Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
T?M
jAH

Vol. 61, No. 169

FOR ACADEMIC DEANS COUNCIL
Open Meetings Favored

LARRYJORDAN
.... in the public interest

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DOUG CASE
HOW WOULD YOU LIKE IT?

This disdainful look is reserved for those stupid
humanoids who ask how this gal likes the
twice-daily routine of having her... well, you
know ... yanked, squeezed, pulled, twisted and

The
Florida Alligator

See Editorial, Page 4
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Associate Editor
Although an Alligator poll
showed a slight majority of the
UF community opposed to the
Council of Academic Deans
closed door policy, reactions
were mixed and generally mild
in tone.
A random poll of 50 students
showed 15 have no opposition
to the deans policy, 22 oppose
the policy and 13 have no
opinion or no knowledge of the
policy.
A similar poll of 25 faculty

THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

otherwise mutilated just so a bunch of college kids
can have their milk every day. Besides the
expression, her comment was, "Well, actually, if I
had my udders .. See story, page two.

University of Florida, Gainesville

members produced seven for the
policy, eight against and 10 with
no opinion.
James R. Pierce, director of
the Legal Aid and Defender
Clinic and a professor of law,
said, Although there is some
controversy about whether the
Government-in-the-Sunshine
Law applies to this case, I cant
understand why they should
deny reporters access to their
(the deans) meetings.
Education Professor Hal
Lewis, past chairman of the
Action Conference, said
reporters ought to be allowed to
attend the meetings.
Some policy protecting

confidential matters like
problems of personnel could be
worked out, Lewis said.
In defense of the deans,
Janies Hollis, 7EG, a leading
campus conservative, said that
things may arise that would
inhibit a free discussion among
the deans.
They are intellectually and
emotionally mature enough to
conduct business without
students being there.
Hollis likened the deans case
to the recent Student
Government decision to join the
National Student Association.
SG never knew about the
NS A decision until (Student
Body President Charles)
Shepherd pushed it through,
Hollis said. Students were never
allowed to participate in the
NSA decision.
Before we, as students, start
demanding something from the
deans, we had better clear up
our own house.
Two members of SG
contacted by the Alligator were
strongly opposed to the closed
door policy.
Larry Jordan, SG secretary of
minority affairs, said that not ..
allowing the Alligator to

gECTwtwMMwawSHEPHERD VOW
V v,
|No Free Legal Aid|
JFrom SG Attorneyl
§ (EDITORS NOTE: This is the second of a three part series £:
about legal representation for students by Student Government :§
:£ and other student organizations.)
g By LEE HINNANT S
X; Alligator Staff Writer &
:j:j
Student Body President Charles Shepherd says he would
g oppose any move to allow a lawyer retained with student £:
activity fees to represent students in court. :g
:!; Shepherd has sent a corporate charter to Secretary of State
Tom Adams for approval. If the charter is approved, Student
| Services, Inc. will be granted funds from the Student Senate to |g
retain an attorney. :g
The attorney would review contracts entered into by Student
Government and other student organizations. SG officers other £:
j: than Shepherd would like to see the attorney represent students g
in court in cases where the decision could have application to *:
g other students.
g Legal disputes between students and landlords and civil rights
v cases involving students have both been cited as cases in which
the decision could have significance beyond the individual case. :§
$: Shepherd proposes that the attorney file an amicus curiea J:
Si; brief in such cases, instead of actually representing the student
:j: in court. %
| The lawyer, as amicus curiae a friend of the court could
present a brief or speak before the court. Although officially
ilj: representing no one in the legal dispute, the lawyer could act as
§ an interested party in regard to the cases. Presumably, the
brief would be favorable to the students side of the case.
But Shepherd thinks students have ample legal support now. g
S Both ACLU nad NAACP are organizations which act as
|i|; amicus curiae in cases in which they are involved, he noted.
Amicus curiae is a good idea, says Student Body Vice |
| (SEE 'LEGAL' PAGE 3) |

Tuesday, August 19, 1969

y JgH
JIM HOLLIS
.... they're mature enough
monitor the deans council was
an abridgement of freedom of
the press.
It is in the public interest to
know what happens at their
meetings, Jordan said.
It reminds one of Star
Chamber proceedings, he said,
with the deans meeting behind
closed doors formulating some
kind of hideous policy.
Student Senate Majority
Floor Leader Marc H. Glick said
the decision was unfortunate.
Everything the council does
affects the students and judging
by some of the policies hoisted
upon us, I can see why they
want their door closed.
If the deans were subject to
the Govemment-in-the-Sunshine
Law, Click said, maybe the
. students wouldnt get it put to
them so often.



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 19,1969

Page 2

jj
{| p \^-: * 1 *"'

;.
x The life of a UF cow is a pretty strenuous

ft thing, dispite the apparent normality shown by
$ these pictures. In the picture above, only one
$ cow bothers to make note of the
:! photographer's intrusion into her
;ji contemplation. Below, in their feeding bins, the

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Senate Bill Gets Joint Support

Leaders of opposition parties
in the Student Senate Thursday
joined forces on a bill honoring
Senate President Bob Blunt. It
was the first bill the minority
and majority floor leaders agreed
on this summer.
Blunt will graduate Aug. 30
with a Juris Doctorate degree
from the College of Law. ,-
Marc H. Glick, majority floor
leader for First Party and Marvin
Sylvest, Focus Party minority
floor leader, stated in their bill
that Blunt has been the most
really impartial and violently
middle of the road and is a

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}
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator;
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
* The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will pot consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be respbnsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given befdke the next
insertion.

helluva guy, and we appreciate
him.
The meeting was the last of
the summer, bringing to a close a
quarter of legislation which
included budget sessions, a
successful senate movement to
join the National Student
Association, and the creation of
new cabinet posts.
During the fall quarter, the
senate will be faced with more
budget sessions, the construction
of an outdoor amphitheatre,
parks for student relaxation,
improvement of Lake Wauburg
facility, plus numerous other
projects.
Also, the senate will be

cows seem only slightly interested in the
observations of the little girl. As the story at
right explains, the life of a UF cow is more than
eating and making milk, it is also a regimen of
research and tests. Photos by Doug Case.

