination, contact Steve
Halpert, 4MD, at 378-2297.
Deadline is Wednesday.



Survey Reveals Opposition To Legislation

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
A survey of 30 faculty
members and 45 students
indicates that some faculty and
students feel the legislature has
over-reacted by passing a series
of laws designed to curb campus
disorder and drug use.
Administrators, on the other
hand, declined to comment on
the laws but were willing to
explain their functioning.
Among 45 students asked
their opinion, six favored the
laws, 24 opposed the legislation
and 15 had no opinion.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, at a luncheon with
the Alligator staff, was asked
what was his opinion of the
laws.
I think it inappropriate for
me to comment, OConnell
said. I would need to give the
same consideration as I would
have as a supreme court justice
to render an opinion.
O'Connell said he would
enforce the laws and that people
who were affected by what they
thought were unjust laws would
have to appeal through the court
courts the way it is in any
case.
James Hennessey, assistant to
the vice president for student
affairs, explained what a
disruptive" activity was
according to the Board of
Regents.
Activity is disruptive if:
9 It involves violence against
any member or guest of the
university community.
It deliberately interferes
with the rights of others.
There is theft or willful
destruction of university
property or property of
members of the university
community.
There is interference with
freedom of movement of any
member or guest of the
university.
It obstructs the normal
processes and activities essential
to the functioning of the
university.
Hennessey said the Southern
Student Organizing Committee
recognition demonstration last

Aftkt Don't miss Arby's A n Arby's A Shake
m FALL Only I
Saturday through Tuesday
Arby's
j us t s OU f| l 0 f the Underpass
Constantly growing COMt tO Coast

LEGISLATIVE OVER-REACTION FELT BY SOME

T: ;
Racism
THE DEMONSTRATOR
.. can be expelled
year was disruptive because it
was declared (by the
administration) to be
disruptive.
There can be no
demonstration inside a
building, he said.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd said, at a
meeting of 150 state legislators
last week, that the legislature
was wrong to compare UF with
schools like Columbia and
Rprlfplpv
Yes indeed the legislature
has over-reacted, he said. You
have done nothing but stiffen
responses and create what in
some instances is an inflexible
situation.
Clyde Ellis, a recent law
school graduate, now involved in
the Florida Legal Action

Movement was highly critical of
the laws.
"The legislature has acted
illegally by passing
unconstitutional laws, he said.
It appears they have, in the
finest tradition of southern and
Florida justice, completely
ignored all constitutional
criteria.
And if they are, in fact,
unconstitutional, he added,
their greatest value is as a
threat since, if prosecuted, they
could be overturned.
"However, some public
officials have often prosecuted
with full vigor laws of dubious
constitutional value.
Ellis said a good many
lawyers and law students are
very concerned about student
rights and abuses by university
officials.
On the other hand, James
Hollis, a campus conservative,
agreed with the legislation and
advocated "getting rid of
disruptive elements of campus.
Considering the Dow
demonstration (two years ago at
UF), Hollis said, had I been
interviewing for a job, it would
have been difficult for me to
interview.
Hollis said that the
demonstration at a ROTC
awards ceremony last year,
fraternity brawls and the attack
by several Cuban students on an
SDS party last summer were all
in violation of the rights of other
students.
There is no place for this
type of person on this campus.
Referring to the radicals, he
said:
They call themselves
peaceful but theyre militant. I
think UF should have some way
of getting rid of them.
Tina Bemd-Cohen, a member
of SDS said the laws allow for
no democratic process whereby
students can alter the university
to meet the changing needs of
society.
"Dissent, under conditions
the establishment makes is no
dissent at all.
Miss Berad-Cohen said the

laws wifi only cause more violent
reaction.
The legislation, she said,
"is designed for political
repression.
Dr. JJ. Zeman, president of
the American Federation of
Teachers, said the laws were
Muu-fosns
IS NSW KVERAUSM
READY FoR
SELF &*feRAiMENT?
O

| Golf Club ~4if I
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1 TTTI Golf all day
Goli Lessons every TUESDAY
Optional through Nov. 30th I
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I N.E. 39th AVINUI I

30,1969, the Florida AfHgator, I

certainly an over-reactiv.*:.
It Is part of the whole
pattern of the way politicians
deal with faculty and students,
he said.
The laws, he concluded,
are somewhat disgusting but
there is nothing surprising about
them.
New Council
Meets Today
The first meeting of he
Presidents Advisory Council
will be held today at 3:30 in
room 144 of Gradu' te
library.
The committee is an
shoot of the Action
Conference.
On the agenda will be i
statement by Presideni
Stephen C. OConnell and i
report by Rae Weimer, special
presidential assistant on the
status of proposals of the
Action Conference.

Page 3



Page 4

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 30,1960

Action Group
Plans Confab
Oct. 10-12
The Florida Legal Action
Movement (FLAM), which says
there are conditions in the south
which are politically and
economically repressive for
movement groups and lawyers,
will hold a conference here Oct.
10-12.
Mrs. Kay Ellis, a lw student
and coordinator in Gainesville
for FLAM, is making
arrangements for the c iference
which is not open to the public,
but will be open to lawyers, law
students, and movemen* leaders
in Florida.
The reason it is not op n to
the public is because then will
not be enough room for
everyone who would like to
come, Mrs. Ellis said.
Subjects under discussioi at
the conference will indude he
draft and military law, pove-ty
law, migrant legal services and
the civil rights movement in
Florida.
The conference will ilso
feature the relationship of the
Florida Bar Assodation to the
law student with an emphasis on
the student's rights in dealings
with the association.
On Saturday evening of the
conference, a black attorney will
speak on a topic yet to be
announced, Mrs. Ellis said.
Mrs. Ellis said that anyone
who wants to attend the
conference should contact her or
Bill Manikas at the law center
complex by Friday.
Accomodations for out of
town law students and others
will be arranged by the
coordinators.

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ACADEMICS
- i. n aw and views
All seniors in the College of Arts and Sdences who are interested in
attending graduate school may apply for a Woodrow Wilson
Fellowship. Requirements include having a 3.0 average and being
nominated by a professor. Applicants must take the Graduate Record
Examination. The deadline for applying for the GRE is Oct. 7. The
deadline for applying for the fellowship is Oct. 13.
The Institute for the Study of Health in Sodety is sponsoring three
conferences in Washington, D. C., and UF students may apply to
attend. All expenses are paid. A conference on environment is Oct.
2326; on population explosion, Nov. 20-23; and radal
discrimination, Feb. 1922.
Students in any field may apply. Steve Halpert may be contacted
at 378-3397 for further information. Deadline for applying for the
first conference is Oct. 1.
UF's Division of Sponsored Research has awarded $189,710 to
faculty members for this academic year. The Bureau of Urban Studies
received $50,000 for recruiting faculty and building resources. This
bureau consults with departments which are planning course work and
programs in urban studies. The library's Special Collections
Committee received $20,000, twice the amount it requested, to
purchase rare books.
Dr. James D. Winefordner, Department of Chemistry, was given
$20,000 to purchase equipment to study applied spectroscopy. The
Sleep Research Laboratory received $19,710 for a second sleep room.
The Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering Facility was awarded
$40,000 to complete the laboratory and building an instrument room.
The UF Research Council got $50,000 for small grants and the
Division of Sponsored Research retained SIO,OOO for small research
projects.

