Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
" Weve g6t a first of ten-let's do if again
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Vol. 62, No. 3

'Don't Judge Us By Others

m r ,-r/
m
CHARLES SHEPHERD
... "consider students"

Glick Bows Out
As Majority Leader

Marc Glick, who served as
First Party majority leader in the
Student Senate for the summer
term, said Sunday he plans to
resign his post as soon as the
party can elect his replacement.
Glick said his decision came
after much thought, but taking
20 hours and working 20 hours,
I cant handle it and graduate
when I want.
First Party will caucus in*
room 349 of the Reitz Union
before Tuesday nights senate
meeting. They will decide at that
time whether to elect Glicks
successor then or wait until the
next meeting.
In either case, Glick said
Tuesdays SS meeting would be
his last.
He denied that there had
been pressure on him to quit.
In fact, he said, There has
been pressure on me to stay on.
(Student Body President
Charles) Shepherd has been
under a bit of strain and hes
going to be facing some
difficulties in the senate.
Glick said Shepherd has asked
him to stay as majority leader
I am concerned with the
Code of Student Conduct and
various other things on campus,
4

The
Florida Alligator
' v ;
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE DAILY

SHEPHERD TELLS LEGISLATORS

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd Saturday
slammed what he termed
legislative over-reaction and
asked that the states legislators
not compare UF to schools like
Berkeley and Columbia in the
ftiture.
Addressing more than 150
state legislators, university
administrators and visitors here
for the annual Legislative
Appreciation Weekend,
Shepherd responded to a
question asking if, in his
opinion, the legislature had

he said, and I feel I will be
much more effective outside the
senate.
Glick said he plans to endorse
a replacement but declined to
say who it is at this time.
Despite his resignation, Glick
said he will continue to work in
Student Government this year.

Law Prof Shot To Death;
Wife Being Held By Police

So WBfe A fiH
J v aK % >
w
WmbL.
NICHOLAS VELONIS
... .unfortunate loss"

University of Florida, Gainesville

over-reacted against campus
disorders.
Yes indeed the legislature
has over-reacted, the
25-year-old student preside At
said. You have done nothing
but stiffen responses and create
what in some instances is an
inflexible situation.
I would ask that you not
make judgements about our
students based on the actions of
other students, Shepherd said.
He said he was more
concerned about the bills facing
the legislature that were not
passed during the last session
than those that were made law.
I would hope that the
students viewpoint is considered
next time, he said. And I
mean the students at UF, the
University of South Florida,
Florida State University and
other Florida schools not
Columbia and Berkeley.
All we ask is that you not
judge Florida students by the
- actions in other states, just as we
would not judge the entire
legislature by the actions of

By JANIE GOULD
Aligatar Associate Editor
A 34-year-old UF law professor was shot to death in his home early
Saturday morning after he reportedly tied up his wife and strangled
Nicholas Velonis, who joined the faculty of the College of Law in
1965, was shot in the lower stomach with a .38 revolver.
His wife Royetta is being held by Gainesville police in connection
with the shooting. No charges have been filed pending completion of
the investigation.
Police said Velonis tied up his wife with a television cable and was
in the bathroom choking his dog. In the meantime, his wife struggled
to free herself. She grabbed a gun and shot her husband, according to
police. Mrs. Velonis rushed to a neighbors home and police were
summoned. Velonis was taken to Alachua General Hospital where he
died a short time after the 12:42 ajn. incident.
Gainesville police Sgt. Roland Stuart was the first to arrive on the
(SEE 'VELONIS' PAGE 3)

.... A. 4
i .
' SEE STORY PAGE 12

demagogues and publicity publicityseeking
seeking publicityseeking individuals in the
legislature, he said.
Shepherd said the flood of
repressive laws coming from
Tallahassee have not been
necessary on Florida campuses
to date. He said they were the
products of legislative minds
that saw schools in this state
through the smoke of
disruptions on campuses in other
states.
Shepherds remarks drew
loud applause from both
legislators and members of the
university community.
In other action at the
briefing, moderated by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell,
Rep. Richard Tillman of Cocoa
Beach called for a state income
tax to help finance state
educational institutions.
This suggestion followed
remarks by J. Hillis Miller Health
Center Provost Dr. Edmund
Ackell.
Ackell said the $19.7 million
in federal funds for expansion of
the health center will be
forthcoming despite cuts in

Monday, September 22, 1969

EDMUND ACKELL
matching funds needed
spending by the Nixon
administration. However, he said
the state would have to come up
with Sl3 million in matching
funds first.
He said if the November
constitutional amendment
providing the sl3 million in
bonds should fail, the legislature
would have to find the money
somewhere else.
We are going to have to rely
on a state income tax and weve
got to face the facts, Tillman
said. He said a firmer tax base
was needed to finance Floridas
higher educational institutions.
In response to a question on
why a D grade was not
accepted at UF from a junior
college but a D grade in a
course taken here could be
accepted, Vice President for
Academic Affairs Fred Conner
said it was a matter of university
policy.
We have never accepted a
D grade transfer from any
other institution, he said.
Inside
H Tteejpatopli
FATE OF LOCATION of
UFs religion department is
still undecided .... page 5
Classified 11
Dropouts 6
Editorials ...... . 8
Letters 9
Movies 11
Sports 1216
Mini-Poster -2



. The Floridi Alligator, Monday, September 22,196$

Page 2

I
FRED BREEZE
pushes program

Legislator Returns To Alma Mater

It has been 18 years since
Rep. William James has been a
student at UF.
From 1947 to 1951, James
was a fraternity man, dater of
FSCW women, who went on to
earn a degree in Business
Administration, and eventually
open his own insurance office.
Today he sits in Tallahaswe

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FIRST REQUEST
*>S* .to see campus

B UFS REPRESENTATIVES
Jim Bartlett John Potocki
George Corl Phil Tarver
Skip Lujack Mel Ward
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
PREMIUM DEPOSITS DEFERRED
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June. July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Pos
Office at Gainesville, Florida J2sol.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments Tor any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
geveral times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Breeze: ODK Evaluation A Must

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The Qmicron Delta Kappa course and teacher evaluation may
soon be used by every UF professor, if Fred Breeze, head of the
program, has his way.
Vice President for Academic Affairs Frederick W. Conner
recently instructed the deans of all the colleges to institute an
evaluation program for all courses and teachers by fall of 1970.
He gave the deans a choice of using Omicron Delta Kappas
evaluation plan or any other which they care to use.
Fred Breeze, head of the ODK program, said he hopes to
convince the deans that the ODK evaluation should be used by
all the colleges.
When you have a standard questionnaire you can get a
comparison of departments and an overall view of the
university, Breeze said.
I would like the deans to work with us, and adapt our
questionnaire to their college.
Begun on a small scale by Student Government in fall of
1967 and given to ODK last year, Course and Teacher
Evaluation attempts to analyze the attitudes and performance performanceof
of performanceof teachers as well as the content of the course.
The form is the one used by Purdue University. Florida State,
University of California, Duke, Harvard and many other schools
have a similar evaluation system.
Breeze says the primary function of the plan is to allocate
LMJJ.M.M.M.M.M.MAMAMAMAMAMAMAWAW.WAWAWAV.ViViVfViVIViV'y*!*!*!*

JAMES TOURS UF CAMPUS

as a legislator, and he is
responsible for the future of the
states educational system.
James came to UF Thursday
night at the invitation of the
Alumni Association and several
groups interested in furthering
UFs stand as the states top
educational institution.
Its a great chance to play

golf, see a football game, and
relive a few memories as a
student, said James.
Mixed in with the memories,
however, was an educational
program intended to sway the
legislator toward realizing UFs
future needs.
Friday, the visiting
representatives were each
assigned a student escort, and
given free reign tor the
remainder of the day.
James first request was to see
the campus. His impression?
Just as beautiful as ever.
Os particular interest was the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center, for
which the legislature was
preparing to fund more than $lO
million for expansion. Ground
for die giant facility had not yet
been broken when James
graduated.
Next came a visit to the
Spessard Holland Law Center.
I could never cut the
mustard here, James said, but
since Ive been in the legislature,
Ive been glad I never became a
lawyer.
The rising cost of college

SPECIAL OFFER SAVE 30< A WEEK
STUDENTS
FULL TERM SUBSCRIPTION TO
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DELIVERED DIRECT \
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students properly, to give them the kind of teachers best suited
to the individual. . ..
Next year he plans to print a booklet concerning each
teacher and course, giving their outstanding weaknesses and
strengths. ...
Raising the standards of the teachers is a long-range goal of
the evaluation, says Breeze.
The reason we have so many poor teachers is not a lack of
potential, but that the emphasis has been on research and
publication. Although they gave lip service to class performance,
there has been no gauge for it.
The questionnaire to be used by ODK has four parts.
The first part determines the attitude of the teacher toward
his subject and his students. Students are asked to rate the
teacher on a scale of one to 10 on such subjects as fairness in
grading, sympathetic attitude toward students, interest in
subject and personal peculiarities.
Part II concerns factors not under the control of the teacher
such as suitability of the textbook and facilities, weight a
frequency of tests and the degree to which the objectives of the
course are fulfilled.
The third section contains a list of specific opinions
concerning the course or instructor. These include opinions on
necessity of prerequisites, amount of required reading, time
spent in class discussion and accuracy of the catalog description.
The last part is a student self-evaluation. This part gives the
student a chance to express his personal reactions to the
instructor, the course and his role as a student in the course.

educations has been a sore spot
to James, who has a daughter
who will be of college age within
a few years. He asked to see
student housing, and was both
shocked and suprized to see the
wide differences in living areas.
The student area north of
the university can only be called
a ghetto, he said. Yet, if you
tear it down and build new
structures you have eliminated
the only remaining low-cost
housing available to students.
Sin City brought raised
eyebrows from the
representative, who says he is
termed a, conservative by fellow
house members.
Im not sure I would have
ever made it through school if
that had been around when I
was here, he said.
James capped off his tour
with a lunch of student food
black beans and rice, at the
home of his student host.
Things havent changed a bit
since college, he said.
Hamburgers for lunch when
you can go out to get them, and
beans if you cant.