considering applications to fill
the post of Student Government
legal counselor, provided SG is
authorized to create the post.
i
i
i
One item which did not go
through the senate this summer
but will be a part of the program
for fall, is the wearing of blue
and orange beanies by freshmen.
i
t
By proclamation, Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd and UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, will
require the wearing of the beanie
by freshmen during their first
quarter here.
yvl |
ENTERTAINMENT
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VAVAVom.*w* w w w
A Cows Life
*
Is Strenuous i
By DON YOKEL £
Alligator Staff Writer
The life of aUF milk cow is becoming a strenuous affair. §
She is being asked to give more milk every year, to §
participate in more research, to eat different types of food, §
some of which would kill a human and to carry three names \
and a number through lifeJ And all of this is getting longer and |
harder. $
The only thing she hasnt been asked to do is wear an orange ;i
and blue beanie, but who knows, it might improve her morale. J
On a24 hour-a-day schedule, the university cow at the Dairy $
Research Unit at Hague has lost the envy of hundreds of |
students who once thought she had it made. £
Along with her major responsibility of producing enough [:
milk for the manufacture of dairy products for thousands of £
people on campus, she is now faced with the problem of jraising jj
the level of protein intake by the worlds population, just one of |
her many research projects now in progress. |
In addition to her academic load, the dairy cow is becoming £
a celebrity, who has to entertain thousands of persons every
year at her 1,171 acre home, 10 miles north of Gainesville on
U. 5.441. t
Part of her fame is due to her ancestors contribution to g
findings in the field of physiology and biochemistry which has
played a major part in her success in Florida.
Mineral deficiency was a big problem 40 years ago when
dairy herds in Florida were scarce. We now supplement their Ij:
diet with minerals and, as a result of this work, there are over |
180,000 dairy cows in Florida today, Dr. Charles Wilcox, fi
geneticist and professor at the unit explained. jjj
All total, there are over 300 cattle in the facility, including :j;
five breeds of dairy stock: Jersey, Holstein, Guernsey, Brown £
Swiss and Ayrshire.
Administrators are constantly shoving each cow through as |
many as thre different research programs at one time. Calves |
and yearlings, which number as high as 130, are taken from the ;i;
mother as soon as they are bom, and placed in a special bam S
and pasture area. |
Bulls, which are rare, are sold. There is no real need for them |
because, since 1956, artificial insemination has been used. ¥
Automation is as powerful a force at the dairy farm as it is
on campus. J
The dairy cow will soon be pushed through a new milking
system which disinfects and cleans her before she enters the
?: milk stall by a system of spray jets originating from the bam
§ floor. |
To keep her moving in the right direction, a system of $
j; automatic gates push her through the milking process and reject £
j: her if an inspector deems her unfit to give milk. :
>; However, at the new bam she will receive the benefit of air ij
conditioning and will not have the milk crew bending down to :
v her, but will be elevated above the crew for easier milking.
She will still be milked twice a day at 2 a.m. and 2 p.m. >j
£ Theres a chance that with the new system she may be able >:
x to break the milk yield record set by Lana, a cow which gave
ve r 141,000 pounds of milk over als year period.
>: The average UF cow produces 100 pounds of milk a day. f
jij v O n the average, she will produce for three and a half years, £
and probably wont five more than 10 years. |:|
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TO STUDY VOLUNTEER WORKERS
Suicide Prevention Center
Slated For Fall Opening

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
A $250,000 grant from the
National Institute of Mental
Health has made possible a
suicide prevention center at UF
this fall.
Dr. Richard McGee, associate
professor of clinical psychology,
will conduct a four-year study of
the volunteer workers at the
center.
UF Student
Dies After
Cycle Crash
A UF student injured in a
motorcycle accident Aug. 9,
died Friday.
Michael Anthony Sorrentino,
had been listed as very critical
since the motorcycle he and
his date were riding was struck
by a car at the intersection of
SW 13th Street and Archer Road.
His date was treated and
released following the accident.
The driver of the car which
hit Sorrentino, Rafael Robayna,
also a UF student, was charged
with running a red light and
causing a major accident.

j Legal Aid Opposed |
p FROM PAGE ONE J
"
|i| President Charles Harris. But it will not be filed in as many :j:
$ cases as would be argued if a lawyer were actually to be retained
$ to represent students.
Shepherd said he believes the amicus curia brief is adequate £
£ in civil rights cases involving students. But in litigation between £
£ student and landlord, he has other ideas. £

£ The student president would like to see a corporation created £
v by students to retain an attorney who would represent students
v in legal disputes with landlords. £
X This should be a matter of student initiative, Shepherd
said. .tv-' £
X He added that his administration would be willing L to provide £
£ unofficial assistance to students in drawing up a corporate £
£ charter. Or, he said, a charter drawn up during the £
X administration of former Student Body President Clyde Taylor £
£ could be made available to students. £
v
£ The attorney could be retained with money from nominal £
£ membership fees paid by students in order to be eligible for X
£ representation by the attorney, Shepherd suggested. £
£ Would funds for the corporation also be available from £
: student activity fees? |:j
if Thats a possibility, he said. But they wont be if I have
if anything to say about it. if
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Michelob on draft \j\
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
V/
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager \i
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. rl
Closed Sundays

McGee expects several
hundred volunteers will answer
the suicide prevention centers
phone at the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center over the four year
period. He hopes to increase the
success of such a center by
compiling information on the
backgrounds and performance of
the volunteers.
Crisis intervention center is
the name McGee prefers since
only about 20 per cent of the
calls are potential suicides. The
24-hour center will provide
advice and comfort for a number
of circumstances, including
marital breakups, financial losses
and family deaths.
However, statistics show the
suicide rate for college students
is one of the highest such rates
in the nation.
McGee extimates 80 per cent
of the centers calls will be
handled by volunteers. He said
his research will seek ways to
improve the selection and
training of this staff. Their
evaluation will include follow-up
studies of the persons who called
the center to find out if the
caller feels he received adequate
help.
There are several responses a
volunteer may make when a
caller says, I cant go on
living. He could argue with the

caller about the value of life or
make no reply and wait for him
to say something else. The
volunteer might ask an unrelated
question to distract the caller or
reflect the callers concern by a
warm, emphatic manner.
McGee says he prefers this
last approach, although there is
little research data to back up
his views.
The suicide prevention center
will need about 50 volunteers to
maintain its 24-hour service.
New recruits will be needed each
year because of the turnover.
For the past two years McGee
has been evaluating the
operations of other such centers
in Jacksonville, Miami. Orlando,
St. Petersburg, Atlanta and
Nashville.
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Tuesday, August 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 19,1969

mi ACC AuiiMm

" "Its John Wayne! I Knew
£&oxoxx<<*x These Days HIWI f
John Chamberlain j

A Utopian Proposal For Peace

Several years ago a former lieutenant colonel in
the U.S. Air Force, Howard Kurtz, came to me with
his idea for a two-platoon strategy for enforcing
world peace: all offensive nuclear weapons would be
turned over to a world peace-keeping organization.
But just to make sure that the world body would
not become an engine of tyranny on its own Mr.
Kurtz suggested leaving all defensive weapons in the
hands of the separate nations. The trouble with the
Kurtz idea, at the time he first offered it, was that
no good defense against nuclear attack seemed
possible.
Our theory of power has now become useless
because we dont dare use even .the small, almost
infintesimal, part of that power represented by
tactical nuclear weapons. A totally new,
unprecedented concept of strategic power and
strategic initiative is imperative.
There is no possible way the sinking national
security can be regained by the open-ended
escalation of the power to exterminate humanity.
Similarly, there is no possible way the national

Immigration Law Trouble Again

A new immigration law became operative under
Lyndon B. Johnson. What it does is to establish
preference categories designed to favor immigrants
with family relationships in the U.S. It does away
with the nation-by-nation approach, setting a total
annual limit of 170,000 immigrants from the
Eastern Hemisphere and 120,000 from the Western
Hemisphere. Our big international companies,
members for the most part of the National Foreign
Trade Council, are suddenly experiencing extreme
difficulty in bringing foreign executive and technical
personnel into this country from the industrial
nations of northern Europe for extensive training.
The whole business makes no sense in an era in
which IBM, General Electric, General Motors, Ford,
Chrysler, Gillette, and Procter and Gamble have
ceased to be provincial corporations primarily
interested in the American market. A survey by the
National Foreign Trades Council, covering a
two-year period for 1967-68, shows that the big
U.S. international companies sent more than four
times as many managerial, professional and
specialist people abroad as came into this country
from foreign shores to gain U.S. home office
experience.

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility

Dave Reddick
Editor-In-Chief

Harold Aldrich
Executive Editor

security can be regained by turning weak in the face
of an enemy bent upon world domination.
The extent to which the two-platoon idea
might be made palatable to the U.S. and to Soviet
Russia depends entirely on the practicability of
creating effective anti-ballistic missile systems. If it
were once proved possible to track down and kill an
offensive nuclear missile, whether carrying multiple
warheads or not, before it had arrived within
dangerous proximity of a target area, then the big
members of the nuclear club could afford to yield
control of their offensive weapons to a UN Saftey
Authority. The two-platoon division between
offense and defense would become diplomatically
acceptable.
Most of our pacifists have been against
anti-ballistic missile experimentation and
deployment. For the life of me, I cant discover the
logic or common sense in their thinking. It would be
the biggest boon in the world for the peacemakers if
a successful ABM could be developed. It would
make Mr. Kurtzs ingenious two-platoon idea
negotiable.