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UF Placement Center
Participates In Survey

A nationwide Nielsen survey,
aimed at improving
communication between
students, companies and
placement centers, will utilize
students and alumni using the
University Placement and Career
Planning Center this interview
season.
The Recruitment Profile
survey is being conducted by the

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A. C. Nielsen Co, which also has
a TV rating sendee.
The survey implements a
two-part questionnaire to be
filled out by those signing up for
interviews. The first part is
designed to measure the
students attitudes towards the
companies. The second,
follow-up part, will be filled in
after interviews.



Orange and

ADDRESS CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

UNIVERSITY RELIGIOUS
ASSOCIATION: Anyone
interested in serving with the
Religion-in-Life Series
Committee should contact the
Department of Religion for
application and information.
PRE-MEDICAL AND
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS
must register with the Office of
Pre-Professional Education,
Roonv 105 Anderson Hall, from
now through Friday, Oct. 10. Be
sure and bring with you the full
names of all your instructors and
the course and section numbers.
STUDENT UNREST
PROVISIONS Department of
Labor, and Health, Education
and Welfare Appropriation Act,
1969.
LAWS AND DISSENT:
Recent Federal laws have been
enacted to deal with campus
unrest and disruptions. These
laws provide for withholding
Federal monies from students
who violate criminal statutes.
The following are the provisions:
SEC 411. P.L. 90-557. No
part of the funds appropriated
under this Act shall be used to
provide a loan, guarantee of a
loan or a grant to any applicant
who has been convicted by any
court of general jurisdiction of
any crime which involves the use
of or the assistance to others in
the use of force, trespass or the
seizure of property under
control of an institution of
higher education to prevent
officials or students at such an
institution from engaging in
their duties or pursuing their
studies.
HIGHER EDUCATION
AMENDMENTS OF 1968
Eligibility for Student
Assistance
SEC 504. P.L. 90-575 (a) If
an institution of higher
education determines, after
affording notice and
opportunity for hearing to an
individual attending, or
employed by, such institution,
that such individual has been
convicted by any court of record
of any crime which was
committed after the date of
enactment of this Act and which
involved the use of (or assistance
to others in the use Os) force,
disruption, or the seizure of
property under control of any
institution of higher education
to prevent officials or students
in such institution from engaging
in their duties or pursuing their
studies, and that such crime was
of a serious nature and
contributed to a substantial
disruption of the administration
of the institution with respect to

ILi i - SCUBA DUBA i
II (\/ / think of the lakes and rivers alone... I K
If /\1 / / -,l*l crystal clear and waiting for explor- C\
l/ /ImVJ /I AJi tt ation! Let YOUR CRED,T union VJ
HJi / I \\ jfi /[ A jiT] finance everything from lessons to gear!
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

which such crime was committed
then the institution which such
individual attends, or is
employed by, shall deny for a
period of two years any further
payment to, or for the direct
benefit of, such individual under
any of the programs specified in
subsection (c). If an institution
denies an individual assistance
under the authority of the
preceding sentence of this
subsection, then any institution
which such individual
subsequently attends shall deny
for the remainder of the
two-year period any further
payment to, or for the direct
benefit of, such individual under
any of the programs specified in
subsection (c).
(b) If an institution of higher
education determines, after
affording notice and
opportunity for hearing to an
individual attending, or
employed by, such institution,
that such individual has willfully
refused to obey a lawful
regulation or order of such
institution after the date of
enactment of this Act, and that
such refusal was of a serious
nature and contributed to a
substantial disruption of the
administration of such
institution, then such institution
shall deny, for a period of two
years, any further payment to,
or for the direct benefit of, such
individual under any of the
programs specified in subsection
(c).
(c) The programs referred to
in subsection (a) and (b) are as
follows;
(1) The student loan
program under title II of the
National Defense Education Act
of 1958.1
(2) The educational
opportunity grant program
under part A of title IV of the
Higher Education Act of 1965.
(3) The student loan
insurance program under part B
?f title IV of the Higher
Education Act of 1965.
(4) The college work-study
program under part C of title IV
of the Higher Education Act of
1965.
(5) Any fellowship program
carried on under title 11, 111 or V
of the Higher Education Act of
1965 or title IV or VI of the
National Defense Education Act
of 1958.
(d) (1) Nothing in this Act,
or any Act amended by this Act,
shall be construed to prohibit
any institution of higher
education from refusing to
sward continue, or extend any
financial assistance under any
such Act to any individual
because of any misconduct

BLUE BULLETIN

which in its judgment bears
adversely on his fitness for such
assistance.
(2) Nothing in this section
shall be construed as limiting or
prejudicing the rights and
prerogatives of any institution of
higher education to institute and
carry out an independent
disciplinary proceeding pursuant
to existing authority, practice,
and law.
(3) Nothing in this section
shall be construed to limit the
freedom of any student to verbal
expression of individual views or
opinions.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAMINATIONS will be given
Nov. 1. The last day for receipt
by the Educational Testing
Service, Princeton, N.J., 08540
is Oct. 8 for application of $lO
fee for reading knowledge
examinations in French,
German, Russian and Spanish.
Registration fees increase $3
after Oct. 8 and up to closing
date of Oct. 15.
GENERAL NOTICES
SIGMA DELTA CHI,
professional journalism society,
will hold its organizational
meeting Thursday, Oct. 2, at
7:30 p.m. in Room 236 of the
Stadium.
BEFRIENDERS will meet
Tuesday, Sept. 30, at 5 p.m. in
Room 355 of Reitz Union for an
organizational-bring-your-own
dinner meeting.
GAMMA BETA PHI
SOCIETY, the only
co-educational honorary service
organization on campus, will
hold a membership drive and
social Thursday, Oct 9, at 7:30
p.m. in Room 123 of Reitz

UF LIBRARY SCHEDULE
Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library Bam ll pm Bam ll pm 2pm ll pm
Research Library Bam ll pm Bam ll pm 2pm ll pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History 8:30 am -5 pm 8:30 am -12 N Closed
Special Collections 8:30 am spm B:3oam__l2N Closed
Architecture 8i Fine Arts Library 3 am 6 pm
Arch. 8t Fine Arts Building 7pm-10 pm Bam -12 N 6pm lO pm
Chemistry Library Bam 5 pm*** 9am l2 Npm spm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm lO pm Ipm 4pm 7pm lO pm
Education Library
341 Norman Hall 8 am 10:30 pm** 9 am 5 pm t 2 pre- 10:30 pm
Engineering & Physics Library Bam spm 9am l2 N 5 pm
410 Engineering Building 7pm lO pm Ipm 4 pmtt 7pm lO pm
Health 8t Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm lO pm Bam l2 Npm lO pm
Health Center Library
Med, Sci. Bldg. LlO2 8:30 am -12 M 8:30 am 5 pm 2pm l2 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall 8 am 11 pm 8 am 5 pm 7 pm 11 pm
Journalism 8t Communications R. R. Bam 5 pm***
Stadium 33/ 7pm IC pm Bam l2 N
Law Library
Law Building Bam- 11 pm Bam-11 pm 8:30 am -11 pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School
Library) Yonge Bldg. F Bam 4pm Closed Closed

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO: THE DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Union. Membership is open to
everyone who has an overall
University of Florida average of
2.7 and a desire to serve the
University and the community.
Refreshments will be served.
MOTAR BOARD-SAVANT
ALUMNAE BANQUET for
homecoming guests will be
Friday, Oct 17 at 5:15 p.m. in
the Reitz Union Ballroom. All
ladies celebrating homecoming
are invited to attend. Tickets are
$5.25 each and can be ordered
from Florida Blue Key
Office, 312 Reitz Union or by
phoning 372-3806.