Bk \
; ** v;
..K.i
WILLIAM JAMES
... .relives memories
MUU-FOSTK*
ft CAUTION
4/^>
f DANGEROUS I
CROSSING
. 1 J



Prof. Velonis Shot To Death In Home

t>ROMPA6E OWEj
scene of the shooting at 816
N.W. 10th St., and the
investigation is being conducted
by Det. George Ml.
College of Law Dean Frank
Maloney said Velonis' death is
an unfortunate loss to the law
school community.
We were all shocked to hear
of his death, Maloney said. It
was a tragedy for all who knew
him.
An assistant UF professor in

NEWS FROM SEMINOLES

FSU Stages Convocation

FSU President Stanley
Marshall will outline major
policies for the coming year at
the first university wide
convocation tonight in Doak
Campbell Stadium. The entire
academic community and local
townspeople have been invited
to hear Marshall's address along
with speeches by Student Body
President Cantor Brown .and
distinguished Professors Dorothy
Hoffman and Dr. Earl Frieden.
ACTIVITIES
Since today is Yom Kippur
classes at FSU do not start until
Tuesday. The administration has
scheduled a number of activities
today to acquaint the members
of the Florida State community
with the various academic and
STUDENT-A-FAIR DAY
The Division of Student
Affairs is sponsoring
student-a-Fair Day to give the

IN THE MALL
N.W. 13th St.
Serving Continuously
11 am to 8:30 pm
CLOSED SUNDAYS

not ash for substitutes
adppetixers
Mushroom Salad 65
Kosher Barrel Cured Pickles 35
Kosher Pickles and Assorted Olives 60
Antipasto Treat 55
Soup of tie J&ay
Made Fresh Daily!
Bowl .55 Cup 40
SalaJs
Tossed Green Salad Bowl, with our own herb and seasonings .55
Mixed Greens with choice of french or roquefort dressing .55
Antipasto Salad Bowl 95
Chefs Pride Tossed Salad Bowl 1.00
Potato Salad, or Macaroni Salad ... 40
Small Fruit Salad with Cottage Cheese v .75
SanJwiehcs
Roast Top Sirloin of Beef 1.20 Imported Swiss Cheese 75
Hot Pastrami .95, with cheese 1.10 Imported Ham 90
Hot or Cold Corned Beef 1.15 Imported Ham and Cheese 1.05
Turkey (all white meat) 1.20 Chicken Salad (Fresh Daily) 1.00
Sirloin of Beef In Buigundy Sauce 135
_...Corned beef, Pastrami and Imported
CARMINELLAS TRIO $ Nl .j ss on triplet! rolls 1.35
Beef and Chicken sauted in peppers
CARMINELLAS DI t O and onions in sherry sauce served
on double rolls . .... 1.30
_ Beef and Chicken prepared in a savory
BAR-B-Q DUO bar-b-q sauce served on double rolls 1 .20
Please Allow A Few Extra Minutes For Above Specialty Hot Sandwiches

the college, Velonis specialized
in Civil Procedure and Federal
Practice, and in addition was
teaching a course in Remedies
this quarter.
, He received his bachelor of
arts degree from Brown
University in 1957, where he
was a Sigma Nu brother and was
tapped for membership in Phi
Beta Kappa scholastic honorary
fraternity. He attained a law
degree at the University of
Chicago in 1960.
Velonis was admitted to the

students a chance to meet
personnel of this important
administrative division on a
personal basis.
EVALUATION
Students who desire to
participate in the academic
decision making of their
universities often find that the
most serious stumbling block is
the lack of an effective means of
communicating their views.
FSUs Student Government has
Staff Meets
There will be a mandatory
meeting of the Alligator editorial
staff Monday night at 8 in the
newsroom on the third floor of
the Reitz Union.
All current editors and staff
members are expected to attend
and students interested in
working for the Alligator are
invited to attend.

G Carmittf Uaa 3

Indiana bar in 1960 and
practiced law in Indianapolis
until 1964. In 1964, he returned
to the University of Chicago as a
Bigelow Teaching Fellow, where
he taught Legal Writing.
He came to UF in 1965.
The December 1967 issue of
the Law Center News contains
a short portrait of the young
professor:
Nick Velonis' relaxed
manner and ready laugh at the
incongruities of life should not
mislead the new student or

attempted to provide an outlet
for student views cm the quality
of instruction they receive
through the publication of a
student evaluation of
instruction.

pH MINI
IB PRINT
IHI SALE
Wed. Sept. 24
Thurs. Sept. 25 ji||PM|||
11am-9pm room 235 I j
J. Wayne Reitz Union

We proudly present our menu and
cordially invite you to dine with us
in our relaxed continental
atmosphere

Our Shoppers' Specials"
Available from 11 a.m.
No. 1 Ham and Cheese on Sesame Roll .90
served with potato salad
No. 2 The Super Sub .80
nam. salami, kmockwurst. rhresr ami salad garnish
No. 3. Super Meat Bailer -85
No. 4 Mini Meat Bailer *>
served with iiotato salad
No. 5 Pasta Fazool* The Poor Mans Cnrmrt Dull 110
scrtcil with iassed salad. roB amd butter
No. 6. Chili-Con Came .90-
serretl with tossed salad and crackers
No. 7. Spaghetti with Meat Sauce 1.10
sorted with tossed salad, roll and batter
SoU Vf-ttrrs
1. Antipasto Salad Platter 1.80
2. Shredded Chicken Salad. Nestled in a hed of our own tooted salad 1.65
X Shrimp Salad. Nestled in a hed of our own tossed salad 1.75
4. Chefs Pride Salad Platter 1-85
5 Fmit Salad Platter with Cottage Cheese 1.35
s-We# 'JPLsttara
Homemade from am gossrmet kitchen
Prepared Fresh tXiilv
Reef Slew. The Slew With Authority!" I*l
Kuackwnrst and Sanerknmt. i Pride of Miheankee) 1.55
A hove sieved with Tossed Salad. 801 l and Butter
- f.
'jPissa
(Small Only)
Pizza with sanre and cheese 1-10
Pizza with peppemnl and cheese 1-35
Pizza with meat sauce and cheese 1.55
Pizza with mushrooms and cheese 1.85
Combination of any 2 1.85
Combination of any 3 2.00

professor, for his congeniality
disguises the ability to respond
provocatively, if cryptically, to a
student's comment, and the
power to stimulate his colleagues
by thrusts from a fresh
perspective.
In addition, the article
described his teaching methods.
The lawyer's duty to
protect the interests of his client
to the best of his ability within
the bounds of the Canons of
Ethics is a concept that he
stresses. .. Nicks method
NEW YORK Sex and age
have a strong bearing on whether
a person is a litterbug, according
to Keep America Beautiful, Inc.
The national anti-litter group
says men litter nearly twice as
much as women and people
between 20 and 35 litter twice
as much as those between 35
and 50.

1 J-rom our \JCitel%cn
SpagL etti
Spaghetti with meat halt ..... 1.60
Spaghetti with meat sauce 1.60
(only above two in child's portion) I.IQ
Spaghetti with mushrooms 1.85 with meat halls 2.35
Spaghetti oven baked in casserole
with cheese 18 1.85
with meat sauce and cheese v 2-35
with shredded chicken and dime 2.85
A!\ Spaghetti order* served with
Italian Tossed Salat!, roll and hotter
Please allow 15-20 minutes on above
as tliey are cooked fresh
HOME BAKED LASACNA 1.65 with meat halls 2.15
HOME STYLE CHEESE RAVIOLI with meat halls 2.25
Above served with Italian Salad. Roll and Butter
Above orders are prepared fresh so
please he patient ami allow 30-25 minutes
-10 c *ter Is
Germantown Cream Cltecsccake .65 Rum Cake .50
with Cherries .80 Home Baked Apple Pie -35
Bavarian Chocolate Pie .65 French Vanilla Ice Cream .35
Coffee .15 Sunka JO Iced J 5
Milk 25
Iced Tea .15 lint Tea (Pot) .30
Dike or Sprite .30
Lowenbrau on Draft .55 Budweiscr. bottle .45
Imported lleiniken, hottlc .70 SdiKtz, battle .45
- Vry?
Oir ate ring


wkmamf,

of teaching is modeled upon the
conferences that a senior partner
of a law firm might have with a
young lawyer over the strategy
to be followed in solving the
problems of a client.
Funeral arrangements are
incomplete at this time.
&
CAMPUS TWIG
1131 W. UNIV. AVB.
MALL TWIG
IN THE G VILLE MALL
WE'VE GOT THEM!
NEED WE SAY MORE?

Page 3



The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 22 1969

Page 4

NO MONEY LOST, CATLETT SAYS

Old Rat Cards No Good

Rathskeller membership cards
for three quarter privileges,
purchased in Jan. 1969, may not
be used as a carryover in the fall
session, even though the
entertainment center was closed
during the summer.
Chip Catlett, Rathskeller
assistant manager, said the club
didnt have the capital to
maintain the summer operation
which cut one quarter from the
quarter membership package.
If we advanced a full quarter
for those, who missed that
quarter, then we would have to
advance the ones, who
purchased cards good to Jan.,
1970, at the same time said
Catlett. Accounting problems
would make it an impossible
task.

Two Green Berets
Granted Immunity?

