Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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Vol 62, No. 8

FINISHING
FRIENDSHIP WALK
When Friendship Walk was a
river last week, and students had
to walk on the grass, as in the
photo at right, it didn't look like
the sidewalk was ever going to
be completed. But Saturday the
Delta Chi's took matters into
their own hands. Below, the
enthusiastic fraternity men are
cementing the red bricks into
place. It's been more than seven
months since the walk-building
project began.

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Administrators Hopeful About Reorganization

See Chart Page- 2
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
The reorganization of the Office of Student
Affairs is viewed optimistically by the UF
administrators who will be affected by the changes.
The main change will be the elimination of the
offices of dean of men and dean of women.
Dean of Men Frank Adams will become dean for
student development and Dean of Women Betty
Cosby will become assistant to the vice president for
student affairs in charge of educational planning and
research.
Another change will be the elimination of
discipline as a duty of Adams' and the creation of
the Office of Student Conduct under attorney
David West.
James Hennessey, assistant to the Vice President
for Student Affairs Lester Hale, said Dr. Cosbys
new job will entail researching and developing
programs for education outside the classroom.
Hennessey said she would also be in charge of
orientation which, in the future, will provide course
credit for students who will then work with groups

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY
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IN OFFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS
* T r

of freshmen during the entire year.
Under Adams will be Assistant Dean Glenn
Farris, past adviser to foreign students. His duties
will remain largely the same.
Four deans whose primary field is counseling will
also be in Adams Office of Student Development.
They are Associate Dean Phyllis Meek who will
coordinate Assistant Deans Donald Mott, in charge
of orientation operations; Jay Stormer, fraternity
adviser; and Loyce Katz, Panhellenic adviser.
Director of Disadvantaged Students Roy Mitchell
will report directly to Hale. Mitchells duties will
also be closely coordinated with Dr. Cosby.
Hale said he sees the reorganization as a more
effective way of serving the students.
The separation of the Office of Student
Conduct and the Office of Student Development
will allow the deans to more effectively deal with
the positive work of helping students.
Dr. Cosby said the new program is a good
move.
She said plans for the reorganization began in
June, 1968, but were held up because of lack of
clearance for new space requirements and title
changes.

University of Florida, Gainesville

DEPARTMENT UNPREPARED

PE Resolution
Hits Problems

By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Writer
Snags have already developed
in a University Senate resolution
calling for the abolishment of
mandantory physical education
at UF. The resolution, passed
Friday and scheduled to go into
effect fall quarter of 1970, calls
for replacement of mandantory
PE with personal development
courses in music, art, drama,
ROTC, and PE.
The proposal passed by a
wide margin in the senate, but
Arts chairman E.E. Grissom said
his department would not be
able to gear for the program by
the implementation date.
Grissom explained there is
oily one course for non majors
in his department, and there is a
perpetual waiting list for the
course even now. Further
requests would only cramp the
course Grissom explained.
Until new sections are added
to the art program the
department cannot handle new
demands the resolution might
cause. The art department has
made no plans for enlargement
at this time Grissom said, largely
because of lack of funds.
Grissom said he opposed the
bill because the curriculum
committee had failed to
investigate problems concerning
specific courses when the
proposal was made.
Grissoms problems may be
small compared to those of
acting Dean Clifford A. Boyd of
the College of Physical
Education and Health.
Speaking on the resolution
Boyd said, It was not the
proposal we asked for, but we
will accept it, although it may

We went ahead anyway, she said. The idea
was good and we thought it important not to wait.
The concept of deans of men and women, she
continued, is outmoded. There is too much
duplication of effort.
For example, Dr. Meek is an outstanding
counselor, but the dean of men had no access to
her.
The trend is to merge the two offices. However,
an Office of Student Development is a fairly novel
idea.
Hale explained the new positions:
Adams new position is an enlargement of his
present responsibilities. Dr. Cosbys is a redirection.
We wish to use her professional knowledge and
experience in the best way.
The only two really new positions are Director
of Disadvantaged Students and Director of Student
Conduct. However, I am not completely satisfied
with either name.
Adams said the plan will bring a new dimension
to the Student Affairs Office.
It will put us in a better position to utilize
deans and counselors of both sexes to the fullest
benefit of the university.

Monday September 29, 1969

cause severe problems in the
department.
Boyd asked for continuance
of the present required program
with credit given for three
quarters with the remaining time
spent in personal development
courses.
A special committee to study
the problems forseen by the
proposal will be appointed by
Boyd. The committee is
necessary because Boyd said he
had no idea what will happen
to enrollment.
At this time, however, Boyd
sees no need for reducing the
staff of his department, a
problem that has plauged the
passage of past changes in the
program.
Boyd said he does not think
the new program will cause a
decrease in the efficiency or
excellence of the present
program
Boyd said his department
plans to revamp their program
to make it more appealing for
students. He plans to continue
reexamining the departments
curriculum continuously.
|§§ ..Inside m
The Gator
UF DEBATE TEAM is
petitioning to get the money
denied them this summer by
the Student Senate .. .page 5
Classifieds 10
Dropouts 6
Editorials 8
Entertainment 12
Letters 9
Sports 13



Page 2

, T.he.Florida AUigator/Mooday, September 29, 4969

Office Os Student Affairs
I Executive
President I Vice President I
- w'? I
Vice President Vice President Vice President
for for for
Academic Affairs Student Affairs Business Affairs
(Conner) (Hale) (Elmore)
Asst! to VP /I \\ Asst, to VP
for Stud. Ass. / / \ \ for Student
Educational f J \ \ Affairs
Planning & / \ Administration
Research / \ (Hennessey)
(Cosby) J \
\^^^Officer
Disadvantaged V 1 for
Students I 1 Student
(Mitchell) I I Conduct
I j (West)
Director Director Dean for Director Director
Student Housing Student Union Placement
Financial (Riker) Development ... (Rion) (Mayberry)
Aid (Adams)
(Turner)
Associate Assistant
Dean Dean
(Meek) (Farris)
Assistant Assistant Assistant
Dean Dean Dean
(Katz) (Stormer) (Mott)
Discussion Replaces
Hostility At Retreat
By Alligator Staff Writers
Worthwhile discussion of university goals rather than
characteristic hostility was the result of the annual Presidents
Retreat, held at Crystal River last weekend.
Student Body Vice President Walter Morgan said he thought the
retreat presented a good opportunity for many people to talk with
each other in a short period of time.
However, it seined that just about the time the discussion started
moving, time was cut off, he said. For example, on the proposed
code of conduct, a lot of views were unable to come out. Many of the
comments made during the break should have been made during the
discussion.
Kevin Davey, secretary of the interior said, It was well worth the
time. A lot of communication lines were open between the
administration and students.
However, more time should have been spent in smaller encounter
groups, he said.
Joan Dowd, president of Mortar Board, said, I was very impressed
with the openness. Everyone placed himself on an equal level.
Everyone made a sincere effort to set forth objectives for all to try to
accomplish not for the students or the administrators, but for the
UF.
Vice President for Student Affairs Lester L. Hale, said, I think we
got a lot of questions answered in some peoples minds. We got a lot
of perspective on students views, especially in the judicial area.
It was a very pleasant and helpful experience, very much
worthwhile.
Roy Mitchell, director for minority affairs, said he had mixed
emotions about the retreat.
I agree wholeheartedly with the students there who expressed
opinions about youth. Im wondering how much attention is going to
be turned to recruitment of minority students, Mitchell said.
James T. Hennessey, assistant to the vice president for student
affairs, said he believed the goal of airing problems' and allowing all
participants to talk their minds was accomplished. He cited the
judicial system, the code of conduct, the activity center and teacher
evaluation as areas discussed at the retreat.
Assistant Vice President for Student Affairs Betty Cosby
commented, Last year tliere seemed to be so much hostility. People
talked about their own personal goals. This time everyone was talking
about university goals.
The students, faculty and staff seemed to be talking of what we
can do together to make UF a better place to live.
Dean for Student Development Frank T. Adams said, It was a
very progressive retreat. A lot of people learned a lot from it, and a lot
of changes will be made on campus because of it.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.53 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or urn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Christian Democrats Win
In West German Election

BONN (UPI) Chancellor Rurt G J;
Kiesingers Christian Democrats retained West
Germanys political leadership Sunday in electl
that smashed the parUamentary ambitions oft
National Democratic party (NPD), which critic
claimed was neo-Nazi.
Early official returns and computer projections
of final results showed the Christian Democrats the
clear-cut leaders in the parliamentary elections even
though their government coalition partners, the
Social Democratic party, officially conceded victory
to the Christian Democrats.
As things now look, a chance of power lies tar
in the future, said Hans-Jurgen Wischnewski,
secretary general of the Social Democratic party.
Computer analysis of the election gave the
Christian Democrats 46.5 per cent of the vote and
the Social Democrats 41.7 per cent. The Free
Democrats, a liberal group, won about 6 per cent
and assured itself of being the third party in

OPEN TO PUBLIC

JMBA Plans 'Free Law School

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The John Marshall Bar
Association (JMBA) at the
College of Law has plans for a
free law school for expanding
curriculum at the law complex.
Ben Patterson, JMBA
president, has initiated the
program to explore areas of the
law that deal with social
problems areas which are not
presently covered by specific
courses.
Classes at the free school
would be held once a week,
probably in the evening, and will
be open to the public, Patterson
said.
Tentatively scheduled to
open in January, the school may
face the same problems that the
experimental college had when it
tried to get class space on
campus last year class space at
UF is for accredited class work
only.
The old experimental college
had to operate off-campus in
private homes, churches, and
recreation centers where it
offered courses in black studies
and subject areas not offered at
UF.
Patterson would like to see
classes at the free school held
at the law complex on Old