Campus
Calendar

Tuesday, September 30
Ballet Lessons for Children, C-4
Union, 3:00-4:00, 3 6 yr.
old; 4:00-5:00, 7 yr. old and
up.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 B, C, D,
Union 6:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Signria Pi Smoker, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Wedensday, October 1
Univ. of Fla. Fencing Club
Meeting, Florida Gym, 6:00
p.m.. All Fencers welcome.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:30
p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 150 F & G
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Museum Association, Fashion
Show, Union Ballroom, 8:00
p.m.

Tuesday, September 30, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

FENCING CLUB:
Registration for beginning
fencing class will be Monday,
Sept. 29, and Wednesday, Oct.
1, at 6 p.m. in Florida
Gymnasium. For further
information contact Rush
Elkins, phone 376-0994.
ORANGE AND BLUE will be
published on Tuesday and
Friday this year. Deadline for
Tuesday is 5 p.m. Friday and
deadline for Friday is 5 p.m.
Wednesday.

Thursday, October 2
Paint for Fun, C-4 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Scabbard & Blade Rush, Army
Bldg., Room 107, 7:15 p.m..
Dress, Khakis.
Baha'i Meeting, 363 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Sigma Delta Chi Meeting, 236
Stadium Bldg., 7:30 p.m.
Football Film, Union Aud., 7:30
p.m.
Friday, October 3
Program Office Lecture Series,
Critical Issues of the Year,
Fred Pinkard, Union Aud.,
2:00 p.m.
Union Movie, Wait Until
Dark", Union Aud., 5:30,
8:00 & 10:30 p.m.

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 30,1969

The Florida Alligator

'RM
jAll Awihim.

Untamed Military
WASHINGTON The capacity of wise and logical men for wishful
self-delusion has never been more clearly demonstrated than by the
mood of optimism with which the Senate liberals viewed the outcome
of the ABM debate. It was a turnaround in national policy, they said.
Routine acceptance of Defense Department expenditures was a thing
of the past. There was at last a chance of bringing the enormous
institutional momentum of the military-industrial machine under
logical control.
The record since does not suggest any such victory. True, there has
been debate and until ABM, debate on military expeditures was
thought to be not only unnecessary but unpatriotic. But the debate is
a little like that between a father who hasnt been paying much
attention and a son, suddenly confronted with questions, but easily
capable of brushing them aside.
There was first the question of the great Army transport, the C-SA,
on which taxpayers have already spent about $2.5 billion. For that
money they were to receive 58 airplanes. The money is spent; only six
of the planes have been built and the manufacturer, Lockheed
Aircraft, is S6OO million in the hole.
What did the Senate do? It ordered 23 more of the planes at an
additional cost of $941 million. Despite the valiant efforts of Sen.
Frank Mankiewicz -Tom Braden Column
-
mk WKm i s
William Proxmire (D-Wis.), the vote wasnt even close. The clinching
argument in the cloakroom was that without the new order, Lockheed
would go out of business.
Next the Senate took up the question of a new nuclear aircraft
carrier. With its escort fleet, the new carrier will cost about $ 1 billion.
Sen Walter Modale (D-Minn.) led the fight against the expenditure on
the grounds that the carrier is an extremely vulnerable weapon and
that neither of our two potential enemies Russia or China has any
carriers at all, nuclear or non-nuclear.
But Adm. Thomas Moorer, chief of naval operations, submitted a
list of 50 wars or near wars since 1946 in which, he said, aircraft
carriers have been engaged. Not one of them, the admiral pointed out,
suffered the slightest damage in these encounters, which included
what he called wars or near wars with Haiti, Yemen and Zanzibar
Probably the senators were unconvinced by this argument, but all
of them must have been aware that nearly every defense contractor in
the nation will have a piece of the carrier pie. At any rate, Modale
didnt get much support.
Next the Senate took up a request for $ 100 million for research on
the advanced manned strategic aircraft. Its advocates estimate that
this will run about S2O billion when it is built over the next few years.
Sen. George McGovern (D-S.D.) who, along with Sen. Charles Godell
(R-N.Y.), led the opposition thinks it will cost SSO billion. McGovern
argued we didnt need any more manned bombers we have over 450
B-525, 70 B-58s, and are building 76 F-l 1 Is.
Even these, McGovern said, are unnecessary because the submarine
nuclear weapon is a far superior alternative to our land-abase ICBMs.
He didnt get far, but North American Aviation, probable builder of
the new bomber, presumable will.
So it is about as accurate to say that the Senate has gained control
over the military as it is to say that a father has controlled his son by
him briefly before giving him everything he wants.
And the little victories the promise by the military to be more
careful about shipping nerve gas, not storing germs abroad without
permission and giving back to the State Department some of the
money it has been spending on college campuses seem trivial
again like that of the father, who having yielded to a new car and a
larger allowance, comforts himself with his sons promise that
henceforth he will clean up his room.
LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters must be typed signed and
double-spaced and should not exceed 300 words in length. A writer's
name may be withheld from publication only if he shows just cause. No
letters signed with a pseudonym will be accepted for publication. The
editor reserves the right to edit all letters in the interest of space.
Addresses and telephone numbers must accompany all letters.
ViT I f'

/
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

EDITORIAL

The new Student Government Traffic and
Parking Commission moved Monday to cure
UF of the campus traffic fifeket plague.
Students who have fallen victim to the
vague and ambiguous semantics now
muddling the rules and regulations handed
out by the University Police Department are
urged to appeal, either in person or by
writing, to the Student Traffic Court.
We endorse this resolution.
We urge all students with valid objections
to campus traffic citations to appeal to the
traffic court.
The court is more than willing to
cooperate, even though they are knowingly
bringing hours upon hours of additional
work upon themselves.
This is more than the campus police have
shown willingness to do.
It is the type of action that is needed to
bring this Pandoras box traffic system to
the point of reality from the brink of
absurdity.
According to commission chairman
Harvey Alper, the newly-appointed group is
greatly dissatisfied with the traffic
situation as it now stands.
The Traffic Court is dissatisfied.
Students, faculty and staff are
dissatisfied.
We are dissatisfied.
But dissatisfaction is not enough. It must
be channeled into constructive action.
This is the action recommended by the
traffic and parking commission.
It is a strong move. But apparently it is

About This Weekends.