SAIGON (UPI) Two men
not officially charged in the
Green Beret murder case have
been given complete freedom of
movement and assigned jobs at
Long Binh Base, a US. military
spokesman said Sunday.
They are no longer under
any confinement or restriction,
he said. This does not change
the fact that the charges are still
pending against them.
Charges against the two were
ordered held in abeyance
Thursday when the military
announced six other Green
Berets would be court martialed
for murder and conspiracy to
murder in the alleged death of a
Vietnamese national m die Nha
Trang area on June 20.
The two were as
Chief Warrant Officer Edward
M. Boyle of New York City and
SFC Alvin M. Smith Jr. of
Naples, Fla.
Sources dose to the case have
said the two men have been
granted immunity so they can
testify in the trials of the others
early next month.
This move by the prosecution
means nothing the two men
might say in court can be used as
evidence in any subsequent trial.
As a result, thev cannot refuse

ms wmmmmgmmtm
I W Find References at a Glance 7 fflj|
IN BOOKS, REPORTS and \ / ||j
M CLASSROOM NOTES V ( B
M Major Accent 8 Accent T 11
§ f ~1 iif/ BMalorAcc.nl N V JUf
HHI \ 1 £: *C.. [ || mm
MALONES BOOK & SUPPLY
y : ; / ,-; 1712 w. univ. ave. g;_ _,

The card, priced at 25 cents
per quarter at the Rathskellers
Jan., 1969 opening, allows
discount rates for entertainment,
sale of beer to adults over 21
and limited quest privileges.
Catlett further that the
savings from the discount
realized in the winter and spring
quarters visits far exceeded the
lost 25 cents.
We only had about 10 in the
school with those cards, Catlett
claimed. Hardly anyone paid
for three quarters.
Business manager Bob Allison
reported the only 1968-69
academic cards that would be
honored for this quarter would
be those marked 1/69-70. This
granted membership from Jan.
to Dec. 1969.

to answer questions on the
ground that it may incriminate
them.
WHATS
HAPPENING
WHATS HAPPENING IS
HAPPENING; Back from
anything but a lazy, hazy
summer, this column will once
again tease your imagination,
test your intelligence, and just
generally tell the facts, Man, just
the facts. If your group is
looking for some good
(best-of-all free) publicity, just
bring it by the Alligator office a
week before the meeting, tea
movie, performance, or
happening is to take place, and
well put the words in print.
Satisfaction is not guaranteed,
but if you can afford to be
particular, put an ad in the
paper.
BABES IN STUDENT
GOVERNMENT: If youre
interested in babysitting or just
want to get away from the
sweet thing, SG is running a
babysitting referral service.
Babysitters can fill out a card at
the front desk in the Activities
office of the Reitz Union this
week. If youd like a babysitter,
also contact SG.

One quarter purchases for
January to March and two
quarter cards for January to
June had no conflicts with the
summer mixup.
..
Rathskeller cards are now
being sold only on a yearly
basis--$2 for Sept. 1969 to Sept.
1970 membeohip to eliminate
the problems caused by
individual quarter and partial
year sales.

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Some home is better than no home at all/' say
members of the Sigma Nu fraternity chapter at UF
as they conduct fall quarter rush activities in a tent.
The fraternity's 40-year-old home was destroyed by
fire in early April and the tent occupies the Sigma

UNION NEEDS SPACE. BOARD SAYS

Religion Dept. Move Asked

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The fate of the location of
UFs Department of Religion has
been lying in the hands of the
Reitz Union Board of Managers
since last spring.
Over the objections of the
religion department, members of
the Board of Managers have
recommended moving the
department out of the Union.
Need for increased student
activities space and crowded
conditions in the current
third-floor offices of the religion
department were given as
reasons for recommending the
move.
At the June 3 meeting of the
Board of Managers a report from
the Space Committee was heard.
The report said, Need for
student organizational space has
increased so that these functions

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should be served. Also, it is the
committees understanding that
the Department of Religion has
outgrown its present facilities
and needs larger quarters.
The board decided that the
committee had not explored the
situation enough and passed a
motion to table the
recommendation until an ad hoc
committee had met with the
director of the religion
department to discuss its needs.
William Rion, Union director,
said Wednesday to his
knowledge no committee has
been appointed to do this.
Dr. Delton Scudder, director
of the religion department;
would like to see his department
remain in the Union.
I think it is a really
marvelous idea for religion to be
centered in the Union. Here we
are close to the students in the

Sanders
fried
y CVicVm

Nu site just north of Florida Field. Sophomore
members Bernard Saenz, left, and James Jack, greet
each other after the long summer vacation and
prepare to enter the Sigma Zoo Circus to meet
rushees.

center of their life; we
constantly stand ready to help in
any way we can.
It seems under any
conditions you would want the
department of religion here in
the Union.
Scudder cited the tradition of
housing the religion department
in the Union since the YMCA
contributed largely to the
building of the old Union, the
history of active participation by
the department in Union affairs
and the purpose of the
department as a student service
as well ,as an academic
department.
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Project Samson is looking for volunteers, and it has 14 areas in
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The student concern organization founded last year hopes to add
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school year and running a day camp during the summer.
Students interested in working with Samson are invited to an
introductory meeting Thursday at 7:30 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
Sunday there will be a longer program beginning at 1 p.m. in Room
101, Little Hall. Speakers will acquaint the volunteers with
community needs.
Some areas in which volunteers are needed include administration
for Samson, teacher aides in adult education, community work with
neighborhood associations, construction work, day care, recreation,
transportation and community center work.
People who can make posters are also needed to help inform
students and adults of community aid programs.
Students interested in tutoring must be able to meet at least twice
a week for the entire school year.
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Monday, September 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 22,1969

Big Four
Talks To
Drag On
UNITED NATIONS (UPI)
Diplomatic sources said Sunday
renewed efforts by the big four
powers to map out a permanent
Mideast peace settlement were
likely to drag on inconclusively
for months.
During the last week, the
United States, Soviet Union,
Great Britain, and France again
displayed their growing alarm at
continuing cease-fire violations
in the Middle East, and moved
to defuse the situation.
Late Saturday night the big
four powers announced, at the
conclusion of a working dinner
hosted by U.N. Secretary
General Thant, that they would
resume their consultations. The
four talks on the Mideast had
been recessed over the summer
months.
The United States and the
Soviet Union moved Jast
Thursday on the Mideast peice
issue by renewing bilateral talks
between U.S. Asst. Secretary of
State Joseph J. Sisco and Soviet
Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin.
The resumption of the big
four initiatives reflected the
concern of the great powers over
the situation in the Middle East.
It also represented a mark of
respect for the United Nations
which has vainly sought a peace
settlement through the
mediating efforts of special U.N.
mediator Dr. Gunnar V. Jarrine.
But diplomatic sources
expected no quick, dramatic
results from the four-power
discussions.
They were slightly more
hopeful about the
Soviet-American talks. Insofar as
outside diplomacy could be
useful, the sources said, the
exchanges between Sisco and
Dobrynin were more important
than the big four exchanges.

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Justices To Testify On Outside Jurist Action

WASHINGTON (UPI) A
Senate subcommittee announced
Sunday that four former
Supreme Court justices will
testify about outside activities of
federal judges, a subject dose to
the controversy about the
Supreme Court nomination of
Judge Clement F. Haynsworth
Jr.
The announcement by Sen.
Sam. J. Ervin, a strong supporter
of Haynsworth on the Senate
Judiciary Committee, raised the
possibility that the former
justices might be asked their
opinion of the conflict of
interest allegations against
Haynsworth.
Ervin said his subcommittee
on separation of powers would
hear testimony from former
Justices Stanley F. Reed, Charles
E. Whittaker, Arthur J. Goldberg
and Tom C. Claik during three
days of hearings starting Sept.
30.
A subcommittee spokesman
said former Chief Justice Earl
Warren might also testify. Ervin
said the new hearings are
intended to air the issues and
find avenues to their solutions,
not to interrogate, any individual
judge or expose spedfic
wrongdoings.

HEARING TO AIR ISSUES

Ervins subcommittee is a
unit of the Senate Judiriary
Committee, which resumes
hearings Tuesday on
Haynsworth. The North Carolina
Democrat began looking into the
subject of judges outside
activities in the wake of Abe
Fortas resignation from the
Supreme Court.
Fortas quit under fire when a
magazine disclosed he took a fee
from a foundation headed by a
financier convicted of stock
market irregularities. He also was
criticized for accepting fees for
academic lectures.
Haynsworth, 56, chief judge
of the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals, was named by
President Nixon to succeed
Fortas on the court.
Sen. Birch Bayh, D-Ind., has
criticized Haynsworth on
conflict of interest grounds,
contending he should have

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disqualified himself from a 1963
case involving a textile firm
which did business with a
vending machine company
partially owned by the judge.
Ervin, who has strongly

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lawyer for the textile company
when the same case went to the
Supreme Court. The high court
partially reversed Haynsworths
decision, ruling instead in favor
of the Textile Workers Union.



