Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UNDERPRIVILEGED ADVISOR
Roy I. Mitchell, a 28-year-old Black
Jacksonville high school guidance
counselor, has been appointed as UFs
permanent full-time coordinator for
disadvantaged students. See page 2.

I Views Varied J
JOn SG Lawyer]
: i
*' >;
: EDITORS NOTE: This is the first of a three part series ;J
£ about legal representation for students by Student Government $
; and other student organizations. J
$ a
: By LEE HINNANT $
: Alligator Staff Writer :J
£ :
fi n
3 While Student Body President Charles Shepherd hopes to jjj
: retain an attorney to review Student Government contracts, J
other SG officers believe the scope of the attorneys duties ;j
>3 should be broadened to include representation of students. :
Shepherd expects to receive approval this week from Florida i|
| Secretary of State Tom
| Adams for
i? The corporation would retain
& an attorney to review
contracts entered into by SG ;
I and other student ;
j| ?. ?.organizations. ;
HH Other officers in the
n Shepherd administration
'"lSfe' 9 including Student Body Vice ;
President Charles Harris and >
Jiff Senate President Bob Blunt -:
the attorney
| be to
£ courts the
| verdict in the case could
| CHARLES SHEPHERD affect the rights of other ij
:! ... should review contracts students.
The same officers said the J
V ,<
greatest difficulty would be in establishing guidelines to
determine under what circumstances a student should be :<
£ represented. ;j
§ Most prominently mentioned were cases involving disputes J
:! with landlords, in which the ruling in the case could be applied' \
:! to similar disputes. :
£ Blunt was indignant about instances in which students are
:> docketed in city court for relatively minor infractions j
ijj committed on campus. j
£ He cited an incident in June in which students were arrested j
in Murphree Area by campus police for throwing firecrackers, j
ft The students were docketed that is, a trial date was set to j
j] appear in city court. |
£ The attorney for the proposed SG-created corporation :
£ should speak to university administrators and campus police j
j:j about such cases as this one, Blunt said. He should represent j
£ the students in court if necessary.
£ Lt. Vernon Holliman of the University Police Department
| said a student is taken to the city police department only if he
j ds
\ examples of minor crimes, he
: cited disturbing the peace, TOM ADAMS
breaking and entering, and ... but decision is his
:j: defacing public property. /
: I am speaking of crimes against the university, not crimes
against persons, Klausner said.
: Klausner said he thinks the UF should maintain jurisdiction
: over minor offenses no matter what the situation. Just because
a student talks nasty to an officer that doesnt make a
: misdemeanor into a felony, he said.
:j Klausner referred to last falls Lavon Gentry incident as one
which should have been handled on campus. Gentry, a UF
:j student arrested by campus police in the summer of 1968 for
ijj placing posters on university buildings, was tried in city court.
> He was later acquitted of the charge of injuring public property.
|

MARRIAGE-UF STYLE
Dr. Robert T. Garke, a* university
psychologist, thinks that UF should play
a role in helping married students adapt
to the academic-domestic world. See
page 4.

\ The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

Vol. 61, No. 168

'CANT RELINQUISH CONTROL

Solons Deny Autonomy
For Law School Group

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Tired of going through
Student Government for funds,
the Law Students Governing
Organization Tuesday asked the
senate for fiscal autonomy. The
senate voted down the request.
Law students asked that 60
percent of their student activity
fees which go to SG be within
their area of control.
During recent senate budget
meetings, law students received
zero funds for several of their
organizations including the John
Marshal] Bar Association.
The bill said if any funds
were left over after the
governing organization at the
law complex had paid for
operating expenses within its
organizations, the funds would
be returned to SG.
Senate Minority Floor Leader
Marvin Sylvest emphasized
Wednesday that the senate
cannot relinquish its control
over organizational spending.
They would spend funds for
most anything if we did that.
The senate also voted down a
bill which would have allowed
the student body to vote on
SGs joining a national
organization.
Last week, the bill passed by
a one vote margin, but failed by
about a 10 vote margin at
Tuesdays meeting.
This means students will not
be given a chance to decide on
SGs joining the U.S. National
Student Association for a one
year trial basis.
The senate committed SG to
a one year NSA membership on
July 1.
i A resolution urging all
entering freshmen to wear
i orange and blue beanies during
first quarter was removed from
the agenda.
Majority Floor Leader Marc
H. Glick and 14 other senators
prepared the resolution but
withdrew it when support by
senators for the action died on
the floor.
Resolution backers are
waiting for Student Body
President Charles Shepherd to
speak to the senate in favor of
the plan before bringing it to a
vote.
In other action, the senate
passed a resolution declaring the
front parking lot in the Twin
Towers area to be hazardous
and in need of improvement.

University of Florida, Gainesville

The Department of Student
Services was directed to begin
plans to improve the lot and
surrounding grounds with a
progress report required by the
first week of fall quarter.
Concerning freshman women
curfew, the senate said curfew
should be limited to first quarter

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Ri i 1
LIGHTNING STRIKES NORMAN HALL
1 Blam! Crunch! Crumble! Lightning struck Norman Hall with such
force during Wednesday afternoon's heavy rain that a peak on the
building's roof was shattered, scattering large chunks of granite in a 30
yard circle on the lawn beneath. Below, Charlotte Moyer, 7ED,
displays two medium-sized pieces she found in the storm's aftermath.
No one on the top floor was injured, but several saw the explosion,
and Dr. Hal Lewis, head of education foundations, said he felt the
bolt in his leg through his metal desk. Photos by Doug Case.
IH sf^|
. > : Z T! ':s:
1S& 7< : a.
Hr&;< * '<-' i w&' y -> j,; ::
POISON AND THE PROVOST
No wore? /ms ;yef come /rom
Agriculture Provost E. T. York Jr., on the
nature of Air Force-linked research The
Alligator asks again: Is it for CBW?
See page 8.

Friday, August 15, 1969

freshman women, to midnight
on nights preceding school days
and 2 a.m. on all other nights.
An appreciation resolution
was passed honoring Mrs. Jeanne
Harris, wife of Student Body
Vice President Charles Harris,
for her service to the senate as
secretary.



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1969

Page 2

Students Lose
Federal Loans
For Fall Term

w s?
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SIMMERING SUMMER SOUNDS
Sweet swinging string along with ... with ... well, these two guys
who just happen to like plucking and strumming in the Plaza of the
Americas any ole summer afternoon during class break.
Underclassmen (that's University College) Michael Kemp with guitar
and Greg Jowaisas, banjo, join in a little impromptu jam session. Say,
do you know... ? Photos by Doug Case.
r- UFS REPRESENTATIVES I
FTlifclAa sle L George Corl Skip Lujack |
I Dan Sapp Artie Watkinson I
1 Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave.
I* NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
I^EFERRE^REMIU^^MENT^^^^^^^J
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

By Alligator Services
Up to 1,000 UF students may
have to look elsewhere for
financial assistance when they
ask their banks for money to
pay tuition in the fall.
That was the estimate
Wednesday by Ira D. Turner,
director of student financial aid,
about the possible effect of
refusal by the House of
Representatives this week to
approve renewal of the

f&derally-insured guaranteed
bank loans for college students.
The program was renewed
92-1 by the Senate Tuesday, but
the House couldnt resolve a
squabble over student unrest and
decided to shelve the bill until
after the fall recess of Congress.
Sponsors of the bill urged its
passage so that thousands o
college students who need
financial aid wont be denied
access to colleges.
College officials have

JACKSONVILLE EDUCATOR SELECTED I
Disadvantaged Students I
Get Permanent Coordinator!