From Tigert Hall:
The FloridaFSU football weekend is on us
again, bringing with it the heightening of spirit and
tensions associated with an all-important football
game. It also brings the usual temptations to
practice pranks and display emotions which, if not
self-controlled, can prejudice the relationship
between our institutions, and the reputation of this
university, and that of its students, alumni and
supporters.
Sportsmanship playing hard, fair, clean and by
the rules by fans and players is one of the prime
reasons for our athletic program. If the playing of a
football game brings unsportsmanlike conduct on or
off the field, its reason for being played is called
into question.
We at this university, and our supporters, are the
hosts for FSU, its students and supporters off the
field. Let's be good hosts in every way. Let's not
lose the weekend by what we do off the field.
Last year all of you by your actions reflected the

7'm Kery Stormed Your Condition. Take Two
Aspirin And Check Back From Time To Time

The Traffic Cure

the only alternative left to students being
trampled and ticketed into financial oblivion
by the University Police.
With nearly 2,000 tickets issued in the
past week, and more than $l,lOO collected
in fines by Friday, it is time somebody did
something.
Now it is up to the students.
Many sections in the traffic and parking
rules and regulations booklet cannot be
explained even by Traffic Coordinator Lee
Burrows.
How, then, are students, faculty and staff
expected to translate the mire of muddy
verbiage?
It is a feat apparently only Campus Police
Chief Audie Shuler can accomplish.
And he seems bent on ramming his
interpretation down everyones throat in a
hemorrhage of traffic tickets.
While the administration with our
support has asked the university
community to give the new parking and
transportation plan a chance to survive,
Chief Shuler adamantly refuses to
reciprocate and give the community a
chance.
If the Chief cannot become more
receptive to this plight facing students,
faculty and staff, he should perhaps find a
campus more willing to be subjected to his
whims.
The UF is not.
But now, the fastest recourse for victims
of the ticket plague is Student Traffic Court.
We appeal to you to appeal.

best in sportsmanlike conduct while giving our
Fighting Gators the finest support ever given a
Florida team. Let's do it again.
Stephen C. O'Connell
From Reitz Union:
With high hopes for this Saturday, we begin
another in the annual football weekends with our
neighbors to the North in Tallahassee.
This annual event is always filled with high
emotions and good spirits, as it should be. As hosts,
all of us have a responsibility to exhibit school
support with maturity and good taste. The
continuity of this series of football games may well
depend upon the responsible behavior of students at
both institutions.
Students are looking forward to hosting our
friends from around the state, and trust that it will
be a highly enjoyable weekend.
Charles Shepherd



Fluted Columns
| Ideal Ass 1
!j I ; - ; {I 1
'![), j!|if|
C*By John ParkerC__]
In last Wednesdays Alligator 36 column inches of space on these
pages were taken up with a rather interesting exercise in mental
epilesy.
We refer, of course, to Jan Elliot Bellows diatribe on WHY I AM A
GOOD CITIZEN.
There comes to mind only two reasons why a normal, reasonable
person would have such an atrocity exhibited in public: 1) Jan gave
the thing at a Kiwanis luncheon as an after dinner sedative and he
wanted some cheap way to get a copy to sent to Aunt Sarah, or 2) he
wrote it for the mere pleasure of provoking, the kind of invective this
column (if I dont control myself) will turn out to be.
If either is true, the piece deserves rebuttal, for no other reason
than to serve as a deterrent to any others who suddenly get the hair to
pull out a Sunday School lesson he gave back in 64 and send it in to
the Alligator in the hopes that geez, who knows, maybe theyll run
the damned thing. My mom always said it was the best thing she ever
read.
The tendency is to belch deeply, blink your eyes, and pretend that
no one could really write something like that and still be enrolled in a
20th century university. But, as we mentioned, some control is
necessary. True rebuttal takes a strong stomach and a strong
immunity to boredom. v
Here are some of the more intelligible bits of wisdom we were
treated to:
Each of us mustanalyze himself and ask the question, Why should
I be a good citizen?
The answer we find out later is: Because I am an intricate part of
my country and work for the benefit of America. The semantics
boys call that a Positive Inferential Non-statement, i.e. a group of
words that chase each other around in a circle. Aside from being a
little odious, Jans idea as to why one should be a good citizen is
meaningless. Convicts are intricate parts of this country and they do
some fine work out there on the chain gangs for America, but that is
hardly cause for finding them to be good citizens.
Probably the most essential aspect of good citizenship is
pride... 1 have looked around an auditorium when the Star Spangled
Banner, the song of our nation, is presented and have seen many
Americans not singing, but instead talking, or just stumbling over the
words.
Mr. Bellows is one of those perceptive people that equate the
ability to recite the Lords Prayer as tantamount to having a reserved
box seat at the right hand of God. The inference of his statement is
that anyone who choses not to sing the national anthem in public is a
bad citizen (or worse, a pinko-commie-liberal-fascist?).
When the band strikes up the ol Anthem the Birchers just swell up
their little hairy chests and their little pot bellies till they almost float
away. And they are great citizens. Hell, last year federal agents
confiscated thousands of dollars worth of weapons from paramilitary
right-wing groups. .If loud singing were an indication of good
citizenship, those guys would bust your eardrums.
Mr. Bellows says that one guide to influence the development of
his citizenship is religion.
The church stands for the highest ideals of living. We note with
interest that some sort of substantial documentation is left out. One
can picture Mir. Bellows climbing the hill up the bell tower and
receiving this information inscribed by lightening on two loose brides.
Suffice it to say that there are a number of atheists in this country
and we have not yet taken to the practice of deporting them for the
crime of bad citizenship.
Religion and religious leaders have been responsible for some of the
most henious crimes man has ever perpertrated against his fellows. To
model himself after the church teachings would be better training
for a grand inquisitor, book burner, or a glaze-eyed hypocrite than a
good citizen.
Just one more. I couldnt put you through any more. Mr. Bellows
states toward the end of his piece (lets see hands for those who got
that far?):
Also as an ideal citizen, he reports any abuses of American
citizenship to his local officials or attempts to correct them himself.
Apparently Mr. Bellows sees himself as a rather healthy cross
between a beady-eyed Gestapo agent and The Lone Ranger. If the
requirements for good citizenship that Mr. Bellows has elaborated are
actionable at law, god help us. Picture if you will: Officer, I want
this man arrested. He was distinctly NOT SINGING during the playing
of the national anthem. Or, Mr. Feldman, you missed church last
week. Im afraid Im going to have to write you a ticket.
The mind goes on and on. We dont even attempt to introduce the
argument that the John Q. Public that Mr. Bellows holds to be an
ideal is a perfect ass. We leave exemplification of that more reliable
interpretation to people of Mr. Bellows ilk who for some reason are
compelled to drag their non-thoughts out for public consumption..
What we are left with is an ALMOST innocent, mildly amusing,
quaintly Bible Schoolish interpretation of what every red blooded
mothers son is supposed to think of as his duty to his country- Gone
is the responsibility of knowleagable dissent. Gone is the right to
exercise the freedoms guaranteed in the constitution. Gone,
apparently, is the right to be an individual in an ever more rigidly
conforming society, for John Q. Citizen is not a person, but a machine
turning out well-worn reactions and words.
If Mr. Bellows opinions are ths least bit indicative of the quahty of
thinking our university system is producing, this coun ry is in lg
be in the precarious position of being babbled to death.
. *: MiV /V 4 v V V
> ---i. * < ***