Even though foreign governments might be
willing to let it pass, the situation is indecent and
will become more so when the four-to-one
discriminatory ratio jumps to nine-to-one, as is
bound to happen.
* f
The U.S. grants visiting visas for short periods,
but this limits the type of experience that a foreign
specialist or managerial type can gain in America
before returning to work for an Italian, German or
British subsidiary of the big international company.
Many jobs require two-and-three-year periods of
training before the foreign experts can return home
to apply U.S. marketing or other professional
expertise in their own international territories.
When John F. Kennedy set out to change the old
national origins quota system he did not envisage
making things difficult for the international
companies which need to bring five hundred or so
administrators or professional employees to the U.S.
each year for training. The law should be amended
to make it possible for business to live in an
international world without fear of the sort
reprisals that only succeed in making everybody
poorer.

Dave Osier
Managing Editor

EDITORIALS
Wait Awhile
The Student Affairs Committee, busy for several months
on the task of revising the Code of Student Conduct, has
drawn up a final draft of new policies.
The draft was approved by the committee Aug. 11. The
student members of the committee are summer
replacements who did not have the benefit of the months of
study afforded to the faculty members.
Hence, they do not have sufficient background on which
to base a reasonable vote either for or agianst the proposed
changes.
Yet committee chairman Ernest Bartley is apparently
intent on completing a ramrod job before the summer is
out. He wants the final proposal to be drafted and sent to
the University Senate in time to be placed on the September
agenda.
He notes in a memo to committee members that the
agenda is already heavy, but we want it on the agenda
anyway.
Why? Whats the rush?
The rush is that many UF officials fear new outbreaks of
unrest on campus this fall,and theywant the tools available
to squash any students who get out of line.
The new student conduct code is equipped to do just
that. So the heat is on for its most expedient approval and
implementation.
In the heat of time, the new code has been poorly
conceived and leaves a great deal to be desired. It totally
emasculates the spirit of the present code, heralded at its
adoption as a significant step forward for student
responsibility.
We will not go into specific atrocities of the proposed
code here, but comment about them can be expected soon.
What we would like to emphasize here is the travesty of
putting this new code on the back of a bull and letting it
charge headlong, crushing what few voices of opposition are
raised during the summer.
In a matter as serious as a code by which UF students are
expected to live, the greatest amount of thought and
discussion as possible should be afforded.
Ramming it onto the September agenda of the senate, a
mere seven days after the student body returns to school
and before it has a chance to express its opinion, runs the
risk of fanning the flames of unrest and frustration. Surely,
this is not the intent of the Student Affairs Committee.
Because of the harm that may accrue from a ramrod job,
we urge the Student Affairs Committee to table this
obnoxious proposal until it has been reviewed by the people
it will affect the students of the university.
Youre Not Invited
The Council of Academic Deans will meet Wednesday at
10 a.m. in the Presidents conference room in Tigert Hall.
But if youre not a dean, dont plan to attend. The public
is not invited.
Vice President for Academic Affairs Fred Conner,
chairman of the council, has promised that the question of
allowing the public to attend council meetings will be
brought up for a formal vote at the meeting.
This follows his statement last week justifying the need
for closed meetings. He said he felt open meetings are
never as frank and full as more private discussions.
Maybe so. No one has ever contended that public
meetings are the most efficient.
But, then, efficiency is not one of the primary goals of a
democracy.
Yet, this imperfect, inefficient system of ours has
survived. And one of the reasons is that the governed have
the right to know what the governors are doing, and why.
This concept pervades the entire spectrum of the
American experience from the meetings of a lowly city
commission to those of the powerful United States
Congress. The names and places change, but the principle
the right of the public to know whats happening IS
always the same.
It is unfortunate that free and honest discussion is
hampered by the presence of the public, but thats one of
the prices we pay for democracy. It is also a sad
commentary on those who hold the reins of power.
If the council of deans votes Wednesday to allow the
public into its meetings, the decision will be a great leap
forward for the continued practice of democracy at all
levels of this institution.
If, however, the deans vote to keep their meetings closed,
it will not be the death decree for what spirit of freedom
there is on this campus, but it will be a setback.
We urge the deans to consider these alternatives carefully
before they vote Wednesday and then to cast their votes
for opening meetings.



We Lived In A Regime Os Fear And Terror

_MR. EDITOR:
I, too, am a Cuban who will not sign
my name to this letter because I still
have a family living in that country. I
have been following the pro and con
arguments your paper has printed of the
Cuban community and the YSA.
First of all, I do not condone the
attack inflicted on the YSA-SDS party,
because it stands against the principles
most Cubans are fighting and dying for:
to return freedom to our country. It
was indeed a regrettable incident.
However, I feel that I must express
some views.
On the YSA letter printed August 5,
the author states that freedom of
expression is supposedly denied to
people in Cuba. He can stop supposing.
All the newspapers as well as all other
news media were confiscated by the
government shortly after the Castro
take-over, so the only news the Cuban
people get are those the government
allows to be given.
An anti-anything party that would go
against the government in Cuba could
not be held, nor could a letter of protest
such as his or mine be printed in the
paper. The authors would be sought out
and made to pay for their crime of
antagonizing the glorious Cuban
revolution.
It is easy to sit down and write
letters solidarizing with ideas or
governments about which the writer
knows little or nothing about except
what he has learned from communist
propaganda. Perhaps he doesnt realize
that Castro did not get to power
brandishing the Communist banner he
now waves. We all fought against
Batistas regime, believe me, and it
wasnt in the name of Communism.
Castro did not wave the Communist flag
until well after the revolution, when he
had complete control, militarily and
otherwise, of the country.

-The World Out Os Perspective

Baseball moguls buy, sell and
trade their players in the spring.
Football does the same in the
fall. Everybody is aware of these
deals but very few people are

HI
f I 'I A
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/A .__..,- v: .... 'y /"' -~
.-i-rfMr*?'-S' Ml
FW// Yom Marry Me?

Open Season On College Professors

aware that colleges and
universities have a similar
practice.
Open season on professors
and college administrators

By the time this letter reaches your
paper, a short talk will have been given
by the YSA on why they support the
Cuban revolution and other progressive
peoples of the world.
They support it because they havent
lived under a regime of fear and terror
where all activities not condoned by the
government are suppressed, where
literally thousands of people have been
stood up before the paredon and shot
for expressing their views like both he
and I are doing, where people go hungry
and sick day after day, in spite of the
great technical advance and help of
mother Russia. Long lines can be seen
daily of people hoping to get their small
share of food or medicine. To the YSA
people this will all sound false and made
up, of course, because they havent lived
in it. I have.
I am also sure they will reply about
numerous instances where these things
can be found in this country, maybe,
and I wouldnt doubt it. But at least in
this country, I know the instances are
the exceptions, while in Cuba they are
the rule. Democracy is not a really good
form of government; it is merely the
most acceptable one, but communism is
the worst, and thus Castroism, because
it is a tyranny, a dictatorship and the
most blatant and degrading form of
denial of human independence and
incentive, and hope for a better life.
1 dont represent the rich class or the
bourgeoisie of Cuba by a long shot, just
as the great majority of thousands upon
thousands of my countrymen who leave
the island daily trying to escape the
oppression dont. The YSA can check
the Cuban Refugee Center files in Miami
to see how many, many more are still
waiting to leave that paradise of
freedom and progression.
They (YSA) support the Cuban
revolution because they dont know
what it is like to live like robots, fearful,
watched and spied on every second, to

occurs every year during the
summer break. During this
period regents and other
state-level education officials
travel all over the country
often on limited expense
accounts no less to attend
scheduled trading sessions in
such dreary, drab places as New
York City, Reno, Las Vegas and
Miami Beach:
At one of these exacting,
hard-working conventions, over
a drink and under a floor show,
in the characteristically
businesslike atmosphere of
heavy smoke and loud noise, I
recently viewed this operation at
close hand.
If present negotiations are
successfully completed, UF will
open in the fall with a number
of new faces, Irving Gilch, head
negotiator for the Florida Board
of Higher Education, told me.
Curious to get more details I
asked for and was granted
permission to sit in on one of
the trading sessions.
Gilch was tactfully wheeling
and dealing with a representitive
from New York, Myrtal
Wartburg.
Listen to reason, Myrt. UFs
football team and Vassars
softball team are both in pretty
good shape. Now doesnt that
mean both coaches are
expendable? What do you say to
a straight swap?
I dont know, Irv. Vassar