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Newberry Road, but approval
for this must come from the
Office of Public Functions at
UF, which is now considering
the request.
I cant see any reasons why
it would object to our using
university class space since the
space will be available at the
times we want to use it.
Much of the law today,
Patterson said, is derived from
academic areas like sociology,
anthropology, and theology, but
society requires us to spend time
studying statutes many of which
no longer apply to the social
problems of today.
Patterson has appointed Mrs.
Kay Ellis, a student at the law
school and wife of campus
activist Clyde Ellis, to head a
committee which will operate
the free school.
Mrs. Ellis is looking for
people in areas of poverty law,
prison problems, problems
associated with black attorneys
practicing in Florida, and the
rights of persons on welfare, to
teach the seminar-like courses.
We want to have courses
where the greatest interest lies so
we can show the law center that
there is an interest in this type of
course work, she said. This
way is better than a protest.
The aims and goals so the

Cl. Sanders
Kentucky Fried

Parliament.
The NPD got about 4.5 per cent of the vote, just
short of the 5 per cent necessary for a party to win
representation in Parliament. A Communist-backed
party, Action Democratic Progress, got only about 1
percent.
Returns indicated that Kiesinger would easily
retain the chancellorship, but it was uncertain
whether he would have to invite the Social
Democrats into a continuation of the grand
coalition in order to assure a working majority in
Parliament.
The Christian Democrats were forced into
coalition with the Social Democrats three years ago
when they lost the support of the Free Democrats.
Kiesinger and the leader of the Social Democrats,
Foreign Minister Willy Brandt, had urged a large
turnout of the countrys 38 million voters to turn
back the Parliamentary bid by the extreme
nationalist NPD.

free school are the same as the
College of Law in that both the
committee and the college want
to expand their offerings, she
said.
She emphasized that the
program has an expanding base
in that the committee is open to
suggestions from students and
the public as to what courses are
needed.
Laymen are looking at the
legal system today and analyzing
it. They have an interest in the
system and want to learn more
about it. This is a chance for
them to add to it, she said.
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New Laws Aimed At Campus Dissidents

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of a two-part series on
new state laws designed to curb
campus dissent and disorder.
This part describes the new laws,
the next will deal with reaction
to the laws.)
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
In reaction to last years
disorders at state universities,
the legislature has enacted a
barrage of new laws to deal with
campus dissidents.
. The most significant to be
approved is House Bill 590,
agned by Gov. Claude Kirk July
Whereas, the bill said, the
Legislature desires to prevent all
disruptive influences at all state
institutions of higher learning
which interfere with the orderly
process of education; and
Whereas, the Legislature
feels that such disruptive
influences should not be
permitted to interfere with the
orderly process of
administration of such
institutions of higher learning;
and
Whereas, the Legislature
deems such disruptive action is
contrary to the public interest
and declares that no public tax
dollars should be spent for the
education or employment of any
individual who participates in
this type of activity...
The bill concludes that since
it is a privilege to attend or be
employed by a university,
anyone attending or employed
by the universities has given his
consent to the policies of that
institution, the Board of
Regents, and the laws of this
state, to include this bill.
The penalties provided for
anyone determined to have
participated in disruptive
behavior are, if the person is an
employe, his contract shall be
immediately terminated and, if
the person is a student,
immediate expulsion for a
minimum of two years.
It remains unclear, within the
law, how one is declared
disruptive, whether through legal
proceedings or administrative
declaration.
Senate Bill 821 declares that

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it is unlawful for any person to
intentionally act to disrupt or
interfere with the lawful
administration of functions of
any educational institution in
this state* and provides a
six-month jail sentence anchor
SSOO fine as a penalty.
RaK/SM
THE DEMONSTRATOR
... can be expelled
Other new laws provide the
Regents with the necessary
power to govern and control the
universities in light of the above
laws.
The new General
Appropriations Bill stipulates
that no funds will be granted to
any student who advocates the
overthrow of the federal or state
government or who engages
with clear intent in any
activity which violates the rights
of faculty or students.
A form which each student

FLORIDA LEGISLATURE CRACKS DOWN

receiving financial aid must sign
reads: I have not been
convicted in any court of record
since July 1, 1969, of any crime
which involves the use of or the
assistance to others in the use of
force, trespass, or the seizure of
property under control of any
state college or university to
prevent officials or students at
such institutions from engaging
in their duties or pursuing their
studies.
A student is uot informed he
must sign this form when
applying for aid but only upon
approval of his request is he told
he must sign.
Assistant Dean of Student
Affairs James Hennessey said
this was only an interim
measure to comply with the
new law, and that the form
would be included with
application papers in 1970.
Hennessey said that only a
very serious offense would
result in the termination of
funds to any student. As an
example of a very serious
offense, Hennessey cited the
Dow Chemical Co.
demonstrations two years ago at
UF.
On another front, Senate Bill
989 is aimed at campus drug
users.
It provides that any person
enrolled as a student in any
st ate-supported university or
junior college who is arrested for
unlawful possession of any
narcotic drug, central nervous
system stimulant, hallucinogenic
drug, or barbituate ... shall be
suspended from all
classes . until the
determination of his guilt by a
court...
If adjudicated guilty, the
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student shall be automatically
expelled.
The law provides two steps.
By merely being charged with
possession, a student is liable to
suspension from classes. A
conviction entails automatic
two-year expulsion.
The law also provides, for
those who would do so, that
any student subject to
suspension or expulsion ... may
be entitled to a waiver of the
suspension or expulsion if he
divulges information leading to

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the arrest and conviction of the
person who supplied such
drug ... or if he voluntarily
discloses his unlawful possession
of such drug...prior to his
arrest.
Government Predicts
BONN West Germanys
population of 60 million will
swell to about 70 million by the
year 2000, the Federal
Government predicts in its
regional planning forecast.

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 29,1969

The UF may lose its pre*veterinary transfer
students from FSU to Florida A&M in a new sharing
program begun by the two Tallahassee campuses.
The Board of Regents approved guidelines this
summer for the exchange of academic courses,
faculty and joint use of library facilities between the
two universities, located less than two miles apart.
Dr. Martin Roeder, dean of arts and sciences at
y FSU, said the biggest transfer will be among
pre-veterinary students going to A&M for animal
husbandry. Prior to this year, any veterinary student
had to go to the UF for his fourth year.
Dean of Administration at A&M Dr. Mahlon
Rahney said no early estimate of how many A&M
students would attend FSU classes could be made,
but predicted the figure might be small due to

Conner To Release UC Study This Week

By SUZANNE LASH
Alligator Writer
An intense and
comprehensive study of the
University College and resultant
recommendations for changes
within it, are to be released to
the public sometime this week.
Dr. Frederick Conner, vice
president of academic affairs,
said he has delayed publication
until the deans and department
heads of the college have had an
opportunity to study the report.

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The study, provided in the
UF constitution, is an evaluation
that was undertaken by a
committee headed by Dr. Hal
Lewis of the College of
Education. The function of the
committee is to examine the
workings of the department or
college studied, not the question
of its existence, said Conner.
Instead, there was a
discussion of the substance of
courses and certain
recommendations and

FSU-FAMU
Exchange
To Affect UF
differences in registration dates.
Roeder said he had approved four applications o
FSU undergraduates seeking classes at A&M, and
expects several more this week as schedule changes
and late registration are completed.
Under the sharing program, fulltime students can
take up to half of their course load at the host
university with the permission of theii academic

comments, Conner said. These
refered to such things as
overemphasis of historical
elements in the physical science
courses or of culture in the
Institutions courses.
Conner says he is a strong
supporter of the aims of the
college.
I think the aim of UC is
threefold, he said. The first is
obvious to help the student to
secure the basic competencies

advisers and dean at the home school.
The courses taken at the host university will not
be the same as those offered at the student's home
We expect it to pick up next year when
students know the opportunity available, he said,
university, and exchange courses are graded simply
as passing or failing. The home university
collects all fees and records grades forwarded from
the host school.
Dr. Stanely Marshall, president of FSU, said the
program fulfills a long-sought goal of many of us
who want to see maximum utilization of all our
educational resources.
The exchange is a two-year trial project and will
be reviewed by the Regents in 1971 to decide if it is
continue.

needed for later study, reading,
writing and mathematics.
The second and most
important, is to supply the
elements of liberal education
that will help the student to
achieve depth and perception on
the world and self.
The third aim, continued
Conner, is io help him get on
the right track. Everybody is
likely to make false starts. UC
should, through counseling,

testing, and providing an
opportunity for experiment,
help to get the student on the
track he likes best and is best
suited for.
Conner said he will send his
recommendations to the
University Curriculum
Committee to be studied and
from there to the University
Senate. He also said he wants
the recommendations widely
discussed by the students and
faculty, all of the people
involved.



Debaters Petition
For Student Funds

UF debaters took to the
streets for their money Tuesday
as they circulated a petition
asking for Student Government
funds.
By Thursday afternoon they
had collected over 2,700 names
from around campus, said John
Wittig, the teams coach.
The UF Debate Team was
one of 17 student groups cut off
completely from student funds
as a result of new criteria
established by this summers
Student Senate.
The senates new policy of no
funds for out-of-state trips, and
its decision that the debate team
did not benefit enough students
to warrant using student funds
were the reasons behind the cut.
All students, regardless of
class or school, are welcome to

RATHSKELLER The Rathskeller at FSU may not be opened until
January, according to Student Body President Canter Brown. The
crux of the problem, he said, is the disagreement between the SG and
the Union Board as to the location of the Rathskeller.
FREAKS Landis Green was the scene yesterday of Freak
Orientation in which a group of 200 students gathered to hear
several speakers talk about local police tactics, drugs and draft
counseling.
HORIZONS The year-old Horizons Unlimited Program in the
School of Arts and Sciences is highly successful according to
director Earl Gordon. Students with socio-economically disadvantaged
backgrounds attend FSU under the program.
MORATORIUM An ad hoc group of the Vietnam moratorium
committee will stage an all-night vigil at FSU as part of a nationwide
Vietnam moratorium on Oct. 15. The list of war dead will be read in
protest to U ,S. involvement in Vietnam.