North Vietnam Denounces U.S. Withdrawal

PARIS (UPI) North
Vietnam Sunday denounced the
withdrawal of more UJS. troops
from South Vietnam as a
propaganda maneuver and
repeated its demand that all
must be withdrawn as the basis
for a peace agreement.
The statement issued by the
North Vietnamese delegation to
the Vietnam peace talks was
signed by the Hanoi government
and was its first major
declaration outside the
framework of the peace talks
since the death of President Ho
Chi Minh early this month.
The uncompromising
statement showed no change had
been made in the North
Vietnamese bargaining position
since Ho*s death.
The Vietnamese people will
realize the last testament of Ho
Chi Minh and put up with all
sacrifices and deprivations to
Peace Ideal
Now Utopian
Pope Paul
CASTEL GANDOLFO, Italy
(UPI) Pope Paul VI said
Sunday the world is afflicted by
a lust for violence and quests for
power and prestige that make
the establishment of peace
Almost appear utopian.*
He said men must give greater
support to international laws
and institutions that seek to
promote peace.
The Pope spoke to pilgrims
and tourists to whom he gave his
weekly blessing at the papal
summer residence in this hQI
town near Rome.
It was his last such
appearance before his return to
the Vatican this week after a
two-month working vacation.
Dogs Shot
Kills Owner
LB HAVRE, France (UPI)
Jean Devauxs dog shot him
dead Sunday.
Devaux, 23, drove to a rabbit
shoot with his gun and his dog in
the back seat of his automobile.
As he opened the rear door to
let the dog out, the dog stepped
on the shotgun trigger, witnesses
said, and Devaux was shot.
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fight until the realization of the
fundamental rights of the
Vietnamese people according to
the Geneva agreements/* it said.
Allied officials offered no
immediate comment.
The_Hanoi statement
described the American position
on the Vietnam War as immoral
and unjust and added:
. The withdrawing of an
insignificant portion of the
American Army is a maneuver
which cannot hide the fact that
the United States is determined
to maintain an occupation army

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of nearly half a million men in
Vietnam and to prolong the war
of aggression.**
The statement continued* It
is precisely for that reason that
public bpinion in the United
States and the world has
denounced this perfidious
maneuver of President Nixon.**
The statement said the
United States continued _to
obstinately oppose** the
formation of a provisional
coalition government to hold
elections in South Vietnam.
The statement repeated Ho*s

demand for the withdrawal of Vietnam so that genuinely free
not 25,000 or 150,000 troops and democratic** elections could
but all American troops in be held.
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Monday

Page 7



l. The Florida Algrtor. Monday. Sutmbw 22.1989

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of rMponaibiNty

Look And Learn, Kiddies
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BLOWING YOUR MIND is for the University of Florida
A Tip Os The Hat
To Gator Offense
MR. EDITOR:
It would probably be a terrible understatement to say that the
students of the University of Florida were happy with the type of
football played this past Saturday afternoon on Florida Field, so I
wont say it. But you have to admit a wide-open offense and a high
score tend to make the winners smile.
Coach Graves finally has plenty of new material to work with and
thus far, he and his coaching staff have done what appears to have
been an admirable job of football preparation.
With all due respect to the talented Jackie Eckdahl, however, we
were all stunned by the fact that Coach Graves has apparently
abandoned last years habit of playing musical quarterback. It s nice
to see the best play the most.
The team has formed a bond of confidence with the cocky Mr.
Reaves and to begin substituting senselessly would surely wreck
whatever momentum we now have going.
So a tip of the Gator hat to the offensive line for protecting
Floridas 1971 Heisman Trophy winner, a salute to the defense for
getting him the ball and awe U-done to the receivers for managing to
hold on to 409 yards worth of aerials.
MIKE POULSON, 4JM
PJS. I think the University of Florida Athletic Department should
invest in a pair of white Alligator shoes for John Reaves and maybe
the Florida Alumni Association could chip in on a New York bar and
rent a couple of hoods to hang around inside.

'M
f* JL
Lets Bring These Children Together

l i Raul Ramin* __
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor

S
Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Vicki Van Eepoel
News Editor

sweatshirt.
ECSTASY is discovering that
your fathers friends daughter
that you are supposed to look
up is tough as nails.
MISERY is having two classes
on Friday-one first period and
one ninth.
ANGUISH is having a snooze
alarm that thinks a snooze is 15
seconds.
FREEDOM is making out on
the steps atawlings.
ACADEMIC FREEDOM is
sleeping through your first
period Institutions class on
Friday.
Being a REDNECK is dialing
the Let Freedom Ring number
and leaving the phone off the
hook.
A SUCCESSFUL football
season is beating FSU and
Miami.
MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE is an
SEC football championship.
Being UNPOPULAR is
making the Beta List-at
Broward.
Getting BENT OUT OF
SHAPE is a freshman coeds
mother reading about the
Playboy rating in the Florida
Times-Union.
APPREHENSION is a
freshman coed the first time she
goes to a seniors apartment
after a late movie.
Being CYNICAL is lighting
your match before youre
supposed to at Gator Growl.
A GOOD INEXPENSIVE
DATE is cooking up something
in the kitchen at Rawlings-with
the lights out.

The Legislature Has Acted ...

EDITORS NOTE: The following letter is
written in response to a letter from Dave Reddick of
the Florida Alligator urging the Board of Regents
not to pass its legislation on campus disorders.)
Dear Dave:
I thank you for your letter of August 30.1 hope
it is needless to state that I concur in your analysis.
In view of this agreement, you are probably entitled
to know why and how I made my recommendations
to the Board of Regents.
As you well know, the Legislature passed several
acts relating to campus disorders, disruptive
conduct, and the use of drugs. Some of these
enactments were simply additions to the
Appropriations Bill. That Legislation was signed by
the Governor and now stands as law of the State of
Florida.
The Regents have traditionally implemented law
through their policies, and so I referred to our
attorney the question of whether amendments to
existing policies should take place and, if so, how. I
might add that I had several inquiries from
Presidents as to appropriate action to be taken in
terms of their own rules and regulations and of
giving notice to students and faculty of the laws.
The attorney advised that it was necessary to
amend the Board of Regents policies and for certain
other actions to be taken. The question then arose
- as to the language of the amendments. I referred

EDITORIALS
Dont Burn Us
Lee Burrows, coordinator for traffic and transportation,
. las ]ast wee k that some people are going to get
burned when the campus police enforce their get tough
policy on unregistered vehicles.
The crackdown on vehicles driven on campus without a
parking decal goes into effect today, according to Burrows.
We deem it as an ill-advised, ill-conceived decision and
urge Burrows and the campus police to reconsider it.
And if anybody deserves to get burned, it is those who
drafted the vague and redundant printed regulations given
to owners of registered cars.
As we have previously pointed out, not even the
originators of the new traffic and transportation plan
consider it an infallible solution to UFs traffic and parking
woes. The system is loaded with flagrant inequities.
The regulations are so ambiguous that not even Burrows
can fully interpret them.
In Fridays Alligator, for instance, we printed Burrows
interpretation of one of the rules in the booklet. He said
that unregistered vehicles could be driven through campus
affer traffic control hours (7:30 a.m. to 3.30 p.m.) as long
as they were not parked on campus.
But now comes Campus Police Chief Audie Shuler, who
says unregistered vehicles may not be driven on campus at
any time of the day or night.
We must note, in fairness to Burrows, that he was not
one of the originators of these regulations and thus can t
possibly know the spirit behind each one of them.
But the fact that not even the coordinator of traffic and
transportation can interpret some of these rules, illustrates
our point: The plan is by no means flawless.
Later this week, we shall make a more specific critical
evaluation of the system and offer our recommendations.
We feel that the system should be given a chance to
work. We feel that students, faculty and staff should help
the traffic and transportation committee correct some of
the inequities in the system by offering their utmost
cooperation and giving their constructive criticism.
But we also feel that the campus police should make this
a two-way avenue. Those same students, faculty and staff
are facing a maze of vague regulations that they should be
given a chance to understand instead of getting burned.
And a get tough policy is hardly a step in that
direction.
Oh, yes, can anyone suggest a good place for a stake and
bonfire?

this question to a group of people consisting of
members of my staff, attorneys, and University
representatives. The decided to track the Statutes in
most instances.
An exception was the definition of disruptive
conduct. This definition, as originally submitted to
the Board, simply adopted the definition arrived at
by the Harvard faculty for use in the Harvard
regulations. I sent the proposed changes to the
Presidents and asked for their objections. After
receiving none, I presented the proposed changes to
the Board of Regents.
I quite agree that laws and regulations are
ineffectual means to cure root causes of difficulty. 1
suggest, however, that once the Legislature acts, and
Board, the Chancellor, the Presidents, and others in
the line of authority are obligated to take certain
action. Failure to take such action may result in
much graver consequences than taking the action
itself.
I have serious doubts about the Constitutionality
of some of the Legislation, but those doubts are no
deeper than my philosophical reservations
concerning the impact of the Legislation. 1 made my
position clear during the Legislative session, both
before committees of the Legislature and before the
news media.
ROBERT B. MAUTZ
CHANCELLOR



Guns Shoot Obiects...And People Too

MR. EDITOR:
We have been waiting for the proper tiire to air
our views on gun legislation. After Mr. Harry
Beckwiths letter of Sept. 18, we feel that time has
come.
Mr. Beckwith is assuming the role of the
doomsday prophet for all gun owners. But isnt he
really just trying to protect his own personal
interests? We feel, however, that weapons should
not be taken from any American who desires them.
The right to bear arms by citizens of this country is
a guaranteed constitutional right.
The disputed issue does not concern the validity
of this right or any attempt to modify it. What is at
stake is the specific fashion in which this right is
manifested in our society. Uncontrolled pursuit of
any right leads to trouble. Take, for example,
freedom of the press. Does this right entitle the
newspaper to publish whatever it may wish? Are
newspapermen free to slander under the protection
of freedom of the press?
Likewise, is the sale of guns to all comers, felons
and minors included, to be continued and any
FORUM:
( Aim ml ViAAuit J
K
A RIGHT TO BEAR ARMS
... only for a standing militia?