JH
svIB^' GLORIOUS
fcLUv\2REVOLUTION?
HJUiiiiuuitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiniiiiimitfltniiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiitiinitniiiiiniiimiiiimttiiimmiusiiiMiitttM
This country faced crime, blockades, aggression and
complicity with its head high. We are deeply aware of what
we have accomplished in these past ten years, of what we
are doing, of what all that is worth and what it means, and
we are ready to go through another ten years with our heads
held even higher!
Granma (Official organ of the Central
Committee of the Communist Party of Cuba)

be put into concentration camps or
shot, or to hope day after day that
something will happen to free them
from the hell, only to give up hope, and
be forced to leave their country of
birth, as did the Jews from Germany
under Hitler, and the Hungarians from
the Russians, and more recently the
East Germans, and now the Czechs.
In this country one has to fight for
changes, and sometimes these changes
come awfully slow and painfully, and
are many times repressed, but in time, if
these changes are for the good of the
people, they come through, because the
people support them, and the people,
even in the long run, have the final
say-so. In Cuba, changes do not come
about at all. Things are the way they
are, and one better like them that way
or else. I know. I experienced it ....
I am not going to wish that the
people in YSA experience what I am

doesnt even have a football
team.
Not yet, you mean. Here,
have another drink. Why not
start an all woman football
team. Just think of the novelty
of it.
I am thinking of it.
Wartburg gulps down his double
scotch. I still think Vassar
would have trouble raising a
team, though.
Gome on, Myrt. There must
be dozens of girls dying to play
football. Look at that chorus
girl. Second from the end. Whos
she remind you of, eh? Joe
Namath, right?
I cant picture her with a Fu
Manchu, Irv. Besides, she doesnt
go to Vassar.
Thats not my problem,
friend. Sign her up if you want
her.
I still dunno. Babe
Rhubarb is an awfully good
softball coach. UF wouldnt be
interested in a shuffleboard
coach would they?
Naw. They just picked up
one of the best from a trailer
court in St. Pete.
About this time some of the
other traders began drifting over.
l hear youve been having
trouble with panty raids and the
SDS, challenged a dapper
regent from California, drink in
hand.
What have you got in
mind? queried Gilch.

Tuesday, August 19,1969, The Florida Alligator,

talking about so that they can check the
veracity, or so that they can see what I
mean and add it to their frame of
reference, because I wouldnt wish to
my worst enemy that he live under
conditions such as now exist in Cuba. I
am not going to wish that they
discontinue fighting for what they
believe is right, because they are
idealists, and without those, this world
would not have gotten very far. But I
would like to have them think over
what is really right, and just, and good,
and to see both sides of the coin, and
see if maybe there not wrong in some
of the things they idealize.
It would be a shame to see people
fight so hard for ideals that would
eventually destroy the freedom they are
fighting for ...
Thank you.
A CUBAN EXILE

By Les Gardieff

Well trade you Hayakawa
of San Francisco.
For what?
Lester Hale and rights to
Dean Dotys system for UC.
Its too uneven. Add
something else.
Well throw in a crop
dusting plane and all the
accessories if youll throw in 100
cases of Gatorade.
Any chance of getting Gov.
Reagan arid 500 National
Guardsmen?
Might be, if youd be willing
to let go of Servomation and
Century Tower.
lll take it into
consideration. If theyve fixed
the tower though the deals off.
Taking advantage of the
ensuing lull a quiet little man
approached Gilch.
Mr. Gilch, I am Ivor
Vorushav from Moscow
University. We hear you have a
Marxist professor teaching at
UF.
Could be.
MU would be very
interested in trading a capitalist
professor and all our right-wing
students for your professor and
all your left-wing students. Some
Politbureau member has been
stirring the taxpayers up over
these capitalist radicals in our
university.
Step over to the bar, Mr.
Vorushav. I think youre the
man Ive been looking for.

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 19,1969

Page 6

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SILVERMAN'S
Tootique hints of old Spain in this unique blend
of old and new fashion worlds. The pants and
bolero are black rayon and silk trimmed with black
buttons. The paisley print blouse is a wild
combination of pinks, yellow and green with a
matching sash. Modeled by Andrea.
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SUSAN SCOTT
Honey Petites has the perfect dress to take you
through the busy Fall quarter. The color is royal
purple. A super big color prettily frames your face.
Gold Buttons accent the sleores, and the
diamond-shaped belt loops help you display your
chain collection. The dress is NOW ... the look is
YOU. Modeled by Lynn.

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THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
A fashion great from the U-Shop! A three-piece
suit by Arpegia features a black (also beige) voile
blouse with puff sieves, and a silk tie. To top off
this outfit, trim with a black umbrella for
unpredictable weather, and an all leather handbag.
Modeled by Karen.
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MAAS BROTHERS /
Tickle your ribs with layers of skinny rib
sweaters by Rosanna. Add a hunter green banlon
polo shirt, and man-tailored, cuffed trouser pants
for that 10ng... drawn ... layered look for Fall
69. Found in Junior Terrace and better sportswear
departments. Modeled by Marlene.



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SEAR'S
For travel, back to school, or whatever... a
complete wardrobe from Sear's Junior Bazaar.
Sharon wears the culotte and knit pullover made of
acrylic, and a coordinate in the toned-down
antique" look of the new blue with cream and
green accents. Go fashion with Sear's.


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STAG AND DRAG
For the coed on the go.. Stag and Drag
introduces the skimmer" or "coat dress" look for
Fall. Made of lightweight hopsack material, the
dress is featured in blue with a pink collar, and is
double-breasted with brass buttons. Modeled by
Charla.
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FIGURE FAIR
Look elegant in your lounge-culotte with a
built-in bra, of nylon tricote leopard print with a
black nylon, sheer robe. Wonderful for travel and
entertaining. In sizes 10, 12, and 14, price is about
S2O. Modeled by Bev.