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join the debate team, the teams
petition maintains.
Noting that the UF has
outstanding athletes to
represent it, members of the
debating team point out it gives
UF a national reputation in the
academic field.
It (the Debate Team) is a
25-year-old tradition that should
not be stopped, the petition
states.
The Debate Team plans to
ask for a rehearing as soon as the
Budget and Finance Committee
announces the time of the
meeting, Wittig said.
In the meantime, their next
tournament comes up next
weekend in Mississippi, and the
team is doubtful it will be able
to go.

ONE BUILDING CONDEMNED

Termites Invade Flavet 111

The traditional roaches of Flavet 111 now have
competitors for the occupation of the married
students housing. Termites have invaded the World
War II vintage buildings.
Building No. 235 has been condemned and the
residents moved to other apartments following an
annual inspection that turned up the termites. The
wood-consuming insects were found in roof beams
and floor boards.
L. J. Hodgins, assistant director of maintenance,
physical plant division, found the building

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Monday, September 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

uneconomically repairable and recommended it
be abandoned. He estimated the cost of repairs
would be SIO,OOO.
Benjamin Bennett, housing building service
superintendent, said a more thorough examination
of the building will be made next week. He said a
decision on the fate of the building will follow that
inspection.
Termites may be invading other Flavet buildings-
Bennett said he suspects the start of damage in
several buildings due for inspection.

Page 5



Tf* Florida AHigator, Monday, September 29,1969

Page 6

SG To Host
FSU Politicos
Its an annual fall tradition
when Florida plays Florida State
University, the home politicos
host a banquet for the visitors.
This years luncheon is Oct. 4, in
the Reitz Union ballroom, with
student leaders of both schools
and the Council of Student
Body Presidents attending.

New Activities Center Plans Moving Smoothly

By ARNOLD MATYAS
Alligator Correspondent
Plans for a multi-million
dollar activities center are
moving smoothly and beginning
to jell, said Fred Cantrell, dean
of university relations and
development, Friday.
In an interview, Cantrell said
the second phase of a three-fold
feasibility study is forthcoming
and expected in October.
Harry Merritt, associate
professor of architecture and
John Mcae, instructor in
architecture, are directing the
second phase. It consists of
location, function and financial
recommendations. x
The first phase of the study,
already complete, was placed in
the hands of Walter Matheriy,
director of physical planning.
Matheriy and a committee
traveled throughout the nation,
exploring the facilities of other
major universities.
The third phase of research
will consist of the employment
of architects to draw up plans
for the complex and also to
continue financing studies.
The complex will include a
$1.5 million natatorium
including an olympic-size
swimming pool, locker rooms
and other related facilities. In
addition, there will be an
amphitheatre estimated at
$400,000, a $2.5 million
performing arts theatre, capable
of accomodating up 2000
people, a four-lane highway to
act as the artery leading to the
center and parking area to house
3,500 vehicles, costing
$600,000.
Finally, there will be a sl2

E
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The only obstacle thwarting
construction at this point is
money.
When plans for the center
were revealed this summer, most
officials in on the project said
they felt the staggered program
could be completed within six
years, if money became
available.
Cantrell said that if that was
the case, ground breaking
ceremonies could be held in
about nine months.
We are fortunate, Cantrell
said, in that the $600,000
needed for construction of the
highway and parking area has
been included in the state road
department's current budget.
The SRD has already begun
surveying the land for
construction.
UF officials are examining
several roads to travel in search
of monies for the' complex.
Alumni drives, grants and federal
funding are but a few of a
myriad of avenues on which the
university has to explore.
Cantrell said students are
excited and enthusiastic over the
project. Those he has spoken
with indicated they would give
their utmost support to the
project in any way they could.
million coliseum with an
estimated seating capacity of
16,000. The coliseum will be a
center of not only athletics, but
also conventions, school
functions and other events. It
will include academic space and
offices.
Mcae said that although the
coliseum would be used for
track meets and other similar
sporting events it would not be

1

NEXT REPORT DUE SOON

just a jocks and socks
building. /
The entire project is expected
to cost $17.75 million when
complete. Construction on the
final building is hoped to be
completed within the next six to
eight years.
The facility, Mcae said, will
be the finest of its type in the
nation.
4

Seating Cut Pressures
Budget For Productions
By SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor
UFs recent decision to cut the Florida Gyms seating capacity
from 7,400 to 4,000. to meet safety requirements, has increased
financial pressures on Student Government Productions.
Until the proposed Student Activities Center is completed, it will
cost us thousands of dollars to operate under the problems of limited
facilities, said Productions Chairman Allen Howes.
Because of limited seating, it is necessary that whenever we have
top entertainment on campus we have to book two shows, in order to
meet student demand.
SG productions are partially underwritten by student activity fees,
making it possible to provide good entertainment at an inexpensive
price.
However, to meet the costs of two shows, the tickets must be sold
at a higher price than desired to prevent productions from going in
debt.
The only way to cover the high costs of two shows, Howes
added, would be through the building of the proposed activities
center, which could have seating capacity of up to 20,000. This
would also enable SG to sell tickets at a lower price.
Howes, who is a member of the planning, felt that it would be
seven to eight years before the complex could be completed.
However, I see no reason why the amphitheatre portion of the
complex could not be finished and in use, within three years.

10, the quarterly cometh

/THE SATurM /\
MOON BOCKET/J

Its uniqueness is that it will
serve as one complex, all
activities located in a central
area on campus.
The location chosen for the
center is the Flavet 111 area
which now accomodates married
student housing.
Facilities will be within seven


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The philosophy of the facility
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IN NORTHERN IRELAND

Belfast Churches Bombed

BELFAST, Northern Ireland
(UPI) Fire bomb attacks
disrupted morning Sunday
services at two Protestant
churches and British troops fired
teas gas to break up another
skirmish in the afternoon.
British reinforcements rushed
to this capital of Northern
Ireland to keep Belfast's tenuous
peace. Soldiers sealed off a
half-mile section of the troubled
area and searched anyone
entering or leaving.
Protestant and Catholic
crowds of about 100 men each
hurled rocks and pavement
fragments across on the army's
peace lines'* near Coates Street
until gas masked troops fired gas
cannisters to disperse them.
A total of eight soldiers and
five civilians were treated at
hospitals for injuries, including
one 15-year old boy.
Angered Protestants tried to
storm through a peace line and
Catholics responded with a
shower of rocks.
Protestant ministers canceled
evening services after the
morning arson attacks.
Lt. Gen. lan Freeland, British
commander in Northern Ireland,
appealed for calm and urged all
those who have no urgent
business in Belfast" to stay out.

i By BRENDA GEVERT2 i
TRIED AND TRUE, OLD AND NEW: Old and new befrienders
are invited to an organizational (bring your own) dinner meeting.
Scheduled for 5 pjn. Tuesday, the group meets in room 355 of the
Reitz Union.
BEING WHERE IT'S AT: The Florida Cicerones will meet at 7:30
tonight in room 346 of the Union.
RIDE EM HORSES: The Block and Bridle Club is having a smoker
tonight at 7:30 in room 362 of the Union. Slides will be shown of last
year's dub activities, induding the little International Showmanship
Contest.
ELECTING FRESHMEN: All freshmen interested in running for a
position on the newly formed Freshman Council for the Student
Senate should register at the Student Government offices on the third
floor of the Reitz Union before Friday. There is a $5 fee. Elections
will be Oct. 15 from 9 ajn. 6 pjn.
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Men in some Catholic
neighborhoods began rebuilding
barricades only recently
dismantled. Five Catholic homes
were severly damaged by
Molotov cocktails.
One militant Catholic
spokesman said people were

McGovern Supports
Oct. 15 Moratorium

BOSTON (UPI) Sen.
George S. McGovern, D-SD.,
proposed Sunday that President
Nixon offer asylum to any
South Vietnamese who would
feel endangered by the total
withdrawal of American troops.
He also proposed that
Americans who disagreed with
a policy of total withdrawal be
permitted to help the
government of President
Nguyen Van Thieu thorugh
volunteer action.
McGovern, a potential
Democratic presidential
candidate in 1972, offered his
proposals in a strongly anti-war
speech prepared for the Ford
Hall Forum here in which he

losing confidence in the army's
ability to keep peace. The day of
stone throwing and arson
followed a night of disorder that
left 13 persons injured and
rekindled hatred between the
city's Protestant and Catholic
communities.
British army headquarters
said additional troops had been
summoned to deal with the
situation.
A Royal Marine commando
unit was scheduled to leave
Plymouth, England, for Belfast
shortly.

endorsed the Oct. 15 campus
moratorium called by peace
groups as a protest gesture.
He was among the two dozen
congressional Democrats who
met in a Capitol caucus Friday
to discuss forcing the Senate to
adjourn on Oct. 15 by staying
away from it, denying it the
quorum needed for it to conduct
business.
McGovern gave few details of
his proposals for file asylum and
volunteer support for the Thieu
government.
(On asylum, he said:
President Nixon should make
an offer of safety to South
Vitnamese who would feel
threatened by our withdrawal.
Other countries could share in
opening their borders to those
South Vietnamese who might
feel that their lives were in
jeopardy if we were to
withdraw. Once that offer is
made and some reasonable time
is provided to carry out the
transfer of those Vietnamese
who wish to take advantage of
it, we should immediately
withdraw all American forces
from Vietnam, he said.

