Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
THINK VICTORY

I?*L

Vol 62, No. 1

LEE BURROWS
... psychological shock

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DOUG CASE
SPIRIT SHAKERS

Word has it the Century Tower is changing its
tune. From "We are the boys from old Florida," to
"Let's spend the night together." Os course, that's
in accordance with UF's new reputation, acquired
last month when Playboy magazine rated our

Florida Gym Has Seating Capacity CutTo4,ooo

Florida Gym, UFs only facility capable of
seating more than 1,000 persons, has now had its
capacity lowered from 7,400 to 4,000.
The restrictions on capacity were caused by
current life safety code requirements concerning
exits. According to W. Ellis Jones, associate director
of fe physical planning, the restrictions are a
temporary measure until plans now in progress to,
provide additional exits can allow normal use in the
fall of 1970.
We have had outside professional consultants

rnu Q
1 lit?
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

UF's Parking, Traffic Plan
Begins Critical Trial Period

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs new parking and
Transportation plan, which has
nought the orange and blue bus
routes to campus, will get a
critical inspection this week

COMMUTERS LEVEL BULK OF CRITICISM

"permissive" school number one in hedonism. So,
to show off our new spirit, UF sun-tanned coeds,
Diana Kanoy/left, and Carol Carswell display some
"Mad Avenue" pseudo-traditions. Color us sexy.

TO MEET SAFETY REQUIREMENTS

recommend specific structural changes and are
asking the Board of Regents to authorize work to
begin in March following basketball season, Jones
said.
He noted that the work would include providing
additional exits on the east and west sides and at the
north end of the gymnasium and air conditioning
the arena area for a total estimated cost of
$750,000. When the pull-out bleachers are used*
aisles must be provided every 14 feet in order to
meet code requirements.

University of Florida, Gainesville

from faculty, staff and students
who are paying for the system.
Meanwhile, university officials
are asking that the plan be given
a chance to work. They are
concerned over the hostile
reception given the new system

by returning members of the
university community.
Lee Burrows, recently
appointed coordinator of traffic
and transportation, predicted
- that it will be weeks before the
new plan will be accepted by the
campus.
He said that it is a
psychological shock for students
and faculty, who have paid $1 or
$2 for the same parking
privileges in the past, to be faced
with the $5 to S3O parking fees
this year.
However, Burrows said the
system must move forward
under pressure of Florida law.
Much of the criticism is being
leveled by off-campus
commuters whose fee money for
decals is being Used to provide
bus transportation for campus
residents without cars at no cost.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd places the
blame for campus traffic
problems on car owners.
We have to pay for this in
some way, and charging people
who drive cars on campus and
who have caused parking and
traffic problems is the best way
to pay for the plan, he said.
Experience at other universities
has shown this to be the best
plan.
However, he is not overly
optimistic about the new plan.
He admits there will be problems
and said he hopes the students
will give the system a chance.
We have struck a bargain
with the student, Shepherd
said. We are guaranteeing a
good bus service for students in
exchange for their payment of
parking fees. We are concerned
that the bargain be carried out.
Tom Wells, UF business
manager, said the system may
have to be reevaluated in the
near future. He also said those
students who are now riding the

Although operating under capacity limitations
may hamper some activities, it is essential that we
comply with regulations of the code, Jones
explained.
As the gymnasium is the only facility on the
campus large enough to seat approximately
one-third of the current student body and is
adaptable for multi-purpose use, it is essential that
the necessary modifications be completed as early as
possible in order for it to be restored to normal
use.

Thursday, September 18, 1969

buses at no cost may be made to
pay a fee similar to the fees paid
by commuters.
Wells said such a proposal
would have to be brought before
the Parking and Transportation
Committee for consideration.
Arnold Butt, chairman of this
committee, said that collecting
tokens of change from students
riding the buses makes it
difficult for the system to work.
It is to our advantage and
everyones advantage to have the
system the way it is, Butt said.
He said, however, that his
committee will listen to other
proposals.
We dont claim to have the
best system in the world for
solving our traffic and parking
problems, he said.
When asked what happens if
the system does not work, or the
buses are not sufficient for the
number of people wanting to use
them, Wells said there would be
no refunds.
I cant see any basis for a
refund, he said. Fees are used
to improve the traffic and
parking plan on campus; parking
lot expansion, shelters and signs
are helped financially by these
fees.
Employes of UFs Physical
Plants and Grounds Division are
still retaining the counsel of a
local attorney who may contest
the legality of the plan.
The Oator
Classified 28
Dropouts 6
Editorials 8
Entertainment 27
Letters 9
Movies 28
Sports 17



I IlnnHMyi Ivf

Page 2

BY FEDERAL SPENDING CUT
Med Center Growth Not Hurt

UFs plans for a multi-million dollar expansion
of the J. Hill is Miller Health Center will not be
delayed due to cutbacks in federal funds.
The $33 million expansion program, primarily
for construction of facilities for the states first
r
College of Dentistry and for increasing
enrollment of the College of Medicine still can
count on $19.7 million from the NationaT
Institutes of Health provided the state of Florida
matches with an additional sl3 million.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell gave
assurance Monday that federal funds for the
expansion will still be available, following word
from Washington.
We are told, he said, at this time there is
no indication of any cutback of approved health
facilities construction grants. AH we need is
funding of the states share of the project to
make it a reality.
NIH approval of the Health Centers expansion

24-Hour Open
Dorm Sought

By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Writer
A resolution that would let
Murphree Area residents declare
24-hour open house will be
brought to the Interhall Council
Monday night for approval.
The resolution, passed by the
Murphree residents 650-20 in
referendum June 5. would let
each 24-man section deeide for
itself when it wants to call theV
open house. Interhall was unable
to act cm the resolution before
the spring quarter ended.
Present University policy
allows dormitory residents to
entertain members of the
opposite sex until 2 a.m. on
Friday and Saturday, and 11
p.m. during the week.
If Interhall passes the bill it
would still have to be approved
by President OConnells
committee on University
Housing and Dean of Student
Affairs, Lester Hale.
Interhall President Sue
Johnson said the bills chances
are not good, there have been
too many violations of the
Shepherd Not
Quitting
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd denied recent
rumors that he planned to resign
from office to ; work in
Tallahassee.
Shepherd said Tuesday that
he had been offered a job with
the state legislature but had
declined the offer.
I dont feel that I could leave,
now with the way things stand,
he said, referring to Student
Body Vice President Charles
Harris resignation during the
summer.
The position of vi£& president
is now being filled by former
Administrative Assistant Walter
Morgan.

M-M-*__---a-BSSSSS2SSS3SSSSSSMBt
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, luly and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or S3.SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable. ;
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion*' -* r. :, > t -. .

present policy, which is fairly
liberal.
- Past Interhall Council
President Mike McNemey
explained that the 6
administration would be wary of
the proposition.
Thy swallowed so much last
year, with the Playboy thing and
all. There have been complaints
from mothers. I doubt that it
will go through.
McNemey was referring to an
article in the September issue of
Playboy Magazine that rated UF
number one in the country for
promiscuity, i
Author of the bill, Mickey
Thursam, past president of
Murphree Area, disagreed with
the concept that the move will
encourage promiscuity.
Nothing more will happen on
24-hour open house than already
happens on the present system.
This sort of thing has been tried
successfully on other campuses.
Some are trying co-ed dorms.
Dr. William Kline, mental
health consultant and housing
committee member, explained
that UF dorms are probably not
suitable for round-the-clock
open house.
Right now it doesnt look
like the bill will make it,
Thursam said.
If it doesnt I guess well just
have to try again.
MiNi-posm
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BAR HERSHEY*
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plans last December brought Florida the largest
federal award of any kind to any university in
the state system. However, a cloud has been
hanging over the plans for some months because
the Florida Legislature in its 1969 session could
not produce the required matching funds.
OConnell said the Health Centers expansion
program is directed at easing the serious health
manpower deficit which exists in all health
professions in the state.
Delays already have pushed the year of
opening for the College of Dentistry to 1972.
Enrollment in all colleges of the Health Center is
severely limited, OConnell said, in spite of the
interest of qualified young people in the health
professions.
The College of Medicine, for example, can
admit only 64 new students annually because of
limited facilities; the College of Nursing only 70.
The College of Health Related Professions has

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SPECIAL OFFER SAVE 30< A WEEK
STUDENTS
FULL TERM SUBSCRIPTION TO
THE TAMPA
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DAILY A SUNDAY
JLgw3ss.k
DIRECT
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qualified applicants for twice the number it can
enroll and must limit occupational therapy to 40
new students, medical technology to 25 and
physical therapy to 26.
The program calls for a five-level basic sciences
building as an extension on the north side of the
present structure which was built in 1956. It
would include teaching laboratories for medical
and dental students, classrooms, a central
learning resources center, an expanded library
and animal research quarters. A southwest
extension would house dentistry facilities, an
out-patient unit and graduate programs for the
dental faculty.
Space for the College of Health Related
Professions and the College of Nursing, enlarged
outpatient facilities and increased bed capacity in
the Shands Teaching Hospital to meet the needed
activities resulting from increased enrollments are
also features of the long range program.

Take Your
Choice?
A contrast in the have and the
have nots.
Above, UF President Stephen
C. O'Connell applies his new
Official Business decal number
one, for the privilege of parking
anywhere on campus
... especially his reserved spot
near Tigert Hall.
For the less affluent, UF's
new buses are pictured on their
periodic runs from Hume lot to
the central campus.
Which all goes to show that
being president of UF has at
least one fringe benefit attached
to it.



Hl
Wk
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_ BARTLEY
]

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Staff Writer
A revision to tjie 2-year-old student Code of
Conduct, in the works for more than three months,
should be ironed out during the annual Presidents
Retreat, planned for Sept. 26. and 27, an
administration official said Tuesday.
Dean of Student Affairs James T. Hennessey said
the revision, which has been under study by the
Student Affairs Committee and the Committee on
Student Conduct will be discussed by a number of
student leaders and administration members at the
retreat.
Dr. Earnest R. Bartley, chairman of the Student
Affairs Committee, sent the committees draft to
members in early August, urging them to make any
suggestions for changes by Aug. 22 so the
completed code could go on the September agenda
of the University Senate.
The present code had come under criticism
recently. Some said it did not provide strict enough
penalties against students participating in campus
disruptions.
Marc H. Click, summer majority floor leader of
the Student Senate, and a member of the
committee, said at that time he was disappointed
with Bartleys apparent attempt to ramrod the
code through.
I think the code needs a lot more work than
three days at the retreat, Click said.
The tone of the code is not satisfactory.
(Student Body President Charles) Shepherd and I
have discussed the matter, and we find we
essentially agree there are a number of points which
need clarification.
I find the existing code, with its few loopholes,
more acceptable than the product Ive seen, he
said.

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v. \
Finally Should Be Ironed Out

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: The code is. not a bad one, but the structure is :
: wrong. $
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: Charles Shepherd £
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Click said he would work with the committee to
write an equitable code of conduct.
The proposed Code seems to be anti-student.
Vice President for Student Affairs Lester L. Hale
intervened, and guaranteed Click the code would
not be placed on the agenda.
Hennessey said several members of the
committee, including Glick and Shepherd had
forwarded suggested changes in the planned code to
the committee.
The code is not a bad one, Shepherd said, but
the structure is wrong.
Shepherd, who worked two years ago on the code
which is now used, said he was not afraid the Senate
would take action on a code which did not have the
approval of the student body.
Included in the rough draft of the revision was a
regulation against disrupting the orderly operation
of the university, and a number of city, county,
state and federal violations including indecent
conduct, and illegal manufacture, sale, providing
to another, possession or use of narcotics,
marijuana, hypnotics, sedatives, tranquilizers,
stimulants, hallucinogens and similar known
harmful or habit-forming drugs and/or chemicals.
Provisions from the two-year-old code which
were included in the planned revision included
provisions against:
Cheating or aiding and abetting cheating;
Stealing or attempting to steal;
'Negotiating a worthless check in Alachua
County;
Furnishing false information to University

Ssrtff- taster s',m- VfMiteS^Sfbl

officials with intent to deceive; J
Forgery, alteration or misuse ofVUniversity
documents; (
Destruction, damage or misuse of public
property;
Participation in or attendance at a raid on
University living units;
i Failure to comply with an official wider of a
University official;
Repeated violations of housing regulations.
To the section on procedural due process, the
committee added a provision for holding pr~*~pt
students hearings.
ihe revirion added a statement which divorced
civil and University action, saying action or
inaction by the civil authorities shall not operate as
a bar to an action against the student by the
University.
For example, Hennessey said a student arrested
for possession of marijuana would be given a hearing
before the Committee on Student Conduct. The
student could be suspended from school depending
on the committees action. If the committee
decided not to suspend the student, and he is found
guilty by civil authorities, the decision of the
committee would be set aside, and the student
would be suspended.
He may have been released on a technicality,
Hennessey said.
Another addition would allow a student to
postpone a hearing due to pending criminal or civil
charges which he felt could be prejudiced by the
hearings findings.
The president would be allowed to immediately
expel or suspend a student if he felt a formal
hearing would find him guilty of an offense which
would call for the action, according to a provision
of the new code.

Page 3

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I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 18, 1969

Page 4

Freshman Lines
Funny Spectacle

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
Freshmen are the funniest
things around to watch
murmured the junior to his
companion.
He rolled his eyes around,
donned the air of one trying to
look /around very
inconspicuously, proclaiming he
was imitating the freshmen he
had observed.
The queue of students, some
shifting weight from leg to leg,
some rubbing aching feet, others
just looking miserable; all
wishing they were anywhere but
in the line that extended from
the depository to the bounds of
the bookstore.
Freshmen were a little more
obvious to spot. They were the
ones who smiled a little too
brightly, looked around with
ardent hope of seeing a friend
from home, or were muttering
with indignant disgust that
administrative inefficiency was
causing them to wait so long in
the hot sun.
Under-upperclassmen bore the
tolerant look of Ive been this
route before and spent most of
their time greeting old friends.
People were trying to pay
then* registration fees, find out
information about where to pick
up such and such forms, and
others were impatiently wishing
somebody would just let them
cash a desperately needed check.
A campus cop was standing
like a personified cigar-store
Indian, blocking the door,
admitting only a select few.
Trying to convince him you
were one of the select was an
exhausting job in itself. His
stone face met each story with
grim unconcern.
One of the bank personnel
pushed his way through the
crowds, stamping registration
cards so some of the lines would
be shortened.
lf everybody would pay his
fees Hnes like this, one senior who
had patiently been waiting for
half an hour to cash a check
said.
At that moment an overeager
girl walked up and asked why he
was standing in line (he was
beginning to wonder himself)
Regents
Grant Tenure
The Board of Regents, which
in July denied requests for
tenure by 279 state university
professors reversed its decision
Sept. 5, and granted its okay for
their continued employment.
In their July meeting,
members of the Board objected
to the usual practice of the
Board of what they called
rubber stamping tenure
request which had been
approved by State University
Chancellor Robert Mautz.
The 279 instructors, including
119 from th UF, had all been
okayed by Mautz for the job
guarantees. Regent Clarence
Menser, Vero Beach, disagreed
with the Boards blanket action,
calling it a steamroller
maneuver.
Tenure is simply a guarantee
of a job, which is usually granted
after a specified time of
Caching.
* I *' ' v ¥ a
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and he toldher where to pay her
fees. He groaned that he was
cashing a check.
Oh, is this the
depository? she Jtrightly
inquired.
Conversation in the sweating
mass of people ranged from
How was your summer? to
Have you seen so and so yet?
Some people were complaining
because they had been asked
repeatedly why they were
standing in line, and was this the
line where you pay fees?
None of the lines are
marked. If there is any sort of
line more people keep adding to
it, but no one is really sure
where the line .will end up,
remarked a tired sophomore
who had stood for 45 minutes in
a line only to find it was the
wrong one.
Further on down the line one
boy was overheard saying he was
there to meet people.
I got lonely. Right now there
are more people here than
anywhere else on campus, he
chuckled. \

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KEEP IN
step with
GATOR ads

SWING
WITH
CHUCK CONLON
and the
"10:30
TONIGHT
Vv (/ 1 N. W. 10th AVE.

AVE.



Defense Chief To Request Lower Draft Calls

WASHINGTON (UPI) U.S. troop withdrawals
from Vietnam, which now will include the entire
3rd Marine Division at the Demilitarized Zone, will
result in lower draft calls in the months ahead,
Defense Secretary Melvin R. Laird said Wednesday.
He told a news conference he would advise the
Selective Service Friday of changes in draft calls as a
result of President Nixons decision to pull an
additional 35,000 troops from Vietnam. T
Laird gave no figures on draft reductions. The
present draft, call is for 29,000 men each in
September October. The calls so far this year
have fluctuared between a high of 33,700 in

No Plans For Draft Suspension
Coming From White House Now

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon is not now
considering a suspension of the
draft, even for a period as brief
as a month, according to the
White House.
But Press Secretary Ronald
Ziegler said Tuesday such a plan
might have figured in earlier
discussions within the
administration on selective
service reform.
He did not indicate, however,
whether it might again come
under consideration at a future
date. He said the President is
ii/i+Vi nn imminent Hoeicinn
* TllUi 11V UIUIUIIVIIV VWVIWAVAa
in the matter.
Ziegler said there is a
continuing review in the White
House regarding the whole area
of the draft with the possibility
of executive action.
He added that there has been
no firm decision on that.
UPI reported in a detailed

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REASON BEING VIETNAM WITHDRAWALS

story Sept. 3 that Nixon was
considering an executive order
to establish a random selection
draft system in lieu of
congressional action on draft
reform.
The story, which said Nixons
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February to a low of 22,300 in July.
The administrations policy of getting South
Vietnam to assume a greater share of the war effort,
Laird said, will have a very significant effect upon
programmed draft calls for the months immediately
ahead. He left no doubt he meant lower draft calls.
Laird disclosed that the 3rd Marine Division, sent
to Vietnam in 1965 during the Johnson
administrations big troop buildup there, would be
among the 35,000 involved in the latest withdrawal.
The division is assigned to the northernmost
provinces in South Vietnam, with responsibility for

plan would reverse the order of
call to draft 19 year olds first,
followed by two days the
Presidents announcement to the
governors* conference that he
would soon issue directives on
the draft.
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Thursday, September 18, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

SIL VERMANS DOWNTOWN =====
VARSITY
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I SILVERMANS have gone 3
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§ S
i SPORT LOOKS FOR 03
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Come in and Browse in our
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guarding the DMZ, and successfully defended Khe
Sanh during the 70-day Communist siege early last
year.
Laird said the identity of other elements to be
withdrawn would be announced soon by Gen/
Creighton Abrams, U.S. commander in Vietnam
Military authorities will meet at Honolulu Sept. 25
to plan details of the shift.
The latest reduction in authorized troop strength
in Vietnam as opposed to the actual reduction of
35,000 men totals 40,500 men, the figure used by
South Vietnamese Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky
before Nixons announcement.

Page 5



Page 6

i, TIM RortAAMcr, Ttwraday, tipMMfcf 18. 1888

Fraternity
Sponsors
Exchange
Students will be able to sell
used books through the Student
Book Exchange sponsored by
the national service fraternity
Alpha Phi Omega. Last year the
book exchange was operated by
Student Government.
The exchange, located on the
Reitz Union patio, is open from
2 until 7 pm. Sunday through
Friday and dosed on Saturday.
The exchange is collecting
books from students until Sept.
23 and selling books through
S*pt. 26. Unsold books may be
claimed between Sept. 28 and
Oct 3.
The book exchange is in need
of volunteer help. Anyone
wishing to help should contact
Lou Tally through Student
Government

Student Card Section May
Be Tradition Os The Past

£>
The Student Card
Section--long-time UF
tradition-may have disappeared
from the football scene and the
people resnanshble for revivine
it don't seem top eager to do so.
In past years, the card section
has played a part in the
festivities of the football season,
yet in rousing the
spirit of Gator fans has been
debatable.
During the first
administration of Student Body
Prsideht Charles Shepherd, a
referendum to determine
whether or not to continue the
tradition was held. Student
approval resulted in its
continuation.
However, at die last meeting
of the student senate held in
August, die senate neglected to
seating for the card
NCtio# due to an oversight.
According to Lee Greene,
secretary of athletics and acting
chairman of the group seating
committee. As of now there is
no card section for this year
Tickets
Available For
All Students
Students whose athletic
identification cards are being
held at the frub for scholarship
processing can still get tickets
for Saturday's HoustonGator
football game.
Assistant Vice President for
Student Affairs James
Hennessey said a list of all
students registered for UF's fall
term has been sent to the ticket
windows at the stadium.
Upon presentation of a
driver's license or other proper
identification at the ticket
window these students can get
game tickets.
Mr. Ray's
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Wa Specialize in Long hair.
Appointments Available.
Four Barbers to serve you.
1125 W. UNIV.AVE. 372 3670

THE DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST
Tiny Tim To Marry Teenage Love

TRENTON, N. J. (UH) Singer Tiny Tim said Wednesday he
found teen-aged love at John Wanamakers department store in
Philadelphia and he is going to be married.
The singer with shoulder-length hair, performing at the Trenton
State Fair, said hiS;lridM*%fj i| 17-year-old Viki Budinger, a recent
high school graduate from nearby Haddonfield.
liny Tim, whose vocal antics range from trembling soprano to
Tolling baritone, said he met Miss Budinger while signing autographs at
the store.

since the senate has not voted
for it''
The SG constitution states the
card section is composed of
residents of Fla vet HI, Diamond,
Cony Village, Schucht Village,
medical students and members
of the John Marshall Rgr
Association. t
Critics of the card section
argue against preferential seating
of a limited number of students
on the fifty yard line with
preference being given to
medical law and married
students.

-
1969 W.H. GRACE 6 CO.
l%mk johnmeyer
speaks your bnguage
W / KSiM The importance of
W k \ 0 m looking absolutely
\ | smashing should never
j \ n -Qv\ be underestimated.
W \ \\\ But it's no problem
f \ Vv when your wearing
\ the longest coat.
W \\V Because John Meyer
\CA ft o went to Qreat lengths
mCf \ W to make this Melton
\ \\ stunner the coat of
'(A 'wy the year. S9O.
\ v\ And underneath, the
H \ Y\\ maxi turtleneck of
1 w. Merino
' ; : L-
..-, > ~. ,*. V

Senators Marc H. Glick and
Archie Mondonoldo plan to
sponsor a revision of the section
at the upcoming meeting of the
student senate Tuesday night.
Majority leader Glick
commented,President Shepherd
and I are for people being
treated equally and the card
section does not provide equal
treatment for all students.
* Reluctance of members of the
student seating committee
indicates dissatisfaction with the
card section in its present form.