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Managing Editor
A permanent, full-time coordinator for
disadvantaged students was named Thursday
afternoon by Lester L. Hale, vice president for
student affairs. The appointment is for one year.
He is Roy Ishman Mitchell, a 28-year-old
guidance counselor at Jacksonvilles predominantly
black Butler High School. He will take over Sept. 1
from second year medical student Don Henderson,
who has been working part time this summer as
temporary coordinator in Hales office.
Hale created the job May 14 when he named
Corbin Camell, an English professor, to a temporary
job as student affairs assistant for minority groups.
Camell left June 30 to take up sponsored research,
and Henderson was appointed until Sept. 1.
In applying for the job Mitchell told Hale in a
letter, The mere creation of this position
represents a new attentiveness and a long overdue
push in education for the culturally and
economically disadvantaged student.
Mitchell said he recognized the frustration of
black students who are shut out from any
educational future. This is an area in which I
would like to work, he said.
The Florida A & M University masters degree
graduate will be assisting the culturally
disadvantaged student already on campus in order
to help them have successful experiences both
personally and academically, Hale said of the
appointment.

shuns yom
BOOKS ?Jg
f* CAMPUS SHOP and BOOKSTORE
is BUYING BACK books
for fall quarter!!
STORE HOURS: Bom. spm man. fri. Phon. 392-0194

estimated that up to 200.000
students will be affected if the
bill doesnt pass.
Turner emphasized that his
prediction did not mean that
1 000 students wont come to
UF. Perhaps 400 or 500 will
have to stay away, Turner said,
while the remainder will have to
Ld some other sources of
support.
The loan program has been in
trouble recently because the cost
of borrowing money has risen to

Secondly, he will be working on recruiting I
academically eligible and promising students and I
devising programs for aid to the marginal student I
he added. 1
In addition, Hale said, Mitchell will work with I
the presidents committee on disadvantaged I
students and will help in creating a curriculum for I
black studies. ~ I
Mitchell reportedly met with members of both I
the committee and the Afro-American Student!
Association and, Hale commented, that they]
concurred in his selection. I
Hale did not say how many applications for the
job his office .had received, but usually reliable
sources told the Alligator that the most snagging
problem was working an attractive salary.
Mitchell will also be a counselor in University
College and also is being hired as an instructor in
comprehensive logic.
He is presently working towards certification in
vocational guidance.
Tests Take Holiday
UFs office of academic affairs Thursday issued a
reminder which will please the bock-weary student
- but not for long.
For after today no examinations, class quizzes,
special projects or term papers shall be given oi
assigned during the final five class days of the
summer quarter Monday thru next Friday.
- Take home exams will not be due prior to the
regularly scheduled exam period, which begins Aug.
25.

X haveasKperanti S|
Many banks in Fl orid 1
completely stopped
considering loaning mo "|
students under the y I
program because of he
The Senate-passed bin I
permits banks to realize 10 I
cent interest through subsEl
payments.



Conner Ponders Proposed Changes In UC

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Vice President for Academic Affairs
Frederick W. Conner, having received
formal and informal recommendations
for changes in University College, hopes
to determine this summer if proposed
reforms should be implemented.
Conner has written his own
tentative evaluation of UC. He says
his evaluation is now being submitted to
persons whose opinions he wants before
making any definite recommendations
about the college.
Among the people being consulted
are University College Dean Franklin A.
Doty, College of Arts and Sciences Dean
Harry H. Sisler, the chairmen of the
seven UC departments, and UF

Moonmen
Get Back
To Normal
The Apollo 11 astronauts,
Edwin Buzz Aldrin, Neil
Armstrong and Michael Collins,
have spent the week receiving
the congratulations and
commendations of a grateful
nation.
The three emerged Sunday
night from a three-week
quarantine which they entered
immediately after returning
from the moon.
Awaiting them was a week of
activities, almost as strenuous as
their trip to the lunar surface.
The astronauts had been kept
in quarantine for fear they may
have brought back dangerous
germs from the lunar surface.
But a series of blood samples
proved them to be healthy, and
they were allowed to leave the
confines of the lunar receiving
laboratory Sunday night.
Released with them were a
number of NASA employes
who, through the past three
weeks, had been exposed to soil
samples brought back from the
moon. Included in this group
was a 23-year-old woman who
had been exposed a week before
the astronauts were released.
First stop was a long-awaited
reunion with their families, from
whom they had been separated
for more than a month.
And then it was a series of
.news conferences, tickertape
parades, and finally a state
dinner in Los Angeles, attended
by members of the House of
Representatives and the Senate,
the governors of all 50 states,
NASA officials and hosted by
President Richard Nixon.
Following the Wednesday
night meeting, the astronauts
continued their tour of the
country.
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE a
NORTH OF ftxA
THE MALL
lie icn AUTHORIZED
376-4552 DEALER
Open til 7 p.m. nightly
I
Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!

President Stephen C. OConnell.
Conner said he also wanted to discuss
the proposed changes with students, but
he did not mention specific names.
After receiving the reactions of
others to his tentative
recommendations, Conner said he will
rewrite his evaluation if necessary and
present it in its final form to OConnell,
probably after September 1.
He said his final recommendations
will be made public at that time.
From OConnell the
recommendation will probably go to the
University Curriculum Committee for
further study. Then it will be sent to the
University Senate and to the Board of
Regents-if extensive changes are
proposed. Conner emphasized the word

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GATOR G/RL DOUGCASE
Today's sight for sore eyes is Becky Hightower, 3ED. Becky hails
from St. Petersburg, thinks the newspaper business is groovy, and to
her friends is known as a "spelunker." That's a caving enthusiast and
bad news to you unfortunate guys with claustrophobia.
5-SHIRTS-99<
(SAVE 51t)
PLAIN
DRESSES-9 9<
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QUALITY IS OUR
MAIN CONCERN
TROPICAL CLEANERS
402 N.W. 13th St. 209 N.E. 16th Av.

if.
I would expect that if there are
recommended changes, they will be
implemented in the academic year
beginning in the fall of 1970, he said.
In evaluating the college, Conner will
rely on years of experience with UC.
The University College was begun in
1935-the same year I came to this
campus, he noted.
The written reports on UC which
Conner received included that of an
Action Conference task conference
committee headed by Dr. Corbin
Carnell, professor of English. That
committees proposal for extensive
changes within UC was approved by the
Action Conference in February.
Before recommending changes,

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gj|p H^. s -. v :
The traditional campus favorite in classic ivy
cut. Casual and dress-up fabrics in the colors
you want, with a crease that never comes out!
Nobody makes Sta-Prest but Levis!
PRICED AT $7.00
USE YOUR BELK, CENTRAL,
OR MASTER CHARGE
LOCATED IN THE GAINESVILLE
SHOPPING CENTER

Friday, August 15,1969, The Florida Alligator

Conner awaited the report of a
committee he appointed and headed by
Dr. Hal G. Lewis, professor of
education. The committee evaluated the
entire college. Conner said the
committee's purpose was not necessarily
to recommend changes, but to provide
an analytical description" of UC as it
now exists.
The Lewis committee report
received before July 1.
A questionnaire was distributed by
the Lewis committee to UC students in
March. It sought students opinion
about the effectiveness of each UC
department and the quality of
teaching. The results were tabulated
and included in the report which was
sent to Conner.

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15, 1969

Page 4

Psvcholoaist Studies Emotional Chemistry!