Reitz Union Fell Lessons
REGISTER FRST NIGHT OF CLASS IN ROOM C-4
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 392-1655
Beginning Bridge Mondays
Starting Sept 29 at 7 PM
7 lessons only $7.50
Ron Schoenau lnstructor
Ballet for Children Tuesdays
Starting Sept 30
Ages 3 thru 6at 3-4 PM
7 and up at 45 PM
8 lessons $10.50
Gail Scott lnstructor
Self-Defense for Women Tuesdays
Offered as a public service.
Instructed by Capt. Roberts and the
Gainesville Police Department
Details to Follow Later.
Water Colors and Drawings Thursdays
Starting Oct. 2 at 7 PM
6 lessons for $6.00
Canning Young lnstructor
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Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, Saptamber 29,1969

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility

Raving

No Movie For A Teddy Bear

Once upon a time there was a
trustworthy, loyal, brave, clean,
reverent quasi-journalist named
Teddy Bear Remley. Young
Teddy Bear had been told all
along that great things awaited
him in the newspaper world, but
there seemed to be no openings
for his abundant lack of talent.
Suddenly, the chance came:
Joe Torchia, irreverent
Entertainment Editor of the
Student Newspaper, went to
Turkey, and there were no nowriters
writers nowriters left in Hogtown. Teddy
Bear then decided to take over
as Entertainment Editor.
It was true that Teddy Bear
lacked talent, but he more than
made up for it through sheer
inability. He was a collegiate
Boy Scout. He feared and
trembled before God (a
fraternity brother of Teddys, by

A i .T^
f
0. I
Alligator Staff
Neal Sanders Dave Osier
Assignment Editor Assignment Editor
Janie Gould Anne Freedman
Associate Editor Feature Editor
Mary Toomey Helen Huntley
Editorial Assistant Assistant News Editor
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of Florida.

Raul Ramirez
Editor-In-Chief
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

the way). He had school spirit.
He loved America, apple pie, and
WASPS. And, most importantly,
he lived in a soporific dream
world, afraid to leave his third
floor cloister and venture out
into the evil, mean, and
oversexed Real World that Billy
Graham and Art Linkletter had
warned us about.
Teddy Bear Remley was
determined to cling to his belief
that nothing existed outside his
dream world, for the future of
the Free World depended upon
such beliefs. After all, hadnt
Christians died at the hands of
heathens so that we might today
live in a more tranquil fantasy?
All went well for Teddy Bear,
the young editor. Then he saw a
movie that shocked him,
dismayed him, and grossed him
out something awful. This

Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

By David Miller

movie, said Teddy Bear, is built
on sex. In fact, the few
instances of deep-felt emotion
shown in the film are merely a
background for its sex
episodes. Tell it like it is,
Teddy! Oh, wow! You know, it
seems that the flashbacks are
poor attempts at film art.
Teddy Bear Remley burned
with livid rage as he finished the
stirring review, for the Spirit of
Saint Louis and the wisdom of
Norman Vincent Peale were
driving him onward, ever
onward, toward his exalted goal.
He finally ended the
magnificent movie review with
these All-American words: If
todays generation truly avoids
shallow movies, the line will
probably be very short for
Midnight Cowboy (Oh, darn
I went and mentioned the
name of that filthy flick.) And
Teddy Bear Remley looked at
his review and he saw that it was
good.
And Teddy Bear Remley
submitted his review for
publication, then went home,
satisfied and quite proud. And
he had some cookies and milk,
read the latest copy of Boys
Life, said his prayers on behalf
of Mommy, Daddy, and Dave
Doucette, and went to sleep,
dreaming of sugar plum fairies
and candy canes. And he slept
very soundly, for he would not
have to review another filthy
movie until October 17. That
was the day Snow White was
scheduled to come to Hogtown.

Staff Writings

As I persued a carbon copy of my junior college
transcript my mind wandered back to the day I set
my goal to attend UF as an upper-division transfer
student. Armed with the assurance that I would be
fully equipped to meet the challenge of the junior
college transfer trauma, I successfully finished my
diverse juco curriculum that stretched from
badminton to zoology.
I finally made it to UF this year. And after a
week, I have realized that a transfer student wears a
hazy label almost indistinct in the college
community.
It is a label that I struggle to conform with and as
I work to conform, I realize that the ivy halls of
upper-division universities arent exactly what I
expected.
I cant be considered a freshman with two years
of college credits but deep inside the feeling is there.
It haunts me when I hear the radio commercial that
claims, The seniors know it, the sophomores and
juniors know it, its the new Gator guys and girls we
want to talk to. Guilty pains rack me when 1 dont
listen to the remaining message because Im a junior
- I already know, they say have to keep up the
image.
Image plays a large part in my activity. To look a
seasoned junior, I attend class with just a notebook,
never laugh at th£ professors jokes and 1 look
bored.
But what really hurts me in my masquerade is

4

That Freshman Feeling

EDITORIALS
Think Young
At last, mandatory physical education -a remnant of a
long archaic, stagnant curriculum has left the UF.
Its abolition is a new landmark on the road to more
progressive, efficient and equitable curricula at this
sometimes forward-looking, sometimes backsliding
university.
We commend the University Senate for its foresight in
this decision.
However, we hope this one step is not an end in itself,
but merely the beginning of what could become a new
stage, set in academic greatness. It is a greatness that could
be, like projected greatness in so many Fields, only paper
promises.
Or this time, it could be greatness given a chance.
The abolition of mandatory PE is, indeed, a promising
step forward. But it is only one step on a road requiring
many steps.
We must keep moving.
There are other areas in UFs whole academic structure
that need immediate attention and prompt revision. There
are attitudes that need changing. There are perspectives that
need alteration. $
We think the proposed amendment to the UF
Constitution, which changes the structure of the senate to a
200-senator membership, including 10 voting students, is an
indication of an attempt to alter a perspective too long
entrenched with' a power-at-the-top,
decision-making-by-the-elite outlook.
Also, by including more representation from lower rank
professors, who are for the most part younger, and
therefore closer to the student viewpoint, the proposal
seems to be a grasping out at a viable, equitable resolve
for everyone.
We hope so. We hope the senators collective consciences
will direct them toward a truly united university, a promise
that need not be left only on paper.
Tour Campus
Those Orange and Blue buses criss-corssing the campus
every five minutes on weekdays are currently being kept in
cold storage over the weekends.
Saturdays and Sundays are the very days when the
campus is deluged with visitors from all parts of the state.
Especially on fall football weekends.
What better way to show them UF than by providing bus
tours?
Not only would it provide a service to this universitys
visitors, parents and students, who sometimes walk on
weekends as well as weekdays, but it would take the buses
out of dry-dock for two days a week.
On a campus this large it is common for even fourth year
Gators not to know many parts of UF.
One bus, running hourly tours of the campus, would give
all a chance to know our alma mater.

By Chuck Keller

even though Im in upper-division, most of my
classes are prerequisites because of the effective
junior college counseling system.
Laundry day finds me reading washing
instructions from my mother, prepared before my
departure. But even image comes into the washing
ritual I disobey my mother and mix my
wash-and-wear shirts with my socks because
everybody else does it.
After the glowing Playboy sex rating, UF
sounded more appealing and as a new student I felt
pride in something to which I had made no
contribution. I have discovered that the UF sexual
activity must depend on where you live, who you
know, etc. It just doesnt happen in Murphree area,
where the liveliest activity is listening to a drunk
play his horn in Fletcher Hall.
I am privileged to bring an automobile to UF
although Im afraid to drive on campus, lest I get
hopelessly tangled in the snarling traffic. I rarely
venture off campus, leery of getting lost.
But of course, with the transportation
opportunity comes the $lO registration fee,
permitting me to park in a residence lot 15 feet
from West University Ave.
For when asked if I am a freshman, I crisply
reply, No, Im a junior college transfer.
Oh, one of those, Im told. We sure have a lot
of em this year!



There is no hope
for the complacent man

Spooking Out

Police Are Against Change

(EDITORS NOTE: The
following is the second half of a
two-part series by Charles
Fulwood.)
Historically in our
communities, bad niggers did
not live long. They were usually
killed or sent to prison because
of their threat to the police.
Others feared the police, but
bad niggers hated the police
and governed their actions
accordingly when they were
victimized.
However, the bad nigger
not only hated the police but
hated anyone who threatened
his status or life. The bad
niggers directed most of their
wars against people within the
community because he was blind
as to who his real enemy was.
Since black people are, in
reality, colonized people, bad
niggers are those that are
psychologically affected by the
external repressive conditions
that they live under.
One of the basic levels of
struggle that oppressed and
colonized people go through is
attempting to be admitted into
the system of the oppressor. The
bad nigger hates the oppressor
but realizes that heavy penalties
are being handed down for
people such as himself.
This keeps the bad nigger
in a cycle of contradictions,
trying to fight the oppressor and
yet trying to please the
oppressor at the same time. In
this ocean of direction blindness,
the bad nigger is literally
helpless when confronted by the
opDressor.
The Police departments have
used this to their advantage since
the emancipation. Often bad
niggers were hired by the police
to become a colored
policeman because the
intellectual police brain centers
understood that once the bad
nigger gets the impression that
hes been accepted, he will then
act as an oppressor.

Dialogue, Goodwill Not Enough

MR. EDITOR:
I would like to respond to
Audrey Wells prescriptions to
Mr. Anson on how to combat
personal powerlessness in the
fight against racism.
Since Audrey Wells is a
graduate student in Political
Science, I am puzzled as to how
much good talking with other
knowledgeable students has
done since the only analysis and
prescriptions her liberalism is
capable of generating is for one
to write the old Congressman,
set a Christ-like example of
tolerance and goodwill or else
refuse to personally shop at
Winn-Dixie unless they consent
to shape up their hiring policies.
I am positive that Audrey
simply bubbles over with
goodwill toward all mankind,
but this kind of liberal
humanitarianism is so

The contradiction is resolved
until the bad nigger is
confronted by the oppressors
racism. But being confronted by
his superior officers racism will
not make him give up his
position. It has been proven that
he will work harder to prove to
his oppressor that he is worthy
of respect. In working harder,
the colored policeman
viciously represses the people in
the black colony, and becomes
the enemy himself.
- i
Since about 20 years ago,
however, the people in the
community knew the bad
nigger before he was a
colored policeman, and were
scared of him. So were bade to
the oppressed people fearing the
oppressor. The internal
contradictions sharpen with the
colored policeman because he
is working with the oppressor
that he hates, and the people
who used to respect him now
hate and fear him as he did once
himself.
Police states and facism
develop when reactionary
governments dont meet the
needs of the people and the
people protest and resist the
political state. When too
many people express their
grievances with the social order
" by using their democratic rights,
the state will then either deny
democratic rights or repress the
people protesting and resisting.
Oppressed people in this
country will no longer allow
themselves to believe that the
problems of poverty and racism
cant be solved. This country is
one of the most well-developed
technological and economic
empires in the world, and there
is no excuse at all for poverty,
indecent housing, unjust wages,
injustices and racism to exist. It
is becoming clear to many
people that the police will be a
major force in trying to stop a
transformation of this society.

amorphous that it is positively
destructive to the attainment of
a humane society.
In fact, I regard it as a much
more profound copout than
Mr. Ansoni regret that he cant
take a black militant to lunch
and talk it over.
Audreys brand of liberalism
is a cop out because it advises
everyone to engage in low-key
political activities as if these
really make a difference in
solving the profound problems
of racism at home and, I would
add, imperialism abroad.
Personal example, bull
Sessions, elections, and letter
writing may be good for
soothing ones conscience, but
they mean almost nothing when
it comes to the problem of
attaining power for the
oppressed in this country.