I reached my hand out for a piece of paper, and instead shs pat
her hand in mine. One touch and I knew it was true love, he said.
Tiny Tim, who refused to divulge his exact age but is in hfc
mid-40's, said he did not think the difference in years mattered
because I'm 16 years old at heart.
Mrs. Allan Budinger, mother of the bride-to-be, said she and her
husband, an artist who also sells art supplies, were elated over the
planned marriage. Mrs. Budinger said no date has been set.

* i j y*. if- 1 - f' * y-
s*£ y&ho| Jf W U 0
without ueallv trying

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Nobody will know whos making
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wearing this! And to show your
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orange and blue, the University of
Floridas official colors. Tip your
hat to a really great team buy
yours before the next game in
Maas Millinery Salon.
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'.l^gfo
RAT CAPS THEN
'44 graduate hopefuls buying "F" books
Beanie Tradition
Revived At UF
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
. 1 ... \ r ,
Those redcaps you see running around campus arent
collegiate-looking bellhops beanies are back.
For the first time in nine years UF freshman are wearing that
ageless symbol which signifies a college rookie.
For openers and to encourage the rebirth of tradition at UF
Student Government people, Alligator staffers and even UF President
Stephen C. OConnell aie donning the Gator-colored beanies.
The beanie tradition died in 1960, but OConnell asked Student
Body President Charles Shepherd if Student Government couldnt
bring them back. v
Shepherd agreed if OConnell would wear his beanie.
OConnell is not only wearing his, inscribed OConnell 3B, but
donating the little orange and blue caps to officials like Florida Gov.
Claude Kirk, Jr.
Shepherd gave a lack of identity on this campus, as the reason
for the revival of the beanie. OConnell has worked to create an
atmosphere of friendliness at the UF since his inauguration, recently
initiating the Friendship Walk on the Plaza of the Americas.
The beanies are available at the Hub for sl. The sale is sponsored
by the Gator Loan Fund and 25 cents from each cap sold will go to
the fund. Every freshman is expected to wear his beanie until the end
of the fall quarter or until UF wins the University of Georgia football
game whichever comes first.
Originally called rat caps, the beanies were inscribed with an F
and the year of graduation. Each freshman was given a rat cap and an
F bode, a pocket-sized booklet full of information on the UFs
organizations, traditions and songs.
Freshmen were expected to know the alma mater and wear the rat
caps. An upper classman could stop a freshman at any time and have
him sing the alma mater. If the freshman didnt know the alma mater
or was caught without his cap, a rat court was held right on the
spot.
The verdict was always guilty and the poor freshman was either
humiliated or beaten up.
The traditions that went along with the rat cap havent been
revived, including the name theyre now Gator beanies.
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Lerner Shops where
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Trend-setters. Classics. Choose dresses
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Td'wvtay, Bptnbf IS, IMS, TJw Ftorkft* AJ*mOF r

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday. September 18. 1969

EDITORIALS
A Border Case
' r -
The already often-cussed, much-resisted parking and
transportation plan still a gigantic question mark~=Hiar
clicked into gear to the jingle of the university communitys
coins.
Despite its apparent shortcomings, some of which we
deem both avoidable and inexcusable, such a comprehensive
traffic plan is necessary and long overdue.
The tremendous growth experienced by this institution in
the past decade has been felt perhaps to a greater degree in
the area of parking and transportation than in any other
facet of our campus. Vehicles and pedestrians have
increased by the thousands, placing a heavy burden on our
limited parking and driving facilities.
Comprehensive planning was urgently needed if the UF
campus was to avoid being submerged in a quagmire of
overheated engines and boiling tempers. Thus the parking
and transportation plan was developed.
The new system is by no means flawless, as its originators
are ,the first to admit. It can, should and must be improved
to meet the needs of an ever-changing community.
Bus routes may need to be changed or extended to better
accomodate the flow of students; new regulations may have
to be enacted to overcome unforeseen problems; and other
rules may be eliminated as they become obsolete. Lee
Burrows, coordinator for traffic and parking, has vowed to
maintain such flexibility. n
A good beginning would be clarification of the vague and
repetitious regulations booklet recently printed.
A first step toward this goal will be taken tomorrow
when the Alligator begins publishing a column answering
questions from students, faculty and administrators about
the new system.
Burrows has said he will welcome suggestions for
improvements in the system and, hopefully, some of its
inequities will be weeded out in the next few weeks.
We feel that a problem area needing immediate attention
is the plight of border zone residents.
The off-campus border zone is that between the limits of
the campus and a boundary formed by the tracks of the
Seaboard Coast Line Railroad on the east, the tracks of the
Seaboard Coast Line Railroad on the south, N. W. 7th
Avenue on the north, and 23rd street on the west.
Students living in this area, though required to pay the
$lO registration fee, may not drive or park anywhere on
campus during the 7:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. restricfed period.
This is nothing new. The border zone and the same
requirements, (minus the $ 10 fee) have existed for years.
But now border zone residents have to pay $lO and get
nothing in return.
.
They can, of course, not register their vehicles and save
the fee. But this would mean they would be barred from
parking on campus at any time of the day or night,
according to the new regulations.
We feel there are only two equitable solutions:
i Either border zone residents are allowed to use the
facilities available to commuters, or
They should be exempted from the $lO fee and given a
refund immediately.
We would then be a step down the road.
Helping Beanie
The orange and blue beanie is back.
Its a small intrusion in the world of the computer and a
students nine digit identification. It is the mark of the UF
freshman.
Its easy to get lost on Floridas 2,000-plus acres. And its
even easier for a freshman.
A friendly greeting or a needed word of advice can do a
lot to bridge the gap from an IBM card to people-to-people
relations.
The freshman beanie should be the cue for all
upperclassmen to make UF a better place to spend that first
year away from home.

The Florida Alligator
< The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility
\SW3gffl Raul Ramirez Dave Doucette
Editor-In-Chief Executive Editor
Caro Sanger Vicki Van Eepoel
m M Mm* Mana9in9 Ed or 1
-- fJJFVwf ISnlfi v t Ku
TEt- *BBA
Bob
Meteors? No, We Just Kept Giving The Military Everything They Wanted
Deadline
.. .a , :
Looking Around

In a story denying rumors
that he will resign to accept
another job, Student Body
President Charles Shepherd says
he is staying here because the
current vice president isnt ready
for the number one position.
Shepherd said he had been
offered a job, but that since Walt
Morgan, the new vice president
replacing Charles Harris who
resigned to attend Harvard
University, does not have the
experience, he will stay.
It appears that Shepherd is
more interested in - leaving
Student Government in the
hands of someone in particular,
rather than finishing out his
term in office because he made a
commitment to the students
when he was elected last spring.
Is Shepherd more interested
in building the right bridges
behind him in his political
advancement, or serving the
students who elected him?
* *
MANY PEOPLE are
concerned about Friendship
Walk on the Plaza of the
Americas not being finished yet,
and one high-ranking
administrator is really worried.
He was overheard telling a
Reitz Union official that the
walk has to be completed
immediately because if any
trouble erupted on the Plaza,
people would start throwing die
bricks.
Thats not quite the right
attitude to take toward the
walk, which is being constructed
in an attempt to increase
friendliness on die campus.
But he wont have to worry

much longer, the walk will be
finished soon.
* *
FRESHMAN BEANIES are
being accepted quite readily by
many new students, but some
Student Government officials
are using them for reasons other
than reviving the old tradition.
Summer camp for the military
has taken its toll in haircuts, and
the short-haired politicos seem
to be using the beanies to
protect their vanity, in addition
to promoting the ratcaps.
* *
PEOPLE-WATCHING is a
popular pastime of many people,
and a night at the Gainesville'
Dragway is a people-watchers
paradise.
The strip puts on a fantastic
show on and off the trade.
Fifteen national records were
set at the strip last Saturday
night, and the kinds of people
there were as varied as the cars.
The drag race fan is a distinct
type of person in the first place,
but the Gainesville Dragways
location in north central Florida
brings all sorts of people out of
the backwoods.
The more prevalent type of
raee fan is the pseudo pseudoparticipant.
participant. pseudoparticipant. He dresses in blue
jeans, a T-shirt from an
automotive products company,
boots and a nylon windbreaker
with more car-related patches on
it than are in a decal catalogue.
If he is really camp, he may have
found a grease slick to dirty his
fingernails and may even carry a
monkey wrench in his hip
pocket.
Another type of fan is similar,
but carries the costume bit to
further extremes by trading the
T-shirt for a gas station work

By Dave Doucette-

shirt with his name roughly sewn
above the pocket.
Then theres the high school
or college student whose total
knowledge of the sport consists
of one crash course out of an
automotive magazine. He is
usually accompanied by several
friends of the same type who
spend the whole night,
comparing the local racers to
nationally ranked drivers and
talking about times and speeds
as if they were National Hot
Rod Association officials.
This type is often
accompanied by a giri who
knows even less about the sport,
but wants to learn, so her date
spends the whole time
educating her from his vast
repository of drag racing
knowledge.
However, the most prominent
type of fan is the true drag
racing enthusiast. He cant be
identified by his clothing or
speech. Hes the one intently
watching this fascinating sport
without trying to impress
anyone with his knowledge or
memory for remembering names
and times. He just wants to see
the race of men and machines
against each other, and the
timeclock.
LETTERS POLICY
Letters must:
t Be typed, signed,
double-spaced and not exceed
300 words.
f Not be signed with a
pseudonym. 6
Have addresses and
telephone numbers of writers.
Names will be withheld only if
writer shows just cause. The
editor reserves the right to edit all
letters for space.



£trowborry Flold
!.* I
t.. $
ft %
! Union Rotation
i i
By Carol Sanger^
Parking on the UF campus is a real joke. But nobodys laughing this
year.
Even the Reitz Union has joined inr the tightening-of-the -screws
game.
Besides the initial $lO to tread on UFs golden roads, there is now a
little man in a little house passing out little tickets to people in one,
two, three and four wheel vehicles who wish to place said vehicles in
the union parking lot.
The object of the game is to keep students, faculty, and other
extraneous university inhabitants out of The Pit.
If you pass go and stay in the parking block for more than one hour
you pay the community chest 25 cents.
If you are presumptuous enough to use the union facilities for more
than two hours, you pay the community chest 50 cents.
The third hour, during which time the officials sitting on
Boardwalk have spotted your intrusion, will cost you another 50
cents. (This brings the jackpot .up to sl...in real money, not
monopoly money. Remember, THEY make their own rules.)
After the fourth hour its all over. Two dollars.
But you must understand ..if you and I take all the parking places
the people coming to the annual Farm and Stable Association meeting
in their pick-up trucks will not be able to hitch up.
But there is a solution!
Its called Reitz Union Rotation and any number of people can
play. Providing you have a one, two, three, or four wheeled vehicle.
Step 1: At 8 a jn. all cars belonging to people registered or teaching
here at the university file neatly into The Pit. No disturbances. If we
do it very quietly maybe no one will notice that we arent driving
tractors or pick-ups.
Step 2: We meet in designated groups. Those parked on the far west
of the lot will quietly gather in a huddle in the southwest comer and
choose a leader. This group will be known as the Blue Jays.
Those parked m me iar east win uo me same m me southeast
comer of the lot and they shall be called Eagles.
Those parking in the middle of the lot or driving motor scooters
will meet on the far north of the lot, also choosing a leader. This
group will be known as the Warrior Doves.
" Step 3: The leader will appoint nine people from his group who
will be in charge of marshalling forces each hour. They will adopt a
bird-call fitting their group name.
For example, a Warrior Dove will coo softly and then attck from
the lots open flank. The Eagle will swoon quietly from above and
then dive suddenly in an air attack. The Blue Jays will caw three
times in rapid succession and then zoom in from the right while all
eyes have been averted by the Warrior Doves.
Step 4: Every hour all Eagles, Blue Jays and Warrior Doves will
swoop, zoom and coo into the Union parking lot and file out in a neat
procession. All first hour free tickets will be returned to the little
man in the little house.
Step 5: One, two, three and four wheeled vehicles will make a large
U-tum in Radio Road and begin filing bade into The Pit. All drivers
of said vehicles participating in the Reitz Union Rotation will make
sure to pick up a little ticket from the little man in the little house
when returning to the parking lot.
This entitles you to another hours free parking.
After the first week, if the little man is still there, ask him for the
S2OO for passing go.
By that time he may give it to you. Then you can buy a helicopter
and forget UFs game of traffic monopoly.

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Gun Laws! Who NeedsEm?

FORUM:
CjAAiiu ml VtMit /)
$lO DecalBut No Parking m

Mr. Editor:
It is unfortunate that I am not a maid working
for a private individual on campus because if I was, I
would only have to pay a $5 registration fee to
receive a Perimeter Parking Decal. As it is, I am just
a student who happens to live in the border zone
and I had to pay a $lO registration fee, and I can
neither drive nor park on campus during the
restricted hours of 7:30 aan. to 3:30 pan., Monday
through Friday.
When I purchased my decal last Thursday, I asked
why I have to pay $lO for a decal that only allows
me to drive my car on campus or park on campus
after 3:30 during the week. They answered with just
a shrug of the shoulders.
A friend of mine who lives in the commuter zone
about a block away from me paid $lO for his decal
but he can drive on campus anytime during the day
in the unrestricted areas and park his car in any of
the commuter parking lots or commuter areas on

Its Our Right To Own Guns

MR. EDITOR:
As I predicted last year, gun
confiscation would take place
some time in the near future,
only it came sooner than I
figured. The National
Commission on the Cause and
Prevention of Violence is headed
by a committee of people who
seem to think that the only
reason why we have crime in the
country is because of guns, of
course thats purely idiotic.
The committee declared that
the individual who keeps a
handgun in his home for
self-defense purposes, may
actually be placing himself in
greater danger. Have you readers
ever heard of a more childish
statement? The people on the
Eisenhower commission are
supposed to have a certain
amount of intelligence, but Im

Thursday, Saptambar 18, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

beginning to wonder about that.
They blame the urban unrest
in the 1960s for the sudden
increase of gun ownership. They
seem to overlook the fact that
the government itself caused this
situation by insisting and
pushing for gun control. The
continual hammering for gun
control has caused a panic for
the average American because he
will not be able to purchase a
fire arm any more. (THAT DAY
WILL COME.)
The Eisenhower commission
right now is trying to push a bill
through to allow SSOO million
dollars to purchase handguns
throughout the country. They
have to start somewhere to
confiscate our guns, and in my
opinion they are starting with
the handguns. With this bill in
effect, ANYONE who does not
turn in their handguns with the
provisions of the bill, will be
prosecuted for criminal
violations. THIS BILL IN
ITSELF IS A DIRECT
CONFISCATION OF ONES
CONSTITUTIONAL RIGHTS.
IT DOES NOT JUST
ELIMINATE GUNS, IT
ELIMINATES YOUR RIGHTS
AS A FREE AMERICAN.
If you people are willing to
give up your rights so easily, so
be it, but I am not. I do not wish
to succumb to the Washington
treachery. Guns are not the most
terrible thing that has ever
happened to this country. Knife
killings are quite common, but
this type .of slaying is not built
up like shooting, in fact knife
slayings are hardly ever
mentioned. Mr. Speck murdered
EIGHT nurses, WITH A KNIFE.
There were five killings in
California, WITH A KNIFE.
These terrible brutal killings did
not require hours upon hours of

campus. These areas are served by the new bus
service.
In other words, a commuter student drives on the
campus, parks his car in a commuter parking lot,
walks a few feet, and a bus picks him up and takes
him to his classes.
I paid $lO for a border zone decal but I am going
to have to hunt for a rare parking space somewhere
off campus and then hike to catch a bus. The
nearest bus service for someone who has to park his
car off campus is 10 minutes away. This leaves us 5
minutes to catch a bus and get to our next class.
I think it is totally unfair that I have to pay the
same amount and yet cant get one half the service.
I request that the Parking and Transportation
Committee review the rules and regulations and
immediately allow those of us who live in the
border zone to utilize the commuter parking areas
so dial we j also, can use this bus sc vice that we so
dearly paid for.

television time, nothing like the
unscrupulous gun control
addicts dedicate to gun killings.
Even SENATOR KENNEDY
HAS PROVEN ONCE AGAIN
THAT IT DOES NOT TAKE A
GUN TO PUT SOMEONE TO
DEATH. He happens to be one
of the biggest GUN CONTROL
PUSHERS we have. DODD,
BROOKS, TYDiNGS, all these
people are after our rights to
own weapons. Some of these
people are more dangerous than
any gun I have ever seen. All of
these people are after our rights
to own weapons. I have yet to
have a full understanding as to
why. In my opinion, I am quite
sure that their own backgrounds
could stand a great deal of
investigation, as has been proven
many times in the past, we dont
have the most honest politicians
in the world.
Its a horrifying feeling to
know that only a few cheap
swindling politicians are running
the whole country. The
MAJORITY of the people no
longer has any say in our
governmental matters. We are
victims of underhanded political
maneuvering, bill passing and
vote swapping politicians
throughout the country, not just
in Washington. FOOL
YOURSELF NOT, as you read
this article, there are many so
called reliable representatives
who are conspiring to relieve
you or your weapons.
I can not help feeling that
there is more of a reason for gun
control than to curtail crime.
That reason is to leave this
country completely helpless.
THERE IS NO OTHER
EXPLANATION FOR GUN
CONTROL.
HARRY BECKWITH
GUN DEALER

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida AMgotor, Ttnmdoy, Sqpwibw It. 1969

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FOLLOW THE LEAbER
Snoopy leads the way to church

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FUN AND FELLOWSHIP
... food and candlelight and singing at University Methodist Church

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*
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EKS 75005
No Jl LP IN THE COUNTRY
LOWEST PRICE IN TOWN
5.98 FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
GAINESVILLES LARGEST SELECTION OF RECORDS & 8T TAPES
Recokdsvillk
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING MALL

Religion Still
Rates At UF
UP may be number one in
Playboys poll, but the students
havent forgotten religion
completely. Sunday night
following the orientation program
at the stadium, the freshmen
trouped off to receptions at the
religious centers along University
Avenue. Entertainment,
sing-alongs and lots of goodies
were featured at the centers, along
with an unexpected treat
candlelight. A power failure left
the students in the dark for a
while. The photos are by Doug
Case.

-^
* <5
Gresham 16th Drug Inc.
Registered Pharmacist On Duty
Victor B. Shipley
Buddy Patton
, f
XEROX COPIES

Greeting Cards
e School Supplies
t,
Cosmetics
e Prescr.^ons
OPEN WEEK DAYS J
8:30-10:00 PM
SUNDAYS drug stores \
1:0010:00PM T 1605 sw 13th street
f % ... > ./ V
* **** *.** ^

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... and so did the camera shooting University Methodist
DANSKIN
LEOTARDS
AND
TIGHTS
\ b
AVAILABLE AT
LICHTERS
IN THE GAINESVILE MALL



Speaker Named To Dirksen's Seat

SPRINGFIELD, 111. (UPI)
Illinois House Speaker Ralph T.
Smith, a veteran legislator and
middle-of-the-road Republican,
was named Wednesday to the
UJS. Senate seat left vacant by
the death of Everett M. Dirksen.
Smith, who promptly resigned
from his legislative post, will be
sworn in as senator in
Washington Thursday in time to

nt Resolution Will Go
4 t t
Before Senate Next Week

By CLINT DUKE
Alligator Staff Writer
A resolution calling for the abolishment of UFs mandatory
physical education program and the institution of personal
development courses will go before the University Senate next week.
The resolution, prepared by UFs curriculum committee, calls for
replacing the present program with voluntary courses in physical
education, ROTC, music, drama, or art skills.
Dr. Roy L. Lassiter, chairman of the curriculum committee, said
the resolution would mean credit for the courses with pass-fail options
depending upon previous decisions by the departments under which
the course is listed.
Lassiter said the new program, which would go into effect in fall of
1970. would require student activity during University College years
but would offer alternatives to mandatory physical education courses.
Although he expects debate on the resolution, Lassiter said it has a
reasonable chance to pass. If the senate passes the resolution it will
go to UF President Stephen C. OConnell for approval.
OConnell said he could make no comment on his decision on the
bill until he saw it. Physical education is an important part of
personal development, OConnell said, but if the present program is
not working adequately there should be changes made.
Dean Clifford A. Boyd, College of Physical Education and Health,
said his staff would not be very pleased with the proposal. Boyd is
meeting with his staff this week to get their suggestions. In his opinion
they will ask for a required program with credit.
Boyd said compromise proposals had been made during the summer
which call for a reduction from six to three quarters devoted to
personal development courses.
A third proposal made by Student Senate was presented to the
curriculum committee last quarter. The recommendation was similar
to the UFs committees in all respects.
All three resolutions came after mandatory PE came under fire last
year. Lee Greene, who presented the SS recommendations to Lassiter,
said the previous senate recommendation called for retaining the
mandatory program.
Greene cited the efforts of ex-secretary of Student Activities Bruce
Harlan, articles and editorials in the Alligator, and student opinion as
reasons for reversal of senate opinion.
Greene was optimistic about chances of the resolutions passage,
but said the senate would take further steps if it is defeated.
Knp ip jour strap lor ]
football vith steak
Bourn
Its the BU-Bwricai food!
(If you play, you need steak. If you
watch, you need it even more!)
We thiuk every student should have a steak place.
raINAN/A
SIRLOIN PIT. /
2446 S. W. 13th ST.
mm m mm mm **** ~

NONCONTROVERSIAL RE PUBLIC A

help choose Dirksens successor
as Senate minority chief.
Smith, a 53-year-old attorney
who was in his eighth term as a
state representative but an
unknown in national polities,
was named Illinois junior
senator by Gov. Richard B.
Ogihie, a Republican. He will
serve until at least January,
1971.
He is expected to be the

choice of the state GOP
organization as the Republican
nominee in the November, 1970,
general election to complete the
remaining four years of
Diiksens term.
The Democratic candidate in
the 1970 senatorial election
appears likely to be state
treasurer Adlai E. Stevenson in,
son of the late UJS. ambassador
to the United Nations.