By Alligator Services
A common experiment in emotional
chemistry-mixing marriage with collegeis the
research interest of a UF psychologist.
The formula for such an experiment is fairly
routine:
Take a new mate to a new home in a strange
community. Switch normal marriage roles so the
wife becomes the breadwinner. Subtract a major
share of the pairs accustomed income, and then add
the normal stress of student life. Plus or minus an
expected baby, and you have the concerns of the
typical married college student.
Dr. Carl T. Clarice, psychologist at the university
infirmary, contends such a mixture is sufficiently
hazardous to the persons involved that it requires
special handling by university officials.
He feels universities generally do a poor job in
helping married couples face these adjustments.
Most orientation programs and student services are
geared to the single student.
When the demands of getting an education and
nurturing a sound marriage conflictand they
frequently dothe marriage suffers, Clarke
maintains.

- /' / I 1 / /
X > \ > ~ X f ::<
'* /'
DOUG CASE
SUPERSLIDE IS COMING!

The Super-Slide comes to Gainesville. Workmen
here begin clearing land at the corner of NW 7th
Avenue and NW 13th Street for the home of the
giant slide with its wide, curving metal planes soon

Special Infirmary Hours Announced

Student Health Services
officials have announced the
infirmarys schedule for the
quarter break for students who
plan to remain in Gainesville.
The infirmary will close at
noon Aug. 31. It will remain
Cocktail
Party
Every Evening
5 to 7
Doubles for
regular price I
Dancing nightly
Entertainment
Fri. & Sat.
1 NW 10th AVE.

MIYINC; MARRIAGEWIH-CQLLEGE

closed all day Labor Day, Sept.
1. It will also be closed Sept.
6-7.
All other days the infirmary
will be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30
p.m. It will resume normal hours
Sept. 10.

I .. s
attention
graduating
I seniors
MORE
I Announcements end Convocation Invitations have
{ amved the CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORP
The supply is limited so hurry!!! BOTH ARF
ONLY 25c EACH. r duih ARE
I GRADUATION AUGUST 30

*
Isnt it strange that in the midst of a
college environment in which learning is so
highly valued and rewarded, young couples
find that learning to live together in ways
that are mu tally satisfying is left almost
totally to chance, to doing what comes
naturally? ,'
- UF psychologist Carl 1. ClarK

Some of the things he recommends to ease the
problems of married students are for universities to
provide low cost housing and day care service,
family medical plans, cultural and recreational
activities which involve the nonstudent spouse, and
part-time educational opportunities for the wives of
married students.
Beyond meeting these external needs for married
couples, Clarke feels universities have an
opportunity to do something about impoving the
quality of marriage life, perhaps through a special
unit such as a Center for Married Effectiveness.
Isnt it strange, he asks, that in the midst of a
college environment in which learning is so highly
valued and rewarded, young couples find that

to be echoing with the screeches of delighted
children and adults, too, for those who have the
courage.

Students requiring medical
aid during evening or weekend
hours may go to the emergency
room of the Shands Teaching
Hospital. A fee will be charged
for the service, the infirmary
officials said.

learning to live together in ways that are mutually I
satisfying is left almost totally to chance-to doing I
what comes naturally? s
Clarke has received a three-year, $250,000 g ran t 1
from the National Institute of Mental Health to I
explore ways of accomplishing this objective. I
I am hopeful our universities will accept the I
educational challenge of bringing to bear on I
marriage what we know about how people grow and I
what we know about how people get sick and I
disturbed, he said.
In his research project Clarice is seeking to find I
out more about the problems of married students I
and about ways to help them through a series of I
small group discussions. He has established a pattern I
of six such meetings in which four or five couples I
participate. After testing out procedures himself, I
Clarke is now training leaders for such groups.
In these groups the couples examine their role I
expectations and openly share those aspects of their 1
married life which are particularly meaningful to I
them.
One of Clarkes earliest research findings is that I
full-time employment by the wife seems to impose I
greater demands upon the time which couples have I
available for companionship. I

ITS WHATS I
BABY! I
weve got a I
crush on patent I
Squashy crushed plastic patent I
softly shaped into gleaming I
new handbags that are really I
something else! Slingers or top I
handles in bolster or envelope
shapes, black or brown,
18.00, n Maas Handbags. I
maaA S/iot/tm
GAINESVILLE MALL




'Education Isnt
Just A Journey,
UF Prof Argues
Since the demands for work will continue to decrease in this
technological age, a UF education professor says, Weve got to quit
thinking of education as a journey.
Dr. Hal Lewis, professor in the Department of Education
Foundations, made the observation this week at a College of
Education faculty lecture.
Weve got to stop thinking of education as youre here and going
there, Lewis said. Weve got to develop a concept of education in
which every day and every year and every age of the child and adult
has its own sanction.
He explained that too many people think of education as a means
to an end. We should start thinking of education in terms of an end in
itself.
The education professor believes that an emphasis on aesthetics
an appreciation of the artistic or beautiful will probably be our
(educations) salvation.
Giving people fruitful enterprises which will fill the vacuum of
less and less demands for work, he continued, is a necessity.
Speaking on the implications of automation and the computer age
in society, Lewis commented that eventually everybody will have
what he wants and demands for goods will level off.
In this future society, Lewis remarked, Machines will eliminate
the routine jobs and school rejects will no longer be absorbed into our
economy.
Workers will need a high degree of literacy, a high degree of
mathematic and scientific knowledge, he claimed.
Because of this eventual change, we have to re-think our purposes
and goals about education.
Cosmetics For Blacks
A Booming Business

By DIANA LATHAM
Alligator Staff Writer
Black is beautiful. And
specially made cosmetics are
being produced to add even
more beauty to black women.
Blanche Calloway, president
of Afram House in Miami, has
been establishing retail outlets
throughout the United States in
response to booming success
Pepper Urges
Parking Loans
Congressman Claude Pepper
(D-Fla.) has introduced
legislation to permit federal
loans to universities and colleges
for the construction of
automobile parking facilities. At
present, no funds under the
Higher Education Facilities Act
of 1963 are allocated for parking
structures.
Before introducing the bill,
Pepper surveyed state and
private universities in Florida
and throughout the country. His
survey produced an
overwhelmingly favorable
response.
This bill will provide a
means of alleviating the chronic
parking problems on many of
the nations campuses. It is time
that we recognize this deficiency
and seek to correct it, Pepper
said.