By Charles Fulwood

We understand that the police
are just doing their jobs. We also
understand that Hitlers Brown
Shirts and SS Troops were just
doing their job. I understand
that this fadst government was
just doing its job when it
detained thousands of
Japanese-Americans in
concentration camps.
I understand that the Chicago
police were just doing their
jobs when they slaughtered
thousands of kids a few months
ago. I understand that the Blue
Meanies from Oakland,
California were just doing their
job when they killed James
Rector. We understand this, and
this is the reason that many
people are caught in the womb
of revolutionism with the
realization that this social order
is forcefully sustained.
Black people understand that
when its their turn to be herded
into concentration camps, that
the police will be doing their
job. But the black colony is also
saying that we aint gonna be
walking and marching and
singing into no showers. When
or if this happens well just have
to do our job and defend
ourselves, regardless of who is
killing us.

This years inflated car registration fee has been a
topic of much debate among the families in our
village. We have been lead to believe that the ten
dollar registration fee is to be used to defray the
cost of operating the newly employed bus system.
The question arises, why should the car owners
on campus be required to shoulder the entire cost of
the bus system? Are we to assume that the buses are
to be used exclusively by those who own
automobiles? After observing the droves of students
piling out of the residence halls and into the buses,
one could hardly draw that conclusion.
The families who live in our village do not live
here either by choice or by chance. We must budget
our lives around a limited and fixed income. By

Car Owners Shouldn't Pay Bus Costs

Liberalism is so pitifully inept, given the
quasi-Facist drift that is emerging in this country, that
the point is rapidly approaching when all kindhearted
liberals are going to have to concretely get out and
support the cause of radicalism or else join the
oppressors explicitly or de facto ...

Liberalism is so pitifully
inept, given the quasi-Facist drift
that is emerging in this country,
that the point is rapidly
approaching when all
kindhearted liberals are going to
have to concretely get out and
support the cause of radicalism
or else join the oppressors
explicitly or de facto, i.e., a
liberal shouldnt forget that
Palmer raids, anti-labor politics,
McCarthyism, etc., chopped off
a number of liberal heads as well
as those of real radicals.
A genuine militant liberalism
could have helped blunt these
sorts of things, but it never
really developed.
One hopes that the liberal
intellectual will do better this
time, but I doubt it. In terms of
allegiance to their own status
positions, pseudo pseudoprofessionalism,
professionalism, pseudoprofessionalism, apolitical
orientations, and screwed-up
ideology, etc., the liberal

c '*'
~^~>~r-r-; .. ,_. r ..
*7 Say Censor Books, Censor Pictures And Censor Sex
Education So That Kids Grow Up To Be Like Us Adults

Monday, September 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

regulation, no one making more than four hundred
dollars monthly or a maximum of forty-eight
hundred dollars annually may reside in the married
student housing.
Nearly one hundred per cent of the families need
cars to get to and from work and to go shopping for
the essentials for operating a household. Thus, the
burden of the disproportionate fee affects nearly
every student family on campus.
We contend, that if a bus system is to be
furnished for students on campus, the cost for such
a system should be evenly distributed among those
persons who use it.
BEN WARDLAW

intellectual has, by and large,
already sided with the
oppressors.
This time around AAUPs
dialogue and goodwill arent
enough. The politics of head-on
struggle is what counts. To not
cop out means to join or
support and defend the AFT if
you are a professor and such
organizations as YSA, SDS,
Womens Liberation, the
Student Mobilization
Committee, or AASA if you are
a student.
If you dont like political
radicalism, then drop out and
smoke grass, drop acid, live with
your girlfriend or boyfriend,
form a commune, etc., etc. This
country is so socially,
economically, and culturally
decadent that across-the-board
rebellion is justified.
PAT QUIGLEY, 7AS

Page 9



Page 10

I. The Florida AHi gator* Monday, September 969

IWIPWWWWWWIF'V'V'***
mCampug Crier
SPONSORED BY STUDENT
Cabinet Offices 392-1665
3rd Floor Reitz Union
Through the cooperation of the Athletic Association and the University Business Affairs office
Student Government has made the following arrangements regarding the activity card as a requirement
for admission to football games:
1) Effective today, September 27, 1969, the athletic ticket card will NOT
be required for admission to football games. Instead the card marked
"Certificate of Registration" (brown I.D. card) WILL BE REQUIRED in f
order to get a ticket of admission to the games.
2) The Athletic-ticket card should be retained by students who have them.
Through an arrangement with Vice President Elmore, these cards will be
honored by the Student Depository for identification purposes when the
brown fee card is tied up for bloc seating.
V : : -- V. ,
3) This procedure will be used for all student tickets for the rest of the
season, beginning with the FSU game.
4) Those students who have paid the $5.00 fee for replacement of the
athletic card will receive a refund check in the mails at an early date.
' ... - x;. ' <0:
5) Students who participate in bloc seating and have already given their
athletic cards to their bloc seating chairman should contact the chairman
and exchange the card immediately.
This action is prompted by the large number of students who inadvertantly destroyed their athletic
ticket I.D. card. The Student Body is most appreciative of the cooperation by the Athletic Association
and the Business Affairs office in correcting this problem.
NOW HEAR THIS
All are invited to dance to the music of the nationally famous,
TROPICS, absolutely free, at the Homecoming Dance in the Reitz Union
Ballroom, October 19th, from 9:00 P.M. 1:00 A.M. Refreshments for the
dance, sponsored by Florida Blue Key, are compliments of the Union Barber
Shop.
The last meeting that the Student Senate can act on referendums for
the fall election is October 15.
6 Want to teach a course in the Florida Experimental College? Want to
know all about the Florida Experimental College? Contact Dan Beardsley at
376-7539.
"Help students help themselves." This is the slogan of the Gator Loan
Fund which is currently selling "campus-paks," consisting of various toilet
articles. They are on sale at the Student Service booth, .25 for male paks and
.50 for female paks. Proceeds are allocated to students needing financial aid.
Also on sale are "Gator Beanies" for SI.OO, which includes a
campus-pak. The brothers of Phi Delta Theta fraternity are supplying the
manpower in the service booth.
6 The deadline for obtaining student government sponsored insurance is
October 15. For information, contact Jeff Warren, 392-1665.
ALTHOUGH THE FLOW OF APPLICATIONS FILED FOR
POSITIONS IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT HAS BEEN TREMENDOUS,
WE STILL HAVE MANY, MANY OPENINGS .. .THERE IS ALWAYS A
PLACE FOR YOU IN YOUR STUDENT GOVERNMENT.
1 > . V >
L



[GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

£/ # V,VVVV* Wrrrw*-<- \ Jf
FOR SALE |
Guns-Qun* Oun'tnvGiitoiy over
450 Buy Sell-'T rede Repair.
Reloading supplies. Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Mlcanopy. 466-3340.
(A-ts-6-p)
1969 HONDA 160 CC ELECTRIC
STARTER WINDSHIELD, NEW
, 300 MILES HELMET $450.00
PH: 376-5197. (A-st-6-p)
T V. Zenith 16* B w. 3 yr. old
Good Condition S6O. Call 392-1674
or 372-5073 after 5 P.M. (A-3t-6-p)
69 HONDA9O Still under
warranty. S3OO Call 378-892 or
3 72-1540 after 5- Excellent
condition. (A-st-6-p)
1962 Galaxie 500, A/C, Auto-trans
radio, new tires and valve job. S3OO.
Call 378-2975 after 3 PM. Runs
good. (A-st-4-p)
Honda superhawk runs and looks
great 2 helmets + manuel $350. Also
ampex 750 tapedeck with cover and
tapes $175. Call Stu 378-6129.
(A-st-5-p)
KITTENS Irresistabiy cute. Get one
free can of cat food per kitten. Call
49 5-2226 before 5:00, 495-2479
after 6:00. (A-3t-8-p)
Mojave cycle -250 cc, 1969, very
good condition, S3OO or trade for
small bike and cash. Call 372-1820
A.M. or after 5 P.M. (A-st-3-p)
1968 Honda 50 cIOO 3 speed low
mileage excellent condition good
transportation around campus $l5O
Call Jon Ciener 378-7353. (A-st-3-p)
Canon pellix 35mm camera, 1.2 lens,
electronic flash attachment, complete
make offer, Call Jeff 378-6819.
(A-2t-7-p)
Like new 1969 honda 175 less than
3000 miles 80 miles per gallon it sure
beats walking or finding parking
space only $595. Call 378-7902 after
5. (A-4t-7-p)
770 x Roberts tape recorder in
excellent condition $275. Call
372-6002. (A-2t-7-p)
1967 Allstate scooter. 60cc. In good
shape, but needs a little work.
Helmet included. SSO. Call Ken at
378-6431. (A-st-7-p)
50cc Honda excellent condition 100
miles to the gallon. Best offer
Accepted 373-1008. (A-2t-7-p)
1967 Honda 305 cc scrambler
excellent condition $475 must sell
Accutron astronaut watch SIOO and
Minnox camera SIOO call 376-0516.
Ted. (A-2t-7-p)
FOR SALE: VW Bug 1965. Excellent
condition SBOO Student entering
service. Call 376-3724 After 5 PM.
(A-st-4-p)
1968 Yamaha 100 twin cc. Excellent
transportation, like new condition.
Only 2800 miles. $290 or best offer.
Call Bob at 378-6626. (A-2t-8-p)
For Sale 1966 Manatee mobile home
two bdr, furnished incl. auto.washer,
10x48. $2700 cash or $450 dwn and
assume $52.65 mo. call 372-1877.
(A-2t-8-p) __
SOUPS on, the rug that is, so clean
the spot with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-It-8-c)
This was
the RUMBLE
that ROCKED
Las Vegas!
The deadliest gamble ever dared.
The odds are against the house 7:50
when you bet violence against &
a payoff in millions! 1 *
heu'S'OQ 1
ANOasDu
PLUS AT 9:40
FABIAN IN
THE WILD RACERS

arnwAuixaH
FOR SALE |
Color TV 3mo. old $650 new $350
or best offer 378-4767 378-5279.
(A-st-4-p)
Tired of walking? Ride to class on a
like new 68 Yamaha 100 Helmet and
extras included 373-2800. (A-2t-6-p)
FOR RENT
3 Bedroom apartment 1 block north
of campus. $165.00. Furnished. 118
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-10t-5-p)