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9HHML HhL-9HHML HMH
ROY LASSITER
... reasonable chance
Lindsey
4 INCHES WIDE
A new extravagance in
width seen on the most
influential men in town.
Not just for the "fad" I
dresser, but equally in
for the traditionalist.
Stripes, clubs, all-over
effects, solid colorsand
like we say, all four
inches wide. 3.00
In the I
Mens Dept
. Gainesville Shopping Center

Thursday

Stevenson, something of a
maverick in Illinois Democratic
Party circles, recently had a
kiss-and-make-up meeting with
Chicago Mayor Richard J. Daley,
kingpin of the powerful
Democratic organization.
Political observers predict
Stevenson will receive Daleys

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Social 'VSek*& /. Price, X
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1 /"// ./ ; " /.. ; ; '
Its the now 100k
your golden day to do your own thing
and with only the flick of a brush!
-r'"*
o Pre-cut tapered back, o Shampoo like your own
ready to wear! hair never needs setting!
o Made of "Perfect Hair" 0 Brush straight or curly,
synthetic looks and into any style desired!
feels IMce human hair! 4
Black, Brown, Aubum
Blondes and Frosteds....
1 IN GAINESVILLE MALL
JUwfiJ)uicl\ Beauty Salons
Telephone 372-8511
Appointments not always necessary l

blessing to seek Dirksens old
seat.
Ogilvie announced Smiths
appointment at a news
conference attended by Smith,
Smith's wife, Marge, and
daughter, Sharon, and Sen.
Charles H. Percy, R-111., now the
states senior senator.

Page 11



Page 12

L Tlw Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 18, 1969

is

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
Amid much controversy this
summer, the Student Senate
gave approval to Student Body
President Charles Shepherds
proposal for a one year trial
membership in the National
Student Association (NSA).
However, the approval was
only the culmination of a plan
conceived by Shepherd during
his first term in office, two years
ago.
I thought a lot about joining
NSA two years ago, Shepherd
said, but it wasnt worth the
political trouble. So I never took
. the matter to the Student
Senate.
Shepherd had been advised by
his political advisors not to
become involved with the
organization, at various times
rumored to be affiliated with
such widely diverse
organizations as the Central
Intelligence Agency (CIA) and
Students for a Democratic
outiciy (oLoj.
The matter came up again
June 25 when Shepherd
announced plans to ask the
senate for authorization to join
the organization.
A special five-man committee
appointed by Shepherd and
headed by Lou Tally, ILW,
immediately fallowed
Shepherds announcement with
a favorable recommendation.
All the evidence, the

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Student Senate Approves
~ -. .. ' ; y~
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Trial NSA Membership

committee reported, which we
have examined.. points to the
advisability of one-year trial
membership in the
NSA... During that time we
urge the student government
administration to participate as
actively as possible in the affairs
of the NSA.
The senate approved
membership in NSA July 1.
NSA has amazing programs
which we would be foolish to
turn down, said former Student
Body Vice President Charles
Harris during debate just prior to
the senate approval.
Almost immediately
opposition to the organization
formed.
Marvin Sylvest, Focus Party
minority floor leader, led the
fight in the senate against joining
NSA.
He said the senate needed
more time to study NSA and
several other senators
complained they hadnt had
time to read the 37-page packet
prepared by Shepherds
committee.
Opposition was not limited to
the senate, however. A petition
to bring the matter to a
campus-wide referendum was
initiated by UF right-winger
Jimmey Bailey.
Baileys stated opposition was
that Shepherd had not allowed
the students to express their
opinion on the matter but had
used a senate, two-thirds of
which were temporary summer

1 REPORT |
V *
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appointees appointed by
Shepherd, to railroad the
matter through.
If the students vote on it,
Bailey said, they will vote it
down.
It is unlikely, however, that
Bailey and other conservative
groups that came to his aid
Young Republicans and Young
Americans for Freedom object
more to the alleged connection
of SDS with NSA.
An Associated Press report
states, Throughout its early
history, the national office of

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SDS spent most of its time
trying to influence NSA.
However, SDS repudiated
NSA when its connection with
the CIA was exposed in 1967.
The mutual dislike of both
left and right for NSA led to a
curious event when a
representative of Young
Republicans came to an SDS
meeting in July and asked for
SDS endorsement of his
anti-NSA program.
Bailey brought his petition to
the senate July 22. The senate
unanimously voted to reject
Baileys proposal and to uphold
its previous approval.
Bailey continued his petition
campaign even after its defeat by
the senate. He also announced
plans to bring a law suit against
student government to restrain it
from joining NSA and said he
had received promise of support
from multi-millionaire and

ultra-conservative H. L. Hunt.
Contacted Tuesday, Bailey
said he plans to continue the
petition campaign in the fall.
We are proposing some
amendments to the (SG)
constitution, he said. Were
writing a brand new
constitution.
Bailey said they had dropped
plans for the law suit since
nothing could have been done
before the NSA convention last
month. He also announced plans
tp form a political party for the
fall SG elections.
Elections for delegates to the
NSA convention were held July
30. Elected were Larry Jordan,
Kathy Spellman, Bill Armstrong,
Henry Solares and George Seide.
Walter Morgan, current student
body vice president was
appointed to go to the
convention in El Paso, Texas, by
Shepherd.

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K- c r ' k
Deans Favorable To Teacher Evaluation

UF (jeans are reacting favorably to a request by Vice President for
Academic Affaire Frederick W. Conner that every instructor
participate in a yearly teacher evaluation by next fall.
Conner assured the deans that the results of the first years
evaluation will be made known only to the teacher. In subsequent
years, though, they will be made available to the department head, the
college dean, Conner, the Personnel Board, and any appropriate
departmental or college evaluation committee for use as one input in
decisions affecting salary, tenure, and promotion.
Although most of the deans have begun discussion of the yearly
evaluation, Pharmacy Dean K.F. Finger is the only one taking definite
steps. He has appointed a committee to develop an evaluation system.
Ive left it up to them as to whether we use the Omicron Delta
Kappa Student Government evaluation, although 30 per cent of our
instructors participated last year, he said.
Ive always been in favor of teacher evaluation, Finger said,

Gasoline Prices
Take A Dive
f r
Gasoline prices in Gainesville are down six cents
per gallon. Service station attendants contacted in
the vicinity of the UF campus agreed upoi that.
According to John Baldwin, the local Sinclair
distributor, the price cuts began about two weeks
ago. Weve had some independents cut prices, he
explained.
What happens is mat when an independent goes
down, the majors try to stay up. said Baldwin.
Sometimes, the majors have to go down with the
rest. Some of ours (Sinclair) are down, he
reported.
Sometimes a little station will hold a weekend
promotion, and that is how it gets started. Its just
like anything else, he continued, y u can t sell
below the market for long.
Baldwin went on to say that in a town the size of
Gainesville there arent many gas wars. Gas ware are
worst in towns where independent service stations
outnumber major dealers.
The Sinclair distributor also said major price cuts
are often accompanied by unscrupulous practices.
Baldwin expected prices to go back up to pre-war
levels in a week or so.'

The American Way...
The Commercial Bank of Gainesville has
carried on in die traditional American
spirit. We have brought you a
FREE CHECKING ACCOUNT
Thats right!
If you maintain a SIOO.OO minimum daily
balance there is NO SERVICE CHARGE..
You may write as many checks as you wish. I
And you will save from S2O S4O a year
1 ill Pv|i|||2>w in service charges.
|i j j 11 fj I- : Be free... have a Commercial Bank Checking Account.
1 I JJLIIP THE COMMERCIAL BANK
OF GAINESVILLE
,717 N.W. 13* S. 378-2344
| ;; THS INTftftAflM( CARD
> Across from Goinosyillo High School a
MEMBER F.D.I.C. ZL
V M 1

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AiJii
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M If J| tHH v
W mm mmm 8 'B 2
f Imm jm iml M bBBI I
mum, m BBr T lw :SjHBE 1
TOM KENNEDY
GAS WAR
... how long will it last ?

because we discuss whether a teacher is good or bad, but have no
criteria to back it up.
Most of the interviewed forsee problems in the mechanics of
the evaluation, but they are nothing insurmountable, and the
benefits will far overcome any problems, Engineering Dean Robert
E. Uhrig said.
Conners August memorandum stressed that colleges can use any
method of evaluation, although the SG system will be available. Most
of the deans said they have not made any definite plans, but will
probably use their own systems derived from the ODK evaluation.
Several colleges had their own methods of teacher evaluation in the
past. The College of Engineering had an informal system and the
College of Education had an evaluation for professors up for tenure.
The purpose of the evaluation, Conner said, is to give teaching
merit a more important and reliable part in judgments affecting the
rewarding of faculty members.
Student evaluation of teachers is an important input to the overall
evaluation, Uhrig said.

Thursday, Saptwwtoar 18, 1909, Tha Florida Abator,

A 1232 W.
ijm4yMk UNIVERSITY AVE.
| | 376-7657
r' J
STUDENT HDQTRS
FOR ART &
1 '' 0
JOURNALISM
SUPPLIES

. -' mi
SlMps-JR
. /.sSsjssAt.y/.. Ml
FREDERICK W. CONNER
... requests evaluation

Page 13



Page 14

1* Tha Flatiife Aftliftor/ TMnKtey, S^ttmfcvl r 16

Committee Eliminates Humanities Progs

By CHUCK KELLER
AlHffator Writer
Departmental objective progress tests will be eliminated in the
spring Humanities Department as a result of a modified curriculum
which will permit faculty members a limited freedom of choice in
reading assignments.
" Hie experimental proposal, formulated by the humanities
curriculum committee, will provide teachers one week in the fall and
winter quarters and three in the spring to assign books of their own
choice in the CHN 251,252 and 253 series.
With three weeks removed from the general humanities program,
there will be insufficient common material for the spring objective
test.
However, this doesnt stop the chance of an individual instructors
midterm or departmental essay according to Dr. Clarence Derrick,
humanities department chairman.
It is a degree of flexibility we need in the course but I dont think

Supreme Court Nominee
Favors Integration Rule

WASHINGTON (UPI)
Judge Clement Haynsworth said
Wednesday he subscribed to the
Gov. Confab
Rejects Bus
Resolution
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. (UPI)
- The Southern Governors
Conference rejected Wednesday
a resolution opposing the busing
of pupils to adrieffe) racial
balance in schools.
Eight governors voted for the
proposal, but with three votes
against and one abstaining, the
measure fell short of the needed
three-fourths majority of those
present.
Gov. Wmthrop Rockefeller of
Arkansas abstained, saying the
resolution as it reached the floor
is quite in contrast with that
we agreed to in an executive
session.
The Deep South votes favored
the resolution, offered by
Alabama Gov. Albert P. Brewer.
Voting for the resolution were
the governors of Alabama,
Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi,
North Carolina, South Carolina,
Tennessee and Virginia. Govs.
Russell W. Peterson of Delaware,
Marvin Mandel of Maryland and
Arch A. Moore Jr. of West
Virginia voted against it.

FIND RERBBlffifff d glance
cla sroom r>rr £* j^*(\
£g;.ft^*-?-'. '^FBlP^mMw^^^^MKSss^V'" / -;- ''''
AT YOUR OFFICIAL CAMPUS BOOK STORE
. . - ... .... - 1 11 1 .1..1.1M-J

1954 Supreme Court decision
outlawing school desegregation.
However, the 5 6-y ear-old
South Carolinian, President
Nixons nominee for a vacancy
on the court, sidestepped, a
question at a Senate hearing on
whether the direction, the
thrust of actions by the court
when Earl Warren was chief
justice were in line with his
views.
Instead, Haynsworth cited his
written opinions as a member
and chief judge of the 4th
Judicial Circuit as clues to his
legal philosophy.
Haynsworth testified for the
second day before the Senate

NOTICE
IMPORT OWNERS
Front-end Alignment,
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By Appointment
372-4373
Al Burrowes
CRANE IMPORTS
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FOR SPRING/QUARTER

we need 35 separate courses, said Derrick.
I think the purpose of the program is to permit more variety in
the personal choice of the teachers, said Dr. Franklin Doty, dean of
University College. It will tend to emphasize a common core for all
teachers to their own experience with readings that interest them
Apparently it will bring a larger measure of teacher independence
or discretion.
Doty also explained that the decision may result in a feedback
from experience to enrich the common core, as in honor classes that
occasionally reveal books that can contribute to the regular class.
But Derrick cautioned that there will be limitations in what
selections will be available.
They will deal with areas which are sometimes called neglected*
such as film, architecture, ballet and music, he said. The limitation
is intended to maintain course balance and prevent overemphasis on'
already covered fields in the course. i

Judiciary Committee, which is
examining his fitness to serve in
the seat vacated by Abe Fortas,
who left under fire for accepting
a fee from jailed financier Louis
Wolfson.
Sen. Philip A. Hart noted that
in 1954 the court enunciated the
doctrine that separate but
equal is not equal under the
constitution. Do you agree?
I certainly agree,
Haynsworth said.
So far in the hearings, Senate
liberals have been seeking
assurances that Haynsworths
private fortune will never impair
his judicial honesty.

4J
Scott Sure Os Victory
As Senate Rep. Leader

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania said
Wednesday he has the strength
to win a first-ballot victory in
Senate Republicans election of
a successor to the late Everett M.
Dirksen as their leader.'
A meeting of the 43 GOP
senators including the newly
designated Illinois state house
speaker, Ralph T. Smith, who
will be sworn in Thursday to
take Dirksens seat will meet a
week from today to select the
minority chief.
Scott is opposed by Sen.

NOW
THE SOUNDS OF
RICHARD PARKER
AT THE
NEW PIANO BAR
9 PM TIL
ALIBI
Lounge
NW 34th ST & UNIV AVE

& i'-
A.
FRANKLIN DOTY
... more variety

Howard H. Baker Jr., Tenn., and
Roman L. Hruska, Neb. Scott
told reporters: I now see the
necessary 22 votes for him on
the first ballot, and more.
A&S To Hold
Council Confab
The first fall meeting of the
College of Arts and Sciences
Student Council will be held
Wednesday, Sept. 24.
All council members should
report to room 103 Anderson
Hall at 4:30 pjn.



Cong Promise Wives Missing Info

PARIS (UPI) North
Vietnamese authorities
Wednesday promised four
American wives whose Air Force
husbands were shot down in
North Vietnam they will
investigate whether the fliers are
still alive.
That pledge was given by
Xuan Oanh, a high official in the
Hafioi delegation to the Paris

Nixon Asks For Raise
In Old Age Benefits

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon, in a surprise
announcement, said Wednesday
he would ask Congress to
increase social security benefits
by 10 per cent effective next
April 1.
Nixon, who had earlier said he
would propose a 7 per cent
increase, made the
announcement with little
elaboration as he signed a law
extending for three years a
federal assistance program for
training elderly persons. He said
he would spell out his program
in a message to Congress next
week.
Nixon said that social security
beneficiaries have been hard hit
by the steady price rises of the
last five years.
Those Who suffered the most
are the older citizens living on
fixed incomes, the President
said.
Nixon made no mention of
how he proposed to finance the
increased benefits, but in the
past they have been paid for by
increased social security taxes
deducted from paychecks.
15 Marines
Die In DMZ
Enemy Attack
SAIGON (UPI) Communist
troops partially overran a U.S.
Marine unit near the
Demilitarized Zone, DMZ, early
Wednesday, killing or wounding
nearly 40 Americans and forcing
the Leathernecks to call in
mortar and artillery fire on their
own positions.
Hundreds of miles to the
south, two high-ranking U.S.
officers were among 12
Americans fulled in the collision
of two helicopters near Saigon?
Seven Vietnamese civilians
were killed and 17 wounded in
the Mekong River Delta when
they were hit by machine gun
bullets and rockets fired from
American helicopters whose
crewmen mistook them for
fleeing Viet Cong.
The Marines reported at least
23 Communist soldiers were
killed in the battle about 17
miles west of the Leatherneck
headquarters town of Dong Ha
and four miles south of the zone
separating North and South
Vietnam.
Marine casualties were 15
dead and 23 wounded. It was
the heaviest fighting near the
DMZ since Aug. 10.
t '' / .. 1 \

peace talks during a 2 I A hour
conference.
The women looked very
serious as they emerged from the
high-walled mission and
informed newsmen later of the
promise.
The four women who flew in
Sunday from Dallas, Tex., on
their diplomatic mission, slipped
unobtrusively into the

Present benefits, which went
into effect in March, 1968, with
a 15 per cent increase, range
from a minimum of $55 a
month to a maximum of
$160.50. The average is $99.69.
The program is financed by
payroll taxes paid by employes
and employers. Each now pays
4.8 per cent on the first $7,800
of a workers salary, or $374.40.
Under present law, the 4.8 per
cent rate will go to 5.2 per cent
on Jan. 1,1971.
The legislation signed by
Nixon Wednesday extends for
three years a federal program
assisting job training for the
elderly, authorizing
appropriations of up to $252
million to carry the act through
June 30, 1972. It also transfers
the so-called.foster grandparents
program from the Office of
Economic Opportunity to the
department of Health, education
and Welfare.
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tree-shaded headquarters of the
North Vietnamese mission to
the Paris peace conference at
3:30 p.m. 10:30 a.m. EDT.
The four women were greeted
at the small door of the
well-guarded mission
headquarters by a Hanoi
diplomat who immediately
ushered them in.
Television cameras whirred as
the four women dismounted
from a rented minibus by the
police barrier in front of the
mission's black iron gate. They

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had been patiently waiting for
the summons in a small case
behind the town hall of Choisy
Le Roi, the woiking class suburb
where the mission is located
south of Paris.
The four women, who flew in
saying they wished to determine
whether we are still wivesor
widows were: Mrs. Bonnie
Singleton, wife of Capt. Jerry
Singleton; Mrs. Joy Jeffrey, wife
of Capt. Robert Jeffrey; Mrs.
Paul Harkness, wife of Capt.
Gregg Harkness; all of Dallas, and

Mrs. Sandy McElhanon, wife of
Maj. Michael McElhanon, of
Fort Worth. Their husbands have
been listed as missing in action
in Vietnam.
Within hours of the
announcement by North
Vietnamese diplomats Tuesday
they would receive the four
women, a group of five Arizona
women, whose husbands are also
missing in Vietnam, announced
in Tucson they would fly to
Paris for a similar meeting.

Page 15



Page 16

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thuraday, Saptambar 18, 1969

. ADVERTISEMENT

I H I *m / I Sw
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Join now for special rates
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Cards can be purchased
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' Three shows Thursday, Friday, and Saturday night
TT Kl September 25,26, and 27: 8:30, 10:30, and 12:30
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'
The :
Florida
Alligator ;
(
mmmaammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm mam

SOPHOMORES
..-.. ' 4
P
HOLD KEY ...

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** $ '- -!iw.inrH iinariiirMiTiTimaiTrtttl
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Carlos Alvarez m-3 Ik i&fl /?-
'> s s£%swm a)|g^.;.ssypfe:;g|§p : ~Mk { ~ ,stsrf£' -v^/r^,. J .t''H
Starting Sophomore I Mk^P^? i; WP%iCJwk |
Flankerback 1H
Hk

SSSS/SS,SSSSSS///SSSSSj'S//SSjSJAj;j;s///SS*SSS/SS/S;sj//S/.s;.-s.rjs/jsr/st;/U/JJSSS*j.,,,

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c
CHUCK PARTUSCH
Sports Editor

&
Thursday, September 18, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

*
* '
...TO YEAR
. >
. +
OF THE
-
FIGHTING
' - 4
&
GATOR
- K \

SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor

Page 17



l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 18. 1969

Page 18

UF Opens Against Offensive UH

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Editor
UF, as everyone knows, opens
the: 1969 football season against
nationally ranked Houston.
Lask year was the Year of
the Gator, remarked Head
Coach Ray Graves at a Rotary
luncheon Tuesday. But the Year
of the Gator never was, as the
Gators finished the season
63l overall and 32l in
The Gators will have :$
: an open practice for the $
: students today at 4 p.m., |
? according to Assistant -i-:
| Director of Athletics £
SNorm Carlson. x
the Southeastern Conference,
which represented a
disappointing sixth place tie
with Ole Miss.
The Year of the Gator was
supposed to be the year the UF
would win the SEC and gain
national honors. But somehow it
never happened.
This is the Year of the
Fighting Gator, said Graves
later at the luncheon. With a
sophomore dominated squad
and the added weakness of jack
of adequate depth at several vital
positions, it will be the Year of
the Fighting Gator, no matter
how many games the UF wins or
loses.
Many pre-season forecasters
predict that the UF will not have
a winning season. Theres just no
Houston Offense
Elmo Wright SE 6-0 195
Craig Robinson LT 6-4 230
Bill Bridges LG 6-2 230
Jim Arthur C 5-11 205
Ronnie Herman RG 6-4 230
David Schneider RT 6-2 220
Earl Thomas TE 6-2 210
Ken Bailey QB 6-1 200
James Strong RB 6-3 222
Ted Heiskell FB 6-0 180
Calvin Achey FLK 6-2 190

People
seldom ask
a VW mechanic
"Whats new?
They figure he works on Volkswagens
only and they never change, so why ask?
That hurts us.
VWs change all the time (always for
the better).
in 19 short years, we've made over
5,000 changes.
Most people just didn't notice them
(which is one reason why VWs never go
out of style).
' But our memorized every
one.
So next time you see a VW mechanic,
ask him "What's new?"
It'll mean a lot.
MILLER BROWN
4222 N. W. 13th St. 376-4551
OPEN TIL 7:00 AUTHORIZED
DEALER
5:00 SAT. 8i CLOSED SUNDAY
I I '

way, they say. So the Gators will
have to fight with everything to
prove them wrong.
But against Houston the UF
may find themselves fighting for
their lives. As Coach Graves said
at the luncheon, Houston has a
very offensive team.
To counter the Cougars
high-gear 562-yard offense the
Gators will rely on battle-tested
veterans to stymie the Houston
attack. If the Gators cant keep
the ball away from the Cougars,
they might very well be fighting
for their lives.
UFs defensive unit is the
Gators strong point, but the
lack of depth may present
problems. All-American
candidate at defensive back,
Steve Tannen, heads a talented
list of returnees that includes
end Jack Youngblood,
linebackers David Ghesquire,
Tom Abdelnour, defensive
captain, and Mike Kelly, and
defensive backs Mark Ely, Jack
Bums and Skip Albury.
But behind them experienced
depth gets scarce.
Another key factor in saving
the Gator skins, as far as the
Gators are concerned is keeping
the ball and moving it against
Houstons big defensive squad,
that includes All-American
defensive end Jerry Drones.
Houstons Head Coach, Bill
Yeoman, feels that added
quickness will help his defense,
which ranked 10th nationally a
Houston Defense
Phillip Jones LE 6-2 227
Glen Lewis LT 6-3 230
Jon Thornburg RT 6-1 217
Jerry Drones RE 6-3 210
Charlie Hall LLB 6-3 202
Glenn Graef MLB 5-10 195
Mike Johnston RLB 6-1 210
Charles Ford LCB 6-3 185
L.D.Rowden LS 6-2 205
Richard Harrington RS 6-1 185
Allen Sumerford RCB 6-0 185

THEBES JUST NO WAY

year ago against the rush.
But one weakness of the
Cougars seems to be the
secondary, as only Richard
Harrington returns.
The Gators are relying heavily
on the passing and catching of
sophomores John Reaves and
UF Offense
Paul Maliska SE 6-1 183
Wayne Griffith LT 6-2 217
Donnie Williams LG 6-0 209
Kim Helton G 6-2 213
SkipAmelung RG 6-1 233
Mac Steen RT 6-3 223
Bill Dowdy TE 6-2 200
John Reaves QB 6-3 204
Carlos Alvarez FL 5-11 181
Tommy Durrance TB 6-0 200
Jerry Vinesett TB 5-11 181
Garry Walker FB 6-0 193
Richard Franco KS 5-9 164

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Carlos Alvarez. Reaves, as a
freshman, connected on 52 of
116 passes for 771 yards in four
games. Alvarez led the Baby
Gators with 28 receptions for
393 yards.
Fullback Garry Walker and
either Tommy Durrance or Jerry
UF Defense
Jack Youngblood LE 6-5 234
Robbie Rebol LT 5-9 209
Robert Harrell RT 6-2 217
Bob Coleman RE 6-2 203
David Ghesquiere LLB 6-2 197
Tom Abdelnour MLB 5-7 194
Mike Kelley RLB 6-2
Steve Tannen LC 6-2 194
Mark Ely RC 5-11 .179
Jack Burns LS 5-11 179
Skip Albury RS 5-10 177

Vinesett at tailback should keep
the Houston defense honest
against Reaves passing.
The Gators will be fighting
this year, but it will be hard to
tell whether its for the game or
their lives. Lets hope its the
former.
Tankers Begin
Fall Practice
The Gator swim team kicks
off their fall practice 3:30
Friday afternoon at the Florida
pool.
The meeting is open to all
prospective men swimmers for
both varsity and freshmen
teams."
First practice is slated for
Monday afternoon.