Gainesville now has the finest in education!
MONTESSORI is now being taught at Belles & Beaux
MONTESSORI instructors in both 2 & 3 year old age group
and Kindergarten
Register your child NOW in Gainesville's most
PROGRESSIVE pre-school Nursery & Kindergarten
School hours 7:30 AM 6:00 PM
Phone 378-4246 or 378-5925 for appointment
Belles & Beaux 1124 N.W. 39th Ave.

selling cosmetics for blacks.
Lipsticks, eyelashes, eye
shadows, powders, perfumes and
wigs are much in demand by
black women, Miss Calloway
said.
Black women didnt need
cosmetics years ago, Miss
Calloway said. Her job outside
the home was as maid or
housekeeper. She didnt need to
look attractive, and couldnt
afford it anyway.
Now the black woman
works in integrated businesses
and an integrated school. She
has to have an awareness of
everything it takes to make her
attractive because she has to
compete.
In Gainesville, Mrs. Mildred
Thompson of Holiday Magic
Cosmetics has worked with
many blacks in selecting
cosmetics.
She said the make-u|> any
woman chooses depends on the
effect the wearer wants to
achieve.
Although many cosmetics
stores dont have a special line of
make-up for blacks, they do
have the darker shades blacks
buy, Mrs. Thompson said.
Blood Needed
The need for blood is
constantly increasing at the rate
of about 12 per cent annually,
says Dr. Frank Coleman of
Tampa, president of the
American Association of Blood
Banks.

f IN-FASHION^WP 1
I
GAINESVILLE MALL H
2546 N.W. 13th Street
Both! Todays fashion outfit
m Jfi from Lerner Shops is our K
Bj Crepe Dress Pants
Your perfect outfit as a
Jumper look dress or
7 1 vjV ,//./, i'.* | combined with its own Crepe fp\\
Wide leg Pants.
Available in Black, Purple, jp||f
Brown.
sn99
-H I I
Photography by Aaron Law IB
'
YOUR FASHION HEADQUARTERS I

Friday, August 15,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1969

\M Kn ONLY TWOWEEKS
H YOUR GRANADA
COMPLETE YOUR SET AT
SANBORN
-lb. r
mAMI a*; can
GUARD 12V4-oz. LUSTRE CREME HP L ' {ll* 4ft &lbs
DEODORANT 58c HAIR SPRAY 48c CAN U 7
5^- LARGE COLGATE 20-Gal. PLASTIC
* 6A V|^ GJ I^ NJ ,,W Limit 1 Coffee Your Choice w/$5.00 or more purchase exl. cigarettes
MxEwtiMwWwwlWmUJl* GT. BLUE, WHITE OR COLD WATER Limitl Detergent of Your Choice w/$5. or more pur. excl. cig.
Arrow Deteraent.....*.39'
§ HOUr \ Bntter...69' Tissue 5/*L
20-oz. DIXIE DARLING PRESTIGE 20-Lb. Bag BRIQUETS
sis Aft f 8read....29 Charcoal 87
jKL "3r f Quantity Rights Reserved-Prices Good All Week Wed. Noon Thru Wed. Noon. August 13 -20
id Hr \ \\MWmpi 1 llfftwKtfi/.
* Xlr 1 lmL LONG GRAIN RICE. 39
- i ife SL-Sr 1 2
r ; ng -t Jr \ kuhTAiii h#f u us** F|SH
W lliOrLWllllll m. CLOROX BLEACH 29*
W mrnKmm m B 3j6jk beechnut strained '
Imfr Limit 1 Shortening of Your Choice With *5.00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes BABY FOOD.
COOKIES 4/Sl . ft 1% JS *.".3/W
BARfrpEARs.:...:. 3/si! 53Au J teabags 8y
TOMATOES.. 6/sl. XL %
SOFT DRINKS 5/$ 1. XS' X4#
PAPER 10WEL5...4/sl. 2 .*T.ag.. JQbF nffe
APPLESAUCE 5/sl. WMtjuJT* GEOR6,AR jJ
GREEN PEAS 4/sl. jf M^gkff%ogp§
HarVeAt JteAk preface m
Celery 2/39* While Grapes 29' S' I PEAK j.
GO,MN RAN,AM WESTERN VINE RIPE JUMBO L H OF
Fancy Corn 5 39* Cantaloupes 3/SI. I lbs < SEASON Jf
WE EIRE MOUNTAIN GROWN U.S. No. I RUSSET BAKING T Btf,
Tomatoes 33* Potatoes... 10 89* U
Prune Plums 4 $1 Nectarines 3 sl.
Keebler Zestas37* iliiliJlfclj^ R'fllgxTw/%Hin''.lr^vi
12a...sunshine lEf MBl T:~ iEIUf !-Y*WJst*mS |I4iI |f p XTT/%. :rrr| EXTRA :
Vanilla Wafers 39* good thru au.;. i 6 |: 9* f l 'Cci GL |j o. UE STAMP |j
BLUE BONNET WHIPPED 22-oz. LUX \ ta 1 IOOD thru Pledge
Margarine Liquid Detergent. . 63 3/M. $163 fr_ ' Facial Soap .... 2/39*
/ 9ent 630 L'febuoy Soap... 2/43*

1401 N. MAIN ST.

Week

130 N.W. 6TH ST.

3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS



LEFT TO COMPLETE
DINNERWARE SERVICE
ANY WINN-DIXIE UNTIL AUG. 27
. SUNNVIAND shank > "********- ir mi 11 nimnLunM i a -*>*** * 4,w>
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED CHUCK USDA Choice W-D Brand Corn Fed Bone In Strip N Y V VtUttULLMt/iOL L
Steak 79' Steaks -*1 49
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED SHOULDER W-D BRAND LEAN GROUND . JjMT* A* GRADE CHOICE
Roast 89? Beef 3 5 1 79 #DftM"CT%
Steak 99' Ckatk-.M I Zi? 1 1
Quantity Rights Reserved Prices Good All W jek Wed. Noon Thru Wed. Noon, August 13 20 ^SSr
FRIED 51iAK5......~ *9* tHHHfj,,
sliced beef 2 $1.49
hot ***** $139 -Jp SLICED INTO PORK v^3
PORK SAUSAGE 69*
BRAUNSCHWEIGER 59' II
TARNOW FRANKS k.49* jgl lllJV Ij,
FISH STICKS 99 I IWI Mr
STEAKETTES 2 $1.89 W CREAM CHEESE 39*
H jg CAN BISCUITS 2/39*
STICK CHEESE 57*
ASTOR ORANGE WF PIMENTO CHEESE....S9*
4r 111 l Wi it&r CHEDDAR CHEESE 89*
# lllirii % fiF L,VER 59<
f vUIII 'ft WHITING FISH 29*
aji jfe 'Jujen Jnd Special*
1 Pkg. OCOMA CHICKEN. BEEF OR TURKEY PL g TASTE O' SEA
4 3 ! Meat Pies.... 6/sl. Fish Sticks....3/sl.
'iQ/t' 12-oz. Os gfe 10-oz. Pkg. ASTOR FORDHOOK OR LAMBRECHT (PEPPERONI...79G CHEESE
%I M CANS ' 4" Baby Limas 5/sl. Pizza Pies 59*
Strawberries 4/sl. Fruit Pies 3/sl.
Topping... 2/sl. Diet Bars 2/Sl.
0
EWZS&SS& ; iLlXi# TOPVALUjE STAMPS IM Jl W STAMM !1 f I STAMM *I f iTIW fol VALUE STAMM 111 [ill W STAMM J
~ ~ COu - *" O' WII ceveOM | PUCM*I o* 1 ---- -1t..... cou.o~ .~t -u.cm.k m WITH Hlwve.M* COU*Om .-e NMMM or J
TWO OTS. DIXIE WHIP ?VS pkg OF swo BEEF TWO 18 - FKS. > FREEZER QUEEN FRIED TWO FLA. OR A Vi OR WHOLE
Topping I Iffyjfffi Steakettes Pereh FilVet* ; fPfffiffi Fried Steak \ fe?' Fresh SmokedHom
| OOOD RU GOO THRU UG 16 A3 GOOD TH U Au - | #ll ; As 3000 nu AU j # OOOD THRU AUO. ! j
50*1 SWEETNER AUNT JEMIMA . 12-ox. 43c . 24-o*. No. 1 Con HENNY PEN j : KLb. (frfRS i
Sweet N'Low Syrup 75* Dog Food .... 3/29* Margarine
l-Lb. ALL VEGETABLE 14-ox. HEINZ W/Onion* or'Regulor 15-ox. Con SWITCH A /s
Crisco Shortening 37* Tomato Catsup . .31* Cat Food 10*. Plus 100 Stomp* w/Coupon j

1401 N. MAIN ST.

Wednesday Thru Wednesday!