Your Words Are Confusing, Black Militants

MR. EDITOR:
I accept your charge of white
racism. I am ready to admit that
the culture in which I find
myself has ruthlessly and
systematically maintained white
racism, from its laws to its
vocabulary, and that my own
presence in that culture has not
had a substantial influence
toward changing things very
much.
My own complicity in this
pervasive scheme, and that of a
great many others whose
temperments and opinions I
would share, is limited
principally to two activities:
1) Being powerless, and
2) Being white.
Biologically, I cannot change
the second; politically, theres
not very much I can do about
the first.
And so there will be_ no
public self-flagellation. Surely
there has been quite enough of
that already. It has produced
little other than a perniciously
self-righteousf liberalism whose
proponents would compensate
in evangelical fervor for what
they lack in understanding of
the issues. I do not believe you
want any more of that. And I
believe I speak for a substantial
number of individual human
beings of good will when I say
that we dont want any more of
that either.
There are those of us in this

society who do not wish to play
the White African Queen. We
feel no calling to civilize any
savages. We do not seek to steal
or hide any of your history. We
are not interested in erasing all v
your cultural differences with us
or in pretending that such
differences do not exist. We do
not want to define your
problems, your issues or your
selves for you. We are aware that
the race problem in this
country is a white problem, and
we know that the definition of
black concepts must and will
continue to come from black
people if they are to be
significant for you.
When youre out there
rapping on the plaza or making a
statement to a reporter, some of
us are doing our very best to
find out what it is that is going
on in your head. If you really
want any of us to know, you
might try other tacks or teach us
to try other tacks. For yc
might be pleasantly suprised to
find some of us genuinely
capable of understanding
something more than
Imperialist Dog Colonizer if
something less than wholesale
armed revolution, despite our
inadvertant ethnocentrism.
Speaking personally, I find"
that much of what has come to
be known as black militant
rhetoric is not having the same
effect on me as you seem to


attempt at minimum gun control to be thwarted by
those waving die right to bear arms. The
minimum form of gun control, which suggest itself,
is gun licensing. This is primarily to keep guns out
Mr. Beckwith uses the old argument that guns are a part
of ones Constitutional rights. This is incorrect. Mr.
Beckwith may join a standing militia, but this is all that is
signified by the right to bear arms. Unless Im mistaken,
no one is disarming the National Guard, the U.S. Army, or
any other standing militias. It is true, as Mr. Beckwith
pointed out, that knife killings are quite common, but it
is also true that there are laws regarding knives and other
potential weapons. I suggest that Mr. Beckwith walk up to a
policeman, dagger in hand, and see how long it takes to be
arrested.
lIIIHIIIIIiniIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIiIIIIIIIUIUIIIIIIIUIIIIIUIIIIIHIItniIIIIRinHHHMHHHHHMHni
of the hands of those who cannot be trusted to
handle them properly, such as minors and felons.
True, this will make it a little more difficult for

Control Lethal Weapons

Mr. Editor:
While reading a copy of the Sept. 18
Alligator, I came across a letter to the
editor concerning gun control, written
by Mr. Harry Beckwith. I feel it
necessary to respond to the arguments
brought forth by Mr. Beckwithh.
Mr. Beckwith accuses the National
Commission on the Cause and
Prevention of Violence of thinking
that the only reason why we have
crime in the country is because of
guns. Following this inaccurate
generalization, he chides the
Commission for blaming the urban
unrest in the 1960*s for the sudden
increase in gun ownership.
If Mr. Beckwith had some facts at his
disposal (a hypothesis contrary to fact,
as one learns in Logic) he might realize
that the latter statement is true; fear of
rioting, crime in the streets, and other
symptoms of urban breakdown leads to
increase in gun ownership. Dearborn
housewives started arming themselves

think it should. Our few briei
conversations have led mostly to
further confusion.
When you are putting out
those words, are you
confronting me as a white
member of a white racist society
or are you confronting me as a
human being? My perception of
my own humanity (perhaps you
will say my racism?) forces me
to draw this distinction.
If you confront me merely as
a somewhat reluctant member of
this society, I cannot respond to
you personally because I
probably agree to the accuracy
of most of the, charges you level
against the social institutions
which perform atrocities upon
your people in my name.
Furthermore, my education by
way of your rhetoric does little
to alleviate my own social and
political powerlessness: I will
not enhance your survival by
telling my neighbor or my
congressman that hes a pig.
Perhaps I might come to
understand the rhetoric as a kind
of linguistic instrument used for
its social, political and
ultimately its psychological
effect. For instance, as a
culturally relevant (to blacks)
framework for the expression of
self-perception, pride or
manhood. Or as a vehicle for
exposing the lies that result from
the way in which we are
conditioned to use certain words

and taking shooting lessons in 1967 as a
reaction to the Detroit rioting of that
summer. Guns are used to shoot objects
... including people.
Mr. Beckwith uses the old argument
that guns are a part of one's
Constitutional rights. This is incorrect.
Mr. Beckwith may join a standing
militia, but this is all that is signified by
t the right to bear arms. Unless Im
mistaken, no one is disarming the
National Guard, the UJS. Army, or any
other standing militias.
It is true, as Mr. Beckwith pointed
out, that knife killings are quite
common, but it is also true that there
are laws regarding knives and other
potential weapons. I suggest that Mr.
Beckwith walk up to a policeman
c dagger in hand, and see how long it
takes to be arrested. Yes, people are
killed by means of A-bombs, bazookas,
and poisonous gas, but should these be
made available to the public? (Or, for
that matter, to the Pentagon?)

The President Wants Him Taken For A Walk
a

or phrases.
But if the words you speak
are intended to confront me as a
human being, then I must
confess to utter future to
understand you or your words.
It is difficult to take you
seriously because I see no
reinforcement in your words. I
mean, do you really intend
somehow to convince ME that I
am your friendly neighborhood
prune-face imperialist dog
colonizer? Or are you just
putting me on?
Im telling you Im trying to
communicate with you in the
only way it makes any sense to
me: as one human being to
another. If you want to hide
from that, go ahead. Thats easy.

Monday, Soptambor 22,1969. The Rorkh AWgetor,

-; 6 -'' 1
John Doe to purchase a gun, but is a gun to be
regarded as any other piece of consumer
merchandise? We think a gun is very special and
lethal.
The facts indicate that just about all holdups and
armed robberies are carried out by means of son*'
type of gun. Mr. Beckwith conveniently mentioned
the Richard Speck killings, but neglected to state
that in Miami, for instance, there have been 5 (not
1, but 5) murders without motive (so say the police)
in the space of several short weeks. All shotgun
murders one victim was shot 15 times.
We all know that licensing of weapons is not
going to guarantee that a disturbed person will not
be able to obtain a gun. But each of us must admit
to himself that it will not be nearly as easy for him
to get this weapon as it is now.
The gun has proven its usefulness as a lethal
weapon in modem day society. After all, who (Mr.
Beckwith excluded) would ever think of holding up
a bank with a knife!
LESLIE OLSHER, 3AS
RICHARD OLSHER, 7EG

Mr. Beckwith generalizes again
.only a few cheap swindling politicians
are running the whole country. The
majority of people no longer have any
say in our governmental matters. There
is some truth to these charges. Over 80%
of the people polled are in favor f
strong gun legislation, but reactionary
Congressmen, such as Senator Roman
Sikes (a lifetime NRA member) pby up
to tiie gun lobby and, aided by
Sunflower Jim Eastlands Judiciary
Committee, prevent debate concerning
meaningful legislation.
Mr. Beckwith might be surprised tc
learn that one of the gun control
pushers is J. Edgar Hoover. I guess
that, in this instance, Mr. Beckwith was
right when he wrote: Some of these
people are more dangerous than any gon
I have ever seen.
Finally, Mr. Beckwith referred tc
Senator Kennedy. Does Mr. Beckwith
know why there is only one Senatoi
Kennedy alive today, not three?
DAVID MILLER, 4AI

But I've heard that weary song
too many times before. It
goes...
Tm telling it like it is and
I'm using these words. If you
don't dig it, you must be one of
THEM.
You can claim anytime that
my whiteness does now and
always will prevent me from
attaining any understanding of
you comparable to the one you
have of yourself. If you do,
nobodys words are likely to
change that.
But if you care, then don't
beat me over the head. Don't
read uptight speeches in my
face. Unclench yourself some.
Talk to me.
DENNIS ANSON

Page 9



Page 10

l. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 22, 1969

fWCampus Crier |
jj \ M jV SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT 4£
II?' ' ' C^ a : "~ :f: : ; j? v * f *> __
Cabinet Offices 392-1665 I
3rd Floor Reitz Union
Student government I
wants I
* BBW
Â¥@P
ATTENTION FRESHMEN! I
\ sshSl
As an official member of the University of Florida student body,
you have pledged to uphold one of the great traditions on campus
student self government. >
This tradition has come to its present status by the willingness of
students to exert real leadership and to assume the responsibility
delegated to them by the University administration.
' J Our Student government is a complex, tightly knit organization
functioning similar to our federal, state, and local governments. As a
part of Student government, you will serve your fellow-students, obtain
valuable practical knowledge and experience of the working of a great
University, learn to work with students in all walks of life, and better
acquaint yourself with the many problems which plague this country
Student Government leaders have maintained close cooperation with
the administration and faculty. In return the administration and faculty
have shown their support and respect for student government. As a
result, this University has not suffered from campus riots and upheavals
prevalent today. Peacefully, the University of Florida student body has
established one of the strongest student governments in the nation.
There are 13 Cabinet positions in student government, all requesting
assistants, committee leaders and committee members,
secretaries . people like you!!

ACADEMIC AFFAIRS
ATHLETIC AFFAIRS
FINANCE
HEALTH AND INSURANCE
INTERIOR
STUDENT SERVICES
LEGISLATIVE AFFAIRS

In addition, three other major positions need to be filled: chairman
of the Student Committee On Organized Education (SCORE);
coordinator of the University Commif|ees; and Student Government
executive-secretary.
Somewhere there is a place for you! While at the University of
Florida, choose student government! It's the most beneficial way you
can help yourself to help others. Come by our office on the third floor
of the J. Wayne Reitz Union or call for information 392-1665.