By SAM PEPPER
Assistant Sports Editor
The year of the Gator is over.
The year of the Fighting Gator is
here
This season, Coacji Ray
Graves rounds out a decade of
coaching at UF, with his
sophomore dominated squad
meeting some of the roughest
competition in the nation,
including top ranked Houston
and rivals FSU and Georgia.
His sophomores inexperience
has been termed the weak link in
the Gator organization.
However, Graves contends that
with the openning kickoff
Saturday afternoon, they wont
be inexperienced any longer.
The Gator slate for 69
includes:
HOUSTON Minus running
star Paul Gibson the Cougar

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The Fighting Gator Is Here

SOPHOMORES DOMINATE SQUAD

offense has virtually remained
intact, and will be out again this
year to top their NCAA rushing
record of 562 yards per game,
which they set last season.
Returning is quarterback Ken
Bailey who passed for 1,279
yards and ran for another 336.
Line standouts include
All-American candidate at guard
Bill Bridges, 230, an Dave Schneider, 230. t
MISSISSIPPI STATE The
Bulldogs have not defeated an
SEC foe since early 1965, and it
appears victories will be scarce
again this season unless the
defense can begin to gel.
On the offense led by
Quarterback Tommy Pharr, who
rushed for 522 yards and passed
for 1,838 yards last year, rest
the hopes of a successful season.
FLORIDA STATE Despite
the loss of Ron Sellers the

Seminoles pro-type offense and
rugged defense remains.
Field general, Bill Cappleman,
appears to be the one to step
into the spotlight formally held
by Sellers.
This season the Sellers4ess
Seminoles have developed a
more ballanced attack with less
dependence on one man.
TULANE When the Gators
and the Greenwave meet in
Tampa, it will more than likely
be the battle of the sophomores.
With 30 lettermen returning it
seems unlikely that no more
than seven or eight will be
regulars on the offensive or
defensive platoons in 1969.
NORTH CAROLINA Tar
Heel coach Bill Dooley who
enters his third year of coaching,
is still looking for a winning
season.
<*
Only seven seniors are on the

Thursday, September 18, 1969, Tha Florida AJlifrtor,
* -* * **' "*' * *"* > Z S -' J T:i: .

squad this season with only 19
lettermen.
VANDERBILT Head Coach
Bill Pace, now in the third year
of an immense rebuilding
program, has developed the
Commodores into the surprise of
the South.
Returning at Quarterback is
Johnny Miller along with
sophomore Watson Brown.
Receivers include Curt Chesley,
who is considered by most
coaches as one of the best
receivers in the South.
AUBURN Ralph Jordan is
back as coach and has instafled a
triple-option offense to
accompany his already sturdy
defense.
The defense should give the
Tigers a chance to beat any
team. Standouts include
linebackers Mike Kolen, Bobby
Strickland, Ron Yarborough and

Sonny Ferguson.
GEORGIA Always a rival,
the Bulldogs appear to be the
team to beat in the SEC
although their defense is a bit
weaker than it was in 1968.
Georgia has 19 letteimen
returning for the defensive
platoon alone. However, the
Bulldogs marked improvement is
on the offensive side.
The blockers up front are big,
pass catchers are excellent and
Mike Cavan, quarterback, tops a
backfield that rates as the best in
the conference.
KENTUCKY Johnny Ray
begins his first year of coaching
and already it appears that
Wildcats should be the most
improved team in the
conference.
Kentuckys big asset under
Ray will be new confidence and
spirit, the major drawback is a
lack of speed in the offensive
line.
MIAMI The Hurricanes
might not be able to field the
best team in the league but it
will probably be the biggest.
Miami has 34 lettermen, with
juniors and seniors at all 22
positions except two.
Quarterback duties have been
awarded to Jim Pytel with the
main rushing chores being given
to Bobby Best.

Never goes to waist


H IJiil
1405 S. W. 13th ST.
Just South of the Underpass

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Saptawibar 18, 9988

By CALDWELL TUMEL
Alligator Correspondent
There is a new fraternity on campus.
To get in you dont have to wear Gant shirts,
tasseled loafers, or drink Purple Jesuss from an
engraved mug on Saturday night.
All you have to do is tun. And run. And run.
Track coach Jimmy Carnes has begun mileage
fraternities among the Gator cross country team
this season. The idea is to run 100 miles in a week,
400 miles in a month, or if you are really gung-ho,
500 miles in one month. Only one person on
campus belongs to the latter.
Graduate student Jack Bacheler, former
Olympian and the nations top distance runner
sports the tiny gold square on his collar that
proclaims simply the numerals: 500. He admits the
membership is limited but claims there is very little
dissent at chapter meetings.
Two other runners have run 400 miles in 28 days.

Track Team
Ranks 14th
Alligator Services
UFs track team recently
earned the 14th spot on the final
collegiate rankings of track and
field teams during the 1969
season.
For the first time in history a
national ranking in track and
field based on actual
performance, winning
percentage, margin of victory,
depth, schedule perfornmance
and hypothetical performance
has been released by George
Wenos, of Costa Mesa,
California.
Kansas led the rankings
followed by Southern California,
San Jose State, and Texas at El
Paso. UF was the only university
in the top 34 from the Deep
South.
I hope this ranking system
will be adopted by track and
field officials, sai4 UF track
coach Jimmy Carnes. It gives
you a true picture of the best
overall track and field programs
in the nation.

WELCOME UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
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at QUANTITY PRICES!
(WHOLESALE)
APPROVED AND REQUIRED
GYM CLdTH ES
FOR ME N FOR WOMEN
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1113 West University Ave, One Block East of Campus 372-8212

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FLORIDA TRACK
\ '*
> Cindermen Prepare for Cross Country Season

CINDERMEN START NEW FRATERNITY

Mark Bir, a freshman two-miler from Indiana and
John Parker, a senior and last years Southeastern
Conference indoor mile champion both wear t e
400 pins. They claim they are proud of them but
since silver is traditionally second place material,
they are both putting in the mileage to join
Bacheler.
I dont want to make any trite statements like
this is the finest group Ive ever coached or
anything like that, said Carnes with an easy smile.
Our whole attitude about running is different this
year. We brought ten boys back to school two
weeks early. They were all ready and eager to run,
so thats just what they did. Twice a day, seven days
a week.
While Carnes is hesitant to be overly optimistic,
the results of a time trial last Saturday morning
indicate he may be smiling smuggly up his sleeve.
Six runners finished the four mile course under 21

minutes, with Bir running 19:59. Only once was 20
minutes broken on the course last year when
Johnnie Brown ran 19:46. That was the middle of
the season.
Aside from that, six runners have qualified for
Carnes neophite group by running their first 100
miles last week. Jack Nason, A.W. Smith, Roy
Benjamin, Benny Vaughn, Johnnie Brown, and Jack
Stewart.
Its a quietly confident team that will tow the
starting line for UF this winter. Running four miles
all out isnt easy, but that doesnt concern the group
much. One runner summed up the attitude of the
group:
We just like to run. People are surprised to see
us striding by the duck pond by the Reitz Union,
sprinting through the Plaza of the Americas, or
jogging down University Avenue at 10 p.m at night.
We like it. Were good at it. Do I say it? O.K. Its
our bag.

Gator PAWN SHOP
GUNS
| LOANS i CAMERAS
RADIOS & TVS
BUY-SELL-TRADE
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MEN! FOR YOUR
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SHOP AT THE
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Phys. Ed. Clothes
gym Shorts
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Grid Upsets In The Fire

. NEW YORK (UPI) College
footballs 100th Anniversary
season is likely to be wonderful
but weird. You cant find a
big-time coach who thinks a
20-point lead is safe. Widespread
use of the Texas triple option
is scaring the defenses.
So, with a warning that upsets
lurk at every corner, lets shove
off another year of forecasting
as many of the top teams make
their bows:
The East.
Penn State 28, Navy 7
Orange Bowl champs could be
better than last year.
Syracuse 28, lowa State 15
Syracuse defense needs
seasoning.
Army 35, New Mexico 14
Cadets are green but Invaders are
greener.
Also: Boston U. seven over

Bookies Pick Houston

The Gators kickoff their
season opener against the
nationally ranked Houston
Cougars as a 10 point underdog
according to UPI Betters odds.
Southern California, playing :
without OJ. Simpson for the
first time in three years, has
been listed as a 7%-point favorite
over Nebraska.
Penn State, the eastern power
bidding for national honors this
year, was made a whopping
25-point favorite over Navy,
Notre Dame was favored by 24%
over Northwestern and UCLA,
which ripped Oregon State in its
opener last week, wasJisted at

D Bell b Howell
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V w Includes:
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Telephone^
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vrwfc.l w m DUAL POWER
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CASSETTES STORAGE ALBUMS 3.00
CLICK CAMERA STORES
IN THE GAINESVILLE MALL
378-8933

'WIERD SEASON PREDICTED

Colgate, Xavier seven over
Buffalo, Rutgers 10 over
Lafayette, the Citadel 10 over
Lehigh, Temple seven over
Rhode Island, Massachusetts 10
over Maine, Conneticut 10 over
Vermont.
The Midwest.
Missouri 21, Air Force 10
Mizzou must be sharp in opener;
Air Force beat SMU last week.
Southern California 17,
Nebraska 14 give new Trojan
offense a chance to shake down.
Notre Dame 28, Northwestern
7 rebuilding Irish still tough.
Oklahoma 27, Wisconsin 7
could be worse.
Also: Michigan State 14 over
Washington, Illinois one over
Washington State, Michigan six
over Vanderbilt, lowa seven over
Oregon State, Colorado 14 over
Tulsa, Utah State one over

28 points over Pittsburgh.
Alabama is a six-point favorite
over Virginia Tech and Clemson
is favored by three over Virginia.
Indiana is a six-point choice over
Kentucky, Syracuse 17% over
lowa State, West Virginia 15%
over Maryland, Michigan 9%
over Vanderbilt, Michigan State
13 over Washington and North
Carolina State, upset last week,
13 over North Carolina.
Also, Georgia was given 24
points over Tulane, Southern
Methodist six over Georgia Tech,
Missouri seven over Air Force,
Auburn 13 over Wake Forest/

Bowling Green, Cincinnati one
over William and Mary, Miami,
(0 ), 10 over Dayton, Louisville
six over Southern Illinois, Ohio
U. 14 over Kent State, Toledo
seven over Villanova.
The South.
Louisiana State 21, Texas
A.-M. 10 solid quarterback,
fine defense.
Indiana 21, Kentucky 14
tough opener for ambitious
Hoosiers.
Houston 28, Florida 17
Cougars have sharp offense again.
South Carolina 21, Duke 14
big one in Atlantic Coast
Conference.
Also: Georgia 21 over Tulane,
Southern Methodist three over
Georgia Tech, Auburn 10 over
Wake Forest, Florida State 10
over Wichita State, Mississippi
14 over Memphis State,
Mississipp State eight over
Richmond, North Carolina State
12 over North Carolina,
Tennessee 20 over Chattanooga,
West Virginia 14 over Maryland,
Alabama seven over Virginia
Tech, Clemson six over Virginia.
The Southwest.
Arkansas 28, Oklahoma State
7 Razorbacks retain punch.
Texas Tech 21, Kansas 20
mild upset in this one.
Purdue 21, Texas Christian 14
Phipps is back and Purdue has
size.
Minnesota 23, Arizona State
17 Gophers must stop Art
Malone.
Also: Baylor one over Kansas
State, Rice 14 over VMI, North
Texas State 10 over
' Southwestern Louisana.

Thursday, September 18, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks,
Meals & RSandwiehes
TV & BILLIARDS^I
I 1718 W University Asre. I
I 'On The Gold Coast I
'= SIL VERM AN'S DOWNTOWN = r
LET'S GET
ACQAfNTED. .
NOW : HERES WHAT WE
WILL DO
I SELECT ANY SHIRT OR SHIRTS §
| FROM OUR EXTENSIVE g
§ COLLECTION OF FAMOUS |
NAME BRANDS AND f
| WE WILL MONOGRAM §
I THEM FREE OF CHARGE 1
| LOOK AT THIS LINE-UP ... |
iv!;; |
I §
gHATHAWAY, MANHATTAN, AND
MADISON .. shirtings with II of the traditional >j
g musts. Vivid new stripes, solids, checks and of course
q white. And... classic rolled button-down collars as
I well as the "buttonless" collars in many variations. co
to 1
Why are we doing all this?
3 Just to get you to come in
and see the greatest collection
g of BACK TO CAMPUS" clothes
o in town. .
s <
FREE MONOGRAM OFFER GOOD
THROUGH SEPT. 27th
Sitivetotm'4-
225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Free Customer Forking on Huge Lot at Rear of Store
Open Friday Night Until 9:00
ji= SIL VERMANS DOWNTOWN

Page 21



Page 22

E, Tho Florida AMpaor. Thowdoy. fptmdw 18, IMB

. Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Thurs. thru Wed., Sept. 18-24
ASTOR ALL GRINDS
Jp* CHEF ttPPERONI I
CHEF WY>£DEE PIZZA
4a l AHHD ANTI-PERSPIRANT UNSCENTEO
Deodorant 99* Limit I with a $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes.
Deodorant 59*
*! ?R\M JIKL4KB limit I with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes
mjm^^my // ]ibk adult pepsodent ijubjwpixiE darling buttermilk
\ Pip# TOOTHBRUSH4/sl. BREAD 2/49*
A 4§# POPCORN 19* DIN. ROLLS... 2/39*
carte all brands fei, CLOROX... 29* DOUGH BREAD 29*
CIGARETTES £ COOKING OIL 69*
&i9RQ ip WESSON OIL 79*
NR. Qts. DEEP SOUTH...Limit 1 mayonnaise of choice w/$S 00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes
J mAiuNKAiSE jy
MAYONNAISE 49*
EVAP. MILK 7/sl.
GOLD MEDAL Plain or Self-Rising 4^^
Limit 1 With $5.00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes gjL 9k |l|A
FLOUR 549- SW/Lt.
MARGARINE 6/$l p* * " **'?.
diet pepsi s/si pictcrgcnTi
BABY rUUV ...... .Y |ig j|
APPLE JELLY 29' NAPKINS 69< 3 g B M *e
CATSUP 5/sl. BART. PEARS 3/sl. J,. ...... Mm X~ax
MAC DINNER 2/39* TOMATO JCE 4/sl. W Mm
COCKTAIL 5/sl. SAUSAGE 5/sl. FjfeM
APPLE JUKI 3/sl. WX CORH....S/sl. >JfclW9l
fii5uE.......... 4/$l Or. BEANS.. 5/sl. 69* lr|r|pP
wvuwuuh
.... --*s.mm. ,' as ; top value stamps 11111 m wA iovi oz. thrifty maid
'UBi =-.-.!SV l*!* M TOP VALUE STAMPS Tomato v- n -.-ui_
mib #o S oi. jo> : jjoi. con iso '"" n^^aSS sfSSmm < lomaro, vegetable, BMan,
Viaoro Pellet* >. tHraf Sweet Relish EMti-Scg Sorov Starch '^.cfou 0 i i b Chicken, A Rice, MetHroom
......... i......tii.. TTT TnTTrTrrTTTri?^* 1* '. >.iJ |
ttor.SunAiniVonJo 15-Or. Switch 12-Oi. Gulf Aerosol -- J '-11U111i..i.,.,1 J
Sfe- 36 S? F 101 !? s ? ct Bomb 98 c Supreme Sauce ...39*
Crackers 34*| Ham Cneddarton 79 c Cookies 45<= SpagTietti" 37 c
1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AYE. HI WAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS



SIT'BACON .7oSAUSAGE ...2 $1.39 .pizza
! ' 6-oz. KRAFT'S NATURAL MOZZARELLA
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED STEAKS *| I fUEECE /[O' 'W* BMP?*I L, MM
MllflOllirOS Cl -CO QIEEjb EP^ [MjffW
VIURVUIVViItHi lB f HI SUPERBRAND (12-oz. Cheese Food) OR COTTAGE El A ftD Anc (A > JOFf'
COPELAND ALL MEAT SLICED O , All'' *- VKAUS A OjF /,/'
RAIAANA ib m< vHEESE a lbs Ot
BVIWIIIIMmMMiUM 18 W7 2-lbs. FREEZER QUEEN GRAVY A SLI. BEEF, SAUS. STEAK,
8-oz. BORDENS NEUFCHATEL LOW CALORIE VEAL PARM._OR (100 Free Stomps w/coupon IIHyL OOV Am v
(BUM CHEESE 35 MEAT LOF. SM y iJB 5b MB
ROUND STEAK V P
SIRLOIN STEAK....T < A
SHLD. ROAST w -89* U^jgP^ v
GROUND CHUCK..... s 2 9 ..
GROUND BEEF 5* $ 2" s * 9
SUPERBRAND SHERBET OR
No. 1
_-£otat oe <& Crea m 5 JJf
0(lp* SP Lettuce 2 49 pdflfois 4/si.
AikiJF S az io' 6V pDrch' steaks...w
TOMATOES .29' TRU|Â¥plS....2/SI.
IU fcT Apples 4 t9< spaghetti. ../si.
. awiec w WSTiSST,. :ZSÂ¥
yogurt ONIONS 3 bag 39* ORANGE JUICE... 59
3Qc Wfiv 2/29* CITRUS PUNCH 59* TURNIPS 3/sl.
lOllf MBPIMBU ;jmmxm jmjTOeVAggAMW i
Vmmhanr cw*oh O' 'Hi oPk Two Poly io 9 On* Holf or Wkolo 5-lb. J woV^ikiT
e SSta=i St W o D kVt.* |Bi' Smoked|om ggjP mNT
IAJr. I lJlSfm*m -ill l l ,J.Oz. Swel Cho*. Or Vonillo G ", 100-C*. lip to.
IfSSd Syrup 63' Frosting .37' Tea Bogs *1.19
LiOQrOOQ 1 r 8-Oz Lioton Sego liquid oz. 29c) Inston.
3/29* French Dressing .. .39* YL tea 85* Diet Mixes ...... .*73
*' ; '* : ', ffi -__ -,
1401 N. MAIN ST. T3O N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441,H1GH SPRINGS
. s
\ ~ .. ..... V.. *Vf i v -' ... : * : *'* ; r__ '.

TTurtru, tTiflr-"- 18. 1968. Tlw Florida AWtor. I

Page 23



Page 24

Fiortdi

Astroturf A Kicker's Dilemma

By STEVE SNIDER
UPI Sports Writer
NEW YORK Bob Pistin,
kicking specialist for West
Virginias Mountaineers, booted
one through the uprights in a
practice session the other day
and a wry smile cracked over his
face as he thought of something.
Theres gonna be a problem
with West Virginias new
astroturf football field.
You cant pick up any grass
and toss it into the air to test the
wind, Pastin joked.
It wont take the kickers long
to find other means, however.
Maybe a personal basket of grass

Alligator To Feature
UPI Coaches Ratings

As a special to the Alligator,
The 1969 United Press
International Football Coaches
Rating Board will make available
the ratings for the nations major
collegiate teams, weekly after
the games of Saturday, Sept. 20.
Three new coaches will serve
on the board made up of five
outstanding coaches from each
of the seven geographical
sections of the country. Their
ratings are recognized as the
most authoritative in college
football.
The new board members are

MEN Wl
NOW THAT SUMMERS OVER AND SCHOOL IS STARTING,
YOURE GOING TO GET FAT!
THAT'S RIGHT, THAT LITTLE ROLL AROUND YOUR MIDDLE IS
GOING TO INCREASE WITH AGE. IT'S HAPPENED TO BETTER
MEN THAN YOU. BUT MANY OF THOSE BETTER MEN THAN
YOU DID SOMETHING ABOUT IT. THEY FOLLOWED A DAILY
ROUTINE AT THE
HdusE/ Health %xsr
E. vs I
THE HOUSE OF HEALTH OFFERS THE CONSCIENTIOUS
FLORIDA MAN EVERYTHING HE WANTS OR NEEDS TO KEEP IN
GREATSHAPE:
COMPLETE WORK OUT FACILITIES WITH MORE
THAN ENOUGH WEIGHTS
0 STEAM ROOM
0 ULTRAVIOLET LAMPS
0 AIR CONDITIONED IN SUMMER & HEATED IN
WINTER
0 A QUIET, UN-CROWDED ATMOSPHERE IN
WHICH TO WORK OUT
/ I
ALL THIS CAN HELP YOU HELP YOURSELF TO BE PHYSICALLY
AND MENTALLY FIT, AND FOR THE SPECIAL STUDENT RATE
OF ONLY $25.00 PER QUARTER, LESS THAN WHAT YOUR
NOT-SO-HEALTHY FRIENDS SPEND FOR A PACK OF
CIGARETTES A DAY.