130 N.W. 6TH ST.

3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

Friday, August 15,1969, The Florida Alligator,

HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

Page 7



, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1969

Page 8

mi -At(

Cubas True Revolution

MR. EDITOR:
I am writing not in reply to
any particular letter but rather
in reaction to certain things that
have been said as well as to
recent events which as a Cuban I
feel obligated to comment upon.
A fellow compatriot points
out the differences between
Castros and American freedoms.
Yet, he fails to realize that the
comparison is meaningless.
Whereas the United States has
had a long history of human
dignity and freedom, Cuba has
had none. Or has Cuban history
been forgotten? Need we name
the long list of Cubas best sons

Trouble For Appalachia?

What price regulation? The so-called non-gassy
coal mines of the Appalachian region, as represented
by the Coal Industry Committee on Mine Safety,
are very much exercised by the mine safety bill
currently before Congress. According to the
non-gassy mine spokesmen, an indiscriminate
application of identical safety measures to all mines,
regardless of whether they are obviously plagued
with methane gas or not, will wreak terrible
economic havoc in the mountainous areas of
Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee.
Predictions are being made that the new
legislation, if passed, would put 4,000 small drift
mines out of business, destroy 40,000 mining jobs
and severely affect the economic base of a half
million people in Appalachia and cost the UJS. the
production of 150 million tons of coal annually.
The layman, trapped between the claims of
safety people such as Ralph Nader and the
owners of mines which have always been put in a
non-gassy category, is at a singular disadvantage. For
coal mining is a tricky business on which even the
experts disagree. Generally speaking, there is
apparently no gas menace in small hillside drift
mines.
The Federal Bureau of Mines has traditionally
classified mines as non-gassy when they have less

These Days
John
Chamberlain

than 25 hundredths of one per cent of methane in
the air (it takes five to fifteen per cent of methane
to cause an explosion). But, regardless of what the
original classification may indicate, mines have
gone bad** without warning. Methane gas can be
formed at* any place where vegetable matter changes
into energy sources. A mine can be safe for
fifteen to twenty years, but underground miners can
suddenly strike an impervious pocket formed by a
clay vein that will trap methane in unusual
quantities.
There have been fifty-three explosions in
supposedly non-gassy mines in the last sixteen years.
Only recently five men were severely burned in a
non-gassy** explosion in the Morgantown area of
West Virginia.
The quarrel over removing the classical
distinction between gassy and non-gassy mines is
represented as one between the claims of human life
and the claims of economic profit. Naturally no
sensitive person wants to say that money is more
important than the safety of human beings. So the
safety** people usually get the better public
relations deal when they argue that all mines should
be compelled to adopt identical rules of precaution.

Florida Alligator
The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility

Dave Reddick
Editor-In-Chief

who spent their lives fighting
tyranny? Jose Maria Heredia,
Jose Marti, Ruben Martinez
Villena, Julio Antonio Mella,
J ose Antonio Echeverria ... a
short list, yet one that cries out
the tragedy of our existence.
Can we truly claim that our
national consciousness does not
carry the burden of our history?
Always in our history the
Machados and the Weylers and
the Batistas end up in power
with the paranoid Cuban
bourgeoisie licking the Yankees
boot and carrying the loot to
foreign banks.
Each new regime fed on the
old and grew on its

IE

Harold Aldrich
Executive Editor

However, death can come to a coal mine
community in different ways. The forty thousand
miners who would be put out of work if the
non-gassy mines were to close down represent a
payroll of S2BO million a year. If small mine owners
went out of business because they cant afford
expensive non-sparking cutting machinery, the
chronic economic distress in Appalachia would be
greatly magnified. The average per capita income in
Appaiachia is already far below the national average
(its $2,468 compared to $3,137).
The Federal government is pouring millions of
dollars into poverty programs in the mountain areas
of West Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. If the
40,000 men now working in small mines which
employ fewer than fifteen men each are thrown on
the labor market in the mountain states, it could
mean death by slow economic strangulation for
scores of communities.
So the safety people, in forcing legislation that
will put the small mine out of business because it
cant afford new cutting machines, are not so
humane, either. They could be accused of
promoting death from hidden hunger. This is not so
spectacular as death from a mine explosion, but it is
extinction nonetheless.
The Senate safety bill, as shaped up in
committee, tries to make things easy for the
non-gassy mine owner by giving him four years to
replace his big machines and sixteen months to take
care of his small equipment. The Small Business
Administration is authorized to make loans to cover
the cost of reconverting to safety machinery. But
the cost of equipping an eight-man mine section
with non-sparking machinery has been estimated as
running to $220,000 and up. Inevitably a lot of
drift mines will go out of business when the
proposed new safety rules have become law.
Good or bad for the country? It depends on
ones taste in catastrophe. Without permissible
safety equipment there will be occasional disasters
in drift mine areas. With strict enforcement of a
permissible equipment law there will be more
decay in the already stricken region. Who is to say
which is more deplorable?
Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey John Sugg
Editorial Assistant Associate Editor
Gayle McElroy Darcy Meeker
Copy Editor Campus Living Editor
i
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
of the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.*

Dave Osier
Managing Editor

putrefaction, and yet we dared
claim that wrongs could be
righted without effort. We are
well aware of Castroisms own
contradictions, but then, this is
the high price we have to pay for
our history. The price that we
pay for the foundations of a new
and better society that is rising
from the sterility of the old. The
one thing that saves OUR true
Revolution is that it is creating a
future for our people. If we lack
the courage or stamina to live
under Castro, how much worse
was it to have lacked human
dignity in living under Batista?
ANOTHER CUBAN STUDENT

editorial
Give Us The Facts
The swelling surge of public inquiry and protest over the
use of chemical and biological (CBW) weapons, which this
week resulted in a unanimous Senate vote to restrict the
deadly devices, has had apparently little effect on the call to
release information on CBW research at UF.
Since College of Agriculture research on plant killers
tested at Eglin AFB could be linked to the overall CBW
program, the Alligator asked in an editorial last month that
a report be issued in the public interest explaining UF
involvement in research that is dubious in nature.
If Air Force-sponsored research of herbicidal effects on
plant life at the military reservation is not associated with
the CBW program, we have no way as yet to know it.
Agricultural officials, including Provost E.T. York Jr., have
neither confirmed nor denied speculation and reports about
the research.
The officials claimed they did not know the nature of
the research. They reported they had not been told what
purpose the Air Force had in mind for the three-year,
$46,000 project. We stated that we had reason to believe
otherwise. We still do, and we are not alone.
In the face of a Senate investigation, the Department of
Defense admitted something horrible was going on in CBW
weapons research, development and stockpiling.
Defense officials even assisted Senate CBW critics in
drafting a set of strict standards for the transportation,
storage and testing of CBW agents, a proposal that was
approved 91-0 Monday.
No one is saying that Air Force herbicide development is
aimed specifically at designing a weapons system for future
use in a war zone. But herbicides could be deployed as a
silent, subtle weapon to damage crops of an enemy country,
inducing widespread blight and forcing national leaders to
surrender terms.
The Army defines biological warfare as employment of
living organisms, toxic biological products, and chemical
plant regulators to produce death or casualties in man,
animal or plants...
A United Nations report on CBW released July 2 said in
part that: The fact that certain (CBW) agents are
k e %
. de'" n J ts' 6 Y
M e"**' 4 o' \
it\ ** Vvo os.^ 6
_o.\\ e aoN
m
m \
potentially unconfined in their effects, both in space and
tune, and that their large scale use could conceivably have
deleterious and irreversible effects on the balance of nature
adds to the sense of insecurity and tension which the
existence of this class of weapons engenders.
In 1968 the Defense Department spent $31.4 million for
stockpiles of herbicides alone. Another $5.2 million is
budgeted for 1969. Overall CBW expenditures for 1968
amounted to $248.1 million. The military plans on spending
about $7 million less in 1969, however.
Since 1964 herbicides have been used in Vietnam for
defoliation of enemy-infested jungles, although this has
been decreased for fear of upsetting the balance of nature.
We are concerned not only about the potential use of
herbicides as a weapon, but also about the UFs possible
role in the development of such potential weapons.
Realistically, we can not expect UF to predict that each
of its defense contracts might be a source of controversy.
Obviously, no one could have assumed herbicides might be
linked to dubious CBW development.
Still, we think guidelines should be established, at least
to inform UF ofSrhat its getting into. Then those findings
should be published and distributed.
We ask once again that herbicide research information be
made public, and hope that Provost York takes the lead in
doing so.