1 Bedroom apartment. 1 Block north
of campus. $125.00. Furnished. 118
NW 35th Terrace. 376-6652.
(B-10t-5-p)
Peter Pan Motel, Williston -Florida,
20min. from Gainesville.
Reservations available for
homecoming weekend. TV and AC.
Call 528-3941. (B-st-6-p)
Air Conditioned, Furnished 2
Bedroom, quiet. Avail. Oct. Ist.
Couples or Grad, students; SIIO.OO
monthly. Call 376-5828. (B-st-4-p)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt- Fully
furnished. within walking distanot of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-2-p)
Share a house that includes two room
private suite, linens, phone, utility,
kitchen privileges, pets accepted. S7O
per month. 372-7186 after 5 p.m.
(B-4t-8-p)
I WANTED I
Wanted studious female roommate
for Colonial Manor Apt. $55/Mo. +
util. Ph. Ann 373-2400. (C-st-6-p)
Couple needs 1 br apt. or house to
sublease from Dec. to June for
approx. $125 per mth. Call Ron at
378-0966 between 5 and 6 or after
10 pm. (C-3t-6-p)
Coed to have own bedroom in large
modern luxury Olympia Apts near
the towers, sororities, Norman. Your
own rrom for $75. 378-3303.
(C-3t-6-p)
Wanted coed to cook dinner for two
medical students meals in exchange.
Call 376-8442 between 67 p.m.
Transportation provided. (C-3t-6-p)
Roommate? Make the best of both
wld. Have place on lake. If you have
room for roommate near campus
contact me leave name, phone no.
for PW Arnett in psy dept with
Ginger 2-0601. (C-st-5-p)
Need one female roommate for 2
bdrm townhouse at La Bonne Vie.
Rent plus utilities divided four ways.
Call Sharon at 392-9237. (C-st-5-p)
One Female Roommate wanted for 2
bdrm apt at Landmark. Call anytime.
376-0972. Good location, loaded
with conveniences. (C-st-5-p)
Male grad needs roommate. Two
bdrm luxury apt, pool, air the works.
Sin city. Have your own room. Eight
mo. lease. 373-1439 after 6 pm b 4 10
a.m. (C-2t-8-p)
Employees wanted for rat sleep
deprivation experiment. 4-hour
shifts. $1.25 $1.50 per hour. Call
Karen at 392-2991 between 8 + 5.
(C-st-8-c)

Give it a try!
FRIDAY 6PMMIDNIGHT
SATURDAY 10AM-MIDNIGHT
SUNDAY 2PM-11 PM
H 36 N.W. 7th Avenue at
N.W. 13th St. Burger Chef

Monday, September 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I WANTED |
Female roommate wanted to share 2
bdrm apt. in Williamsburg apts.,
$55/mo. Call 378-9934. (C-st-7-p)
I want to buy your old bicycle. Call
Palmer 373-2817. (C-lt-8-p)
Such a deal. Beautiful Landmark
Apt. needs one female roommate,
apt. 122 Phone 378-1933. (C-st-8-p)
Male roommate for three bedroom,
air cond. house. Newly panelled and
fireplace. 41.50/month+share elec.
711 NE sth Terr. Call 378-4317.
(C-st-8-p)
Girl to cook evening meal for 3
graduate students. Call 378-2281 5
7 pm. (C-3t-8-p>
aiMIIOIOWWK^^WWWWgVWV^;
HELP WANTED jj
Desk clerk wanted. Hours Fri. 5
12p.m. Sat 12 5 & 8 12 p.m. Sun.
8 4p.m. More hours may be
acquired. Apply in person at Manor
Motel from 8 a.m. 2 p.m. (E-3t-6-p)
Part-time secty, shorthand +
experience required. 2 days per week,
apply at 16 NW 18 St. 9:30 5 p.m.
(E-3t-6-p)
INFANTS NEEDED FOR SPEECH
EXPERIMENT Must be between 3 &
5 months of age and in good health.
Subjects will be paid $2.00/hr. for
approximately 3 hours. Call Mrs. J.
Bruno or Dr. T. Murry, 392-2046.
(E-10t-4-p)
HAVE FUN! MAKE MON! Show
Holiday Magic Cosmetics. 617 W.
Univ. Ave. 372-6121. (E-st-7-p)
Babysitters to work full or part time.
Car preferred but not necessary. 617
W. Univ. Ave. 372-6121. 9-5.
(E-St-7-p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Mary, University
extension 392-2049 for appointment
between Bs. (E-st-1 -c)
Wanted RN & Donor Tech, for Blood
Bank. 378-9431. (E-st-4-p)
fri;3:9;Q;Q C B 8 B iMMMWfiWfiIWW 80 M OOO'i'ffC
L AUTOS I
SaPftWWWWMiWMBIIiIIIIIW
63 TR4 good condition. Brand new
clutch and brakeshoes. Must sell
S6OO or best offer. Phone 376-7019
and see at 501 N.W. 15 Ave.
OBrien Apts. (G-st-4-p)
Porsche sc 1964 am fm radio varoli
racing wheel chrome rims luggage
rack coni shocks disc brakes driuing
lights deep blue S3OOO 378-5645.
(G-st-5-p)
Two VWs for sale. '6l with rad,
heater, sunroof. New clutch. Cute.
$450 64 with rad, heat, air
conditioned! Both run well. Phone
373-1936 anytime. (G-3t-6-p)
For Sale: 1965 Impala Super Sport.
Power steering & brakes. New tires.
Automatic. Excellent condition. Call
Alan at 373-2254 after 3:30.
(G-3t-6-p)
65 VW was wrecked but has new
engine. Would make nice beach
buggy $375. Call 372-6002.
(G-7-2t-p)

Page 11

I AUTOS I
9 i
VW 67 FASTBACK. Radio.
Excellent condition! SI2OO cash
takes her! Phone 370-4532. See at
Apt. 31, 1716 NW Third Avenue.
(G-st-6-p)
1963 Corvette Stingray Roadster.
327 4 speed new tires paint.
Beautiful condition 51450. Call
376-4913 after 5:00 p.m. (G-10t-6-p)
1964 Spitfire Very good running
condition. Call 373-1316 afternoons
and evenings. $494 firm. (G-3t-5-p)
59 Ford 4d automatic 5000 mi on
new engine new tires power steering
excellent second car asking S3OO call
Larry Cobb 376-9403 376-5181.
(G-st-8-p)
1966 MGB-Excellent condition, good
tires tonneau cover, boot, and
luggage rack. Lot price $1495. selling
for only $1350. Call 376-4962.
(G-3t-8-p)
67 Cougat XR7, 390ci, 4br, 4sp
posi-traction, front disc, wood panel
dash, leather bucket seats. Asking
$2500. 372-5698 after 4 p.m.
(G-st-8-p)
-x-x-x-x-v-vixvx-x-xc-x-x-x-x-ivx-xox-X;
| PERSONAL
?x*x*x-x-x*!.xx*x-x-x*x-x-:x*:Mif.xwx*>> >^
Are you foundering? No S. F. in your
life? If you are interested in
discussing the literary aspects of
science fiction call Dave Depew at
392-8184 or Dave Meade at
376-0808. (J-3t-6-p)
Flying Hawks Club Flight instruction
$7.00 solo, $12.00 dual for club
members FREE ground school 5 min
from campus Stengel 376-0011.
(J-10r-5-p)
16 wk. old miniature Basset puppies.
$65.00. AKC Reg. Shots and
wormed. Day 378-4480, or evening
378-1068. (J-St-5-c)
Phillips flying service flight
instruction 9.00 solo 13.00 duaL
495-2124 after 6 p.m. Ground school
starting Sept. 3. (J-10t-1-p)
Talent Audition Anyone interested
in auditioning for the Rathskeller
come to the Rat Tuesday, Sept. 30 at
8:00 p.m. All types of entertainment
are welcome.(J-2t-7-p)
n Beta Phi transfers, please call
378-6382. (J-10-2-p)
Roberts 8 track stereo cartrages from
your records only $4.50 372-9718.
(J-St-3-p)
1 female roommate wanted to share
1 br Univ. Garden Apt. Grad
student preferred. Call 372-7977
after 6 p.m. (J-st-8-p)
Florida Players: Open meeting
Monday Sept. 29 at 5 in the theatre.
AH interested students are welcome.
See you Monday at 5! (j-lt-8-p)
JpMOteMWBMSTWSWSTO?X'X-I-X-X-X-X-X-X-Mj?
I LOST & FOUND |
'y/WK^XOvXX'XvNVW.v.VAvXvXvXv""'
Lost at Houston game, prescription
sunglasses, soft black case, dark
green-grey frames. Reward. Call
392-2143 or 376-0466. (L-2t-7-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
you choose what you want...
pay only for what you get!
MONDAY
BAKED MACARONI TQ
& MEAT SAUCE / Vv
(All You Care To Eat)
TUESDAY __
FRIED CHICKEN 99(
AH You Care To Eat)
s! X GAINESVILLE MALL