Tuesday, August 19,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

fashion layout by ... joyce gehrke
photography by ... aaron law

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 19, 1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

PARKING DECAL SALES:
Beginning Wednesday, Aug. 20,
all University faculty and staff
members, except Health Center
employes, can register their
automobiles and purchase their
1969-70 parking decals at the
U niversity Police Department
From Sept. 2-5 all Health Center
personnel can register their cars
and obtain their decals in the
lobby of the Center. Students
can complete the procedure
beginning Sept. 9 at the
U niversity Police Department
When registering the automobile,
the owner must present the
current title or registration
certificate. Faculty and staff
members will be required to
show their personnel card and
students must present their I.D.
card. Hours for the sales are
tentatively set for 8 a.m. to 3:30
p.m.
STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE: The service will
curtail evening and weekend
emergency operation during the
break between the summer and
fall quarters. Medical services
will be available between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m., Monday through
Friday only, excluding Labor
Day. Emergency coverage will be
resumed the evening of Sept. 10
before registration. Emergency
cases will be treated at the
Shands Teaching Hospital
Emergency Room during the
time the Infirmary is closed.
Patients visiting the Shands
Teaching Hospital Emergency
Room will be charged a service
fee plus the cost of medication.
M ARKET ING
SCHOLARSHIPS: The
Department of Marketing in the
College of Business
Administration has four SSOO
and S6OO scholarships available
for 1969-70 marketing majors,
both undergraduate and
graduate. Applications should be
made in Room 209 of Matherly
Hall.
CEASING PUBLICATION:
The Alligator will cease
publishing Friday, Aug. 22. The
last Orange and Blue Bulletin
will be published Tuesday, Aug.
19. Publication will resume
Thursday, Sept. 18, and the first
Orange and Blue will be Friday,
Sept 19.
FACULTY AND STAFF
NEEDED: Faculty and staff

I DRIVE like a king
- poJ/ \\ Add to the trade-in value and at the
/A \\ same time enjoy air conditioned com- T
VBB AiV'N \\ fort...arrive refreshed and wrinkle free!
v *7\j \\ We'll make all of the arrangements!
I HH KsA \\ That's what YOUR CAMPUS CREDIT
\\ UNION is for!
%+ > \V \\
i\ GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

Administrative Notices

members from all disciplines on
campus are needed to participate
as discussion group leaders for
upper division transfer
orientation students at 9:30
Wednesday, Sept. 17. For
further information contact Don
Mott, assistant dean of men, at
392-1261.
CSS 111, CMS 171: All
students whose last names begin
with A-L report to Little 101,
M-Z report to Little 109.
CSS 112: All students report
to Little 113
CSS 113: All students report
to Little 121.
CPS 121: All students whose
last names begin with: A-L
report to Little 113, M-Z report
to Little 121.
CPS 122: All students report
to Little 125.
CPS 123: All students whose
last names begin with: A-J
report to Little 101, K-Z report
to Little 109.
CLC 141, CBS 261: All students
whose last names begin with:
A-K report to Litlle 101, L-Z
report to Little 109.
CLC 142: All students in
Section 0147 report to little
125.
CLC 142: All students in
Summer Developmental Sections
0150, 0153, 0156 whose last
names begin with: A-K report to
Little 113, L-Z report to Little
121.
CLC 143: All students whose
last names begin with: A-G
report to Little 235, H-M report
to Little 237, N-Z report to
Little 239.
CHN 251: All students whose
last names begin with: A-C
report to Little 113, D-H report
to Little 121, 1-0 report to
Little 101, P-Z report to Little
109.
CHN 253: All students whose
last names begin with: A-D
report to Little 207, E-J report
to Little 233, K-P report to
Little 235, Q-Z report to Little
237.
CHN 251: All students whose
last names begin with: A-C

BLUE BULLETIN

report to Little 113, D-H report
to Little 121, l-O report to
Little 101, P-Z report to Little
109.
ASSEMBLY EXAMINA EXAMINATION:
TION: EXAMINATION: Room assignments will
be announced by the instructors.
EXAMINATIONS
ACCORDING TO THE TIME
OF CLASS MEETING: All
examinations not listed by
names will be given in the usual
classrooms.

Tuesday, August 19,
Union Supervisors, 118 Union,
9:00 a.m.
Childrens Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 1:00 p.m.
Student Senate, 349 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C Union,
7:30 p.m.
Engineering Dames, Perry
House, 8:00 p.m.
Fla. Players: Experimental
Theatre, Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Wednesday, August 20
Cabinet Meeting, 305 Union,
8:00 p.m.
Specological Scoiety ,346
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Ski Club, 355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Mensa Meeting, 150 B Union,
8:30 p.m.
Union Supervisors, 122 Union,
9:00 a.m.
Physical Plant, 150 F Union,
10:00 a.m.
Campus Credit Union, 150 C
Union, 11:00 a.m.
Childrens Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 11:00 a.m.
Phi Kappa Phi Initiation, Union
Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Christian Scientists, 357 Union,
6:30 p.m.
General Dames Bridge, 150 C
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Friday, August 22
University Police Dept., 349
Union, 1:00 p.m.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus
Calendar

GRADES: All grades due at
12 noon, Monday, August 31.
A PPLICATIONS: A
University College Student
desiring to take a comprehensive
examination in a comprehensive
course for which he is not
registered, must file an
application for such an
examination at the Office of the
Registrar, Tigert Hall, before
4:00 p.m., Wednesday, August
20.

Muslim Student Assoc., 123
Union, 12:30 p.m.
Afro American Student Assoc.
349 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Monday, August 25
Campus Community Council,
Arredondo Room, 12 noon
LDS Student Center, 118 Union,
7:30 p.m.

Gainesville now has the finest in education!
MONTESSORI is now being taught at Belles & Beaux
MONTESSORI instructors in both 2 & 3 year old age group
and Kindergarten
Register your child NOW in Gainesville's most
PROGRESSIVE pre-school Nursery & Kindergarten
School hours 7:30 AM 6:00 PM
Phone 378-4246 or 378-5925 for appointment
Belles & Beaux 1124 N.W. 39th Ave.
GOT SOMETHING TO SELL?
T ar.> X. *1 \\
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1
/&> i*%;
TURN
OFF
SUMMER
, **
auto air conditioning
FIRST.. and still Bart
cost* lets than factory a/r
GODDING & CLARK
MOTORS
2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E.
378-2311



- m 1 -
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE .t j
YAMAHA 250 CC. PERFECT: Street
model 4500 m. $450 or BEST offer.
Call Mike (nights) 378-6431.
(A-st-165-p)
For window air conditioner
for man sft. Bin. tall, wt.
160 lb. call 378-5402. (A-3t-166-p)
WHY PAY RENT 3x40 trailer with
Bxl6 bedroom addition (2
bedrooms) AC carpeted
clean-attractive $1595 furnished. Call
378-5781 NOW (A-st-165-p)
1964 VW yellow convertible, best
offer. Call 372-1656. (A-3t-166-p)
GunsGunsGunsl over
450. Buy Sell-^pde Repair.
Reloading supplies, Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-163-ts-p)
window fans, $lO ea.; kitchen table
& 3 matching chairs, $10; bookcases,
$3 & $7; arm chair, $5; clock radio,
$5. In good shape. Can 376-4952
after 5 p.m. also 3 boxes.
(A-2t-166-p)
66 Triumph 650 2 helmets 2 extra
tires extra sprocket extra set of trail
pipes all excellent condition $650.
Call 378-4574 after 6 pm.
(A-2t-167-p)
AKC poodles 3 males silver black and
silver beige. Must see to appreciate.
Stud service and poodle grooming.
Call Miss Wiley, 376-4614.
(A-3t-167-p)
1 968, New Moon, 12x47, 2
bedroom, air condition, Early
American decor, electric range,
$3600, 372-9601. (A-3t-167-p)
condition 4000 mi. S2OO or best
offer. Call 378-4654 between 5 and 8
p.m. Helmet included. (A-169-2t-p)
COLOR By Dpi >e .f
I I

4g WITH THIS COUPON ONE 1
§ COMPLETE $1.25 CHICKEN 3
| DINNER I
I 96< §
I COUPON GOOD TUES. 19th & §
I 4 WED. 20th FOR IN §
AAU:./. fI | STORE PURCHASE g
FRIED CHICKEN
S 516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET
Hon
IwUlll ~i
Some People Dream Os. I I
II nilll The Harold Dobbins People Do. \| || f
"Y "1 rftey Do It All In y 11H11U |
Jrhlre^|j
gSt bSwrobbew