FORUM:^^
C -AidM omL 'Di&Awf /)
y vi
hope for the c^m^c^-* 0000^
CHARLES E. HARRIS
...find some guts, deans
Babies Arent Cheap
MR. EDITOR:
As another married UF student, I wish to take issue with the logic
behind Mr. Todds letter of August 8, 1969. His objection to the
placement of the activities center is not my point.
Mr. Todd says, The need for cheap and good housing for married
students is extreme. This valid point is followed by the
pablum-minded statement that married people cannot scrimp on baby
food and doctor visits for their children. I would like to point out that
being married is not equal to being a parent. Having a child when one
is unable to provide for it is ignorance that does not deserve a special
rent subsidy.
Having children should be a rational process, and should include
financial considerations.
TSCmAS-iRAKAUER
DEPARTMENT OF ZOOLOGY
We Like Our Prof

MR. EDITOR:
Letters criticizing faculty and
other factors here at the
University of Florida are
common in the Alligator. For a
pleasant change, the undersigned
students would like to voice
their appreciation for a well

Bobbing Beanies
? MR. EDITOR: 2

ij So were told that freshman beanies are to make the campus $
5: scene £
ij To make freshmen feel cohesively just what college can mean, $
£ As grouply they participate in the collective wean.
> V
. : : :
$ For, after all, its hard to cling to group identity g
:! While bobbing, tieless, anchorless, upon the campus sea |
And signing homework 268-04-073.
| %
§ And who do freshmen see all day, but who? £
>: In logic class, in English class, and institutions, too? :j!
5 Now, REALLY, dont you think those caps are like Scotch tape ¥
l for glue? |
| |
:ji The purpose of those caps to end UF ambivalence.' £
$ Weil, fine! But spirit in freshmen has no equivalence! jj
£ May I salute that logic with a series of sibilants!
6 §
j: Still, 1 suspect this fall well see a sea of striped caps §
So freshman can find freshman, (Also classes with his maps,) |
| Enjoying group security -in freshman lecture, perhaps! |
| MELANIE FRUITSTONE, 4AS §

prepared professor who appears
truly interested in his Zoology
202 class, Dr. C. A. Lanciani.
T.C. Mill J.S. Southwell
Ronald F.. 1 uller K.K. Snyder Jr.
Donald Guttinger I reida Sessions
Stephen Ripple/ K. Lewis Cox
Neal F. Kichholz R.M. Harvy
Candace Bamford Thomas Peterson
Nora A. Dalton Lynda Powell

Lets Have Public Council

MR. EDITOR:
Congratulations on your fine editorial stand
concerning the closed meetings of the Council of
Academic Deans.
Whether Floridas Govemment-in-the-Sunshine
law applies to university committees or not is really
rather unimportant. For if
student-faculty-administrative understanding and
free discussion on this campus can only come about
by court enforcement, then the University of
Florida may well be closer to a Berkley than many
of us believe.
Just six months ago, the archaic University
Senate opened its doors to students and the press
(while wisely and rightfully reserving the privilege of
meeting in executive session on special matters).
The basic argument expounded in favor of free
access to these Senate meetings was the same as the
premise of your request to the Council of Deans:
people including students have a right to
participate in decisions that affect their lives.
After considerable discussion and maneuvering,
the University Senate which makes basically all
student and academic regulations agreed to open
sessions. It is truly unfortunate that the Deans, in
their wisdom, could not see the writing on the wall.
Lest the Deans supply their usual argument that
their Council meetings do not make policy but
rather only allow them a place to candidly discuss
affairs of the University Community, let me agree
with the Alligator that this point is, at most,
non-persuasive.
Regardless of the on-paper reasons for the
Council of Academic Deans, they do far more than

Speaking Out

UF Forgets Needy Families

As a resident of Flavet 111,
the only university village for
student families with low
incomes, I should like to
comment on matters arising
from an article recently
published in the Alligator (No
Flavet Coliseum CCmncis
Foreseen, page 6, August 8).
In this article, it is stated that
the university plans to replace
Flavet 111 with new apartments
for married students. The
implications is, at the very least,
misleading. The University
plans to build luxury
apartments; it has no plans to
replace Flavet 111 with married
student quarters renting for
amounts comparable with the
526 and S3O per month
presently charged in Flavet 111.
It is always sobering to the
optimist to recall that Flavet I
and Flavet II were destroyed
without replacements. It was a
largely unnoticed tragedy. It was
unnoticed because the majority
of the students in these villages
were not requested to enter
more expensive housing, they
just graduated and so were no
barrier to the razing of cheap
housing. In addition, many of
those student families who
should have entered these
villages could not attend the UF,
and so they are not here to
complain.
Soon literature sent to
prospective students who
request information concerning
housing for themselves and their
families will exclude any
mention of Flavet 111. The
remaining choices wii! bt !h e
other much more expensive
student villages or outrageously
expensive private housing.
The waiting list for Flavet 111
will be closed or severely
restricted. Most students in
Flavet 111 will graduate in the
next two or three years. The

remainder will be shifted to
make way for the student
activities center, which is to be
erected on the land presently
occupied by Flavet 111. There
will be no replacement for
* ia cl ill, just as there were no
replacements for the other
Flavets.
All this will happen with
relatively little comment because
those student families which
might need cheap housing will
not be at the UF to demand it,
and those who presently have
cheap housing think they will
leave before they lose it- '*
Obviously, planning for
development at the UF is not

\ IK

Friday, August IS, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

casually discuss important matters. Their meetings
are run like those of any deliberative body, with a
presiding chairman and votes on each issue of
interest. These votes candid discussions to Vice
President Conner and the Deans are recorded and
presented to the University Senate and the
Administration as unofficial policy
recommendations. I would judge that these
recommendations carry at least the weight of those
presented by the powerful campus Senate and
Presidential committees.
Any group which influences the policy decisions
of this institution to such an extent must be open to
the students, faculty, and staff who are affected by
these decisions.
Yet the Deans prefer to remain in their inner
sanctum, safe from the watchful eyes and possible
criticism of the University Community. This
paranoid attitude reeks of an attempt to take the
easy way out of decision-making.
It is far more difficult to say what you believe
and why in public than to say it in private and only
allow the eventual decision to creep out from
behind closed doors. History has recorded few great
men who found it necessary to make their
important decisions while snivelling in a closet.
If some of the Deans on this campus of
emerging greatness cant find the guts to state
their beliefs before the eyes of the University
Community, perhaps they should retire and go
water their pansies.
CHARLES E. HARRIS
STUDENT BODY
VICE PRESIDENT