ARTIFICIAL TUPF TALLY INCREASES

picked up from somebodys
lawn and stashed on the
sidelines. Or a portable
weathervane. Or a bag of
feathers snitched from a pillow
in the dorm.
One way or another the
kickers will learn to live with
artificial turf. Its here to stay.
Eleven colleges ranging
from Michigans vast stadium
seating more than 100,000 to
Illinois State at Normal, 111.
have joined the artificial turf
parade for 1969.
Thats a total of 18, counting
fields installed earlier with
surfaces of Monsantos astroturf

Rick Forzano of Navy, Rod
Rust of North Texas State, and
Joe Yukica of Boston College.
The first of the 1969 ratings
will _be released for the
Wednesday, Sept. 24 edition of
the Alligator.
Each of the 35 coaches will
rate the top 10 teams each week.
Their selections are used only to
reach a consensus and never on
an individual basis. Points are
aWarded on the basis of 10 for a
first-place vote, nine for second,
and so on down to one for a
10th.

or the 3-M Companys tartan
turf.
More are in the works for
1970, including the new
footballbaseball parks in
Cincinnati and Pittsburgh.
New this fall are Michigan,
Michigan State, Franklin Field in
Philadelphia, Alabama,
Arkansas, Texas, Oregon,
Oregon State, West Virginia,
Illinois State at Normal and
Northern Illinois U. at Dekalb,
111.
And the whole thing began in
Houstons Astrodome in 1966
when the proprietors of that
fabled sports palace discovered
to their dismay that natural grass
simply wouldnt grow indoors
after certain alterations were
made to make the stadium
suitable for baseball.
Exhibition games in the
Astrodome revealed the
CRANE H|jn
IMPORTS |j 111
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville

skylights made it almost
impossible to follow the flight of
a fly ball. Those ceiling windows
then were painted over with
black Therefore, no sunlight fell
on the grass that even then was
struggling.
An &.OS. to the test tube
people at Monsanto resulted in
the first installation of astroturf
for use by the Houston Astros
for baseball, by the Houston
Oilers of the American Football
League and the University of
Houston footballers.
Within eight years, says Pro
Football Commissioner Pete
Rozelle, I would expect all our
games to be played on artificial
fields.
The advantages are obvious.
For one thing, the outdoor
installations are all-weather

DELOACH'S
MEAT MARKET
THE ONLY ONE IN GAINESVILLE
ANNUAL
STUDENT SALE
round qo
STEAK ib
SIRLOIN 119
STEAKS I ib
STEAKS ib
GROUND 159
_BEEF 3lkvl
FILET MIGNON Ofl t I
BACON WRAPPED (l CA
6-OZ. WW EA
~SUCED C7 (
BACON UI ib.l
~PORK 7ft t
CHOPS Iv ib. I
3432 HOURS 9-7 I

fields. They play virtually the
same under all conditions. The
problems of frozen natural
ground or mud during heavy rain
are eliminated.
Bud get-conscious athletic
director's also are intrigued by
the dollar saving of artificial
turf. An installation runs
roughly $250,000 and thats big.
But maintenance costs are next
to nothing and the fields may be
used for all sorts of activities
from varsity football or
intramurals, from soccer to
lacrosse to band practice.
Injuries, particularly those to
the knees, are said to be reduced
sharply and thats a boon to all.
But for the kickers, there still
is a sticky problem to be solved:
When the wind doth blow,
which way doth it?



AIR FORCE PULLS UPSET

Footballs Go Airborne

By Alligator Wire Services
One hundred years ago,
people figured if God had meant
for footballs to fly, hed have
made them with wings, but
Saturday night illustrated that
the football world has learned
better.
One hundred years. Thats
how old the college game is% and
thats how long the second half
lasted for the Air Force Falcons
Saturday night before they
wrapped up a 2622 victory
over the SMU Mustangs as both
teams demonstrated the modern,
faster mode of travel.
Falcon quarterback Gary
Spider Baxter piloted his
teammates to a comfortable
230 lead at halftime, then
went searching for a parachute
in the final 30 minutes while
SMUs Chuck Hixson, the
nations leading passer last
season, hurled the Mustangs to
within four points of victory.
Baxter, 190-pound senior
from West Covina, Calif., ran
two and 15 yards for first-half
touchdowns, hit 15 of 34 passes
for 206 yards and set up field
goals of 44,33,34 and 21 yards
by Dannis Leuthauser.
Hixson, meanwhile,
completed 34 of 53 for 356
yards and fired scoring strikes of
15 and six yards to Ken Fleming
and Sam Holden, plus a pair of
two-point conversions to

No weighting around

\ I
Bi n.| uii
H fijXH
1405 S.W. 13th ST.
.4ustSau.th.9f the UndelS.

lilt
m,
%
f
Fleming, and by the fourth
period Air Force had air
sickness.
But the Falcons trapped
Hixon eight times for 63 yards
and intercepted three passes to
hold on for the win.
At Los Angeles, junior college
transfer Dennis Dummit waited
only three plays before dropping
a 60-yard bomb on Oregon State
as he started UCLA toward a
370 romp over the beavers.
Dummit hit Gwen Cooper for
the score with his first major
college pass and competed 10
passes for 160 yards before
giving way in the fourth period
to reserve Jim Nader, who threw
a 68-yard TD pass to Brad
Lyman for the Bruins final
score.
Quarterback Butch Dusharms

A LAP DOG? ~
OR A RACE CAR?
WHICH DO YOU
WANT?
Test drive a real sports car... at your Datsun Dealer!
RACING NEWS
SCOVILLE CAPTURES SIXTH
WIN AT SEATTLE,
REMAINS UNDEFEATED
KENT, WASH. Sunday, Aug. 17
V. V
For the sixth consecutive time this year. Jack Scoville of
Corvallis, Ore. captured first place in a national championship
sports car race.
Driving a D Production Datsun 2000 in the combined C and
D Production, C and D Sports Racing and B and C Sedan
event, Sdoville barely nosed out another two-liter Datsun
driven by Dick Roberts of Garden Grove, Calif. Roberts
finished a mere one-tenth second behind. The two cars
exchanged the lead more than a half dozen times during the 30
minute race which had spectators cheering wildly at the close
competition.
During their heated duel, both Scoville and Roberts lapped
the entire D Production entry which consisted of Triumphs,
Austin Healy 3000 s and Lotuses.
The win for Scoville assures him of the championship in the
Northern Pacific Division and gives him a starting position at
the American Road Race of Champions (ARRC) which takes
place in November at Daytona Beach, Fla.
GODDING & CLARK
DOWNTOWN BY THE POST OFFICE
2nd AVE. & 2nd ST. S£.
OPEN TIL BPM MON THRU SAT
"HOME OF THE NEW LEADER"

51-yard scoring strike to
fullback Tom Owne in the
second quarter inspired Wichita
State to a 17-7 upset over Utah
State while sophomore Bill
Craigos 47-yard TD pass to Ed
Puishes supplied the University
of Texas at El Paso with a
1410 decision over the
University of the Pacific.
Sophomore Larry Russell
threw a 31 -yard touchdown pass
to Don Kobos in the second
quarter, then tossed a two-point
conversion pass to Buz Leavitt in
the final five seconds to lift
Wake Forest past North Carolina
State 22-21.
Miami traveled 118 yards
through the air on the throwing
of Cleveland Dickerson and Jim
Bengals to whip Xavier 357.
Gary McCoy completed 12
passes for 166 yards, including a
56-yard TD pass to Duane
Miller, and set up Bob Chases
25-yard field goal with three
seconds remaining to lift Drake
to a 2424 tie with Louisville.
Whether West Virginia has
decided to abandon the strong
passing attack which carried it
through the 1968 season is not
clear, since the Mountaineers
never were challenged in their
opening 5711 victory over
Cincinnati.

Thursday, September IS, 1960, The Florida AMipetor.

I Tickets Sold Out I
I For Rival Games I
No tickets remain for 1969 UF football games against FSU and
Georgia and those left for the September 20 opener aga nst
nationally-ranked Houston are going fast.
According to Gator Ticket Manager Ray Dorman, the Oct. 4 FSU
game in Gainesville and the Nov. 8 Georgia game in Jacksonville are
officially sold out.
The Cougars, ranked number one in the nation in one preseason
poll, bring the nation's highest scoring offense to town and Dorman
estimates current sales over the 42,000 mark already.
Remainder of the home ticket situation looks this way:
c North Carolina (Homecoming), Oct. 18 North Carolina just
returned some tickets on sidelines. Approximately 42,000 sold or
reserved for students.
Vanderbilt, Oct. 25 Some sideline tickets remain, approximately
41,000 sold or reserved for students.
Kentucky, Nov. 15 Approximately 40,000 tickets sold or
reserved for students. Some sideline seating remains.
In addition, ticket sales for the Oct. 11 battle at Tampa Stadium
against Tulane are on sale at the UF Athletic Ticket Office, or from
the West Coast Bowl Association in Tampa.
(lo\ J
HRKp&L Y H Ifey, Jm
Bh I Jg gBS. jss m
I J I styling. In shades of flj
1 I country blue, brown, B
I jnSL M \\ I green and gold. B
I L L/j J 'il slacks in the new fi
fl p||||§ Jf l 1 country look and col- fl
Vs/ I & 11 styling look trim and H
l wear comfortably. I
1 Illllllv on Sears Revolving Charge M
HIT
The store within a store at Sears, Roebuck and Co.
TOP OF THE MALL N. W. 13th at 23rd Blvd.

Page 25



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday. September 18, 1969

Page 26

'. r ; V> t- V 'v \ ' 7
' ( ' 7' . **
STUDENT FOOTBALL INFORMATION-1969
HOW DO I OBTAIN A
FOOTBALL TICKET? =
- ( ... 4 ....
STUDENT SEATING
STUDENT SEATING: Each student who pays the student activity fee is entitled to admission ;nstride B 'according^o 1 the* following
obtain a reserved seat assignment for each game separately. These are issued at the Gate 13 tic e
schedule:
DATE TICKETS: nn
Houston September 20 date tickets @ $3.00
PSU October 4 date tickets @ $3.00
No. Carolina October 18 date tickets @ $6.00
} Vanderbilt October 29 date tickets @ $3.00
Kentucky November 15 date tickets @ $3.00
Student wives will have the opportunity to purchase season tickets for the five Gainesville home games for SIB.OO, limited to 1,500. Spouw
tickets must be purchased at Gate 13 Sept. 17-18-19 20,1969 ONLY. Window and date schedule for each game is as follows:
HOUSTON (September 20) F S U (October 4)
Six Windows Ten Windows
Wednesday, September 17 2:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Monday, September 29 2:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
Thursday, September 18 2:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 30 1:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
Friday, September 19 1:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, September 20 10:00 a.m. 2:00 p.m. B,oc 681,09
Fee cards in Monday, September 29 Gate 13
No bloc seating Tickets picked up Wednesday, October 1 Gate 13
_____ NORTH CAROLINA (Homecoming) (October 18)
Ten Windows -
Monday, October 13 2:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, October 14 1:00 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
Bloc seating
Initial request Friday, October 3 Gate 13
Fee cards in Wednesday, October 8 Gate 13
Tickets picked up Friday, October 10 Q ate
VANDERBILT (October 25) v KENTUCKY (November 15)
Six Windows Six Windows
Monday, October 20 2:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m. Monday, November 10 2:30 p.m. 8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, October 21 1:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m. Tuesday, November 11 1:00 p.m. 5:00 p.m.
Bloc seating Bloc seating
Fee cards in Monday, October 20 Gate 13 Fee cards in Monday, November 10 Gate 13
Tickets picked up Wednesday, October 22 Gate 13 Tickets picked up Wednesday, November 12 Q ate 13
Thereafter, all seats will be at the regular price of $6.00 for students and general public alike.
The tickets will be thoroughly mixed and issued at random so that any seat location could be given out at anytime. There is no advantage to
be gained by forming lines early. You MUST accept the ticket issued to you. You may not exchange it later for a better one nor refuse the
ticket issued and go to the end of the line in hope of a better draw.
Each student must bring his ID cards in person to get his ticket. Those wishing to sit together must come together. However, a student with
a non-student date may buy a date ticket at the same window and receive two adjacent seat assignments. A student with a coed date may bring
both cards for two tickets. Once your card is punched, you can not buy a date ticket at a later time.
The reserved seat assignment is not good for admission; it merely gives the location of your stadium seat. For admission, you must have your
picture ID card, validated fee receipt for the first quarter, and a reserved seat assignment. A date must have a date ticket, a seat assignment
adjacent to the date's, and be accompanied by a student of the opposite sex.
DATE TICKETS
DATE TICKETS: Available date tickets may be purchased at the Gate 13 ticket windows at the same time your seat assignment is issued.
Once your card is punched, a date ticket can not be obtained at a later time.
GEORGIA GAME
GEORGIA GAME: Each student who plans to attend the Georgia game in Jacksonville must deposite $2.00 He will receive a receipt which
he will present at one of the east side ticket booths in Jacksonville for a full refund of his $2.00. Each student must claim his own deposit
refund. v
NON-HOME GAMES
NON-HOME GAMES: Tickets may be purchased at the ticket office in the lobby of the stadium on th Q w
tickets, depending on supply, from the start of school until listed deadlines: " n the west s,de You ma V buy one or more
SEPT. 27, MISSISSIPPI STATE NOV. 1, AUBURN
OCT. 11, TULANE NOV. 29, MIAMI



The
Floi*ida
Alligator

ASM'' " yk> :
/w £;< fl, J* 4**J £ jl ;< i f / '
' : <>y Tr >t wTr
o*
haiftmieeStormSJment^
The popular Gator Band, directed by Richard Bowles and led by
Head Drum Major Lamar Sawyer, will provide entertainment at
halftime during Saturday's game.
a.

-SR: : S :: Sii : SiF B fftlMlllilhHKl
TIV I i n | u llv l VWB
ns H ii'B'>

The curious can catch the
modern-day practitioners of
witchcraft in The
Witchmaker. This movie opens
tonight at the Suburbia Drive-In
Theatre along with The Masque
of the Red Death. Complete
shows can be seen at 8:05 and
10. /
The Witchmaker is the
story of everlasting life for
QjeQL Lindsqj
\
|b^
TfffflS
The original Blue Levi's Levi'sin
in Levi'sin rugged XX
denim ... lean and low
waisted. America's
favorite jeans. Sizes
2842. g £SO
SHOP BELKS FOR A
COMPLETE LINE OF
LEVI PRODUCTS.
Everything for your
Campus wardrobe.
In the men's dept.
Use your Belk, Central,
Master Charge or BankAmericard
Gainesville Shopping Center
* North Main St.

Thursday, September 18,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Suburbia Drive-In
Features Witches

witches. Unfortunately, this life
is drawn from poor mortals, in
the form of their blood.
The film, which was shot in
the remote swamps of Louisiana,

Another 'first for the
world's finest 35mm single-lens reflex
Nikon FTn
now offers
thru-the-lens
exposure control
n
* Ni kon
Nikon F with Photomic T fj meter/finder
system links thru-the-lens exposure
accuracy with picture quality of famous
Nikkor lenses. Photomit Tn interchanges
with other Nikon F finders.
Come in and see it today. I
- ~.r _x . ... '*. H
TRADE UP TO THE FINEST:
LEICA
Ready for better pictures? Whether youre deeply
involved in photography or take "just snapshots
let us show you a Leica. You may have a friend who
owns a Leica; hes probably told you that it never
disappoints. A Leica owner never gets into a photo photographic
graphic photographic situation where his camera cant deliver.
Bring in your old camera; lets discuss a trade-in for
a new Leica M-S or Leica M-2, with automatic fea features
tures features that make photography easier than ever. Once
you own a Leica, youll never want to trade again.
UNIV. CITY PHOTO
1021 w. univ. ave I
376-1258 I

Ted Remley
Entertainment Editor

stars Anthony Eisley, Thordis
Brandt, Alvy Moore and John
Lodge as Luther the Berserk.
These two movies will play
through Sept. 24.

Page 27



r;wwxxwwmv*>sswj;
FOR SALE §
Upright piano $l5O mono
vertical tape deck all
transistorized SSO metal bunk
bed w mattress S2O crib w
mattress S2O. Gall 372-7795.
(A-SM-p) J
Yamaha 60, 2500 mi, runs very
good, asking $l6O. Bruce at
373-2687. (A-3t-l-p)
1967 Homda Superhawk 300. In
good condition, 8500 miles. 2
helmets and tool kit, $430 cash.
Call Joe, 378-9617. (A-2t-l-p)
Portable Stereo: one year old.
Like new. All components
$85.00. Call: 372-2329.
(A-3t-l-p)
HONDA 305 Superhawk license
inspected. $350 or best offer.
Helmet $lO. Honda 250 engine
Honda frames and parts make
offer. Call 373-1249. (A-2t-l-p)
GARAGE RUMMAGE SALE
Oil pntgs. orig. drawings,
ceramics, clothing. 406 N.W.
10th St. 10AM-SPM Sun Sept.
21 only. (A-2t-l-p)
1966 Capella, 12X52, Air cond.
2 bd., 10X20 awning, storage
shed, SISOO equity, $64
monthly, or 3500 cash.
378-1857. Excellent condition.
(A-lt-l-p)
YAMAHA 60cc. 4400 mi. with
helmet $l7O. SELMER
TRUMPET with case and music
stand S9O. Hi intens lamp $5.
Call 376-0126. (A-st-l-p)
THINK ABOUT IT! Studying is
tough but we can make it easier
& much more pleasant. A new or
used desk chair or file will help
you in the right direction. High
quality at far below chainstore
prices. TRY US TODAY IT'S
SALE MONTH JR OFFICE
FURNITURE & EQUIPMENT
CO. 620Vz S. Main St. Call
376-1146. (A-7t-l-c)
Not a felmsy portable or a cheap
chainstore but Royal Standard
Size Typewriters just like new
with 90 day, guarantee. I4
years old New Price $266.00
and up. Now while they last
$129.50 JR OFFICE &
EQUIPMENT CO. S. Main
St. Call 376-1146. (A-7t-l-c)
Shipment of used desk & chairs
just arrived. Ist come basis.
Lowest prices highest quality
new furniture too. JR
OFFICE FURNITURE &
EQUIPMENT CO. 620Mz S. Main
St. 376-1146. (A-7t-l-c)
BRACE yourself for a thrill the
first time you use Blue Lustre to
clean rugs. Rent electric
shampooersl. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-l-c)

w 1

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

Jack Lemmon I
I Catherine Deneuve I
I are I
I The April Fools |
I Iml Swm f matuk k*mmm Technicolor.
fi|l |lW| hmutm. wcr< totmo if
COLOR by OeLuxe I.
I Dont mix with BURT REYNOLDS I
I HIM Its ANGIE I
Iv^^nnrriskyiDrasom

\. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 18. 1969

Page 28

I FOR SALE |
68 Yamaha 100 cc. only 770
miles. Just married, must sell
373-2800 best offer it.
(A-3t-l-p)
62 Dodge Dart GT interior
excellent, A/condition, radio,
heater & good tires. Low on gas.
Black with red bucket seats. Call
373-1487. (A-st-l-p)
SEPTEMBER ONLY Clean,
oil, adjust, & new ribbon on any
portable typewriter. Reg.
$18.50. THIS MONTH ONLY
$12.40. JR OFFICE
FURNITURE CO. 620Vz S. Main
St. Call 376-1146. (A-st-l-c)
DISCOUNT OFFICE &
STUDENT FURNITURE.
QUALITY FOR LESS. 4
Drawer suspension file regular
$69.50 NOW $44.95. BIG
beautiful desk, modern design
regular $169.50 NOW
$ 105.00. JR OFFICE
FURNITURE & EQUIPMENT
CO. 620Vz S. Main St. Call
376-1146. (A-7t-l-c)
FOR RENT
Upper division & graduate
students quite well managed
trailer space available 7 mi. no.
of city on 441. Call Mrs. Tanner
Progress Tra. C. 462-1660.
(B-3t-l-p)
FURNISHED HOME 7 Miles
From Campus. Spacious, quiet,
beautiful, near new golf course,
big fire place, fully paneled, two
larg6 bedrooms 2 baths.
Beautifully furnished, air
conditioned with your own
screen porch next to pool, use of
pool bar-b-que house plus much
more $175.00 a month. Lease
required. Call 376-3900 or
376-1146. Sorry no children or
pets. (B-7t-l-c)
j WANTED
>oooooeo :
3 female roommates for 2
bdrm., ac apartment. Come to
851 SW sth Ave. or call
373-2925 after noon. (C-2t-l-p)
CHELP WANTED |
wx-x-x.:.%%vx*:*s x*>x.w.nv*:*m<*
Men interested in sales for better
than average commissions. Full
training, no experience
necessary. No door to door, or
travel. Apply in person 2929 NW
13th St. Will not interfere with
school. (E-3t-l-p)
Girls extra income, part time,
full time, receptionists,
telephone girls, typists, etc. Late
shift 3pm to 9pm. Bonus pl2n
set your own pay. Apply in
person 2929 NW 13th St. Suite
3 10AM to 4PM. (E-3t-l-p)