There is no hope
C-t
for the complacent man

Staff Writings

Dont Forget The Flowers

Why does one stop to view a
burning dusk sky or the delicate
precision of a flower?
He is not motivated by
earning more money, gaining
prestige, increasing his sex
appeal, or maintaining his
survival. His act is for its own
sake: merely for the pleasure of
doing it.
Our society would call the
action impractical. (In physical
terms it is unnecessary.) Yet,
such an act is necessary, not to
sustain the physical being but
the spiritual being. It gives the
soul a certain excitement which
other mundane experiences of
life cannot. It is an aesthetic
experience, and has no meaning
and purpose beyond itself.
Our society discourages such
experiences, thus inhibiting our
sensitivity to such stimuli. The
purpose of this university as a
state university, according to a
recent series in the Gainesville
Sun by its education writer, is to
provide the state with skilled
professionals to meet its needs.
We are not here as scholars,
but as trainees. Not as
adventurers in the New World of
ideas, but as pack animals being
led down well-trodden roads.
What could be an exciting four
years or more is reduced all too
often to a drudge to prepare
ourselves for the Great Rat Race
outside the walls (which
frequently proves to be a worse
drudge). What follows that is
retirement. Then death.
Some of us manage to escape
the strong force of
regimentation. It is difficult to
say why exactly. Those few may
frequently be found in the arts
and sciences departments, of
universities, preparting to be
sensitive people rather than
engineers, lawyers, journalists,
'V*

A Put-On Review?
MR. EDITOR:
I am writing to you in reference to a movie review which appeared
in your newspaper on Sept. 19th of this year.
After reading Mr. Remleys review of the movie Midnight
Cowboy I am convinced that he did not see that picture at all. If this
is the case he is quite fortunate as I can only feel that if his review is
based on his feelings after seeing the picture, he is quite an
unperceptive person.
To say that the movie dwelt on sex is redundant. The story was
built around Joe Buck's unsuccessful attempts at being a stud-for-hire.
Joe's experiences regarding his profession were humourous rather than
lewd. Any attempt to find obscenity in this film would indicate to me
that your entertainment writer is possessed of a Victorian moral code
that is well outdated in these enlightened times.
To moralize upon the character of Ratso instead of enjoying him
reflects a most juvenile attitude on the part of your critic.
In conclusion, I can only imagine that this review is a sick put-on
of some sort. If it is not, may I say that I feel very sorry for your
paper, your staff, and yourself.
In closing I would like to say that I would appreciate your
comments on this letter if you are inclined to make any.
ANTHONY HESS
Im Impressed, Police
MR. EDITOR:
Let me offer my congratulations to the Campus Police Force. What
an outstanding job of displaying their power on this campus. How
impressive to see a thermometer with a total of new tickets given out
as compared with last year's totals.
Chief Shuler seemed to be very impressed with the fact that he has
three new officers to ticket offenders. I wonder if the educational
level of these officers has also increased. It appears very arrogant to
me to see the police of this campus practically boasting at the number
of tickets they are able to give out each day. Instead of three new
officers to give out tickets, how about spending the money to build a
few more parking spaces on this campus. The money would be well
spent PETER FRYEFIELD, 3JM

doctors, or teachers. The more
enlightened of this genre explore
many fields, trying to find in a
discipline excitement heavily
camouflaged by regimentation.
Men are especially to be
congratulated fear they do this in
the face of social pressures
which equate personal worth
with ability to earn money.
They have withstood the
pressure to enter vocational
school on the colleg level. One
may eventually enter a
profession for which others train
from the very beginning; but
they would be able to bring to
it, ideally, a sense of perspective
and ability to unify many fields
of study, as they should be.
It is not that a person in any

'~~" ' ' ' ~
You Boys Down There In The Think Room Really
Came Up With A Stroke Os Genius But Where Did
You Put The Buildings?

Tuesday, Saptamber 30, 1960, The Ftorida AMpflor, I

By Linda Miklowitz

college vocational training
program cannot muster up this
same excitement or the same
flexibility of mind which enables
one to explore other worlds with
interest. It is just that these
individuals are so rare.
In short, is there the
opportunity in schools today to
view education as an aesthetic
experience where one learns
for the mere reason of
enjoyment and satisfaction? As a
state school specifically given
the role to train and as the
most professionally-oriented in
the state, ours is a bad offender
indeed.
Those who come here for
UF's stated purpose will
probably shrug their shoulders.
They don't really care.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

!>VtV. .W.V.V.V.V.V. .V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.S
I FOR SALE [
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way
from carpets and upholstery. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-1 t-9-c)
Need Campus Transportation? I must
sell my Suzuki 50cc Cycle. Two years
old Good Condition $150.00 Call
Bill 392*7511. (A*3t*9*p)
1964 Chevy Belair Power steering
radio heater $650. gfcone 376*8983
after 6 p.m. (A*st*9*p)
1969 Honda C8*350 excellent shape.
Graduating in December so I must
sell. S6OO. Contact Wayne Neet.
378-7103 after 7 p.m. (A-3t-9-p)
RIVERSIDE 350 cc. Less than 3000
mi. Like New. Only $375.00 or best
offer. Call 373*1650. (A-3t-9-p)
Suzuki lOO. Great condition. Will
do about 65 mph. Many new parts.
Perfect to beat campus parking. S2OO
firm. Phone 376-7481. (A*3t*9*p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466*3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
1969 HONDA 160 cc ELECTRIC
STARTER WINDSHIELD, NEW
1,300 MILES HELMET $450.00
PH: 376*5197. (A-st*6-p)
Honda superhawk runs and looks
great 2 helmets + manuel $350. Also
ampex 750 tape deck with cover and
tapes $175. Call Stu 378-6129.
(A-st-5-p)
KITTENS lrrestably cute. Get one
free can of cat food per kitten. Call
49 5-2226 before 5:00, 495-2479
after 6:00. (A*3t*B*p)
Like new 1969 honda 175 less than
3000 miles 80 miles per gallon it sure
beats walking or finding parking
space only $595. Call 378-7902 after
5. (A-4t*7-p)
1967 Allstate scooter. 60cc. In good
shape, but needs a little work.
Helmet included. SSO. Call Ken at
378-6431. (A-st-7-p)
1962 Galaxie 500, A/C, Auto-trans
radio, new tires and valve job. S3OO.
Call 378-2975 after 3 PM. Runs
good. (A-st-4-p)

| |X # 11 lIJ I ITM ICitizen1 Citizen
including:
V; .^y r -'.** y\ .* ' Changes, Circles Spinning Looper

p 1 FOR SALE |
: I v §'
1968 Yamaha 100 twin cc. Excellent
transportation, like new condition.
Only 2800 miles. $290 or best offer.
Call Bob at 378-6626. (A-2t-8-p)
For Sale 1966 Manatee mobile home
two bdr, furnished incl. auto.washer,
10x48. $2700 cash or $450 dwn and
assume $52.65 mo. call 372-1877.
(A-2t-8-p)
| FOR RENT |
Upper Division & graduate students
quite well managed trailer space
available 7 mi no of city on 441. Call
Mrs. Tanner Progress Tra C.
462-1660. (B-3t-1-p)
1 Bedroom apartment. 1 Block north
of campus. $125.00. Furnished. 118
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-10t-5-p)
/eter Pan Motel, Williston Florida,
20min. from Gainesville.
Reservations available for
homecoming weekend. TV and AC.
Call 528-3941. (B-st-6-p)
3 Bedroom apartment 1 block north
of campus. $165.00. Furnished. 118
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-1 Ot-5-p)
Share a house that includes two room
private suite, linens, phone, utility,
kitchen privileges, pets accepted. S7O
per month. 372-7186 after 5 p.m.
(B-4t-8-p)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished, within walking distance of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-2-p|
I WANTEDj[
Wanted studious female roommate
for Colonial Manor Apt. $55/Mo. +
util. Ph. Ann 373-2400. (C-st-6-p)
Need one female roommate for 2
bdrm townhouse at La Bonne Vie.
Rent plus utilities divided four ways.
Call Sharon at 392-9237. (C-st-5-p)
One Female Roommate wanted for 2
bdrm apt at Landmark. Call anytime.
376-0972. Good location, loaded
with conveniences. (C-st-5-p)