MOW!
! iMB. "Fewwma!
# .. t ke irord for irontam ... l I

FOR SALE I
% A
v-.
VW-68 European model low
seatbacks 18000 mi. $1450 or best
offer. Call 2-1433 or contact Village
flbsent Tue wea wea|
| wea| roTuNT 1[
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221
(B-ts-156-c)
U n i v e r s i tyA pt s.j u st n orth of R esea rc h
Li b. 2 sizeseff ~2sty leslbdrm.and2bdr
m .a lla.c.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
. LeaseQuarterlyratesyearlyaverage7s
- 120/m 0.3 76-8 9901536NW3rdave.
(B-12T-158-P)
Two-bedroom duplex air-conditioned
apartment behind Norman Hall. $125
per month. 1117, 1119, 1125 S.W.
7th Ave. 376-5381, ext. 435.
(B-3t-167-p)
University Gardens Trace now with
two pools and new furniture . two
bedroom apts. from $l6O per month.
Models open daily 9 to 5 p.m.
(B-3t-167<)
Available Sept. (Ist) first, large
comfortable rooms in private home.
Mature students or faculty. See 202
NW 12th Terr. Call 376-5368.
(B-l 67-3 t-p)
Sacrifice must sublet Sept, only two
bedroom furnished airconditioned,
pool, luxury apartment $125.00. Call
372-0528 after 6 p.m. (B-2t-169-p)
3-room furn. apt. Available Sept. 15.
Married couples only, 90.00 per mo.
plus utilities, years lease, no pets.
Call 372-0175, 1830 NW 2 Ave.
(B-169-2t-p)
Privacy is th4 emphasis, but w/o the
expense. Gainesvilles newest
apartment idea is LA MANCHA,
nearing completion at SW Bth Ave. &
9th St. Renting for Sept, on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Fridays,
3-5 pm at the site. Ph. 372-5346 or
372-2662. (B-3t-167-p)
{ >; g mb a sc 8 0
WANTED
2 coed grad students would like to
share 2 bedroom apt. with 1 or 2
others in Sept. Prefer Williamsburg,
Tanglewood, etc. Call Harriet at
305-758-2194 collect after 6 p.m. or
write 945 NE 138 St. No. Miami, Fla.
(C-4t-165-p)

Tuesday, August 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

|-nrnmn^-^iwnnM.inn.u
We buy, sell, trade used paperbacks,
magazines, Playboys. Laurents Book
Shop, 1634 W. Univ. Ave., 376-9755.
(C-3t-167-p)
One female roommate to share Gator
Town apt. with 3 seniors. Rent $45 +
V 4 util. Call Sally, 376-7129.
(C-3t-167-p)
Need 3 painters immediately, $1.65
per hour. See Paul Mattison, 708 SW
16th Ave. No calls. (C-3t-167-c)
Need 2 coed roommates for fall
quarter. Two bedroom Tanglewood
townhouse, pool. Call Diane or
Teresa, 376-1015. (C-3t-167-p)
Two female roommates needed for
fall quarter in LaMancha. Located
two blocks from ££'mpus and have
your own bedroom. Call 392-7661.
(C-4t-166-p)
One Female roommate 3 bedroom
house 1 block from campus own
bedroom $42.00/mth. Plus utilities.
Call Jane 378-2828. (C-3t-166-p)
Female Roommate Prefer someone
tidy. Only 3 blocks from campus,
A/c, own room, SSO per month. Call
378-4851. (C-169-2t-p)
Female roommate LaMancha
townhouse Private room. Call Anita
or Barb afternoons and evenings.
372-2890. (C-169-lt-p)
Wanted one coed roommate starting
Sept, for apt. across from Tigert.
$45/mo. plus utilities. Call 372-4971
between 8 and 3. (C-169-2t-p)
One female roommate for fall quarter
at La Bonne Vie. Call Renee
392-7690. (C-169-2t-p)
COED roommate needed for one
bedroom Gatortown apt. starting fall
qtr. $l4O for qtr. Call Linda at
372-5246. (C-169-2t-p)
Enjoy the country air! One female
student to share 2 bedroom apt.
$42.50. Prefer grad or settled person.
7 min. from campus. Shirley
378-0367. (C-169-2t-p)
COED NEEDS APT. to share with 3
girls Landmark or French Qtr. for
next year starting fall qtr. Call: Susan
376-2129. (C-st-165-p)
I HELP WANTED I
Assistant Manager. Couple preferred.
Wife not working. Call 376-8990.
(E-169-lt-p)
Wanted: Managing Editor for Florida
Quarterly. Interviews now, until I
think Ive found the person. Trial
period of adjustment not only
allowed but demanded. Is literature
or art your thing? No particular
talent demanded but must have
capacity to work hard, be
responsible. Will know everything the
Editor knows, run the staff. Must be
somewhat fluent, capable of poise,
able to organize. Mostly your own
bosS. Pay per issue of magazine, if
you are the right one. Start now.
Quit talking about communicating
and put it in print. See Jessica
Everingham, Editor, Florida
Quarterly 336 Reitz Union 10-5.
(E-166-tf-nc)
Wanted: Typist. No pay, work with
groovy people, learn the workings of
a magazine. We need your help
whenever you can give it. Pretty
exciting things happen in our office officebe
be officebe part of them. Exercise your
other talents, bring a friend, rap. No
job interview, no hassle. Roughly
10-5 we inhabit our office. Do
something real. Appear at the Fla.
Quarterly 336 Reitz Union.
(E-166-tf-nc)
I AUTOS J
57 Plymouth, white, clean,
everything works, fair tires. $l5O.
Dave Sheffield 933 S.W. 1 Ave.
(G-169-2t-p)
| PERSONAL I
Harry Tea Tours is off to the Dallas
Pop Festival. A most groovy
gathering of great stars. Full ticket
and tour information now at the
Record Bar 923 W Univ Ave Captain
Platter can help you with anything in
the world of sound. (J-169-2t-p)
Miller-Brown
ONE M,LE
NORTH OF" MM
THE MALL
0-7 C jcco AUTHORIZED
376-4552 dealer
Open til 7 p.m. nightly

Page 9

PERSONAL
raduating male, moving to Atlanta,
steed roommate to share apartment
and expenses. Contact Bob, 1111-27
16th Ave., 378-8518. (J-3t-167-p)
TRUCK to MIAMI via TAMPA. Will
take your trunks, boxes, cycles, etc.
after finals. Door to Door. Very
reasonable. Call Jim, 378-8625.
(J-3t-167-p)
SACRIFICIAL OFFERING Motorola
8-track tape player, $65, tapes, $4.
For Golfers Blue Ridgedon irons &
woods, bag & putter, S3O.
(J-2t-167-p)
r smvTces I
Me 0 no iMWii'B i 1111111 iiwwiiOTmivwwwtf l
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-c)

I Efll PME ro ¥M MI 111 I
/ %rAnU,Un -BECKLM OPTICIANS
22 West University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Phone 376-3516

RED PM 0 A I
NIGHT JV
8-10 PM
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

Florida Players present
THERE COMES A STRANGE FOUL
a
NO EXIT
i
TONIGHT Constans Theatre
8:00 p.m. Admission is free.
Hi Vy \ SPECIALS §1
11\_ TUESDAY SPECIAL ||
FRIED 1
I CHICKEN I
HI ALL YOU AAI I|l
||| CARE TO EAT WM \ |||
If WEDNESDAY SPEOAL W
||| LUNCH AND DINNER ||l
I JUMBO CHOPPED S
| STEAK 0 |
|j| WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY O C HI
HI AND YELLOW RICE T |||
1 MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS §
||L GAINESVILLE MALL JM

SERVICES |
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
HORSEBACK RIDING
HAYRIDES PARTIES!!! S.E. 15th
St. Cowboy riding stables 372-8460.
(M-3t-166-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible-but you'll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
5 1 9Vz SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. (M-155-ts-c)

HlHlMlf
>IIJ A*J flm
US



Page 10

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 19,1969

SURVEY USED AS PROFILE

Blacks Are Non-Savers?