I HELP WANTED j;
!iyy'x;*;-:*>x-x*x*x*:v*xx*x x x*x ooWM 2'
Listeners Wanted Will pay
$1.50 for one hour session. Must
be native English speaking and
have normal hearing. Please call
Mary, University extension
392-2049 for appointment
between 8 5. (E-st-l-c)
Help wanted Shakeys Pizza
Parlor must be 21 and available
to work week ends. Apply in
person 3510 SW 13th St.
(E-2t-l-c)
Male over 21 Hours after 5 p.m.
Pizza Inn 376-4521 316 S.W. 16
Ave. (£-3t-l-c)
Female over 21 7p.m.
M-F Pizza Inn 376-4521 316
S.W. 16 Ave. (E-3t-l-c)
MALES immediate openings
part or full time. Good salary.
Apply in person ARBYS 1405
SW 13th Street. (E-3t-l-c)
I USE THE GATCR ?
§ CLASSIFIEDS j:
_jSWRTS" FR? l
i WHAT "CAN i
I FREDRICO FELLINI I
I AN I
ROGER VADIM 1
j DO WITH I
. EDGAR ALLAN POE
WHO KNOWS?
WELL SEE
UEDGAR ALLAN POESI
I j' -' '''
Powfw Gfatirilto 1 AT LEAST I
i inisnT?rv thru
MviiiilSijJ sun
I mw~

GATORS I
THE GAINESVILLE MALL MERCHANTS
WELCOME YOU WITH:
FREE BUS RIDES TO AND FROM THE
MALL EVERY HOUR STARTING 11 AM
END 7:45 THURSDAY
FRIDAY ll AM UNTIL 10:30 PM
LOOK FOR THE BIG RED DOUBLE DECKER
BUS AT THE ALL CAMPUS BUS STOPS.
BARGAINS GATOR MOONLIGHT SALE
FRIDAY SEPT 19 7 11 PM
ENTERTAINMENT FRI. SEPT. 19
WORLD TRAVELING FOLK SINGERS
THE HA SKINS
APPEARING 7-11 P.M. NO CHARGE

An unprecedented
psychedelic roller
coaster of an
experience."
TODAY
IF YOU ARE LIKE WE
ARE YOU CAN SEE IT 10
TIMES AND STILL
WONDER

,v#Vi Vi** i v#v,*,' *
v.;i;.;;;;|V,VtViVVV.V*%V
PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS
-- |ll| :;,:;: : ||j||, J I
T"U,'HW^
Kllri .
tail 3 \m.Af '.
|_jogml, ot |
LAST DAY "ANNA MY DARLING" I

i \, v IMBS|p llfM
I \ V set llf* AmP
I \V ; S§SF*SSR&T:£ *' aRT;
L
UE^TCjH
F Ed I [,*(
SUPER PANAVISION* METROCOLOR



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

£^avww?:*X'X*x*xxxxw
| AUTOS |
*>.V.WX*X*X*>X X*X*X*X*XX-X*N?. X X*X*X*:#
1965 Rambler American,
automatic radio heater 4-door,
excellent condition low mileage
very clean, see at Southside Gulf
or call 372-2317. (G-st-l-p)
1966 MGB Excellent
condition. Good tires. Tonneau
cover, boot, and luggage rack lot
price $1495. Selling for only
$1375. Call 376-4962.
(G-3t-l-p)
MGB 67 EXCELLENT
CONDITION radio heater
Tonneau cover and more extras
SI6OO br *' best offer. Call
378-9228. (G-st-l-p)
I PERSONAL
Phillips flying service flight
instruction 9.00 solo 13.00 dual.
495-2124 after 6pm Ground
school starting sept. 3.
(J-10t-l-p)
Yummy yummy yummy! Hot
Fudge Sunday! DIPPER DAN
IN THE MALL. (J-st-l-c)
MARRIED female roommate
wanted to share 2BR trailer
(Varsity Villa) sllO/2 3 utilities.
Call Mary 373*2577. (J-3t-l-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear
message any time day or night.
LET FREEDOM RING. 16 NW
7th Avenue. (J-st-l-P)
Experienced bench technician
for radio, television, stereo. Part
or full time. Alliance TV Service
815 W. University Ave.
(M-st-l-p)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
"SERVICE needs efficient,
experienced typist to work
mornings only. Call for an
appointment, 376-7160.
(M-2t-l-p)
Tutoring in GERMAN by
professional instructor.
Streamlined course for ETS
exam. Individual or group
sessions. 376-9674 p.m.
(M-lt-l-p)
**
Tennis racket restringing free
pick up and delivery M&R
Tennis Services 378-2489.
(M-22t-l-p)

gP \Cf T SPECIAL sgi
1 I Lunch and Dinner
g THURSDAY 1
1 ROAST TURKEY 9
§|| DRESSING, CRANBERRY SAUCE, J \J A |||
gW CHOICE OF POTATO * V |||
8 FRIDAY
1 SAUTED H /o 1
AIMONDINE OOC B
g|| WITH TARTER SAUCE
* hS
1 MORRISON'S 1
1 CAFETERIAS I
|L OAMEMUI MALI M

Thursday, September 18, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

[jj

Page 29

Hj
If If ) PERSONS UNDER 17 I
A J NOT ADMITTED
* ADMISSION

UNIVERS]fYLEAGUES NOW ORGANIZING
If interested come by the GAMES
AREA and fill out an application
or call 392-1637. Deadline Sept. 26. f
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA-GROUND FLOOR REITZ UNION
FREE FROM THE
A HI JT
Iff PIZZA HUT QF Gainesv illcj§jfi||
One dollar off with purchase of
any large pizza.
NOW 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU!
1723 S.W. 13th St.-Phone 378-5761
2109 N.W. 13th St.-Phone 372-5295
PHONE AHEAD FOR FASTER SERVICE I

HI WELCOME I
WllllllllllilM i niii II r$
THE WITCNMAKER litinifyii|TNMcalar-TicWscapc
ALSO AT 10:00 ONLY VINCENT PRICE



Page 30

), The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Saptawbar 18, 1989

ByTEDREMLEY
Entertainment Editor
UFs fall entertainment
package traditionally revolves
around football games and Gator
Growl, and this year is no
exception. Leaving no time to be
bored and sparse hours to study,
several areas of the university
work together to entertain its
students.
Gone are the days of the Class
B j Union movies. With the

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THE FLORIDA A&M BAND
. usually steals the show at Gator Growl
How come so many
$2,995 cars end up
costing $4,000?
Options. Just add on a few of them and in a matter
of minutes you can add a thousand dollars to the cost
of the car.
But it wont happen if you buy a Volvo from us.
We sell a complete car, not a do-it-youself kit.
Volvo comes equipped with 4-speed synchromesh
transmission; 4-wheel power disc brakes; whitewall
tires; two undercoatings; rear window defroster; deluxe
upholstery; reclining bucket seats; rear seat armrest;
windshield washer and 2-speed wipers; trip odometer;
alternator; and a steering wheel lock so a thief cant
take it all away from you. t
Necessities like these are included in the basic
price of every Volvo, itemized on the price tag, and
marked N/C.
Which means No Charge.
So for the price-conscious car buyer, its a most
rewarding experience to come in so our showroom, look
at a Volvo price tag, and total up
CRANE IMPORTS university

Gator Growl Tops Fall Entertainment

scheduling of films such as
Rosemarys Baby, Wait Until
Dark, Odd Couple and
Dirty Dozen, top-rate
entertainment will be available
in the Union Auditorium almost
every weekend at a very low
cost.
Last nights Union dance with
the Tropics was the first of a
series of such events to be held
throughout the quarter. Bill
Cross, the Assistant Union

DOES ANYONE STUDY?

Director in charge of activities,
reports that an ID check will be
enforced at future dances.
The Hurdy-Gurdy Man
himself, Donovan, will perforpi
in Florida Gy nvFriday, Oct. 10.
Hint: Get tickets early! v
Monday, Oct. 13, the U. S
Army Field Band will give a free
concert in the University
Auditorium.
Homecoming is Oct. 17-19.
The Parade is at 1 p.m. Friday
(classes are dismissed early) and
later that evening Gator Growl
takes place. Gator Growl
Director Randy Williams
promises a bigger and better
show for 69.
The Lettermen will set the
mood for Interfraternity
Councils Fall Frolics Oct. 31.
Independent tickets are usually
made available for this event.
The Goldovsky Opera
Company will bring La
Traviata to the Florida Gym
Tuesday Nov. 11. This is another
Student Government
Production.
'* A Company of. Wayward
Saints will be the reputable
Florida Players fall production.
The play will run Nov. 10-15.
The Music Department will
present its semi-annual version
of Handels Messiah, Nov. 30.
Guest performers are featured
and this event has gained a great
deal of deserving fame.
Winding up the quarter,
Florida Players will present an
Experimental Production in
Constans Theatre Dec. 4-6.
If boredom still persists and

WE SHOULD KNOW
WHAT IT TAKES!
Weve been feeding U of F students for 18 years
GOOD FOOD./Nothing but choice meats
EXTRA LARGE EGGS.."Delivered 3 times a week "Local Farms
EXTRA LARGE SERVINGS
OUR PRICES-CRAZY!
you can get a London Broil Steak w/all Trimmings
$1.15
ASK ANY OLD-TIMER ABOUT LITTLE LARRYS
MICHELOB ON TAP-BREAKFAST TO SANDWICHES TO FULL MEALS
WE BELIEVE WE'RE THE BEST
RESTAURANT IN TOWN...
AND WE CAN PROVE IT!
};. /
OPEN 6:30 AM to 3AM 7 days a weak
** r 1225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE

these activities dont interest
you, you might take in Camp
Wauburg, the Union Activities

l 1 11 'i' 1 ,"nin |i 1 |
a Jjfe . v- v,\ '#
fC; 11|F Jr Jr ysm
BS'" j
> y j jr w m
JgP .> A>- :f§a y^
HU; .>
SILKSCREENING
... can be learned at Union Crafts Center
Florida Awards & Trophy Co.

Gainesvilles Largest Display
Trophies-Plaques-Ribbons-Gavels
Mugs-M etals-M edal lions
Fraternity Crests-Jewelry
Guaranteed Watch Repairing
1230 W UNIV AVE.
PHONE 378-8111
Engraving Specialist

Center, The Rathskeller or a
local fraternity party. At UF, we
try harder. Ip



Field Band Is Cultural Ambassador

The UF Music Department
and Army ROTC unit is bringing
the internationally famous
United States Army Field Band
to campus Oct. 13. The free
concert will be at 8 p.m. in
University Auditorium.
The Field Band of
Washington, D.C., is the official
touring musical representative of
the Department of the Army. A
distinguished member of
Congress aptly described the
band as, A great instrument for
stirring patriotic emotions.
The band is under the
operational control of the
Armys Chief of Information at
the Pentagon. Known as the
Kings of the Highway, the
Field Band travels thousands of
miles each year on at least two
major concert tours, and is
considered by music critics to be
one of the most proficient and
distinctive musical organizations
now appearing before the public.
All concert tours are made as
directed by the Secretary of the
Army, and performances are
open to the general public, free
of charge.
The Field Band was organized
on March 21, 1946 when
General Jacob L. Devers issued
the following order to Chief
Warrant Officer Chester E.
Whiting, then commanding the
Armys First Combat Infantry
Band:
I want you to organize a
band that will carry into the
grassroots of our country the
story of our magnificent Army,
its glorious traditions and
achievements; and of the great
symbol of American manhood
the Ground Soldier.
Whiting was the Field Bands
commanding officer until Nov.
1960, at which time he retired
from the Army with the rank of
lieutenant colonel. In his 14
years as commander, Colonel
Whiting guided the fledgling
band and literally took it
around the world. Under his
baton the band performed in all
50 states, Canada, Mexico, the
United Kingdom, Europe and
the Far East.
Major Hal J. Gibson of
Oklahoma City, is the bands
present commanding officer and
conductor. He assumed this
position in March 1968, as the
fourth director in the Field
Bands 23-year history. Major
Gibson brought to this
command more than 21 years
experience in military music.
The Field Band is composed
of the Armys finest
soldier-musicians. Many have
studied at the countrys leading
conservatories and schools of
music; many have played with
major symphonies and leading

take^hmTminutwrlveTmd^
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I STARKE 0 1 FLORIDA
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
M HOURS HOURSWEEKDAYS
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dance orchestras before entering
the service. All of the musicians
-by personal audition have
been specially selected for
assignment to the Field Band.
The Soldiers Chorus, an
integral part of the band, is
made up of 20 highly-trained
and talented vocalists under the
direction of Sergeant Major
Gene Coughlin of Detroit Lakes,
Minnesota. The chorus presents
its own special arrangements of
well-known compositions at
each Field Band performance.
The bands concert repertoire
is designed to appeal to all
audiences, offering classical,
semi-classical, and popular
selections, choral arrangements,
novelty numbers and military
marches on each of its programs.
On tours of other nations, the
Field Band has performed the
works of American composers as
well as music indigenous to that
country.
The band has earned
considerable fame outside the
United States on three tours
sponsored by the Department of
the Army and the State
Department. The first of these
tours included eight countries in
the United Kingdom and
Europe, and was highlighted by
performances at Londons Royal
Festival Hall, and the opening of
the Edinburgh Music Festival.
Major concerts were also
presented in the Olympic
Stadium in Berlin, Luxembourg
Gardens in Paris and the Concert
Hall in Amsterdam.
Many favorable reviews were
received during this tour.
Following the concert in York,
England, John Blunt of the
Yorkshire Evening Press wrote,
...115 men in a park did
more good for their country in
90 minutes than the
pronouncements of their
statesmen could do, perhaps, in
as many months. Critic Ivan H.
Peterman of the Philadelphia
Inquirer said, A Paris audience
came to sniff at Gershwin music
but forgot their French
nonchalance to cheer
enthusiastically. Amsterdams
audience became a wild cheering
throng as Sousas famed Stars
and Stripes March ended the
show.
On its second European tour
the Field Band appeared in 12
countries. This was the first
service band of the United States
ever to play in Yougoslavia. The
concerts in Belgrade and Zagreb
proved to be a significant
cultural dent in the Iron
Curtain. The Field Band
became the first major U.S.
Army band to appear in
Norway, Denmark, Portugal and
Monaco. Concert sites included

UF CONCERT PLANNED

the Municipal Stadium in
Belgrade, St. Marks Square in
Venice and Tivoli Park in
Copenhagen.
The Field Bands third
overseas trip was an all-airborne
tour to Hawaii, Japan, Korea
and Okinawa, in which 45
a
concerts were presented in 41
days. There were special
performances for U.S. and U.N.
troops and the President of
Korea, as well as a television
broadcast to all parts of Japan.
The Field Band was the first
group of visiting artists ever to
receive a standing ovation in
Yokohama.
On its tours with the
continental UJS. the Field Band
has performed at most of the
countrys finest concert halls
and amphitheaters, including the
Hollywood Bowl, the Red Rocks
Theater in Denver, Philadelphias
Robin Hood Dell, New Jerseys
Garden State Arts Center, the
Hatch Shell in Boston, the San
Francisco Opera House and the
Ford Auditorium in Detroit. In
New Yorks Carnegie Hall, the
Field Band was the first military
band to present a full-dress

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UNITED STATES
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ARMY rItLU BAINU
- WASHINGTON, D.C.
s . v . ' -.. ... ",% S > kVfi&'i '%<, v'T.;
HOUSE OF TRAVEL I
1 complete travel services 1
1 credit cards accepted I \ I
I specializing in cruises J ) I
I representing all major I
airlines nJ^VNiXv^//f
I no service charge / I
.w
I TRAVEL I
1 Mon. -Thurs.: 3415 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 1
I 8:30 AM. 5:30 P.M. GAINESVILLE. FLORIOA I
Friday: WESTSIOE
I B:3OAM-7:OOPM SHOPPING CENTER I

Thursday, Saptambar 18, 1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

concert. The band has appeared
at the New York and Seattle
Worlds Fairs and represented
the Department of the Army at
EXPO 67 in Montreal.
Though seen and heard by
millions of people around the
world on television, radio, and in
motion pictures, the largest
crowd ever to witness a single
performance by the band was in
Milwaukee, Wisconsin. On the
evening of July 3rd, 1968, more
than 325,000 people jammed
the shoreline of Lake Michigan
to hear the band as it
participated in the Old
Milwaukee Days celebration.
In addition to its concert
tours the Field Band is called
upon to participate in a variety
of ceremonial events. The band
has marched in five Presidential
Inaugural parades, escorted the
President on special occasions
and played for many visiting
heads-of-state.
y The Field Band, as the
musical voice of the Department
of the Army, is authorized to
carry and display the Army Flag.
This banner bears 151 streamers
representing the campaigns in

which the Army has participated
since its inception from the
Revolutionary War to Vietnam.
In concert and on parade, this
standard is always found to the
left of the American Flag.
As impressive as the
performance of their music is
the outstanding appearance of
the bandsmen attired in the
distinctive Army dress blue
uniform. Though in striking
contrast to the dress of the
soldier in combat, the blue
uniform has a tradition dating
back to the early 1800s, when it
was worn by the officers and
men of the then young United
States Army.
Richard Bowles, Gator Band
Director, points out that a native
of Gainesville is a member of the
Field Band. Jason Weintraub,
who played with the University
Symphony while attending
Gainesville High School, is
probably the best oboe player
ever to come from the state of
Florida. If the Field Band plays
as well as its oboist, the
performance will be excellent,
Bowles said.

Page 31



Page 32

t, The Florida AMgotor, Thursday, Soptambor IS, 1968

Let the chef in the
j Public .Freezer
H Kudin cook dinner tonight!
P|j I P|j| ji|;.<. ..: i;.:' .\\ # K.J } lt TOICLS GOOD i-j .4~*"'Zk£ ; Js. I oxporting Ranchchefs to Americo-
THURS, SHT. 18 / fH: g IMmS/Ii /A -J 11 at executive salaries. Although
THRU J) : ; ;: ;j..:. v) gifted chefs are scarce, you can
uicn MftAW 0r mum .V enjoy many of their creations,
rcu. NOON, =a / r cj JU yiS'l::* ; "'*. tCdC*.** .: A : i-.. thanks to the marvel of frozen foods.
...... i
ISEiI 1 V 25 Borden, Aort.d Flavor, Roman Brand Frozen
Ik mil I mill I ksnf r Sherbets .... 5 *~ s l ; k,; 59
UpPTIAi Kl 3 1255252 i m, ** SSSE*. Retain X 49-
j/Ji j !Iflndlfl Cocktail 5 Cream of Shrimp. VJi 47*
HBililJ M: iatium A Rice Verdi X 39*
aF* -ij.|| j; ni I 6 %a*SUp 4 l t s ..
IN [J 1 S II! 10c car a,i " A -i ed fi * "*" Perch Fillet ... # lit 89 c
lijllLtMH aruHlusi *.. 07 r | sh F ||| et X 69*
SAVE 35c Stokely's Cream Style w
I V'" ,! Olden Corn 5 ?r. $ 1 Fillet of Flounder X 43
v Cooked Shrimp .. X 99*
~V I. Singleton's Frozen
Snack Crackers Pk- 25* Shrimp Cocktail
X little Chocolate
A Duplex Cremes ... S? 39' *'uu 3X. 99*
J Nabicco Sugar
Honey Grahams.. 41*
>'W Koehler's Toity
Zesta Saltines pka 39 c
m. f m 25-oz. I-xStl
Apple Sauce 3 " Fruit Drinks 3 4 t 6 a : $1
32c Assorted Flavors t J | J
Doa Food 8 'X.T $ 1 Pancake Mix T4l
X'LXTLXXT. Waffle Syrup £- 44' I O
Detergent 3 bets. h.i,d.i,i. u
SAVE 35. Libby. Fr*n Green Beans... 5 2 $ l
Monte
Lima Beans 29* Cam SpeciA
SAVE 4c Hunt's
Tomato Baste ...X 29* O
SAVE 6c 7 Saas Cream Russian or Italian Peanut Butter Cups
Dressing X: 29* XI 3-
SAVE 6c 7 Saas Groan Goddess or Caesar I """^ ,,w ~a
Dressing 000006060 bat. 39* I Thin Mints oo o box 39* jj f B9BH
saveioc ] f
Instant Tea 99* £a< / Gttmfikk /
OuickOats X 29* 49 I |
Whita, Decorator or Assorted Colors Bag ChoCOldtOS. . beg 79* 1 J
_-mOL MP _B 2-rall ass, Ooanet ClMters, Chocolate Mint*, Chocoloto g g Bg
9COTI I OWOli 00000 RCiCk dir Chocoloto Peanuts, Chocoloto Moltocl Milk Bell.) fj -lO^g^hl



Crisp Apples 4 L"., 49*
j Pineapples e e 3 tor
Fruit Salad V£ 69*
IJniblf AhOA/IrA fresh, Selad-Perfect
Cucumbers 5
Pimento & Swiss.. .ST 75* v
Kraft's Cracker Berrel
J Sharp Cheddar.. .Sff 79* r
Ameer's Miss Wisceesie
A Medium Cheddar .£T 69 e
KJ Pewu ledivMeeiir-wraeeerf
w Sliced American.. zb
Duiri-Frosh Delicious
SWIFT'S premium proten GOV'T. Cottage Cheese ... 5 59*
JNSPECTEPJtEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE Margarine '-15*
3 c V* J
Swift s Premium Proten Bone-In nSntiAr Dallc -* Oft c J
§nl Daucl p r u Ac Dinner Rolls < 39
rUI KWST 000000000000 |b. f 7 Newt Assorted Flavors
Swift's Premium Proten toneless YogUf"t # 4 tee* M
Imperial Roast Mr 99* Kitea# 0r "-' '" Wry ~
SwMt's Premium Prmdn tpn.l.s, ln 9 ..sh Cut CHoOSe Spreads .
Beef Roast ?; s i* **. PMim*.*.!* Q
Swift's Premium Proton toof Cream Cheese pkg. 33
A | _e| Testy Cheese A Tumeto
SllOrf Ribs ?b. 39* Merio's Pizza . . Tim 1 89 e
Swifts Premium Tender-Grown Government- I CFfoleny
Inspected Shipped, D&D, Fresh not Frozen, I
i.bi
Fryer Breasts n>. 69* IjoWI
For The Kids, Fryer ||| B
Drumsticks 69
Fryer Thighs >. 69
ADAbm Beef Liver >1
Fryer Wings ......... ' 39 | x 69* HJSJ
Swift's Premium Brawn-Sugar
**Ae Sliced Bacon S* mil^B^ai
Swift's Premium Testy ....
. am m *eio Swift's Premium Kosher Style
Corned Beef $ 1 Sliced Salami VEST 49*
/-mjigm, .-)} B Swift*. Premium Seusegu * pa
rapm "*** ~ 69 Polish Sausage 'ST 79*
iMSjm Braunschweig 39* c,eked H a m *1
AT eI I 111 |* U r\ a, m Always A Family Favarita
\Mtmm\km Tarnew Wieners 'ST 55*
. Ratb's Black Hewk Banalas.
f. Smoked Dainties 99*
SI K Sliced PepperOltl #e a pound 49 H.rmea'.Oranga-SeadAsst'd Sliced
Lunch Meats eeeeeee 3 pkg*. 99*
Olive Salad "99* KlS^^.iSr32-
Diffsr.nt Famous Armour's Star
Om£.- "' r Health Salad ST 39* Hot Dags £69*
__ Greet Snndwickas nt tka Gamnl Sanfned Trantt Quick-freon
Submarines 39* Treat Fillets 89*
U Bar-B-CwedFryers ....-79* LakelrieSmelts X S3*