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 30,1909

MIIIIBB>WVWmMWMW!WMeib
I WANTED I
Roommate? Make the best of both
wld. Have place on lake. If you have
room for roommate near campus
contact me leave name, phone no.
for' PW Arnett in psy dept with
Ginger 2-0601. (C-st-5-p)
Female roommate wantedl 35.00 a
mon. plus utilities. Two bedroom
house with air cond. 1246 SW 13th
St. Please call 376-2964 Dottle.
(C-3t-9-nc)
Books wanted: eds 431 by Kins, and
mgt 310 by Richards. Call 378-0938
anytime, until answer. Good Price
Paid. (C-3t-9-p)
Wanted: married couples to
participate in group experience for
increasing awareness and
communication of positive feelings
between husbands and wives. This is
not a therapy group, but an
enrichment experience sponsored
by marriage and college life project.
Call 372-3502 eves, after 6 for
details. (C-st-9-c)
Male grad needs roommate. Two
bdrm luxury apt, pool, air the works.
Sin city. Have your own room. Eight
mo. lease. 373-1439 after 6 pm b 4 10
a.m. (C-2t-8-p)
Employees wanted for rat sleep
deprivation experiment. 4-hour
shifts. $1.25 $1.50 per hour. Call
Karen at 392-2991 between 8 + 5.
(C-st-8-c)
Female roommate wanted to share 2
bdrm apt. in Williamsburg apts.,
$55/mo. Call 378-9934. (C-st-7-p)
Such a deal. Beautiful Landmark
Apt. needs one female roommate,
apt. 122 Phone 378-1933. (C-st-8-p)
Male roommate for three bedroom,
air cond. house. Newly panelled and
fireplace. 41.50/month+share elec.
711 NE sth Terr. Call 378-4317.
(C-st-8-p)
Girl to cook evening meal for 3
graduate students. Call 378-2281 5
7 pm. (C-3t-8-p)
HELP WANTED jj
HAVE FUN! MAKE MON! Show
Holiday Magic Cosmetics. 617 W.
Univ. Ave. 372-6121. (E-st-7-p)

HELP WANTED j
Waitress full and part time noon
hours. Must be neaL Good pay.
Apply Kings Food Host 1802 W.
Univ. Ave. P.M. only. (E-st-9-c)
INFANTS NEEDED FOR SPEECH
EXPERIMENT Must be between 3 A
5 months of age and in good health.
Subjects will be paid $2.00/hr. for
approximately 3 hours. Call Mrs. J.
Bruno or Dr. T. Murry, 392-2046.
(E-10t-4-p)
Listeners wanted Will pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Mary, University
extension 392-2049 for appointment
between Bs. (E-st-1-c)
Babysitters to work full or part time.
Car preferred but not necessary. 617
W. Univ. Ave. 372-6121. 9-5.
(E-st-7-p)
| AUTOS
Porsche sc 1964 am fm radio varoli
racing wheel chrome rims luggage
rack coni shocks disc brakes driuing
lights deep blue S3OOO 378-5645.
(G-st-5-p)
1949 Mercury coupe V-8 stick good
body; runs fair. $75 as is. Call
376-2998 after 6:00 p.m. or see PJ.
Day in Games Area. (G-1 t-9-p)
VW 67 FASTBACK. Radio.
Excellent condition! SI2OO cash
takes her! Phone 378-4532. See at
Apt. 31, 1716 NW Third Avenue.
(G-st-6-p)
1963 Corvette Stingray Roadster.
327 4 speed new tires paint.
Beautiful condition 51450. Call
376-4913 after 5:00 p.m. (G-10t-6-p)
1966 MGB-Excellent condition, good
tires tonneau cover, boot, and
luggage rack. Lot price $1495. selling
for only $1350. Call 376-4962.
(G-3t-8-p)
67 Cougar XR7, 390ci, 4br, 4sp
posi-traction, front disc, wood panel
dash, leather bucket seats. Asking
$2500. 372-5698 after 4 p.m.
(G-st-8-p)

| PERSONAL |
Love needed. 3 kitten* needJovlnf
home. Cali 392-6101 or 378-5460
after 8:00 p.m. (J-3t-9-p)
Let it hang out in print! Custom
made personalized bumper and door
stickers you write the message wo
print it. All subjects: politics, sex,
etc. $1.50 each 4 for $5.00 Send
copy and check or money order to
Bumperstickers, P.O. Box Os,
Perrine, Fla. 33157. (J-6t-9-p)
Phillips flying service flight
instruction 9.00 solo 13.00 duaL
495-2124 after 6 p.m. Ground school
starting Sept. 3. (J-10t-1-p)
Flying Hawks Club Flight instruction
$7.00 solo, $12.00 dual for club
members FREE ground school 5 min
from campus Stengel 376-0011.
(J-1 Or-5-p)
16 wk. old miniature Basset puppies.
$65.00. AKC Reg. Shots and
wormed. Day 378-4460, or evening
378-1068. (J-st*s-c)
Roberts 8 track stereo cartrages from
your records only $4.50 372-9718.
(J-st-3-p) _____
1 female roommate wanted to share
1 br Univ. Garden Apt. Grad
student preferred. Call 372-7977
after 6 p.m. (J-st-8-p)
Pi Beta Phi transfers, please call
378-6382. (J-lOt-2-p)
| LOST & FOUND |
ft s
Lost red contact lenses case in
Norman Aud. last Monday third row
from back. Phone 392-8533. Reward.
(L-st-9-p)
f SERVICES I
LEARN TO FLY 5 min from
campus Best Instructors Best
airplanes best ground school best
DEAL FLYING HAWKS
CLUBStengle Field 376-0011.
(M-10t-2-p)
WAKE-UP TROUBLES? WAKE-UP
SERVICE. $5/mo. sl2/qtr. Phone
378-4216 (M-st-6-p)



[| jlllll||innHWWlllinimmu mmTTTTnn11nin iifinniTiflfH irifi imlflllP ¥
| CLASSIFIEDS
r'rrfm n rrn nnnnnnnnnnr

1 SERVICES
RUBYS ALTERATIONS 1126 W
N.W. Bth Street 378*8508. (M-st-9-p)
washing STARCHING 8
I IRONING DONE REASONABLE
I RATES N.W. Section. Call 372*1688.
I (M-St-9-p)
[professional TYPING
SERVICE needs efficient,
experienced typist to work mornings
only. Call for an appointment,
376-7160. (M-2t-9-p)
Photography Bxlo*Bl.oo 5x7=.50.
Sororities, Frats, teams parties,
portraits, portfolios. Can handle any
assignment Call Ronnie Koru
376-6042. (M-Bt-6*p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7300. (M-ts-2-c)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Calf
376-0710. (M-St-3-c)
I RED PIN 01 1
NIGHT jV
8-10 PM A
WIN FREE GXMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