By Alligator Services
%
With incomes at an all-time high and
employment at a peak in the United States, what is
a non-saver like these days?
Dr. Walter Polner, director of Research and
Economic Department of CUNA International, Inc.,
attempts a profile of the non-saver in the latest issue
of Dimensions, monthly publication of UFs
Bureau of Economic and Business Research.
Using a study from the Survey Research Center
of the University of Michigan as a spring board for
his article, Polner says, The non-saver is generally
non-white, is unskilled, may have a low income and
may be supported to some extent by a government
welfare program.
The report shows that 80 per cent of blacks are
non-savers as compared with 39 per cent of
non-savers among whites. The majority of unskilled
persons are non-savers; for instance, 63 per cent of
laborers and service workers are in this group. And
their income usually falls below the $5,000 level.
However, Polner points out, the single person or
family not reached by three major savings
institutions mutual savings banks, savings and
loan associations and credit unions may have
other avenues of savings open to them.
He lists these: mortgage equity, life insurance or

UF RESEARCHERS PONDER
(How To Manage!
I Tons Os Waste? [
UF research talent is being called upon to find better ways to j£
Hj manage 3.5 billion tons of solid waste generated each year in h
s America.
The collection and disposal of solid waste primarily refuse §?
I has become one of the largest and most costly of all urban §j
§§ problems, with a current national price tag of $4.5 billion a H
One of the nations needs is a set of standard test procedures |§
H for the physical, chemical and biological examination of =|
H municipal solid waste materials. §§
To develop such procedures, the Department of s
j= Environmental Engineering has been awarded a three-year i§
H research grant totaling $142,512 from the U.S. Department of j|
§§ Health, Education and Welfare. s
Dr. Russell H. Susag, associate professor of environmental |j
§jj engineering and principal investigator for the project, notes that =
H standard procedures have been developed and proved essential M
§§ in the control of other areas of environmental pollution, j§
= notably water, air, milk, fooehmd general'sanitation.
Susag cites other efforts by the University of Florida in §§
H coping with the mounting waste disposal problems.
One is the joint city, county and university demonstration ||
§§ project centered around the Gainesville compost plant H
H (Gainesville Municipal Waste Conversion Authority, Inc.) -a s
§§ combination venture to investigate a method of re-utilization of f§
H refuse. M
At the time the project was funded by the Office of Solid §j
H Waste (now the Bureau of Solid Waste Management), it was the ||
H largest demonstration project of that agency, Susag said.
That makes this area somewhat a center for research =
H activity into the waste disposal problem, he noted.
1 Susags program, an interdisciplinary project, is utilizing the |j
s talents of Thomas deS. Furman, professor of civil engineering; j|
§f Dr. Hugh D. Putnam, associate professor of environmental M
H sciences, and Dr. Edward Singley, associate professor of water =
js chemistry.
I The bureau last week expressed confidence in the universitys s
= work when it extended for the third year with a $51,094 =
grant its support of a five-year training program in solid waste §
s§ engineering. 9
ROBBIES
The Best In Steaks.
Meals Sl
TV & BILLI ARD^H
I 1718 W University Ave. I
LjOnTheGddCoast]_J

the equity stock market. Many non-savers being
those who do not utilize the three major sources
return their profits to their own businesses.
A market for the savings institutions exists in
this group of non-savers, and the data show it has
not been tapped.
Some of the subgroups of non-savers who might
be the object of savings campaigns are working
wives, persons steadily employed even though they
may have a relatively low income, and persons
possessing substantial liquid assets.
For the savings institutions, Polner points out the
natural audience of campaigns for each of them:
i banks persons having checking accounts,
9 saving and loan associations mortgage
holders, and
9 credit unions persons in the bond of the
association, but who are not members.
A second article appearing in this issue of
Dimensions is The Autonomous Manager or
shifts in corporate notions of how to develop
managers, written by Dr. Gary R. Gemmill, assistant
professor of management at Syracuse University.
Another entry is Competition and Antitrust:
Traditions, Laws and Practices, by Dr. Bernard
Alpert, associate professor of management at San
Francisco State College.

Computer Course
The UF Computing Center
will offer a short course in the
use of statistical library
programs Sept. 22-26.
The class will meet Monday
through Friday at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 230 of Bryant Hall.
Programmers Jean Holzer and
Mary Lynch will be instructors.
The course will provide an
introduction to computers.
Persons wishing to register for
the course should contact Frank
Towers at 392-2061.
Have
Your Generator
OVERHAULED Soecial
s*so
INC LABOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
508 NW Bth AVE. GAINESVILLE
Mon.Fri. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm

TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
11AM TO 9PM
LONDON BROIL STEAK
FRENCH FRIES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD Jfc A
HOT ROLLS & BUTTER U g L
Hit* * Y
* f 1225 W. UNIV. AVE
t 'A BLOCK from CAMPUS
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL ,V
BLACK ANGUS STEAK N a
F.F. & CHOPPED SALAD $1729
MONDAY- SHRIMP IN BASKET F.F, Cole Slaw
THURSDAY- LONDON BPOIL -F.F, Chopped Salad
FRIDAY- ROAST BEEF F.FCole Slaw
jfttu Q7l
y 2 BLOCK from CAMPUS
WE RE NOT A GIANT CHAIN OPERATION SO WE TRY HARDER

I y Y^llS T UFs REPRESENTATIVES |
V--T- - Jim Bartlett John Potocki
I i George Corl Skip Lujack |
I Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson 1
Mel Ward
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave. §
If NO WAR CLAUSE
I^JE^RRE^REMHJ^AYMEN^^^^^^^J
I COMPLETE VOLKSWAGEN
I REPAIRS
Factory trained mechanics
I Complete parts department |
I Bring This Ad With You 1
Service Maintenance Only S 7.95 I
1 I! 1 11 -*!!*?- _!
* 1
"TODEROSA
JML l STEAK HOUSE \
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
WELCOME*!! U of F PERSONNEL
>N9VNw
%nmp
Jcity ; BaNitwJ
?& b k
1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
THE CLOSEST FULL SERVICE
BAfJIt TO CAMPUS



By IRA LEE RIDDLE
Alligator Correspondent
Defensive Bidding Part II
When one of the oponents
opens the bidding, a good
portion of the hands total
points are now pinpointed.
Therefore, the purpose of
defensive bidding would be to
attempt finding a distributional
fit. Thus, most of the defensive
bidding conventions show two
suited hands, and ask partner to
bid the better of your two suits,