PUBLIX

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Store hours 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Straat

Thursday, gaptaiwbar 18, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

o
A It K E T S
cUf mlJb
/yoMp^s
\ assumes**
'\' ; e
This coupon worth
on the purchase of 8 bars^^^j
personal IVORY SOAP I
with coupon 4/25< IP"
I*! Good at PUBLIX MARKETS |R|K|
EXTRA W^\
Stamps pl
its this covpon ami rstcsAtt or Bifid
Swift's Premium Boneless
Canned Hostess Hams
I I four lb. can $4.99
37. (fxpirm W**., Sapt. 34. 14*4)
EXTRA
VTITN THIS COUPON ANB PVBCNASI Os HkSSB
[Herman's 0.8. Asst'd.
Sliced Lunch Meats 2
three 6-oz. pkgs. 99c
38. (Cipirss Wsd., Sept. 24, IHf)
EXTRA iF^I
wit* this couron am* r**CMA>i or BBBH
S. S. Pierce Frozen
Beef Bourguignonne
16-oz. pkg. $2.99
4* t
, OV. (Expim W. 4., S**t. I*. 14*4) <
xee*iu>ftiuuuuudiuuuHUH> EXTRA (F s^
WITH THIS COVfOM ANB PVBCNASI Os Kfifl
E Heart's Delight 1
Apricot Nectar 1
6 12-oz. cans 99c 2
40. ((**<>* W**., S**t. 14, 14*4)
EXTRA
WITH THIS COVPON ANB PVBCNASI Os
I Hunt's
Tomato Sauce
4 #3OO cans $1
41. (Ixpir** W**.. S**t. 14. 14*4)
WITH THIS COVPON ANB PVBCNASI Os
[Johnson's Glory
Bug Cleaner
24-oz. can $1.89
42. (fxpir*, Mr**.. S.pt 14. 14*4)
EXTRA
WITH TNIS COVPON ANB PVBCNASI Os Kb
IStouff air's Tuna-Noodle I
Casserole 2
11 V2-ox. pkg. 59c 2
45. (Expir*. Mr*4.. s**r. 14. 14*4)
HCgS^H
with covpon Bbiijjl
(Lambrecht's Pizza
with Sausage A Cheese 2
14-oz. pkg. 79c
46. IlKptr** MT*4.. S**l. 14. 14*4)

wmm
ARK E T
Where shopping
is a pleasure

Page 33



Page 34

1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 18, 1969

, mi, sa? iiitlrv'
Sr ;: vi\ >w* ^ok***!
H* t-Mlv-
fIHWk .;JT :
B T -~~ xmmsJU |g
C 1
jp i ; *My%j t *jss§p .y s 11 ii'
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Bk E
mt s ft \j-~ ? >- ...
Hi, : IPul me Sk^
II / ', .-,, V, jf_ , >v\ v*v jf 3 '* *s*SH J&l|i3fN
f' T % IK
' W JliiiiilHti* r 't- i^pwaS
V ( f* \* *> A /;' ; v sf, *x n
; v **&
/Music Building Going Up

By Alligator Services
Ringing hammers herald future melody as
construction is underway on UFs new music
building.
The three-story $1.6 million project, located just
south of the University Auditorium in the center of
campus, will compose the west end of the
Architecture and Fine Arts complex. Drake
Construction Company, Ocala, is contractor for the
teaching and rehearsal facility scheduled for
completion in early 1971.
Especially designed acoustically, the new unit will
give the Universitys music department a permanent
home for the first time. Currently the department is
housed in a temporary wooden structure ally
constructed as a basketball gymnasium.
The first floor of the new building includes
classrooms.

MALONES
Book and Supply
Completely Remodeled
Use our NEW CUSTOMER PARKING LOT
located at the rear of our store.
SAVE ALSO r £
On New & Used U. of F. Glasses & Mugs
U. of F. Sweatshirts
For All Courses Pens
Be Sure To See Us Briefcases
For All Your Art Supplies
SCHOOL NEEDS Desk Lamps
IU. of F. Jewelry Book Ends 1
IU. of F. "T Shirts Checks Cashed I
; .. ... 1 pllli
I Stuffed Animals Clocks I
1712 W. University Ave. Phone 372-0368

The administrative suite for the music
department is located on the first floor and includes
counseling and secretarial spaces.
One of the most complete music libraries in the
state will be housed on the second floor of the new
building.
The real working heart of the building is the third
floor. It contains 20 faculty studios, 25 practice
rooms and a large organ teaching studio. The four
practice rooms have small pipe organs and several
rooms have grand pianos.
The planners say that when the doors are closed
there should be silence in every room.
Designed to be attractive from all angles, the
building has no definite front or back determination
although the exterior stairway is on the north side
of the building facing the Century Tower.
A $458,976 grant from the U.S. Office of
Education will support construction costs.

r Climbaboard X
.. e S.S. Winnjammer* £
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to /l
Yt Midnight ")
' J Bernie Sher //
i at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday It
) Oysters & clams on the half shell I* I
Michelob on draft \(\
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty A
V/
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2n Closed Sundays A)'

MUSICAL HOME
The Music Department will be
making its home in a $1.6
million building by 1971. This is
an architect's conception of the
three-story structure.



lEF ,oin the THO||SAND t,
fflZ Are Saving Money
and Parking Space yo> saw
I SAVE On Every Item
Every Day m
HEALTH BEAUTY AIDS COSMETICS GREETING CARDS
PHOTO FINISHING XEROX COPYING PAPERBACKS MAGAZINES
I \
I ..v J **- \ 4
Look what 9<
will BUY!

McLeans
Toothpaste
Family size __
value $1.09 3/ w
Money Saving
Coupon On
Photo Finishing
'so( This coupon worth 50c
on the developing and printing
of Kodacolor film. Must be
presented when brought in for
processing
Expires Sept. 27,1969
2 Locations T Serve You
* \
, ,-y ; f
> V
1620 W. University Ave.
.
6 E. University Ave.
+

Alcohol
Rubbing
Compound
Value 49c
' 9
Safeguard
Soap
Complexion Size
Value 19c
~WT
Fingernail
Clipper
Value 29c
*

Thursday, September 18. 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Coupon
FREE
Xerox Copy
Limit One
y , c 'r' m
Per Customer
Expires Sept. 30,1969
COMET
CLEANSER
Value 20$
14$
THIS
COUPON
Worth 50<
Purchase Os Any

Stereo Record Album
- This Is In Addition
To Our Everyday
Low Discount Record
Prices
Expires Sept. 26,1969

Page 35



Tlw Florida Alligator, Thuraday, Saptambar 18, 1969

Page 36

62-Year-Old Philosopher
Designs Teaching Method

By Alligator Services
A method for teaching arithmetic instantly to
kindergarten children will be introduced this fall in
a pilot study at UFs P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School.
Devised by William King Skinner, a third year UF
philosophy student, the concept is based on the
hypothesis that children will learn mathematics
more easily and naturally through play experience.
Skinner has desired a set of light-weight wooden
blocks with raised colored mathematical signs and
numbers so that the four and five-year-old child can
associate the number of lines in a sign with the
number on a block.
According to Skinners formula* the child, under
the direction of the teacher, will teach himself
arithmetic and discover for himself the concepts of
methematics.
He will learn the location of the numbers in the
value hierarchy, how to add, subtract, multiply and
divide by a process of absorption rather than rote
memorization.
Skinner hypothesizes that by the time a child is
ready for first grade, he will be ready for signed
numbers, fractions and decimals, and by the time he
is in second grade, he should be able to do algebra
and geometry.
The study will involve two groups of 30 children,
four and five years old, at P. K. Yonge, under the
direction of Mrs. Ruth Duncan, director of
curriculum and research. The experimental group
will use the Skinner blocks while the control group
will study mathematics without the blocks.
Although the 62-year-old self-styled philosopher
never finished his Brooklyn Public School 107,
Skinner was admitted to Tufts University Graduate

Roast beef ala car
% ki i


I,
l 1 m

to* *. .
- M
. 1405 S.W. 13th ST. I
Just South of the Underpass

J 7 : ' '-w* '" * W 5
V v. IK- wai'.i n oi ami-wica, Inc.
$1,799*
Whats the catch? There isnt any.
$1,799 is the suggested retail price at the port
of entry tor the VW sedan.
The price includes the Federal excise tax ,and
import duty.
It also includes the built-in heater/defroster,
windshield washer, electric windshield wipers,
outside rearview mirror, padded dash, front seat
headrests, and seat belts front and back.
Not to mention the new electric rear-window
defogger and the new ignition/steering lock.
(When the key is removed, the steering wheel is
locked in place.)
Its the price of the real thing, not a stripped strippeddown
down strippeddown economy model.
What else do you have to pay?
The charge for transporting the can from the
port of entry. The dealer delivery charge. And
local sales tax.
There is one optional that makes a lot of sense.
The automatic stick shiff. (It eliminates the clutch
pedal.)
Well, thats it.
Unless, of course, you count the cost of gas and
oil it takes you to get here in your present car.
Miller-Brown
422 N. W. 13th St. 376-4551 AUTHORIZED J
. Mp . mmm . , DEALER
OPEN TIL 7:00
5:00 SAT. & CLOSED SUNDAY

School for a special summer course in 1957. Later
he enrolled at Miami-Dade Junior College where he
received the associate of arts degree. He has been at
UF since September, 1968.
Under the guidance of Dr. Leonard Kaplan,
associate professor of elementary education.
Skinner expanded upon the idea he conceived in
1965 to teach instant arithmetic to youngsters.
He enlisted the help of an education graduate
student, Robert Paul Souvorin, to make the blocks,
and Jack Bates, local attorney, to underwrite the
SSOO cost.
At the beginning of the school year, the childres
in each group will be given a standardized test to
determine their level of readiness for mathematics,
and at the jnid-point and end of the year to evaluate
their progress.
If Skinners teaching theory works, it will be the
climax but not necessarily the final
accomplishment for a career that started as a
runaway 12-year-old in Brooklyn, progressed as a
successful salesman, unsuccessful businessman,
volunteer policeman, junior college graduate and
elder statesman undergraduate.
Skinner says he has three main goals: a college
degree, publication of his book and locating his
18-year-old son who lives somewhere in Brooklyn.
Skinners book, The Lost Angfo Saxon Bible, is
a paraphrase into modern language of Dr. L. A.
Waddells The British Edda. The latter was a
translation of The Poetic Edda by the British
comparative philologist (Waddell).
Skinner claims, because of obsolete Anglo Saxon
terms, the drama of the book a unique history of
primitive European religion as translated from
Icelandic scrolls is completely lost to 499 out of
500 readers.

M Bb vB 1 B
HEY * R^R^Rv.R
>t RMBRa
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> v a RSll^l%slii:l'i
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\ ',\l < .1,..0*m
wmgmjMmr mu vmmmml y jl \
- / \
A
wt i,v \ m^^bP^
BhirmlbK v 3f\ nmiifi^
Wl LLIAM KING SKINNER
... instant arithmetic for kindergarteners
N/m back to
SCHOOL
SPECIALS
Handsome three-piece O
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Tape Input and Stereo Headphone Jacks
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Plays all size cassette tapesup to
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The DUET. A6lO e Automatic record level control!
COUCHS Inc
"Serving The Uof F Since ?933
608 N. Main Ph. 376-7171



~ ~ Jf i# Shop Wilsons
( Sale >*
jfl U w '*h *^ own 1 orth value
M m m m |
Famous Brand SWEATERS JfH
Sportsnirts Pullovers, cardigans jmf pll|
£i;ii|||jyJsfeys£ c *n bu,k v or P|M
Stripes, Solids, fancies. : -'X:. u p|w'- ft/- y\ Wool, orlon and blends 1/ \ 81l
Perma-press. Regular and or 9 * 9 * lS \
button down collars styles. |f SALE $5.99
Re $6 s7 slacks wtm
y jMfl Wool, wool blends %p*-.. 1
Annivprsnrv and corduory. Bell JflflNKl
Anniversary / >Mf and straight leg. dfy^^r
Sale 83.99 f\ \? Xf 0,i ' smh
/ U. / SKIRTS bALt W W
*|> \ / Wool, woolblends in straight
and pleated styles.
lQ Famous Brand ri - 5 sale $5.99 Ate#
I
All Weather Jackets B
Unlined. Perma press Dacron j J I Favorite styles in
and cotton. Machine washable L* f SHHHRV /\ / /X short and longsleeves.
Select from the new foil colors J| jj solids, checks
Reg. sl6 \it-V in cottons, blends
Anniversary Sale $10.99
, e TIP* Anniversary Sale $3.59
Men's Shop.-Street Floor '* |

Thursday, September 18, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 37



I, Ton Florida AWtar. Thurstoy, Soptambor 18, 1969

Page 38

r -V ;* \
|HHHh
. *
*


I v£P yD .m v ,n 4 r P^'CE |
I GoocTN Rich I
[ MIXES I
I sto 8c: IfV I
i pkg S

r LIBBY'S )
(PEAS, FMNCN STYLE I
I BEANS OR |
I GOLDEN eORMSSft.SSSj
I fSmml Ki7ez I
J 1/

I EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
|
SALTINESj
ILB l£i< I
BOX I jF

Save Everyday on Your
Health and Beauty Needs!
SAVE 604.50 x CAN. ANTI-PfRSPfRANT SPRAY
SECRET....... .99*
SAVI SLO7.AOOI7.MED A HARD
COLGATE Tooth Brush. 3/$l
v " ooi
SMMuSXSiuwsnuVtMiVKWmiMU
HIDDEN MAGIC.. 99*
ttVESOMoxBTLRCOANDDRY
HECK SHAMPOO 39*

P 2o" J
| 'MtrMftOr
S JMAXIMI
UTKYHIS |
COUPON
E Kxratcssorseti*^nw*
bMMBHIaiM

Daily-Fresh Baked Boads
French Stick
BREAD
DHINEB ROUS 1/29*
KACHWiS 49*

ItL tB|M 'W BB
Will H I IIII
Choice Daeufis!
EVERYDAY LOW PRICES GOOD SEVEN DAYS A WEEK. BONUS BUYS GOOD THURSDAY
J ' (.

[fyERTDAY tow Pfi/CF/'I
rUBBYS
I CATSUP j
[* 5/ $ 1 J

| gyEflypAY low price f]
I FRUIT j
I COCKTAIL I
[ 355/*1 J

rio'oifj
ANY SIZE*??!
I CHEERIOS I
! WITH THIS f!
I COUPON jl
.. I
, Sammstrr a*4 rrpj

/ KING SIZE )
tajPRIYE
|\yWW\ LAUNDRYDETEKOHIT I
I \
Jp 4|ij|nRS&ES!li|35SE5BH 7%sisiF

[EVERYDAY LOW PRICE <1
j
HUNGRY JACK I
PILLSBURY. INSTANT MASHED 8
POTATOES I
320, Og< I
BOX

COMPARE! Yrtf
White Potatoes uor PAQca uaa 8/$l $1.16 16c
Lillys Tomato Saucell c >* sc
Mushrooms 4 OZ. UN STEMS 0 PIECES. 4/$l $1.32 32C
Lykes Beef Stew 3/95c $1.17 W
Biltmore Luncheon Loaf- 3/$l 1.17 ,n<
Lykes Potted Meat 10 c 2/e ? c
Tuna Fish 41 1 OZ. TIN EATWEU 5/$l $1.35 35c
Packer Label Saltines * 19c 29c 10c
Chocolate Jumbo Pies ioxo,u 3/sl*i.i7 i/ c
Choc. Chip Cookies 4/$l *l*32 32c

m 1
fOf "off 7
I GIANT SIZE (Slb.loz.) I
I 3-B All I
I concentrated AABmRb
WITH THIS
I COUPON I
U"'* I Covpmi par Family
I W?riA EXP,RES SIW 24-69

/Apple m )
PIES M
( 9:39*1

I EVERyDAy 10W PRICE?']
[ KRAFT
I MACARONI I
I DINNER I
[ I9 C J

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
| TOASTEM frl
I POP UPS OR I
I KELLOGG'S I
I POP TARTS I
[ 3f c j

f RICH-TEX OR 'l
SNOW FLAKE
SHORTENING
I SAVE I

| £V£RYPAY tOtV PRICEH
f FRISKIES^I
I ASST MEAT FLAVORS
I DOG FOODS j
[ & ? 1 j

COMPARE! S-fiT
Vanilla> Wafers IS o*. BESSIE lt| 4/$l $1.32 32c
Sandwich Cookies stars*. 39c 49c ioc
Potato Sticks ** 3/$l $1.17 i7
Twin Pet Cat Food i 3/29 c 39c io<>
Dog Food .so 6/slsiqs sc
409 Spray Cleaner 77c 79 c ?
Crystal White rs t ot rr 49c wc ioc
Borateem *. 69 c 79c ioc
Pantry Pride Bleach -< < 28c sic sc
Pantry Pride Bleach 39c 45c 6c

| EVERYDAY LOW PftlCf
I COFFEE I
I MATE I
1801 mm 18
\- y I

StokeiysGEENS
SAVE SH
Sir 3/49
.) ~r: JEtr
SAVE j£o4.QU<J?lAsTtC.sf*OONPf jSfNVf
i wMpflHB *3O -
N * !.> ..

!, EVERYDAY LOW PRICE/I
f 1,1 'i^l
WITH BEAN 'j J
HORMEL I
CHILI I
3/1]

| to iv rfiicr.^
I 9 Lives
jf ASS r MEAT FLAVORS I
I CAT FOOD I
6 c s an 10" J

[merpur tow price
APPLE H
I JELLY I
1 BLUE PLATE OR il/NAID PURE fl
I ?i I
[ JAB ITr J



more lor u s,
iflnnt hSHim till ssr""
UUin HflTu JLUS
THRU WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th, 1969 QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED

I fVFRyDAy LOW PRICE!]
[POT 1
ROAST I
I tylfcjf *&(£*, I
I ntjfl BP*- I

( SIRLOIN ]
STEAKS
I @£3 tiast am I
[,ifs m Jl*l9J

SAY LOW PRICE f]
M FRESH tJJJM
SOUND I
IEEF j

COMPARE! HFf'Vf
Daisy Cheese Wedges 69c 7 ?< iw
Fish Fillets i.o ao*
Hygrade Cheese Loaf * 59c m iw
Solid Oleo PANTY PRIDE 11. PKOt. 2/29c 35* 4<
Sliced American Cheese i, < 69c 7 < iw
Boneless Beef Stew 78c m n*
Lamb Roast sssr.ssr 49c ao*
Pork Chops PMST CUT RIB PR It. 49c 69* 20 1
Pork Loin Chops 68c 7 w n*

1 BONUS BUY!U
I i
IBS: BRE AK T AST LINKS |h|
I Fresh Pork I
SAUSAGE
- 89 3
[ pkg ;t|yff Jtlb Jgg

ww am m mwmb OUR (VERY PROft~
COMPARE! ar s?
Uverwurst ** 29c aw iw
Sliced Ham 59c w iw
Skinless Franks ssss* 39c 49* 10*
Chipped Sliced Meats W 33c aw w

Bay tow pm?]
in I
UCK
OAST I
; 58]

hvf/DAy tow PRICE.n
| SLICE 1/4
I PORK LOIN I
I CHOPS I
[ B I

I BONUS guy/ -1
I E23 ASSORTED wM
I COLD I
I CUTS I
L ?? 1

5 a y tow price ri
UCK H
TEAK I
S 68]

( DIR o> 'i
I Bm UP COUNTRY STYLE I
STEAKS
I A| I
leal ftmiun C I
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lyjjjjj Jr LB y

IEVFRyDAy 10W PRICE H
l
SLICED
BACON I
six 69 j

COMPARE! iPfF
White Paper Plates 9in."69c aw aw
Aluminum Foil 4/$l *l-32 32c
Best-Pak Freezer Bags 51 * 25c 2 w w
Charcoal Briquettes = 88 c $1.19 aw
Charcoal Lighter Fluid > 3/$l n. 17 iw
f LAUNDRY sheM
[basket 79*J

| BONUS BUY! 1
| JUMBO M
I HONEYDEW I
I MELONS I
| if

COMPARE!
Georgia Peaches m
Mandarin Oranges
Carnation Slender -
Strained Baby Foods
Libby Garden Peas
Green Giant Peas *
Del Monte Garden Peas* 01 "

-
GAINESVILLES
LOWEST
Em FOOD
Hgjjygl PRICES!
"fWJPJfIWWJJFJIJPR IN J.M. FIELDS PLAZA
9J7 NORTH MAIN THE
CORNER OF lOtl. STREET
V 1 --J

[mmay tow price f]
I SOUD^J
OLEO j
[ a £29* J

gwt/s BUY I 1
YSUCKLE w|
CED J
URKEY I
1.391
ROAST :mh 52.89 flf

E BONUS BUY!
I
4r; -.1 EATING I
.\ P>|\ OR COOKING I
APPLES J
49* I

OUR EVERY plot- SAVE
DAY LOW aaly **
PRICE II p*y T TO
4/$l SI 24 24c
4/$l 1.16 16c
99C 10c
B c 6/65c 17C
5/$l $1.35 35c
4/$l SI.OB 8c
4/$l SI.OB 16*

Thursday

DE CU FLORIDA "N
I FRYERS
rTmUfl I
linmnj I
WHOLE BAGGED D J
SAVE 12$ LB /

# firmwl _P- A
I linrmj jfleSK fancy coiden ripe I
BANANAS
HORMEL BACON. ............(.a 89^
HORMEL FRANRS.:* &69t
HERMAN SLICED HAM.ff.ws....gpAW

f £H U.S. NO, I WHITE
/ potatoes I

j BOm BUT! 1
ILEG-oH
LAMB
R QUICK FROZEN NEW ZEALAND J
t wHCit "YFls
I LB g*f J

| BONUS BUY! 1
I
i PERCH J
I FILLETS I
1 39< J

| BONUS BUY! J
i! FRESH FIRM RIPE 1
E SALAD 1
I TOMATOES I
[4U* 19 J

Page 39



Page 40

the

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ONE
Fill in the card. Name: Deborah Toule;
Classification: 2UC; Wanted: one parking sticker.
The Saga
Os A
Parking Sticker
^
32719 Mofos
COMMUTER By
EXPIRES T w
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Pay up. For $lO she gets a little black and white decal.