MARRIED STUDENT AFFAIRS
MINORITY GROUP AFFAIRS
PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
STUDENT AFFAIRS
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
CONSUMER AFFAIRS
i



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;y^ FOR SALE §
Mamiyaflax c-33 2V. camera w/!>
lenses w/hatd leather cases like new.
cost over SIOOO new wNI taka best
offer over $575 caN 3754702 after
5. (A-3t-2-p)
Not a flimsy portable or a cheap
ciuinstore but Royal Standard Size'
Typewriters Just like new with $0
day guarantee. 1-4 years old New
Price $200.00 and up. Now while
they last $120.50 JR OFFICE .
EQUIPMENT CO. 020% S. Main St.
Call 370-1140. (A-7M-C)
Shipment of used desk 0. chain just
arrived. Ist come basis. Lowest prices
- highest quality new furniture
too. JR OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT CO. 020% S. Main St.
375-1140. (A-7M-C)
65 Yamaha 100 cc. only 770 miles.
Just married, must sell 373-2000 best
offer takes it. (A-3t-1-p)
1 1 1
*62 Dodge Dart GT interior excellent,
A/condition, radio, heater A good
tires. Low on gas. Black with red
bucket seats. Call 373-1407.
(A-st-1-p)
SEPTEMBER ONLY Clean, oil,
adjust, A new ribbon on any portable
typewriter. Reg. $10.50. THIS
MONTH ONLY $12.40. JR OFFICE
FURNITURE CO. 620% S. Main St.
Call 376-1145. (A-st-1-c)
DISCOUNT OFFICE A STUDENT
FURNITURE. QUALITY FOR
LESS.'* 4 Drawer suspension file
regular $69.50 NOW $44.95; BIG
beautiful desk, modern design
regular $169.50 NOW $105.00 JR
OFFICE FURNITURE A
EQUIPMENT CO. 620% S. Mailt St.
Call 376-1146. (A-7t-1<)
68 Triumph 500 cc. twin. Excellent
condition and insured! helmets,
cover, whitworth tools, cover,
manuals included. 2000 mi.
378-5570. SBOO. (A-st-2-p)
Yamaha 60, 2500 mi, runs very good,
asking $l6O. Bruce at 373-2687.
(A-3t-1 -p)
THINK ABOUT ITI Studying is
tough but we can make it easier A
much more pleasant. A new or used
desk chair or file will help you in the
right direction. High quality at far
below chainstore prices. TRY US
TODAY ITS SALE MONTH JR
OFFICE FURNITURE A
EQUIPMENT CO. 620% S. Main St.
Call 376-1146. (A-7t-1 -c)
Honda CB 350 2100 miles, perfect
condition. $625 or best offer. See at
304 15th St. NW. Dave Buster, Room
no. 9. (A-3t-2-p)
For Sale 1968 Volvo 144 S ex. Cond.
Radial Tires, Radio, Many other fine
features. S2IOO Phone. 373-1054.
(A-5-2-p)
Upright piano $l5O mono vertical
tape deck all transistorized SSO metal
bunk bed w mattress S2O crib w
mattress S2O. Call 372-7795.
(A-st-1-p)
GERMANY BOUND MUST SELL:
Bki/graJbahama bed couch SSO; sml.
port. TV S2O; curtains, rugs, misc.
items; call 378-0935 after 6 p.m.
(A-st-2-p)
Need Campus Transportation? Must
Sell 50cc Suzuki Cycle. Good
Condition. Call Bill at 392-7511.
(A-3t-2-p)
Miracord A dual turntables, 3
amplifiers, tape deck, 75 stereo tapes,
4 speakers all half price. Only 18
months old. Doug Firestone r
378-1998. (A-St-3-p)
OVER 16 ONLYC
11 /y COLOR DeLuxe I r
PCHBQNB
iHair

Monday, September 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

1 FORSALE I
HONDA 1968. Need money
desperately. Ask S2OO. Apt 75
Quarter. Ph. 373-1417. Barry.
(A-st-2-p)
1 V w,d# tral,#r 2 bedroom
$l5O down and take up payments.
f2i. D *2 ,n Gam ** Ar a or call
376-2998 after 6:00 P.M. (A-It-3-p)
Mojave cycle 250ec, 1969, very
good condition, S3OO or trade for
small bike and cash. Call 372-1820
A.M. or after $ p.M. (A-St-3-p)
Two Schwinn Varsity bicycles (one
mans racer, one ladys touring) well
equipped, over SIOO new, purchased
In Feb. S7O each. 475-4735.
(A-3t-3-p)
Motorcycle 1965 Riverside 50cc.
Asking SBS. Call 370-0040 after 6:00
or see at lot 4-B Raileys Traitor Park.
(A-st-3-p)
1965 Allstate Mooter good condition
good inexpensive transportation
helmet included all for $65. Call
Sam. 378-7212. (A-3t-3-p)
THE amazing Blue Lustre will leave
your upholstery beautifully soft and
clean. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowery Furniture Co. (A-It-3-c)
1966 CapeHa, 12X52, Air cond. 2
bd., 10X20 awning, storage shed,
SISOO equity, $64 monthly, or 3500
cash. 378-1857. Excellent condition.
(A-It-1-p)
YAMAHA 60cc. 4400 mi. with
helmet $l7O. SELMER TRUMPET
with case and music stand S9O. Hi
intens lamp $5. Call 376-0126.
(A-st-1-p)
FOR RENT
FURNISHED HOME 7 Miles From
Campus. Spacious, quiet, beautiful,
near new golf course, big fire place,
fully paneled, two large bedrooms
2 baths. Beautifully furnished, air
conditioned with your own screen
porch next to pool, use of pool
bar-b-que house plus much more
$175.00 a month. Lease required;
Ca 11.376-3900 or 376-1146. Sorry no
children or pets. (B-7t-1-c)
Male Roommate Wanted ssO a
month + % util. 4 blocks from
campus, call David 378-6347, apt.
25, 1530 N.W. 4th Ave. FOR LEASE Fenced private
parking near research library.
QUALITY REALTY 378-1353.
(B-St-2-p)
Spacious 1 bedroom AC apt. Fully
furnished within walking distance of
University. 372-3357. (B-10t-2-p)
WANTED I
Two roommates for furnished 2 br
apL Central air A heat, part utilities
included. Nice location. $51.80 mo.
829 NE 4 Ave. or call 378-6127, Jeff.
(C-3t-2-p)
Hip roommate wanted to share
apartment. 32.50 per month plus
utilities immediate occupancy come
to 1118 S.W. First Ave. Apt. 2. Ask
for Marc. (C-2t-2-p) __
1968 Honda 50 cIOO 3 speed low
mileage excellent condition good
transportation around campus. $l5O.
Call Jon Ciener 378-7353. (C-St-3-p)

Give It a try!
3PM-11PM 1
FRIDAY 3PM-MIDNIGHT
SATURDAY 10AM-MIDNIGHT
SUNDAY 2PM-11 PM
1236 N.W. 7th Avenue at
s N.W. 13lh Sf. Burger Chef

Jllllll! 8 yy///^woewvwwwi|
WANTED
BiiiiiiDJu;<^>wflc MALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Separate bedroom at no extra cost.
Swimming pool. Central heat and air
conditioning, brand new place,
adjacent to campus. Phone 372-0344.
914 S. W. 9th Ave. (C-4t-2-c)
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED.
Brand new apartment adjacent to
campus and sorority row. Central
heat and air, landscaped patio with
swimming pool, your own bedroom.
Phone 372-5345. 914 S.W. Oth Ave.
(C-4t-2-c)
GRADUATE STUDENT
ROOMMATE. Private bedroom and
study area in townhouse apartment.
Brand new furniture, swimming pool,
central heat and air, utilities
included. 914 S.W. Oth Avenue,
Phone 372-5344. (C-4t-2)
Coed student for own'bodroom in air
cond. luxury Olympia apL Near
sorority row close to campus $75 and
utilities. 376-3303. (C-2t-2-p)
Need 4th female roommate for 3
bedroom house central air $35/mo
Really nice NW section. Call
373-2730. (C-It-2-p)
Student 23 SAR wants to share apt.
pref. close to campus. Call 373-1806.
Ask for Jim. (C-2t-3-p)
Wanted coed to share furnisnea a
bedroom house 10 blocks behind
Norman. S3O month (includes
water). Call 373-1740 anytime.
(C-st-3-p)
Female roommate wanted to share 2
bdrm Gator Town ApL Call LatreHe
376-1131. (C-st-3-p)
Roommate, to share with one girl,
own room, serious student upper
division preferred, % block behind
Norman 370-7638. (C-st-3-p)
Wanted 1 or 2 female roomies 2 br
apt. very close to campus,
comfortably equipped $ 130/mo. split
2 or 3 ways plus util. Call 378-9098
Please! (C-st-3-p)
f "'HELP WANTED j
Men interested in sales for better
than average commissions. Full
training, no experience necessary. No
door to door, or travel. Apply in
person 2929 NW 13th St. Will not
interfere with Mhool. (E-3t-1-p)
Girls extra income, part time, full
time, receptionists, telephone girts,
typists, etc. Late shift 3 p.m. to 9
p.m. Bonus plan set your own pay.
Apply in person 2929 NW 13th St.
Suite 3 10 AM to 4PM. (E-3t-1-p)
Listeners Wanted Will pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Mary, University
extension 392-2049 for appointment
between Bs. (E-st-1 -c)
Help wanted Shakey's Pizza Parlor
must be 21 and available to work
week ends. Apply in person 3510 SW
13th St. (E-2t-1-c)
MALES immediate openings part or
full time. Good salary. Apply in
person ARBYS 1405 SW 13th
Street (E-3M-Q
BABY SITTER: Must be dependable
and love children to care for adorable
lyr, old. Good pay excellent
working conditions 378-0387 after
5. (E-3t-3-p)