I LOST 1 FOUND j
ilIIMWIIIIIIHIIIHOOWlffli f n
Lost prescription sunglasses at
Houston game $3 reward Tom
Rosseter 1314% N.W. 2 ave.
(L-2t*7-p)
I SERVICES j
WAKE-UP TROUBLES? WAKE-UP
SERVICE. $5/mo. sl2/qtr. Phone
376-42.16 (M-St-6-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-st-3-c)
Happiness is getting your eyeglasses
at the smallest eyeglass office in
town. Drive your own waiting room
to University Opticians at 519 SW
4th Ave. across from Greyhound Bus
Station, 378-4480. (M-ts-5-c)
LEARN TO FLY 5 min from
campus Best Instructors Best
airplanes best ground school best
DEAL FLYING HAWKS
CLUBStengle Field 376-0011.
(M-1 Ot-2-p)
Tutoring in GERMAN by
professional instructor. Streamlined
course for ETS exam. Individual or
group sessions. 376-9674 p.m.
(M-It-8-p)
Photography Bxlo=sl.oo sx7= .50.
Sororities, Frats, teams parties,
portraits, portfolios. Can handle any
assignment Call Ronnie Koru
376-6042. (M-st-8-p)
Tennis racket restringing free pick up
and delivery MAR Tennis Services.
378-2489. (M-22t-1-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7300. (M-ts-2-c)
rQQQQHrv
I last 2
|aeuaikx/I.RD/ j | W
l.'r*+~r I nAVQI
UNBELIEVABLE? ...
YOU BE THE JUDGE
aoURKT
{ % ID IK
ikw
A UWIVtIISAL PICTUUCS LTD, WCTUtt^
CAPACITY GROWS!
gEP*-
VIXEN.
NO ONE UNDER
17 ADMITTED.
PROOF OF AGE
REQUIRED!



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 29.1969

The
Florida
Alligator

AT RATHSKELLER

Dion Livens Weekend

By TED REMLEY
Alligator Entertainment Editor
The Rathskeller and students
who run it deserve
congratulations. This past UF
weekend was virtually void! of
entertainment but the campus
beer-serving establishment filled
in the lifeless evenings with
songs by Dion.
Marc Glick, who turns up at
the oddest places, served as MC
for the performance. He told the
crowded, hot capacity audience
that Dions show was
tremendous. But who can
believe a politico?
Clad in faded blue jeans,
black sweat-shirt and rimless
glasses, Dion mounted the stage
to prove all those wrong who
doubted his talent.
Although Glick had
apologized at the beginning of
the show for a blown amp lost
in service to the students a
standard political explanation
Dion's voice came out clear and
strong. He is one of the few
folk-singers today that
enunciates clearly.
Not much of a talker, Dion
did manage to provide a few
chuckles between songs. He
promised to write a song about
them love-bugs plaguing
Gainesville, and made various
snide, but funny, comments to
the WUFT newsman filming the
show.
Due to his dress and
appearance, Dion had the
hippies and pseudo-hippies with
him from the moment he came
on the stage. But it took his old
hit Run Around Sue, with the
students taking the Belmonts'
part, to endear him to the
straight element'' of the
audience.
Obviously a little ashamed of
the song that helped make him
famous, Dion used it to
manipulate the listeners into

jjt
Take your baby to a specialist
Our mechanic knows just about all there is to know about
_ Volkswagen*.
He should. He went to special Volkswagen mechanic school.
(How else would he know that the tightening torque for the
wheel bearing locknut should be 50 foot-pounds incorporated
on a torque wrench?) And he passed a series of special exams.
He goes bock periodically for a refresher course / too, to
keep up on all the changes we make (over 5000 in the past 19
years). Which means he doesn't stop learning when he starts
working.
So when your little one needs a checkup, take it to our
mechanic. He works only on Volkswagen*. So he's a specialist
ot curing the bug.
MUIR-MOWN $
4222 N.W. 13Hi St 376-4551 ~~
Mmmmmmm i, ,1.. U . 1 || i | j JllWl'lll >i l liiu !> N lit-

ENTERTAINMENT

participation the mark of an
experienced performer.
Turning to a philosophical
mood between two of his later
songs, Dion talked of trying to
emulate die Man who walked
the earth 2,000 years ago, and
understanding those that do
make the attempt.
With his visual appearance the
folksinger told his audience what
he was going to do and he did
it. A professional in the true
sense, throughout the
performance Dion carried his
Rathskeller crowd with him.

Backstage Interview

By ANNE FREEDMAN
Features Editor
The Dion of Run
Around Sue and Abraham,
Martin, and John fame looked
beat.
Sprawled out with his chair
leaning on two legs like a
rocking-chair, Dion complained
that he was croaking.
It was between the first and
second show Friday night.
It's the kids tonsilitis, he
explained. I've got two little
girls ages three and one.
Born in the Bronx, New
York, 30 years ago, Dion
Dimucci has never had any
formal musical training on the
guitar.
I spent all my time in the
pool room.
His experience in the streets
of New York provide the basis
for much of his original
city-street blues.
Songs are like a diary, ya
know? You write about what's
going on today, he said.
When Dion performs an old
song, It's like Writing about
that thing that happened back
then. Its hard to get involved
again. Im interested in whats
going on today.

I ' v% r I
mm
I
Hi| > >
HBBiik 1 'll
DION DIMUCCI
... in casual no-costume"

Dion lives in Miami but has
traveled world-wide in the 10
years hes been in show business.
His appearance has changed
from the slicked-down,
tight-pants look to the
super-casual no-costume outfit.
Wheres he headed in music?
I dont worry about where
Im going. I just live for today,
he said.
Thats the one thing I found
out. You are really only
equipped to handle today. If
you think about tomorrow it
takes away from today.
Dion still thinks with
admiration about his old style of
music.
I really like the romantic
rock and roll.

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I The
I Florida
I Alligator

Gators Out-Gun MSU Bulldogs 47-35

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Editor
The fightin Gators kicked out
the jams against the Mississippi
State Bulldogs 47-35 Saturday
night as John Reaves led the
10th ranked UF to a hard-fought
victory in the Southeastern
Conference opener for both
teams.
The Gator offense smashed
out a total of 582 yards, 329 by
passing, and 253 by rushing,
against the Bulldog defense,
which at times resembled the UF
defense in that neither one
seemed to exist for the purpose
of protecting their respective
goal lines.
The Bulldogs rolled up 396
yards, 111 passing, and 285
rushing, in almost matching the
Gators score for score through
parts of the tight game.
The Gators got off to a quick
scoring start, just as they did in
the 59-34 Houston upset,
taking the ball in for
touchdowns the first two series
of UF downs, and although the
Bulldogs stayed close, the Gators
were able to maintain command
of the scoring by
the Dogs.
Reaves hit on scoring tosses
of 16, 47 and 9 yards in a
dazzling aerial display, with ace
receiver Carlos Alvarez catching
12 for 180 yards and a
touchdown.
Alvarez total equalled the
Gator record of 12 set by
Richard Trapp against Auburn in
1967.
In addition to the aerial
show, which the opponents
expect, the Gators displayed a
strong running game which the
Gators lacked against Houston,
as sophomore tailback Tommy
Durrance rushed for 127 yards
on 21 tries.
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You wont
find it in Webster's New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful infor information
mation information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addi addition
tion addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, youll find 48 clear def definitions
initions definitions of the different mean meanings
ings meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of ones Use.
In sum, .everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isnt
it time you owned one? Only
$6.50 for 1760 pages; $7.50
thumb-indexed.
At Vour Bookstore

J -- :

a White
m A f it i wl H
VINESETTSTARTS ON SWEEP TOM KENNEDY
... offensive tackle Skip Amelung lead interference.

Sophomore fullback Mike
Rich, who earned a starting spot
for his play in practice last week,
gained 84 more yards on 13
carries, for two touchdowns.
The scrappy MSU Bulldogs
also took to the air, with starter
Tommy Pharr passing for two
touchdowns and Joe Reed
throwing for two more after
Pharr suffered a slight knee
injury just before the half.
Pharr and Reed literally tore
up the Galor defensive
secondary, particularly in the

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I PRIZE: $25 in Mens or Ladies Wear I
I EXTRA $lO if winner is a girl I
j Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will win j
Saturday, Oct. 4 Estimate total yards to be gained by
Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Tearn
r Auburn vs. H Kentucky
| C Florida vs. Florida State I
I C Georgia vs. South Carolina j
J = LSU vs. Baylor j
North Carolina vs. m Vanderbilt
~ Notre Dame vs. Mich. State
I Northwestern vs. __ UCLA
Purdue vs. a Stanford
Texas vs. = Navy
Washington vs. [j Ohio State I
I Total Yards Gained by FLORIDA I II
I Winners Signature Must Agree With I
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I Entries must be deposited in U shop by Fri., Oct. 3 I
f In case of tie, prize will be divided equally among winners. J
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second half when the keyed up
Bulldogs forced the Gators to
match them point for point.
Pharr hit on seven out of 14
passes for 167 yards, and Reed
12 out of 19 for 118 yards.
It wasnt until the final
buzzer sounded over the
clanging of 37,000 cowbells,
which the MSU fans had been
ringing since the start of the
game, that charged-up
Mississippians realized that MSU
had lost to the fightin Gator.