500 VIRGIN CERTIFICATES
Playboy Belied
Virgins over 2 1 years old number at least 500 at the UF,
according to a report Tuesday by the owner of a local
cocktail lounge.
Ernest Cramer, owner of the Thirsty Gator, said he has
issued certificates of virginity to more than 500 women
students who are at least 21 years of age and are qualified
for the title.
Playboy must have been wrong in their survey, said
Cramer, referring to a recent article in Playboy magazine
which ranks UF the most sexually permissive campus in the
nation.
The virginity certificates issued by Cramer entitle the
bearer to special considerations in his establishment, plus
the right to bullyrag those of the same sex not awarded
this certificate.
Qualifications for obtaining the certificate include the
qualities of being pure, untouched and unsullied, as well as
an oath of virginity upon ones honor as a Florida student.
If the Honor System is good enough for the university,
its good enough for me, Cramer said.
What Honor System? said Tomi I. Sapp, a coed from
Florida State University recently awarded the certificate.
Movie Times Times
Times rotten ;M J mediocre ) good excellent
Center I Peter Pan and The Horse with the Flying Tail.
Peter Pan is well done, colorful, and a light, happy thing. 2:10,
4:38,7,9:34.. @
Center 11 Romeo and Juliet. Not over-dramatized. 2.03,
4:32,7:01,9:40. 0
Florida Daddys Gone A-hunting, with Carol Wight and
Paul Burke. Girl falls in love, begins to realize her lover is a
psychotic, turns him aside. So he hunts her dowi*. 1:30, 3:30
5:30,7:30,9:30.
Gainesville Drive-In If Its Tuesday It Must Be Belgium,
with Suzanne Pleshette. 8:42. The Detective, with Frank Sinatra
as the straight cop and Lee Remick. 10:43.
Plaza I Stiletto, with Alex Cord. Little story and that hard
to follow or care about because of a dream-like quality, poor
continuity and shallow characterization. 2, 3:50, 5:42, 7:30
9:30. (m)
Plaza II Femmina, with Mireille Dare.
Suburbia Drive-In Naked Angels. 8:52. PitStojLj^36^^^
LEARN
Introductory Flight Lesson
I Discover why the swings to wings.
| Try our introductory flight lesson in a modern
| La I I Piper Cherokee. Come see us today.
VETERANS!! Your G.l. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot
Tra ning For full details, call:
378-2646
f CASSELS IN THE AIR. INC. __

Defensive Bidding: Michael s Cue

no matter what kind of a hand
he may have.
One of the more commonly
used defensive bids is the
Michaels Cue Bid. The
requirements for bidding a
Michaels cue bid are simple
an opening hand and a
two-suiter, each suit of at least
five cards.
Michaels cue bids consist of
overcalling the openers bid in
the same suit. An overcall in a
minor suit tells partner that you
are at least 5-5 in the majors. An
overcall in a major suit shows

the other major ahd a five-card
minor suit which is not
specified. Over a 1-club opening
bid, a Michaels cue bid would
look something like: S: A, Q,
10, 3,2; II: K, Q, J, 8, S;D: K.
10; C;5.
When responding to a
Michaels cue bid, jump a level if
you have a good holding in one
of the specified suits and more
than 8 points. This tells the
partner that you were not really
forced to enter the auction, and
that you are not ashamed of
your trump suit.
If you can bid neither of your
partners suits (you only need
two in a suit to respond in it),
you either have an extra long
suit of you own, in which case
you can bid it, or you have a
trump stack against the opening
bidder's suit, in which case you
are in a bit of trouble. Best thing
to do in a situation like that is to
either bid no-trump with a lot of
silent praying, or leave your
partner in his cue bid, if youve a
semi-solid suit. Otherwise, it
might be best to bid your better
of his two suits.
When partner overcalls a
Cocktail
Party
Every Evening
5 to 7
Doubles for
regular price!
Dancing nightly
Entertainment
Fri. & Sat.
V i
1 NW 10th AVE.

GIVE A LITTLE EACH MONTH
GET A LOT EVERY DAY
896
The driving machine that likes
people. Its the new leader
in small cars... DATSUN
mmn
GODDING & CLARK w
2ND AVE & 2ND ST S.E.
OPEN TIL BPM 378-2311
P.O.E., plus tax, license, local freight, D & H

major suit, attempt to bid the
other major suit. With little
support for it, bid your better
minor, hoping that you pick his
minor suit. If you didnt, youll
find out in a hurry.

Car Need Repair?
Tune-ups Brake Repair Overhauls
We work on all makes and Models of cars.
10% discount to Students and FREE ESTIMATES
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
Corvair Specialist
1031 So. Main 376-7771

LUNCH SPECIALS
' FROM THE COLONEL
/^T'oC
\ CHICKEN /
\ SNACK /
FISH CO
j^p^^SNACK
214 N.W. 13th St. 114 N.W. 34th St.
376-6472 372-3649

Tuesday, August 19, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

1 Dick Doimu
JtWtLIB#
IcLOCK, WATCH 1& JEWELRY
I REPAIRS
I TROPHIES ENGRAVING
V 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
i/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 19,1969

JUST TRYING TO MAKE ENDS MEET

Gators Play Musical Chairs

(EDITORS NOTE: The
following is the second in a
series on the Gator football team
prospects for 1969).
Few of Floridas defensive
ends have seen much of the
position, questions remain
concerning the health of some,
but overall Coach Ray Graves
likes the potential.
There is not a single boy on
the three-deep roster at the
position whose original high
school or collegiate playing time
was defensive end. Conversions
have been made all over the lot
in an effort to put the best
athletes at this position and
others in an effort to get the
best 11 men on the field.
Top man at left end is
converted tackle-linebacker Jack
: I
t
ML
'IHKi )
i Jpffor
mam .
'fffispSkv.
' ..S.
ssf iPlk Hjv Mj
JACK YOUNGBLOOD
.... converted linebacker
Youngblood of Monticello. His
first team counterpart is
ex-quarterback Bob Coleman of
Avon Park. These boys are
backed by former
tackle-linebacker Robert Harrell
of Jacksonville and one-time
running back Rick Schmidt of
Melbourne.
We think all these boys are
good athletes who can play the
position, Graves said.
Injuries cut down
Youngblood and Coleman last
spring and coaches hope they
Wake Me When
It'zzzzzzz Over
It took the Silver Streaks all
day to win the Intramural
softball tournament Saturday
but then that was the idea.
The Streaks, who started
playing ball in the morning and
didnt finish til 7 in the evening,
outlasted the Subterranean
Circus, 8-5 and 11-6 for the
Marathon title.
Both teams logged 10 hours
of playing time.
Runnersup included the
Braves, Tallywhackers, and the
Hammies, who had a long lunch
break by getting eliminated in
the third game.
CRANE mi
IMPORTS |j ill
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville
fFTOTida^Quarterlyt
| ON SALE!] I

will be 100 percent effective in
the fall. Injuries completely
eliminated senior Britt
Skrivanek, who has started 15 of
the last 20 games for the Gators.
If all three of these boys are
ready it will greatly enhance this
area.
If all these boys are healthy
and we get normal improvement

rMIfnHnO^INIITEDWVEAND|
I SAVE) I
I STARKE, FLORIDA I
",SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER jjf
I WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM I
I SATURDAY BAM IPM I
[GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT!

I taco rakcho i
VSH* the "Sandwich Shaped Like a Smile"
I MEXICAN FOODS 1
H W V A ;1
W- Kiddie Burger M
9 O vV /V^ vV > :*
M V- u #:
TAMALES s W'
IJ L Es
RANCHITOS S A ** II
. the "Sandwich Shaped like a Smile" (?)
OL E! I
1624 SW 13th St. ft
DONKEY HQJI IS COMING SOON Just Post S,n C,ty
a* a* a *a* a 'a*a* jv a**'a.

out of them we will be adequate
in the position, Graves said. If
we get more rapid progress than
normal, which is possible, well
be above average.
Youngblood will also handle
much of the Gator kicking game.
He is UFs leading returning
scorer with 35 points and
booted seven field goals last fall.

Wishbone
There s a new Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Store at
704 S. W. 2nd Avenue or 16th Ave at S. Main Street.
J
vv*v'v%v*ViVo*#v*vvv%ViVvvy#%y*'>v>vXMV -. _