By A. Todd

done with the needs of low
income student families in mind.
Perhaps those responsible cannot
foresee the effects of university
projects, or perhaps tnev
Consider p~ ovision Q f cheap
housing which allows students to
pursue their education at one of
the best state universities in the
Southeast as a privilege, which
may now be rescinded. Whatever
the explanation, this matter and
others indicate that, although
the UF may not raise its
academic entrance requirements,
it relentlessly and needlessly
raises the economic
requirements for entry for all
students.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1909

Orange
and BLUE
BULLETIN
Administrative Notices
ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

PARKING DECAL SALES:
Beginning Wednesday, Aug. 20,
all University faculty and staff
members, except Health Center
employes, can register their
automobiles and purchase their
1969-70 parking decals at the
U niversity Police Department
From Sept. 2-5 all Health Center
personnel can register their cars
and obtain their decals in the
lobby of the Center. Students
can complete the procedure
beginning Sept. 9 at the
U niversity Police Department.
When registering the automobile,
the owner must present the
current title or registration
certificate. Faculty and staff
members will be required to
show their personnel card and
students must present their I.D.
card. Hours for the sales are
tentatively set for 6 a.m. to 3:30
p.m.

Campus Calendar

Friday, August 15
Florida Nurses Assoc., 235
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Muslim Student Assoc., 123
Union, 12:30 p.m.
Student Publications, 361
Union, 2:00 p.m.
Afro American Student Assoc.,
349 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Union Dance, 'The Beloved",
Union Terrace, 9:00 p.m.
Union Film: "Spencers
Mountain", Union Aud., 7:00
& 9:00 p.m.

, Come Celebrate the End
of ARMADILLO WEEK!
WITH A
FREE DANCE
FEATURING. TlttHtW'
FRIDAY, AUG. 15 UNION TERRACE
SPONSORED BY
9:00p.m. to 1:00a.m. REITZ UNION
"Armadillo Week Needs YOU!

STUDENT HEALTH
SERVICE: The service will
curtail evening and weekend
emergency operation during the
break between the summer and
fall quarters. Medical services
will be available between 8 a.m.
and 5 p.m., Monday through
Friday only, excluding Labor
Day. Emergency coverage will be
resumed the evening of Sept. 10
before registration. Emergency
cases will be treated at the
Shands Teaching Hospital
Emergency Room during the
time the Infirmary is closed.
Patients visiting the Shands
Teaching Hospital Emergency
Room will be charged a service
fee plus the cost of medication.

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Saturday, August 16
Benton Engineering; Council
347 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Union Film: "Spencers
Mountain", Union Aud., 7:00
& 9:00 p.m.
Sunday, August 17
Univ. Film Series: "Umberto
D", Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:15
p.m.

MARKETING
SCHOLARSHIPS: The
Department of Marketing in the
College of Business
Administration has four SSOO
and S6OO scholarships available
for 1969-70 marketing majors,
both undergraduate and
graduate. Applications should be
made in Room 209 of Matherly
Hall.
CEASING PUBLICATION:
The Alligator will cease
publishing Friday, Aug. 22. The
last Orange and Blue Bulletin
will be published Tuesday, Aug.
19. Publication will resume
Thursday, Sept. 18, and the first
Orange and Blue will be Friday,
Sept. 19.

Monday, August 18
i
FERDC Meeting, 355 Union,
10:00 a.m.
Accounting Dept. Luncheon,
Arredondo Room, 12 noon
Fla. Players Experimental
Theatre: "No Exit" & "Here
Comes A Strange Foul",
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Ballroom Dancing, Union
Ballroom, 7:00 p.m.
Modern Interpretive Dancing,
245 Union, 7:30 p.m.

SAVE!
I |uslNoTl^j|* r
I 1 STARKE, FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
I HOURS HOURSWEEKDAYS
WEEKDAYS HOURSWEEKDAYS BAM-6PM
SATURDAY BAM ipm
[GAINESVILLE PHQNEj72j>IO3_ANYTIMEj>Y^VPP^NTMENT
JHL < STEAK HOUSE \
[MATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
LEAPN justsc
I* "Q f or our Special
Introductory Flight-Lesson
I why the swinyStC VV.TS?
P| Tr y introductory flight lesson in a r icmjvi-i |
Piper Cherokee. Come see us today.
VETERANS!! Your G.l. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot
9 For full details, call:
378-2646
KSL CASSELS IN THE AIR, inc.
SPECIAL
BUY ONE DOUBLE
CHEESEBURGER FOR
45t GET THE NEXT
ONE FOR ] A
OFFER GOOD FRIDAY 15th
THRU SUNDAY 17* ~
715 N.W. 13th St. fmgUCtgiJ
1412 N. MAIN St. \ 1 I