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Check in. Here's where they find out she lives far enough from
campus to qualify as a commuter.
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Another check. Pick up parking information and on to the next stop.
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Stick it on. Now she's a registered commuter.



f II % A a
The Great American
College Bedspread may send
you to 001% free!
(Announcing the 2nd Annual Bates Piping Rock
Send Me to College Contest.)
... jmmmL:..- *.
pJHm
JMfffllBBPX "\ /
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£sxSj§jftX\ .' ;X;X;XyXyX*XyXv* *iyX\\;X\jx;XyXy.;.yXyX
-life Bates Ist Annual
SendMeto College* Contest. And a
years free tuition at Hofstra
This year, the Send Me to College'
|| Contest is going to be even bigger.
Because this year Bates is going
& college. :|;; s ,:
And one of those students could be you.
:£ ; The contest is simple to enter. All you have to do is go to the
Domestics Department in any of the stores listed i n this ad. Put
your name and address on one of our ballots. And wait. The contest

I.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.:.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;-;.;.;.;-;-;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;. i-11-M-I-i-.ylylvMvM^l-M-Iv.-XvM-M-X'lvl-XvX'X-XwrvMvMvX^X'XvX'M'Mv^X-MvX*:*:
w a4swnr. /*r r Ar/ Ililplj
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IVEYS OF JACKSONVILLE

§|§ runs from 3*
why is Sates doing ail this? l;: .. w*~' w
Well, youve been taking a Bates Piping Rock to college for so l||l|
many years, we felt it was about time Piping Rock took you to college
Youve made Piping Rock the Great American College
Bedspread. And no wonder. Piping Rock comes in 18 different
colors. And you dont have to waste valuable time taking care of it.
Piping Rock is machine washable and dryabie. Theres even a No *.
Press finish, so it never needs ironing.
!-x-:v;->!-XvX\\;Xy!;!yX-!;.;v.'vX;Y.-:-;- ; -vX; ;X;X;XyX;XX ; x-x-X\Xx-x'x"xXx"xXx";X-X\;X X\-x x x-XvX-x*x-X\\yX*XyX'X\\yX
So enter the Bates Piping Rock Said Me to College
Contest at any of these stores, rfry m
And let Bates take you to college. f £>/¥
PIPING ROCK IS A BATE'S T M REG FULI DTTAUS AT STORES \
x I4st Nruf Yrk
;"xvx"x*x'xvxvx*xwx'x*x*xx*£*i"x->x"xxsx*x'xx*x-x'xx^'x*x*x*x*xv£^^
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thursday

Page 41



L Th. FlwMa AWPMT. W W. W

Page 42

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HAIR IS THE ISSUE

UF males like hair and not all of it's on the
top of their heads. This collage o# senior portraits

Shooting The Curl
BSftb
Wild Surf
Vlflp* Out

shows a few growths that could put Civil War
generals to shame.

Summers over, but
for a lucky few its still
Surfs Up
*
' S
- ~ -£
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.
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PHOTOS
BY
TOM
KENNEDY

Swimming Pools
Coming In Spring-
Sometime early this spring UF will have a pair of recreational pools
and a new set of handball courts.
The two pools have been in the planning stages since last year, and
final architectural plans are due by the end of the week, according to
Campus Planning Director Walter Matherly.
The handball courts, which have been under discussion during the
summer, are due to be let out on contract this month.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd announced the decision
of the Campus Planning and Land Use Committee to relocate the
handball courts from the proposed Yulee-Broward area to Norman
Hall area.
Shepherd said the committees decision was based on the fact that
handball courts are architecturally ugly and would destroy the
aesthetic value of the Yulee-Broward area.
The eastern end of campus was chosed because of its accessibility to
Yulle, Broward, Towers, and Rawlings. During September of last year
* each of these dorms conducted a survey to see if a recreational center
- consisting of the present tennis courts, and the constructions of a
pair of pools and the handball courts would be favorable with
residents, Mike Davidson, Secretary of Recreational Affairs said:
The results were overwhelmingly favorable, Davidson said, We
(SG) then took the proposal to the Campus Planning and Land Use
Committee. They in turn referred us to another committee.
I was under the impression this committee was to decide on the
feasibility of the location, but it started an investigation of every
recreational project that was started in the UFs existence. It seemed
like it was stalling us, hoping wed become tired with the delay and
forget our plans.
While construction will be underway within the next month for the
handball courts, the pools are still on the drawing board.
Red tape procedures and the selection of an architect were cited by
Davidson as the reasons for the delay.
According to Davidson, the Federal Housing Administration in
Atlanta is giving money to the Division of Housing for the express
purpose of building pools the UF at large is not providing the funds.
This federal grant is given under the heading of dormitory
improvement. The grant must go through Housing.
We made an agreement with Housing that we would divert our
immediate funds to the improvement and reconstruction of Camp
Wauberg, and when they (housing) got their money, they would have
the pools built.
The cost of the pools has been estimated at $150,000.
Matherly says building will start when the architectural designs have
been approved and a construction company has been named.

but



History Prof To Study Cuban Revolutionaries

The Caribbean Legion, a shadowy group of
unsuccessful revolutionaries who taught Fidel
Castro how not to overthrow a government, is
proving to be a research challenge for a history
professor at UF.
Dr. Neill W. Macualay Jr., who once served as an
officer in Castros guerrilla army, hopes to put
together a series of personal interviews, private
papers, documents, newspaper articles, diplomatic
correspondence and historical articles into a
comprehensive account of the legions exploits.
The common characteristics of this particular
group of revolutionaries are that they were loosely
organized, largely middle class liberals or radicals,
and almost universally unsuccessful.
By the end of 1954 the legions enemies were
secure in almost every republic in the Caribbean,
Macaulay notes. During the nine-year period
following World War 11, they had attempted to
overthrow such Caribbean dictators as Trujillo of
the Dominican Republic, Somoza of Nicaragua,
Perez Jimenez of Venezuela and Batista of Cuba.
Two futher characteristics of the legionnaires
- their seeming distaste for hard work and their
failure to attract popular followings were not lost

Army Drummers
To March At UF
The United States Drum and Fife Corps will
appear at this years Homecoming Parade. They will
march and perform drill maneuvers and appear in
Pre-Growl..
The first Homecoming float committee meeting
will be tonight at 7 in the Blue Key office. Deadline
for float entries is Sept. 26.

What Is Fraternity?

&. V V -*'
" .. ? "*. ..
"X..
Visit the 26 fraternities
and see for yourself
' o
what fraternity life
really is. We will
be open every evening
This Webk, for your
convenience ... or stop
in and party with us
*
after the game.
* t

There is a place for you in a Florida Fraternity
* -A i-' j

FORMER GUERRILLA OFFICER

upon two of their number, Castro and Ernesto
(Che) Guevara.
Macaulay believes it was during this period that
the pair conceived a new Caribbean revolutionary
strategy modeled after the successful campaigns of
the Viet Minh against the French in Indo-China.
While Castros own successful take over of Cuba
was financed largely by the middle class, Macauly
said, his accompanying propaganda efforts were
aimed at the lower class throughout Latin America.
He counted as much on this propaganda as on
fighting.
Castro avoided conventional military conflict
with Batistas army, according to Macauly, but
through guerrilla tactics he convinced the Cuban
populace that Batistas rule and the military force
was ineffective.
The historian expects to follow up his present
study with a book on Castro, whose rebel army he
joined in 1958 as a young ex-GI just back from
Korea. His interest in Cuba had been kindled earlier
when as a student he traveled there on low-cost
vacations.
Macaulay broke with Castro after his rebel army
ousted Batista. He resigned from the army and made
a short-lived attempt at truck farming on the island.

a Ji
IB p *B/ L h 1w I [ B| U
*£. < iJKf jdf / ,AK
jfIHHHi -BBMHfc
SHADES OF 1776
I ... U. S. Army Drum and Fife Corps practicing for Homecoming Parade.

1 fIIHB lire; %
am m LWdi3^ >; 1 ?
P sF' ijyM
; :' J ; \ ' v

Thursday, Ssptsmbsr 18, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

As Castro assumed dictatorial powers and began
courting the Communists, Macauly fled from the
island for the safety of his family.
Macaulays research on the Caribbean Legion
began last summer when he was awarded a grant
from the Social Sciences Research Council at UF.
As a professor at UF, Macaulay is strategically
placed for research on the Caribbean area. The UF
library has one of the best concentrations of
Caribbean source material in the world, including
back copies of all important newspapers in the area.
The historians research also will take him to
Miami, where a number of the participants of the
1945-54 revolutionary and counterrevolutionary
movements now live, to Washington, D.C., and to
numerous countries in the Caribbean area.
In that 25 years have passed since the start of the
legions activity, Macaulay must intensively
pursue personal interviews. Death and lapses of
memory are rapidly erasing this rich source of
material.
He has published a number of articles on
the Cuban revolution, including a Marine Corps
Gazette series on guerrilla tactics in 1963 a time
of increasing American military interest in the
methods of the Viet Cong.

Page 43



Page 44

L The Florida Alligator. Thuredey, September 18, 1969

Your Convenient A & P Only 5 Blocks East of Tigert Hall
r~"~: % jlf jJT Exta Special! 7< off label
$T Crisco Oii LMwiv
Extra Spcda AOa
Elects SFsolad Dressing 'V wT E "O"*",,
!W" .'VI BJB |M #% I#% Old Milwaukee Brand
k^ 7 mlldCIB It DCCD fc.
aN?'49f OSJt
order
etch u p 2 3 9^|rUPV^
All Grinds Vacuum Packed Coffee (limit 1 w/ss. or more food G,t r ''t '*
£ m.-.--, Ist f BI, jr*aIMKMeBBM
.1 W Ex p i ii s b p ll 'y SaSH^
11 idea recipes FLOUR Regular or Low Calorie Yukon
-tpi?if§lj 2 '79jF
more food order wSuVchase^^^^^B^fc.
a Serenade . A
be for For
grocery you are
Je to one low
jHp no .
B $6 purchase you can get two pieces B^B
w W ... and so on. P
Dishwashing Detergent Special! Showboat Brand Special!
AHOY LIQUID 29{. PORK & BEANS 10{
Thirst Quenching Special! <_ _ Morton s Frozen Special!
GATORADE CREAM PIES 4 £*l



wiROUND STEAI -4 Pork Chopst
X22ir-^c pork roast lb 55$
All Varieties Sultana Frozen EXTRA SPECIAL!
': SU SU
ssm! itQa 1L&
TL PKG v ? ib. IO va
Vvilx I
i6oz can #R^HAyIBBi|JHR
r*JN/RF* 4/89 r vWT"
Jane Parker Regular Sliced Fresh Crisp Iceberg
WHITE BREAD '4 4/89$ LETTUCE ha 19$
Jane Parker ~b AA Fresh Firm Ripe AA
LEMON PIE ~ 39C TOMATOES lb 23$

Thursday, September 18, 1909, The Florida AMfetor,

Page 45



Page 46

Old Traditions
Aimed At Frosh
V '
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The university in todays space age hardly seems the place for old
traditions to flourish, but the UF has several still alive, some retired
ones old timers would like to see return, and many more no one dares
bring back.
Freshmen were the target for most old traditions and Homecoming
was the season.
Students spent months before Homecoming collecting every loose
piece of wo+d in Gainesville for a bonfire, says Journalism Dean J. P.
Jones, a student here in the 3os. The freshmen did most of the
collecting, though. They had to match their weight in wood.
Every bonfire had one thing in common an old outhouse placed
precariously on top. The night before the game, after this finishing
touch was added, freshmen were collected from the dorms and
paraded around town in their pajamas.
The parade route was the same for each game, downtown and
through the local movie theater. Two thousand students marching in
front of the screen totally disrupted the theater, Jones said.
Eventually, the theater management promised UF students a free
midnight movie, providing they stopped the pajama parades.
Another reposed practice is the fraternity house party, recalled
Robert C. Beaty, former dean of student affairs. Before UF became
coeducational, one weekend was set aside each spring when UF men
invited Florida State University women to stay at their fraternity
house for a house party. Beaty said classes were called off on
Thursday and Friday, so the weekend parties began early.
House parties arent the same now that UF is coed, but the
fraternity weekends each spring keep the tradition alive.
The fraternity serenade is another tradition that still flourishes. But
another type of serenade no longer exists, Beaty said. Students used
to sing to the president on his birthday.
Hazing is a tradition better left in the past, Jones said. Some of
those beatings were pretty severe.
The many bamboo thickets which used to cover the campus have
disappeared understandably. A favorite pastime of students was
burning the thickets.
The burning bamboo sounded like machine guns, Beaty said.
The Plaza of the Americas has always held special meaning Tor UF
students. The 21 trees in the plaza symbolize the 21 countries of
Latin America, Beaty said.
But the most cherished tradition, he said, is the honor system.
UF is one of the very few schools in the south to use the honor
system from the very beginning. Legend has it that one of the first
professors at the UF gave his first test on the honor system, it was
successful, and the whole school soon joined in.
UFs reputation for high scholarship and easy relationships between
faculty and students has always been the same, Beaty said.
But the tradition of friendliness is dead, he said. Students always
spoke to each other on campus. Now they dont even nod.
FOR DOGGONE GREAT VALUES!!

P. "" I
,oC^.
Youre in charge of building the float, decorating the house
* and dressing up the party. So you need Pomps, the flame flameresistant
resistant flameresistant decorative tissue. You can decorate anything beau beautifully
tifully beautifully with Pomps, inside and out, and do it faster, easier,
better. Pomps dont cost much. Theyre cut 6 /r x 6" square,
ready to use, come in 20 vivid colors that are virtually run runproof
proof runproof when wet. Buy Pomps at your bookstore, school supply
dealer or paper merchant. And ask your librarian for our
booklet How to Decorate With Pomps. If she doesnt have
it, just tell her to write for a copy. Or, order your own copy.
Send $1.25 and your address today to The Crystal Tissue
Company, Middletown, Ohio 45042.
Vr pomps 9
- 7 1 : J
t i 1

>

K The Florida Alligator, Thursday, September 18. 1069.

It Costs $5 To Replace
Brown Registration Cards

If youve lost, discarded or burned your
registration card, or the new card for the
acquisition of athletic tickets, its going to cost you
$5. Theres just no way out of it.
It seems many students didnt read the
instructions on the cards carefully. They threw
away one of the cards, and are now requesting a
duplicate.
The confusion has arisen from the fact that in the
past only one card has been issued, for
identification purposes, as well as for acquiring

Annual Staff
Will Meet
There will be a brief staff
meeting for editors of the
Seminole Tuesday night. Section
editors appointed over the spring
and summer should report to the
Seminole office in room 337 at
8:30 p.m.
Other students interested in
working on the yearbook are
asked to come by the office and
fill out an application.

BLOW YOURSELF UP
md any black & white or color
ioto up to 8" x 10" (no nega negates)
tes) negates) and the name "Swingline
it from any Swingline stapler or
aple refill package to: Poster Posterart,
art, Posterart, P. 0. Box 165, Woodside,
.Y. 11377. Enclose cash,
leek or money order (no
O.D.s) in the amount of $2.00
r each blow-up; $4.00 for
ow-up and frame as shown,
id sales tax where applicable.
Original material returned
undamaged. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Allow 30 days
for delivery.
Poster only $2
(t -rrr,
M^ ,rames4
ONLY 98<
with 1000 FREE staples!
' THE GREAT NEW SWINGLINE COB* THE GREAT SWINGLINE CUB
HAND STAPLER Designed to fit DESK STAPLER A real heavy-weight with
L h l^ 1 ft rn X P 0 / ttable-2 i ble -2? l s X $1 M a compact build. ONLY $1.69.
With 1000 staples, $1.98. With 1000 staples, $1.98.
32-00 JSSff N.Y. 11101
e.
*
k a # 4 *'*"* < - 3 y A- ' '' *

football tickets, according to Joseph P. Hough,
director of finance and accounting.
It was decided to issue two cards so the student
could get tickets, but still retain the identification
card which he might need, Hough said.
The $5 replacement fee is to cover the actual cost
of replacing the cards, as well as to act as a deterrent
to students trying to obtain an illegal card, Hough
said.
The $5 charge for replacement is stated on the
registration card. This charge has been in effect
since January, 1968.



Reitz Union
To Charge
For Parking

ACADEMICS
9 Administrators Chosen

This month UF added five
new assistant deans and four
new department chairmen,
following a Board of Regents
meetiitg in Orlando. Four deans
are in graduate school, and one
in academic affairs.
New assistant deans are: Dr.
Wallace K. Boutwell Jr.,
academic affairs; and Drs.
Theron A. Nunez, Leonidas
Polopolus, John T. Algeo and
Charles V. Shaffer. All of them
hold other faculty positions.
New department chairmen are
Dr. Robert E.C. Weaver,
chemical engineering; Dr. Mihran
J. Ohanian, nuclear engineering
sciences; Dr. Shannon McCune,
geography; and Dr. Hal Lewis,
Education foundations.
Dr. Robert Bryan, former
assistant dean, left for a new
position at Florida Atlantic
University, and Dr. Alex Smith
returned to full-time work in the
Department of Astronomy.
Oral surgeon Dr. Quentin M.

New Courses Offered
In Sociological Science
A new series of courses covering the history of science and the
relationship of science and social issues is being offered to UF
students this fall.
Available for upperclassmen and graduate students, the first quarter
of the series covers science in the prehistoric period through the
scientific revolution.
The course, ASC 501-2-3, is from the historical or sociological
point of view rather than the scientific and requires only the
minimum University College science requirement, said Jerome Beiber,
the instructor.
The second quarter of the history of science series is concerned
with the scientific revolution through modem science and the third
quarter deals mainly with modem sciences relation to society.
Students who are interested in biological warfare and other
scientific problems of today should take this course, Beiber notes.
McGuire Trophy&Engraving
1706 W. University Ave.
4
"Complete Service Shoppe
Trophies, Engraving, Signs, Name Tags
Desk-Plaques, Rubber Stamps, Imprinting
Mac McGuire' vE Pres. Phone 378:8585
(keep your eyes on gator ads|
VOR DOGGONE GREAT VALUES! |

Smith has been named professor
and chairman of the Department
of Community Dentistry in the
College of Dentistry. He is
presently director with the U.S.
Public Health Service in Atlanta.
His new appointment is effective
Oct. 1.
Two UF mechanical
engineering doctoral students
have won national prizes in
machine design theory. Paul
Eschenbach and Charles
Benedict won first and second
places for research papers
submitted at the national
Applied Mechanisms Conference
at Oklahoma State University
, last month.
The Spessard L. Holland Law
Center has received $107,000 in
the past two years in federal
grants to establish a center of
competence in eastern water
law. Dean Frank Maloney, a
specialist in water law, said the
center will locate, abstract and

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writar
The Parking and
Transportation Committee
Monday approved charging
persons who use the Reitz Union
parking lot a minimal fee.
However, the committee
could not agree as to what
method should* be used to
collect parking fees, how much
should be charged for parking in
the lot, and hours of operation
of the lot.
In a proposal from the office
of William E. Rion, Union
director, the plan would have an
attendant on duty from 7:30

index all published materials
dealing with water law in six
states.
William Kirk Jr. is director of
the center. The abstracts are
prepared by law students.
UF education professor Dr.
Arnold E. Wirtala has been
selected as the first president of
Germanna Community. College,
Fredericksburg, Va. He was
coordinator of undergraduate
studies for the College of
Education. Dr. Charles
Henderson will assume that
position temporarily, and Marvin
Armstrong, a doctoral student,
will become assistant director of
student teaching.
Lewis Stark, UF law student,
was chosen the outstanding
cadet of his company this
summer at ROTC camp at Ft.
Benning, Ga.
UFs Graduate Engineering
Educations Systems (GENESYS)
is now operating in West Palm
Beach via closed circuit
television. The system will
provide study facilities for
employed engineers working
toward an advanced degree.

The Men of Pi Lambda Phi
Welcome All New Students
House Activities September 18-21
Thursday Saturday
Classes Begin Football Game
750-9:30 Breakfast 10K)0 Pre-Game Brunch
11:30-2:30 Lunch 2:00 Florida vs. Houston
6:00 Dinner: Roast Beef 4:30 Postgame Dinner
Open House 7:30 Pr e-Party
9:00 Party featuring Ron
- and the Starfires
11:00 Moonlight Dinner
Friday Sunday
Classes
10:30 Pledge-up Brunch
11:30-2:30 Lunch 12:00 Pi tom Special
7:00 Carnival Night Activities
Food! Fun! Prizes 5:30 Pledfle Banquet
Stag or Drag
' ' . -i
15 Fraternity Row
$i iamhlia Phone 376-8304 I

a.m. to 7:30 pjn. issuing time
tickets to can entering the lot.
Parking charges for one hour
would be free, with a charge of
25 cents for the second hour, 50
cents for the third hour, $1 for
the fourth hour and $2 for the
fifth hour.
The committee passed a
motion to send the proposal to
the UF business office for
consideration and further
consultation with the Union
administration. Action on the
plan is expected this week.
A request from the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center for free
parking for private duty nurses

Thuradey, September 18, 1808, The Florida MM*,

V J'*^Sr' > '* .*?V\ || t' CW S
k -*" I%* :
< jJi?
&|k iKIk \\ ,***.
y" "' v 3,.qji mi i'i r
DAVE BRAITCH
THEYRE BACK AGAIN
The students are back and so are the love bugs. Their madcap
mating adventures plague Gatorland every spring and fall. And, as
every driver knows, love bugs are less than lovable.

was turned oyer to the hospital
administration and the
Coordinator of Traffic and
Parking, Lee Burrows.
.Also, the committee passed a
motion to allow all stickered
cars to park in the Law Center
parking lot located south of the
complex.
Only 230 all area decals have
been issued so far this year,
compared to IJOOO last year.
Students who are classified as
being a freshman or sophomore
may drive a car in Alachua
County, but may not register
their car on campus, the
committee said.

Page 47



Ip The Florida AMfator, Thuraday, t^lfcir 18. 1989

Page 48

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