Lunch Special
11 AM -3 PM
8 Pizza
Salad 108 iO
Beverage
316 S. W. 16th Ave. 376-4521
QBQBirV / % ENDS TODAY \
IuhSEmHI I I "JOURNEY TO THE p
\ far side of the sun" J
\ i il I1 M. ,1
: v
Music by Hsnry Mancmi. Lyrics by Rod McKuen. Directed Fred Coe j** ctss=^=S=^
*.r v.e V * ~
j A A * **'*** J
- * - f v V V 4 *'*. -

nr rir w r.r ww99999^^^^vvvw^vvwww
the RUMBLE
that ROCKED
Las Vegas!
The deadliest gamble ever dared.
The odds are against the house 7: 50
when you bet violence against &
a payoff in millions! 11:10
HELL'SPQ
p^
k
PLUS AT 9:40
FABIAN I!^n E yy ILD RACERS

l
can
V
a
student
v
magazine
make
an
impact
on
today's
world?
Well, first you have
to create a magazine.
We did.
p
Then it has to be
good.
We think it is.
Then people have
to buy it.
People are starting to.
Now,
the answer is up to you.
florida
quarterly
a magazine of the arts
by students -for students
FORESTS CANT
FIGHT FIRES

MHlUMmilnau!
you choose what you want...
pay only for what you get!
TUESDAY SPECIAL
FRIED OOa
CHICKEN WC
ALL YOU CARE TO EAT
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
JUMBO CHOPPED
STEAK 63 d
WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY
AND YELLOW RICE
GAINESVILLE MALL*|gg
U P^^^yHOPPINGCENTER_^,
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, me the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowiqg 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredJMinimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the numbei
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY RHONE
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Tuesday, September 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



The Florida Alligator

Gators Slip To 14 In UPI Poll

By United Pres International
After finishing 10th in the
United Press Internationals
weekly polls, the Gators have
slipped from the top ten to 14th
after their 47-35 victory over
Mississippi State.
Ohio State, rated the nations
no. 1 college football team
without having played a game,
Banners Fly
On Saturday
This Saturdays game
between the fightin Gator and
Sammy Seminole has been
declared as Banner Day by the
Student Government Spirit
Committee.
Every organization on
campus is invited and urged to
enter the Spirit Committees
Banner Contest and aid in
creating the spirit necessary for
another Florida victory over the
Seminoles of Florida State.
Trophies will be given to a
non-bloc seating and a
bloc-seating organization on
campus which produces the
outstanding banner.
As an added incentive for
bloc-seating organizations,
preferential seating for the UFs
Homecoming Game will be
awarded the bloc-seating winner.
Those organizations who wish
to participate in the contest
must call 392-1675 before
Friday at noon to enter.
Fraternities are urged to
display their banners in front of
their houses where they will be
judged and other organizations
are asked to bring their banners
to be displayed at the Reitz
Union.
All banners should also be
brought to the football game on
Saturday. The top four banners
will be given special placement
at the stadium with the winning
banner being posted across the
front of the press box.
Announcements concerning the
awards will be made during the
foolball game.
THE SWING'S
TO WINGS
All over America people are taking to the
sky...young and old...some Just for the fun
of it, others because their business bene benefits
fits benefits from faster flying trips to out-of-town
customers.
TRY A LESSON
iutt $5 Thats all it costs for our Special
ntroductory Flight Lesson in a Piper
Cherokee with modem low wing and total
Hying ease. Come visit us today.
CASSELS IN THE AIR
GAINESVI LIE MUNICIPAL
AIRPORT
.WIMJ WALDO ROAD

$ FAU FRO M TOP TEN

justified its ranking Saturday
with a crushing rout.
The Buckeyes, defending
national champions, demolished
Texas Christian 620 in their
opener and received
overwhelming support from the
35-member United Press
International Board of Coaches
as the nations top team.
The dogfight for third
continued, with Arkansas (231)
nosing out Texas (229) and
Southern California (187).
Oklahoma finished sixth with
147 points, followed by Georgia,
Purdue, Missouri and UCLA.
Each week five coaches from
each of the seven geographical
areas of the nation comprise the
UPI ratings board. They select
the top teams in the nation, with
points awarded on a
10-9-8-7-6-54-3-2-1 basis on
votes from first through 10th.

Were a diversified company. A
big one. Our sales will run more
than half a billion dollars this
year.
Theyll come from computer
service, education systems, heli helicopters,
copters, helicopters, farm equipment, space
systems, all kinds of technical
services.
And airplanes.
Airplanes turn us on. Weye
built them for going on sixty
years.
Our planes scored the nations
top kill ratios against Zeros and
again against MiGs.
Weve won the Thompson Tro Trophy,

Airplanes
%*4 turn you on?
Join the club.
/* *.- V .V.V.-.V.V..... .v.
**" X* A *'* ' ,A,M W /
I j
& #" \
X V> ,v.v-
, "fk /flrv. v ;*
'M / ./ f v.:
A quality company of Ling-Temco-Vought. Inc 4L.TT W

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor

Page 10

The UPI top 20 major college
football teams with first place
votes and won-k) st-tied records
in parentheses (second week).
POINTS
TEAM
1. Ohio State (32) (1-0) 347
2. Penn State (1) (2-0) 251
3. Arkansas (2-0) 231
4. Texas (2-0) 229
5. Southern Cal (2) (2-0) 187
6. Oklahoma (2-0) 147
7. Georgia (2-0) 124
8. Purdue (2-0) 75
9. Missouri (2-0) 71
10. UCLA (3-0) 64
11. Michigan (2-0) 48
12. Tennessee (2-0) 32
13. Michigan State (2-0) 26
14. Florida (2-0) 24
15. Louisiana State (2-0) 18
16. Stanford (2-0) 16
17. Alabama (2-0) 15
18. Wyoming (2-0) 11
19. Kansas State (2-0) 10
20. Florida State (2-0) 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 30,1968

phy, Trophy, the Collier Trophy, and the
Doolittle Award.
Our chief exec is a recon reconstructed
structed reconstructed test pilot. Weve got
more fighter jockeys in manage management
ment management than any other company in
the country.
Besides our attack airplanes,
were involved in the 747, S-3
and the DC-10 and the SST pro programs
grams programs to the tune of hundreds of
millions of dollars.
Our simulators are the finest in
industry. So is our schedule per performance.
formance. performance. And our titanium capa capability.
bility. capability. And our record of coming
up with growth designs.

SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor

MCBljy WINNER AND STILL CHAMP!
Americans most popular
ft Those who know sports cars know
H / the MGB. And the years of MG
tradition that preceded it. What
makes the MGB tops in its class?
Powerful 1798 c.c. twin-carb engine.
Fully synchronized four-speed gearbox.
UnUJ Dual braking system with disc brakes up front.
Mk Rack-and-pinion steering.
fevaii># Heavy-duty suspension system.
Plus features that make the sporting life fun, such as: English
leather reclining bucket seats, snug-fitting top, efficient
heater/ defroster.
Come to our showroom today and test drive the MGB. Youll
feel like a winner when you slip behind the wheel of the
CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVKSITY AVE.