Page 11

["help wanted!
Female over 21 12 pjn.7 pjn. M-F
Pizza Inn 37C-4921 31S S. W. 1C
Ave. (E-3t-1-c)
Male over 21 Hours after 5 pom. Pizza
Inn 376-4521 31C S.W. 1C Ave.
(E-3H-C)
Male and female help wanted Part
Time Good Salary Apply Little
Larry's Restaurant. 122 S West
University. (E-st-3-p)
I AUTOS p
For sale ICC 2 tudor Corvair Monza
Shiny black, radio bucket seats Left
for OKINAWA. Please call Office
372-4609 or late 376-0464.
(G-st-3-p)
For sale C 4 VW sedan Radio heater
wsw New safety sticker UndercoaL
Excehent condition. Service record.
$795 can 376-0405 after S p.m.
(G-3t-2-p)
Falcon sprint, 19C3, 4 speed, 2 dr.
hL new tires, many new parts, SSOO
or best offer. BIN Kerr, 211-T Flavet,
37C-CCO2. (G-st-2-p)
w ir
19CS Rambler American, automatic
radio heater 4-door, excellent
condition low mileage very clean, see
at Southside Gulf or call
372- 7.(G-st-1-p)
19C6 MGB Excellent condition.
Good tires. Tonneau cover, hoot and
luggage rack lot price $1495. Selling
for only $1375. CaM 37C-49C2.
(G-3t-1-p)
MGB C7 EXCELLENT CONDITION
radio heater Tonneau cover and more
extras SI9OO or best offer. Can
379-9225. (G-St-1-o)
PERSONAL §
>: $
Training in ZEN meditation in return
for participation in psychological
research. Call Mike 379-9625
evenings. (J-It-3-p)
The war is not over until all the Gls
are home. Film: Hanoi 13 by Alvarez
winner Leibzig festival Wed. Reitz
Union Auditorium Student
Mobilization Committee to End the
War. Box 13197 Univ. Sta. (J-3t-3-p)
Yoga lessons. Group $2.00 private
$5.00. One private lesson
pre-requisite for group. Contact Mike
Geison 379-4022. (J-st-2-p)
PS Beta Phi transfers, please call
379-6392. (J-10t-2-p)
We moved out of the dorms and now
were lost. We need coeds to cook, go
skiing or to football games
0r... Help us find our way. Call Jim
or Butch 379.2799. (J-st-2-p)
MARRIED female roommate wanted
to share 2BR trailer (Varsity Villa)
sllO/23 utilities. Cali Mary
373- (J-3t-1-p)
Dial 379-5600 and hear a taped
message any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING. 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-st-1-p)
Phillips flying service flight
instruction 9.00 solo T 3.00 dual.
495-2124 after 6 p.m. Ground school
starting Sept. 3. (J-10t-1-p)

MORRISON'S CAFETERIA
-
you choose what you want...
pay only for what you get!
MONDAY
BAKED MACARONI Q
& MEAT SAUCE /7?
(All You Care To Eat)
TUESDAY
99$

| PERSONAL |
Yummy yummy yummy! Hot Fudge
Sunday! DIPPER DAN IN THE
MALL. (J-SM-C)
1 LOST 6 FOUND 'll
lUwiMlllllllll WWNWRBBnfUWiniIMiW
REWARD: Skinny male Siamese;
dark with gray hairs; bend at end of
tail; pink flea collar; Missing 9/29 SW
16 Ave. area; 376-2909. (L-6t-3-p)
| SERVICES I
Experienced bench technician for
radio, television, stereo. Part or fuN
time. Alliance TV Service 915 W.
University Ave. (M-st-1-p)
Volkswagen Parts and Service
Guaranteed Repairs by Specialist.
Gainesville Machine Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-St-3-c)
Roberts 9 track stereo cartrages from
your records only $4.50. 372-9719.
(M-st-3-p)
LEARN TO FLY 5 min from
campus Best Instructors Best
airplanes best ground school best
DEAL FLYING HAWKS
CLUB Stengte Field 376-0011.
(M-lOt-2-p)
Volkswagen parts and service
guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gfinesville Mach. Shop. CaH
37641710- (M-2t-2-c)
Alternators generators starters
electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
SL 379-7330. (M-ts-2-c)
GUITAR LESSONS AND REFAIRS
2 years experience see Bob Zuber c/o
Bent Card Coffee House 1926 W.
Univ. Ave. 376-0539. (M-5t2-p)
BSETnowT
MW. tarn tt. artifdd* T| w w
THvehewr 179-2434 VUMBF
PANAVISION* COLOR JS
mmu\ nowi
f 4tpwv 379 3434 W
~Jk -m,
COUJMBI* PICTURES UR[ FOftfMM sP'S
TOM COURTENAY T
ROMY SCHNEIDER I
"=s*otlev
ffila



Lovers Victorious Over Fighters

By SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor
Houston footballs greatest show, has closed
on opening night.
Saturday, two Playboy number ones met at
Florida Field. The Gators number one in romance
and Houston, number one in football this time
the lovers won, 5934.
It didnt take long for the Gators to get moving
as flanker Carlos Alvarez grabbed a pass from team
mate John Reaves on the third play of the game and
went all the way to put his team out in front for
keeps. -
The pass was right on the money, Alvarez said.
AD I could think of was run baby, run, it looks bad
to fans when you get caught from behind.
The momentum had begun.
(jj^
Houstons second play from scrimmage, a
pitch-out to Willie Roberts was fumbled and
recovered by the Gators Robbie Rebol on the
Cougars 30 yard line.
Minutes later Richard Franco booted a ten yard
field goal, giving UF a 100 advantage.
Another fumble by Roberts set up the Gators

The
Florida
Alligator

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TOMMY OURRANCE
... scored three times

GATOR

Gator Combo, John Reaves And Carlos Alvarez Connect For First UF Score

GATORS UPSET HOUSTON. 59-34

Houston Upset
A Gator Dream
By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Editor
. ... ;V,. .-#
The sophomores were the key... to the Gators 59-34 slaughter
of Houstons highly-rated Cougars.
But the inspiration for the sophomore-led Gators success should
be credited to the Gator seniors.
And while credit is being dealt out by the shovel fuH, I think a lot
of the credit should go to the Gators offensive line.
Os course Im not the only one with the opinion that the Gator
victory laurels belong to the Gator offensive line.
Head Coach Ray Graves, sophomore quarterback John Reaves and
sophomore flanker Carlos (Chico) Alvarez are of the same opinion.
We had that game you dream of as a coach, said Graves. We had
the best line-blocking and pass protection ever.
AH our big five up front did a great job... Wayne Griffith,
offensive captain Mac Steen, Donnie Williams, Skip Amelung, and
Kim Helton.
I told you we had the best line in the SEC, said Reaves. Didnt
I tell you? Those guys are just fantastic. Did you see the way they
blocked out there? It was fantastic.
Our line did a great job blocking, said Alvarez. It gave us a lot
(SEE GATOR'PAGE 15)
-\.. 1

Records Tumble
INDIVIDUAL
Passing yardage 342 by Reaves (old
record: 279 by Spurrier against Auburn,
1965).
Touchdown passes 5 by Reaves (old
record, 4 by Spurrier against South Carolina,
1964.)
Total offense 341 by Reaves (old
record, 317, by Spurrier against Auburn
1965).
TEAM
Most touchdown passes 5.
Passing yardage 409 (SEC record,
breaking 407 by Georgia against Miami,
1960; (old school record, 343 against
Northwestern, 1966.
Points by Graves-coached UF team -59
(old record 51 against^
second TD, this time a Reaves pass to Garry Walker.
The second quarter turned out to be a replay of
the first with Reaves connecting with Alvarez,
Jimmy Barr picking off a Ken Bailey pass, and

Reaves hitting Tommy Durrance all for
six-pointers.
Houston picked up their first score with three
minutes left in the first half as Mike Parrott took a
16 yard pass from Bailey. The extra point attempt
was blocked by Barr and the Gators jumped to a
38-6 advantage at halftime.
The Cougars bounced back in the third quarter as
Bailey connected with Elmo Wright twice for TDs,
narrowing the gap to 3820.
Their success was shortlived as Durrance went six
yards around right end with eight minutes left in the
third period, killing all Cougar hopes.
Reaves then threw his fifth TD pass, a six-yarder
to Durrance, while Jack Eckdahl, who replaced
Reaves late in the third quarter, went up the middle
for one yard to round out the Gators scoring.
Houstons only other TDs came on Bailey passes
to Parrott and Wright.
Reaves, in only three quarters of play, was able
to smash three records formerly held by Heisman
Trophy Winner Steve Spurrier.
The sophomore quarterback in his first game as a
Gator, threw five touchdown passes, passed for 342
yards, and picked up 341 yards total offense.

CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor

Page 12

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!. The Florida Alligator, Monday, September 22,1969

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DAVE GHESQUIERE
* cause Cougar fumble

SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor



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He goes back periodically for a refresher course, too, to
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TO UGH DAY
FOR COUGARS
Gator defense has an
outstanding day as Jimmy
Barr (above) intercepts a Ken
Bailey pass, and team mate
Rich Buchanan dumps
Houston quarterback Garry
Mullins for a loss.
PHOTOS BY
RANDY BASSETT
AND DOUG CASE

Alumni Sponsor Bus

The UFs Alachua County
Alumni Club is sponsoring a
charter bus to Tampa Oct. 11
for the FloridaTulane football
game.
The bus departs from the
campus parking lot west of the
Century Tower and University
Auditorium at 9:30 a.m. It
arrives in Tampa in time for
passengers to attend the
pre-game Futbol Fiesta

A A 1232 W.
fllDfluB) UNIVERSITY ave.
v W w I W
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STUDENT HDQTRS
FOR ART &
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SUPPLIES
FOOTIALL CONTEST
PRIZE: $25 in Mens or Ladies Wear
DORA $lO wtatr b (irl
Place an "X" in the box of the team you think will win
Saturday, Sept. 27. Estimate total yards to be gained by
Florida, which will be the tie breaker.
Home Team Visiting Team
Alabama vs. So. Miss.
Clemson vs. M Georgia
Georgia Tech vs. Baylor
Kentucky vs. Mississippi
Miss. State vs. Florida
Ohio State vs. TCU
Purdue vs. Notre Dame
So. Carolina vs. No. Carolina
Tennessee vs. Auburn
___ Vanderbilt vs. Army
Total Yards Gained by FLORIDA | 1
Winner's Signature Must Agree With
Signature On Entry Blank.
Entries must be deposited in U shop by Fri., Sept. 26
te.
In case of tie, prize will be divided equally among winners.
WINNERS NAMES TO BE/OSTED IN:
isht nibersitp
1620 West University Avenue University Plaza
signature; T
v
ADDRESS ' ~ ~
CITX STATE
ENTRIES LIMITED, TWO PER PERSON

Monday, September 22, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

sponsored by the Tampa Alumni
Club or eat lunch elsewhere.
Round trip cost will be $7
per person, including tax and
refreshments aboard the bus.
The deadline for reservations is
Sept. 23 and game tickets must
be purchased separately.
Checks payable to Alachua
County Alumni Club may be
sent to Bob Lynch, 111 N.W.
26th St.

Page 13



Page 14

Th Florida Alligator, Monday, September 22,1969

Time Trials Boost Spirit
As Trackmen Meet Rivals

By CALDWELL TUMEC
Alligator Correspondent
The UF cross country team
thinks it holds the first
haymaker in a one-two punch
that may leave Mississippi State
reeling next Saturday.
The team of distance runners
meets its Mississippi State
counterpart at 2 pan. on the day
that the Gator gridders take on
the same school in Jackson.
The footballers can obviously
look forward to their meeting
with confidence because of their
blasting of Houston last
Saturday, but the runners
received their shot of enthusiasm
from a much less heralded event.
A time trial Saturday
morning before the game
revealed that the team is in far
better shape than any other
Gator cross country team has
been at thhis early stage of the
season, or perhaps any stage.
Team captain John Parker led
the harriars around the four mile
course in 19:53, one second
ahead of freshman sensation
Mark Bir, who recorded 19:59 in
winning a similar trial one week
ago.
In third place was freshman
A.W. Smith, who improved his
time by over a full minute from
last week. He was recorded in
20:27. Johnnie Brown was
fourth in 20:27.5. Brown, a
sophomore, was the only runner
to break 20 minutes on the
course last year when he ran
19:46.
Steve Atkinson rounded out
the first five with a 20:43, an
Albert Picks
All But One
Albert Predicts started off the
year in true Gator fashion by
picking 13 winners out of 14
attempts for an average of .928.
Alberts only downfall came
at the hands of Georgia Tech as
they squeaked by SMU by only
three points.
All was going well up until
the final three minutes of the
game when Tech scored from
one yard out.
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improvement of almost two
minutes from last week.
Jade Stewart, a muscular
freshman half-miler from New
Jersey shocked track coach
Jimmy Hawk Carnes when he
recorded 20:45 for sicth place.
Stewart is doing perhaps the
most amazing job of all the fine
runners we have on this years
team, said Carnes. He has put
in as much mileage as the other
boys who are not built so
heavily and who have less
trouble covering long distances.
As a matter of fact, one day he
ran 32 miles, the most anyone
has put in this year.
All in all, eight runners broke
21 minutes during the trial. Roy
Benjamin and Jack Nason, who
were injured and could not run,
both recorded under 21 minutes
in the first trial a week ago.
They are suffering from

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minor foot ailments and should
be ready to go by next Saturday.
Nason was fifth in the SEC cross
country meet last year and was a
4:13 miler in high school. As a
freshman, Benjamin ran a 4:18
mile last year and was a cross
country first-stringer before an
injury spoiled the majority of his
season.
The big trouble with this
group, said Carnes, is that I
dont know who to take on
trips. You are allowed to have
five men count in the score as
well as two extra men who can
force the other teams score
down. Thats only seven. We
have 12 boys who are running so
well that my conscience would
hurt to leave any of them at
home.
But Carnes isnt dismayed.
Its one problem I dont
mind too much, he said.

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Gabriel Leads Rams Over Baltimore

BALTIMORE (UPI)
Roman Gabriels three
touchdown passes led the Los
Angeles Rams to a
come-from-behind 27-20 upset,
victory over the Baltimore Colts
Sunday.
With the Colts leading 17-10
in the third quarter, a 31-yard
run by Larry Smith set up a

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12-yard TD pass by Gabriel to
Willie Ellison to tie the game.
On the next* series, Ed
Meador intercepted a Johnny
Unitas pass at the Colt 35 and
ran it bade to the 11. Bruce
Gossett kicked a 15-yard field
goal four plays later to put the
Rams ahead 20-17.
The Rams scoring was

SMITH'S RUN SETS UP TD

completed when Bob Klein
recovered Preston Pearson's
fumble on a punt return on the
Cdlt 13. Two plays later, Gabriel
hit Wendell Tucker in die end
zone to make it 2717.
Lou Michaels kicked a
41-yard field goal with 4:06 left
in tiie game to complete the Colt
scoring.

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Monday; September 22, 1960, The Florida AMfator,

The Rams scored first when
Gossett kicked a 29-yard field
goal following a 48-yard drive in
the first quarter.
A Colt touchdown in the
second quarter was assisted by
two Ram penalties, including an
interference call that moved the
baO 40 yards to the Rams 6.
Two plays later tight end Tom
Mitchell made a diving catch of a
Unitas pass for the TD.
The Rams came right back
with a 63-yard drive capped by a
four-yard Gabriel TD pass to Bill
Truax. The Colts took the
kickoff and moved 68 yards

Gator Teamwork
Nucleus For Win
FROM PA6EI2^
of time to set up our plays.
Alvarez and Reaves know how valuable tune is, although it didn't
take them much time to put the Gators on the scoreboard byway of
a 70-yard touchdown on only the UFs third offensive play of the
game.
And the time never ran out for the Gators as it did for the Cougars.
We just did our job, said offensive tackle Steen. The victory
was really a team victory.
When you stop and think about it, the Gators upset victory really
was a team effort, not just Reaves to Alvarez.
Who both more than did their part, as Reaves passed for five Gator
TDs and 342 yards, which was good enough to break former Gator
great and 1966 Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurriers single game
passing records of four TDs and 279 yards.
Alvarez caught six passes for 182 yards, breaking Charlie Caseys
172-yard total, and tieing the SEC single game record for receptions.
Sophomore tailback Tommy Durrance more than did his job too as
he scored three TDs on two pass receptions and a 6-yard run around
end.
Tough senior Paul Maliska exhibited a fine pair of sure hands
bringing down five passes for 76 yards, including a diving 46-yarder
from Reaves.
Bill Dowdy, another sophomore, caught four passes for 53 yards,
and proved he could catch the ball in a crowd, something only
experienced tight ends are supposed to do.
And of course all of this would not be, if not for the steady and
fantastic job the offensive line performed.
The UFs defensive squad did an excellent job containing
Houstons famous Veer-T offense, even with defensive backs Skip
Albury and Steve Tannen hurt on the sidelines.
Sophomore Jimmy Barr did an excellent job according to
Defensive Chief Gene Ellenson, filling in for the injured Albury.
Sophomore kicking specialist Richard Francos place kicking
performance was perfect as Franco hit on eight straight
point-after-touchdowns and a 26-yard field goal on his only field-goal
attempt.
As offensive captain Steen said, the Gator victory was a team
effort. The nucleus was the team, not just certain individuals.
As long as the Gators continue to play as a team they have a damn
good chance to beat every team on their schedule. Im not saying they
will, but that they have the potential to.
Lets hope the Gator mistakes are few and far between, and then
maybe this will be the Year of the Fighting Gator.
univershyTeagues
NOW ORGANIZING
If interested come by the
GAMES AREA and filfout an
application or Call 39?-1637
DEADLINE SEPT. 26
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA-GROUND FLOOR REITZ UNION

before their drive stalled at the
Rains four and Michaels kicked
a 15-yard field goal.
The Colts last touchdown
came in the third quarter on a
41-yard pass by Unitas to Jimmy
I On.
i ...
Bloc-Seat Meeting
There is a bloc-seating
meeting in the Reitz Union in
room 349 at 7:30 p.m. tonight.
All chairmen for their
respective interest groups are
expected to attend.

Page 15



> r Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, September 22,1969

Page 16

JP The All-American food! STEAK
PLAYER ol th,WEEK £ k
Creators of Arbyf Roast Beef Sandwich 1961. Arty's BONANZA
V of The week
E E) E D jUjjjjjy ,* iU*
ARCHITECTURAL John Reaves ar Bh
EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES Mfc IW
ART SUPPUES
John Reaves is awarded the first Player of the
STUDY LAMPS Week award for his five TDs and 342-yard passing |
performance in leading the Gators to a 59-34 upset
GYM OUTFITS The sophomore from Tampa completed 18 of 30 I I |
passes on his way to breaking former Gator great and 1 JMK. 1
SWEATSHIRTS 1966 Heisman Trophy winner Steve Spurrier's I I Mjf
records of four TDs and 279 yards for a single game. A) F VV
COLLEGE PETS Reaves' performance also tied a Southeastern j I
Conference record held by two better-than-average I 1
roi I PAF CCA I passers, Babe Parilli and Billy Wade. W >k* \i U
Reaves' 341 yards total offense also broke V
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