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor

Monday, September 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

o
UF-MSU SCORING
UF Rich, 18 yd. run (Franco kick)
UF Alvarez, 16 yd. pass from Reaves (Franco kick fails)
MSU Milner, 12 yd. pass from Pharr (Jordan kick)
UF Durrance, 47 yd. pass from Reaves (Franco kick fails)
MSU Milner, 11 yd. pass from Pharr (Jordan kick)
UF Durrance, 2 yd. run (Two pt. pass fails)
MSU Hoggatt, 18 yd. pass from Reed (Jordan kick)
UF Maliska, 9 yd. pass from Reaves (Alvarez 2 pt. pass)
UF Durrance, 2 yd. run (Durrance 2 pt. pass)
MSU Whaley, 1 yd. run (2 pt. pass fails)
MSU Milner, 13 yd. pass from Reed (Reed runs 2 pt)
UF Rich, 12 yd. run (Franco kick fails)
i
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SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 13



C Tha'Florida Alligator. Monday; Yaptamlwr 29.1969

Page 14

mfr Jj| J.
i /i J "* Jj

TOM KENNEDY
ON THE lAND AND IN THE AN

Tommy Durrance (L), on his way to gaining 127
yards in 21 carries including three TD's, held down
the rushing chores against the Bulldogs while Carlos

Cross Country 'Banshees
Top Mississippi State Field

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Corrapondent
JACKSON Like a herd of
wild banshees the UF cross
country team descended the
final hill of the Milsap College
four-mile course to take the first
eight out of seven possible places
here Saturday against a hapless
Mississippi State team.
Wait, not another
typographical error. Although
only seven runners score in a
normal cross country meet, even
the UFs one extra runner beat
die first State man.
Team captain John Parker
and freshman ace Mafic Bir ran
away with the pace early in the
race with Parker outsprinting Bir
with about 30 yards to go,
19:57 to 19:58.
Sophomore Johnnie Brown
came next in 20:33, followed by
freshman A. W. Smith in 20:42
and senior Steve Atkinson in
20:49.
Another freshman, Jack
Stewart, finished sixth in 21:00,
and sophomore Frank Betts tied
with another first year man,
Bennie Vaughn, in 21 :0Y.
..
Nineteen seconds after
Vaughn and Betts finished, the
first State man, Jim Crawford,
came in. The score was a perfect
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15-50, low score winning.
The race was run at 2 pjn.
before the football game and
most of the runners seemed to
feel the afternoon heat.
We would have had some
more men in under 20 minutes if
it werent for the heat, said
Parker. We do some of our
training in the afternoon at
home, so were pretty used to it.
But we still don't like it much.
Although track coach Jimmy
Hawk Carnes has tried to stay
away from predictions, talk of
an SEC championship is bandied
about almost daily.

Intramural Deadlines
Set For This Week

Intramural deadlines for all
independents, dorm sections,
and fraternities are scheduled for
today and Tuesday.
The deadline for dormitory
football is today at 5 pjn. All
fraternities must also have their
swimming entries in to the
intramural department by 5

KVHnUI am^wj^^m^-r
Jtfffli '
msga^
Fla. Interviews
Oct. 9-10
ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS PHYSICAL SCIENCES
Texas Instruments
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Alvarez (R) took care of the pass catching
department, as he hauls in one of his 12 receptions.

mfr w W jS9

This early test may be an
indication of the teams overall
potential, said Cames. Most of
these boys are members of our
400 or 500 mile clubs, so they
are dedicated enough.
They are already as good as
any veteran cross-country team
weve had here. The best thing is
that they just love to run. It
seems that Cames is right. After
cheering the UF gridders to
victory Saturday night, the
runners held a little celebration.
They went out and ran six
miles through the streets of
downtown Jackson.

today.
The last day for independents
to sign up for basketball is
Tuesday, Sept.3o, at 5 pm.
All teams may sign up in
room 229 at the Florida Gym or
call 392-0581.
Paid football officials are also
needed.

THE PENNANT RACE
Braves Down Padres
Up To The Giants Now
ATLANTA (UPI) Rico Carty drove in three runs Sunday with a
long two-run first inning homer and a double in the eighth to lead the
Atlanta Braves to 4-2 victory over the San Diego Padres and at least a
share of the National Leagues Western Division Title.
The victory, ninth in a row for the streaking Braves, gave Atlanta
its longest winning streak since the franchise was moved from
Milwaukee!
If second place San Francisco lost its game with Los Angeles later
Sunday, the Braves would clinch the Western Division Title and meet
the New York Mets for the National League championship.
Cartys long drive over the center field fence came with two out
and followed a single by Hank Aaron. Aarons run was his 100th this
year, the 14th year he has scored at least 100 runs, a new major league
record. He also doubled in the eighth following Tony Gonzalez single.
Pat Jarvis started for the Braves but needed relief help in the
seventh inning from Cecil Upshaw to claim his 13 th victory against 11
losses. Jarvis walked one and struck out four.
Felix Millan doubled and Gonzalez singled for the Braves third
run.
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Guthries Toe Lifts FSU Over Miami

By Alligator Services
MIAMI FSU
MIAMI Florida £tate rode
Bill Capplemans magic arm and
Grant Guthries accurate kicking?
toe to a 16-14 come-from come-frombehind
behind come-frombehind victory over the Miami
Hurricanes Friday night in the
Orange Bowl.
A First night crowd of 55,478
saw Guthrie decide the tight
contest with a line drive 31-yard
field goal with only 1:55 left on
the clock.
TULANE
WEST VIRGINA Tulane
TheTop2o
In Action
NEW YORK (UPI) How
the United Press International
top 20 major college football
teams fared this weekend:
1. Ohio State defeated Texas
Christian 62-0.
2. Penn State defeated
Colorado 27-3.
3. Texas defeated Texas
Tech 49-7.
4. Arkansas defeated Tulsa
55-0.
5. Southern Cal defeated
Northwestern 48-6.
6. Oklahoma defeated
Pittsburgh 37-8.
7. Georgia defeated Clemson
30-0.
8. Notre Dame lost to
Purdue 28-14.
9. UCLA defeated Wisconsin
34-23.
10. Florida defeated
Mississippi State 47-35.
11. Indiana lost to California
17-14.
12. Missouri defeated Illinois
37-6.
13. Mississippi lost to
Kentucky 10-9.
14. Purdue defeated Notre
Dame 28-14.
15. Michigan State defeated,
SMU 23-15.
16. Stanford defeated
Oregon 28-0.
17. Auburn lost to Tennessee
45-19.
18. Arizona State lost to
Oregon State 30-7.
19. LSU defeated Rice 42-0.
20. Wyoming defeated Air
Force 27-15.
Like Father Like Son
Dave Stydahar, a rookie for
the Chicago Bears is the son of
ex-Bear and Hall of Fame
football star Joe Stydahar.
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GEORGIA SHUTS OUT CtEMSQN 30-O

downed West Virginia 17-15 in a
non-conference grid clash here
Saturday.
NORTH CAROLINA
COLUMBIA, S.C. Favored
South Carolina, its offense
shackled for the first 30
minutes, found the-touchdown
formula in the last half and
defeated North Carolina, 14-6 in
an Atlantic Coast Conference
football game Saturday night.

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Mmfciii BIWI IK ilii RIHP I H
Do you have to give up your identity
to make it in a big corporation?

You've heard the stories:
One big corporation forbids you to
wear anything but white shirts.
Another says it wants you to be crea creat,*ve
t,*ve creat,*ve and gives you a 4-pound rule
book telling you exactly how to do it.
Yet another doesn't want you to buy
a more expensive car than your boss
because it wouldnt look right.
Is this really happening in American
business?
Have companies become so rigid and

General Telephone & Electronics
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VANDERBILT
*.. <
NASHVILLE, Term. Army
quarterback Bemie Wall, mixing
pinpoint passes with a crunching
ground attack, led the Cadets to
a 16-6 victory over Vanderbilt
Saturday night in an
Intersectional college football
game.
AUBURN
KNOXVILLE, Tenn.
Tennessee bolted to a three
touchdown lead in the first half
Saturday, and then survived a

fossilized that theyre scared of people
who dont fit the norm?
Not this company.
Weare not hung upon trivia I ike that.
The advances General Telephone &
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gallant second half rally by
Auburn to trim the Tigers, 45-19
in the Southeastern Conference
opener for both teams.
GEORGIA
CLEMSON, S.C.
Quarterback Mike Cavan passed
for two touchdowns, scored
another and set up still another
Saturday as Georgia shut out
Clemson, 30-0 in its most
lop-sided victory over the Tigers
since 1927.
Vince Dooleys Bulldogs who

who developed the high-energy liquid
laser, who came up with the sharpest
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blanked Tulane last week 35-0,
maintained their perfect
defensive record by blunting
three Clemson threats with pass
interception, two of them by
David McKnight.
KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, Ky Upstart
Kentucky drove 63 yards in the
third quarter, then capitalized
on Mississippi errors for a 10-9
Southeastern Conference
victory Saturday night over the
eighth-ranked Rebels.

Page 15



Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, Septambor 29,1969

Page 16

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|BB: Capt. Wishbone, that flamboyant
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and supplies Tommy Durrance ZlJ e X.L m ZZ
Art Supplies plump, juicy WISHBONE fried*
The second 'Player of the Week' goes to sophomore chicken is finding its way into their
uuy Lumps running which netted him 127 yards on 21 carries and
College Seal Durrance also scored another Gator touchdown on a JL 4 Ep
smartly-called 47 yard screen pass on the part of Ms m
Mascot Stationary quaterback John Reaves. r
So far in just two varsity games Durrance, a 6 foot ArHC
Film and Dnvolnnina 201 P ounder from Daytona Beach, has scored six
** touchdowns. He has gained over 156 yards on 29 carried v
Service f r a 5.3 average, and has caught five passes for 100
AAflkinAV EDIhAV Q Q UF coaches say Durrance reminds them of former
/V\UINDAT- rKIUAT O-O Gator great and All-American running back Larry
c ati ipvN a v O 1 O Dupree with his running balance and ability to follow
OMI u y-\4 blocking and quickness.
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