This is where you ought to be
if youre an AE, EE, ME, or IE
with a thing about airplanes.
Talk with our campus rep
when he comes to your school.
Hell be the guy with the long
white scarf.
Or sit down and write us to tonight.
night. tonight. Address: College Relations
Office, LTV Aerospace Corpora Corporation,
tion, Corporation, P.O. Box 5907, Dallas, Texas
75222. Were an equal opportuni opportunity
ty opportunity employer.
Campus Interviews:
TUES., OCT. 14, 1969

CRANE Ip!
IMPORTS mill
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville



Vols Watson Edges Out Reaves

KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (UPI)
Tennessees block-busting
sophomore fullback Curt Watson
today was named the United
Press International Southeast
Offensive Player of the Week
after his two-touchdown
performance Saturday against
the Auburn Tigers.
The 210-pounder from
Crossville carried 21 times for 98
yards in Tennessees 45-19 win
Saturday, bringing his two-game
production to slightly more than
five yards per carry.
Watson was the second
sophomore in a row to win
offensive player honors in the
Southeast. It was a tough

r==== INTRAMURALS
Action Starts Soon

UF fraternities and residence
halls kickoff their annual
intramural sport programs on
Monday, Oct. 6.
Dorm area football fields will
be the site for the opening
football games between
residence hall sections at 4:45
p.m.
That evening, the fraternities
begin their traditional swimming
meets at 7 pjn. with Blue
League Preliminaries. All
fraternities participate in either
the Blue or Orange League,
whose preliminaries begin Oct. 7
at 7 p.m.
Independents, made up of
various groups, clubs and
individuals, will also begin
basketball the following week,
Oct. 13, from 5 pjn. to 8 pjn.,
with four games on tap.
* *
The Intramural Department is
now offering a co-recreational
program for all interested
students, faculty, staff and their
wives.
This program enables couples
to participate in various sports
offered each quarter.
The activities scheduled for
Fall Quarter are golf and
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Websters New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time you owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1760 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore
f-siSpy
F
K

PLAYER-OF THE WECK ;

JOHN REAVES
... runner-up in voting

bowling. Table tennis and
badminton are scheduled for the
Winter Quarter and volleyball
and tennis during the Spring
Quarter.
All interested persons must
sign up before 5 p.m., Oct. 8, in
the Intramural Office, room
229, Florida Gym.

...put it cmpaperi
\ iFt&ttcs vbst 1
1 3fc a* §
things go better with COKE

Come on, man, shine a new light
on the subject. Views are changing
and Marg Benning of Auburn Uni University
versity University has created a new ad for
our good friend...Coca-Cola. But
its not just a bright idea, its Margs
impression of our product and
thats important to us. What about
you?
How do you see Coke as part
of your today? Why not take a few
moments to design an ad for us?
Show us your unique way of look-

COCACOLA AND COKE" ARE REGISTERED TRADE-HARKS WHICH IDENTIFY ONLY THE PROOUOT OP THE OOCA*COLA COMPANY.
- ?

decision in giving him the edge
over Floridas passing whiz,
quarterback John Reaves,
winner last week, who
completed 24 of 30 passes for
329 yards and three touchdowns
in the Gators 47-35 win over
Mississippi State.
Reaves, in two games, has hit
42 of 60 passes for 671 yards, a
prodigious production for a
youngster in his first varsity
year.
Watson is a solid, all-round
GATORS CHEER
HISTORICAL
YEAR
1969
Magnetic and
All Purpose Signs
in U. of F. Colors
CALL HENRY
378-4051


.
m mB H
B.
iM
W

football player, said Tennessee
coach Doug Dickey of his
fullback. He handles the ball
well. He also did a good blocking
job against Auburn, handling 13
of 16 assignments with real
authority.
Watson won the starting
fullback spot during spring
practice, and in the spring game
piled up 193 yards in 31 carries
to blot out all other individual
performances in the minds of
most spectators.

I SAVE!
I 1 STARKI 1 FLORIDA
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER "jf
I HOURS
I WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
I SATURDAY BAM IPM
|GANESVLLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

Tuesday, September 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

ing at Coca-Cola. Go ahead... grab
a Coke and lay the words on us!
If your ad is chosen to be pub published,
lished, published, well lay $25.00 on you.
Who knows? You may be $25.00
richer. And, if nothing else, youre
bound to enjoy the Coca-Cola.
When your bright
idea for Coke is on MliMalll
paper, mail it to:
College NewspaperA&SP Uja|
P.O. Drawer 1734
Atlanta, Georgia 30301

TEPS ARE TOPS
Tm KpMm PM

Says New Pledget
Bob Kaye
Noman Katz
Sam Silver

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, September 30,1900

Champ Combines Hobby With Studies

' By LARRY BROWN
Alligator Sports Writer
Douglass Halsey, national
champion in the moth class
sailboat division and second
overall in the world, is one
athlete that does not depend on
physical prowess alone.
An aerospace engineering
major, Halsey has the enviable
distinction of combining his
favorite sport and hobby with
his scholastic major and future
endeavor.
Any boat qualifying to sail in
the moth class competition must
conform with certain standards
as in most other sailing
categories.
However, within the rules of
the moth class, many variations
in design are allowed with the
only rigid requirement being the
eleven foot length of the hull
and the maximum sail area of 85
square feet.
The fact that we are allowed
to modify our boats makes
successful sailing in moth class
competition a great challenge
and a lot of fun, Halsey said.
He also added that many

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changes such as hull design and
sail shape, are allowed and lend
much popular appeal to the
moth classification.
I am able to use many of the
principles involved in aerospace
engineering to help improve my
sailboats. Such characteristics as
hull design and sail area comply
with the lift principles involved
with aerodynamics and much
study and especially
experimentation have aided me
in making a boat which fits my
proscribed specifications.
In short, Halsey is able to
build for himself a very fast boat
which is still within the
specifications of the moth class.
However, Halsey wasnt
always so systematic about his
sport.
He began sailing when only
12 years old in St. Petersburg,
which is still his home.
He gravitated toward the
moth sailing class as his interest
in sailing grew because these
sailboats were relatively
inexpensive and easy to
construct.
Coupled with the relative
building ease was the factor of

DOUG HALSEYSAILBOAT CHAMPION

design variation which, for
Halsey, soon merged with the
science of aerodynamics.
As his experimentation in
design became more refined, his
| 1 ri
DOUG HALSEY
... national champ

success within the moth class
competition also improved
favorably.
Halsey first became National
Champion in 1966 when 19, by
finishing first at the Nationals
held that year in Millville, New
Jersey.
He repeated his first place
finish in both 1968 and 1969.
Each of the years he won first
national honors, Halsey was sent
Soccer Club
Loses Opener
The UF Soccer Club made
history this past Saturday, but it
was of the wrong kind; as
Embry-Riddle Aero Institute
defeated them 3-1 to make the
first defeat in the season opener
in Club history dating back to
1953.
The Gator Kickers had
many chances but missed a few
goals by inches. Outstanding for
Florida were: Co-Captains
Suffem and Wills, and Parker
and Murphy.
The UFSC plays Florida State
here on Saturday Oct. 4 on
Fleming Field at 10 a.m.

to represent the United States in
the World Championships.
He finished ninth in
Switzerland in 1966 and fifth in
France during his second
reigning year in 1968.
This year in the world
competition held at Ocean City,
New Jersey, Halsey finished
second.
In March of 1970, Halsey will
again take on the rest of the
world.
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