re enSta mps I [ 1111 r e enSta mps [ill MWG reenSta mps (111 MWG r eenSta mps [ 1111><3 WG r e enSta mps
Ah WIIH THIS COUPON AND MKml^l WITH TMII COUPON AND fuICHAII Os WITH TMII COUPON AND OT KilifllAa WITH TMI COU.OH Os Umml WITH THU COUTOH AliM
£ < *>
Macleans Polident Powder I Pepsodent Medium or < u . Deep Magic
Tooth Paste 6.65-ox. or Hard or Lifeline Toothbrush < 1 c ^ e t a Dry Skin Conditioner
; 6%-oz. tube 10-ox. size <: i Adult size j| 12-oz. bottle J I 3-oz. size
, 1. (I.pir.. Wad.. Ayg..*lo, 1*69) | 2. (i.pir.. W.d., August 20, 1949) (lprw. W.d., l JO. 1 969) i l 5. (I.pir.. W.d.. Aygy.t 10. I*4*)
Iflll^GreenStampsi^lfllll^GreenStampslillllllUwGreenStampsp^lllll^WGreenStampsp^Plll^WGreenStamps^^
WITH COUPON BiiiiiillJLHLJ WITH THIS COUPON AN* PURCMASI Os WITH THIS COUPON BttiiiiULaLjl WITH ' PURCHASI OP
I*~ *> * t fj*
Clearasil Regular or Any Brand Johnson's <1 Prell Concentrate < Prell Liquid
Clear Medication Sun Jan Lotion I Baby Shampoo < | Shampoo Shampoo
.65-oz. or 1-oz. size Any Size I 7-oz. size jj I 5-oz. size UVz-oz. size
6. {(kpirws Wd.. August 20, 1969) j I 7. (I.pir., W.d., A.f.H 10, I*6*l j 8. (E.pir.. W.d., Aygu.t 10. 169) J| 9. (Inpirn WtA. A)M| 10, Hit) |:> * (I.pir.. W.d.. August 10, 1*69) J
fmn r e eiTsta mps G r eenSta mp s r eenSta mp s G reenSta mps WG r e enSta mps
WITH THIS COUPON ANO FURCHA.I Os WITH THIS COUOH AMO ryICHASi OF KiiijMlMAdi WITH COUTOH AMO FURCHA.I Os kAAO WITH COUFOH AHD f u ICH All 0T WITH THII COUFOH AHH FURCHA.I Os
Toni Tame || Regular or Extra-Hold if Regular or Extra-Hold !|; Brylcreem Lime, Menthol or Regular
Creme Rinse If Dippity-Do Setting Gel Adorn Hair Spray ill Hair Dressing 111 Noxzema Instant Shave
8-oz. size ; 8-oz. size 13.7-oz. can j I 3-oz. size ji j 6V 4 -oz. can
; 11. (I.pir., W.d A|wll JO, I**9) 12. (I.pir.. W.d Au,..t 20,19*.) !I1 3. (I.pir.. W.d.. Augu.l 10. 1969) j| j 18. (I.pir.. W.d.. A.,.., *O. 1*69) jjl l s (I.pir.. w.d.. A.,..t 10, I***l
iflll]^GreenTtamps[B^|[lllMwGre x e T n R Stampsii K l|[lllM^GreenStamps|i]j[lll]ks^GreenStanipspl[lll]k3wGreenStamps|i^
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PURCHASI OF WITH THIS COUPON AND. PURCHASI OP WITH THIS COUPON AHO PURCHASI OF WITH THIS COUPON ANO PURCHASI OP WITH THIS COUPON ANO PURCHASI OF
I Personna Stainless Steel | Arrid Extra-Dry Spray Secret Spray jIE FDS Feminine Regular or Super
Double-Edge or Injector Blades < Deodorant J Deodorant pkg. of s's or 7's \ 4.3-oz., 6-oz., or 9-oz. 7-oz. or 14-oz. size 16. (I.pir.. Wd.. August 10, I***) j [ 17. (I.pir.. W.d.. August 20. 1969) j [ 18. (i.pir.. W.d., August 20, I*6*) jj| 19. (I.pir.. W.d., August 20, I*6*) < j 20. (lupins Wd., A.gu.t 20. I*6*) i
reenSta mps [ill MwG reenSta mps f 111 reenSta mps tPS 111 MwG reerTsta mps [ 111 G reenSta mps
WITH THII COlirOH AH* FURCHA.I WITH THII COVPOH AH. O. WmBIIbAb WITH TMII COUFOH OT VbMBB WITH COU.OH .CHAU OT WITH COU.OH
Sucoryl If Excedrin i|f Foil Pack J \ Vaseline 1; Lysol Spray
Concentrate [1 Tablets || Alka Seltzer < ; Petroleum Jelly | ; Disinfectant
; 1-oz. size 1| bottle of 100 j| pkg. of 72 <; 13/ 4 -oz. or 4-oz. I; 7-oz. size
| 21. (I.pir.. W.d., A.gmt 20, 196*) jj> 22. Ilxpir., W.d,, August 20, 1 *6*) 35. (I.pir., W.d.. August 20. 1*69) J
mTiI^WG reenSta mp s 1111 r e enSta mps [ill reenSta mps fill MWG re eiTsta mps G r eenSta mps
2. J COU.OH .NO FURCMAt. !. lihidjjfllUjLJl WITH THIS COUFOHA HDlUirnil 5, WITH THI. COUfOH AHO IU.CH.iI OT SijiMlihdLdi WITH TH IT COU ro M .HO ru .C H A.. OT Wi*iAllAdAA ''" >HI TOH AH. .. OT
HMhI with q < £ |
-n insect J? Johnson & Johnson II Johnson's ;| Johnson's
! II - || Any Size Package || Baby Powder Baby Oil
; Repellant ; || Pk t Mv ~ j- 2* ; : *O. ...
> Wed., Avgust 20, 1969) 27. (Cxpirws Wd., August 20, 1969) (**|Mru. S.B j
IflllUwGreenStampsfi'^iflllUwGreenStamDsriPlflTlUwGreenStaiTips^lflllU^GreenStampsll^lllllii^breeiiotdnipjO^
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PURCHASI OF WITH THIS COUPON ANO PURCHASI OF IbiawifliUHMj WITH TH IS COUPON ANO PU RC HA SI OF WITH WITH THIS COUPON AN*
[Housewares Special! || Housewares Special! || Housewares Special! 11 Housewares Special! i ;
Meat Thermometer || Egg Beater || Teflon Fry Pan | Swing Top Container | ; Wild Bird Seed
each || each || each eoeh 15-lb. pkg. I
31. (I.pir.. W.d., Augu.l 20, 1*69) 32. (I.pir.. W.d., Augu.T 20, 1 *69) li 33. (I.pir.. W.d Aupu.l 20, 1969) 34. (I.pir.. W.d,, Auu.T 20, 1 *6*) | | 35. (I.pir.. W.d,, A. t .. 20. I*6*) <
fnTn^GrSampsl*^flllMwGi^^ampsPilllll|^Gree^ampspi|[lll|^G^enStaiTips|*i[lll]^Gi^enStanips^
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; (Girl Talk Ensemble, Blue || || || ; Horse Deluxe, Campus Mates, || $1 or more II $1 or more of |1 $1 or more of , or Leather Look) School Binders <|| 0 f Any Candies || Any Glassware Any School Supplies > 36 .. ill 37. (I.pir., Wad.. Augv.t 20. 1*69) 38. (i.pir., W.d Augu.T 20, 1*69) E> 39. (I.pir., W.d., Aug.,l 20, 1969) i 10 1*69) 1
> (Expires Wed., August 20, 1969) < r , ,P t !lAft ft A Aflfl AflAft P
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(Cutex Nail || Johnson & Johnson j | Housewares Special! Housewares Special* <|| Star Brand
Polish Remover Cotton Swabs 3-oz. or 4-oz. size ; pkg- of 54 or 88 || each [ eacV, j | each pkg.
41. (I.pir*. WI..A. gU ., 20. 1969) 82. (i.pir.. W.d,, *... 20, 1*69) 83. (I.pir., W.d, A.gy.t 20, 1969) | l (i.pir.. ,,4 10 1969) || 45. (I.pim W.d A.p... 10, 1 *69) J
j.igHt|' !agy ''-~EXTRA^ ji!fg W^llr!ijFl' in 1 "n" f| Ex'TRA* > FLI'JII --!.S RA " "e XX £L "" " ppsnn
|illliWGreenStamps|^|illl^GreenStamps^|ip|^WGreenstampsP l "?^||dWGreenStamps[^|ql|^WGreenStamps|jiy
with thii cooro. amo o, with ihii eour
I 24" x 46" I f Round Plastic T o 'l"'.es Housewares Special! | Smoky Bear J
| Empire Bath Towels || Laundry Baskets ; Cleaner Moth Block ] | ,ft h^J' C t a,
I each E each j pkg. each pkg. | 10-lb. bag |
I 46. (I.pir.. W.d., A.gH.t 20, 1*69) | | 87. (I.pir.. W.d., A.gy.t 20, 1*69) dt (I.pir., W.d,, Aygyll 10, 1969) 49. (I.pir., W.d Aygy.l 20, 1969) l (I.pir., W.d., Aygy.t 10, 1969) |
I H *T.ru,. S r I 10-lb. pkg. If Any Condi.. I I Any si.,i.n.ry -SffIWGS
I si. 11 1; 53 J CaJ
r

Friday, August 15,1959, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1969

Page 12

. AS AN ADDED QuAlihh**, BosuU, THE If
' ITEMS AND PRICES IN THIS AD WILL BE (V
Wf EFFECTIVE THRU WEDNESDAY NOON
Of* nilDI IV il AUGUST 20, 1969. YOU MAY NOW SHOP
lOGmEW^S.
lj ****" .. LUUUU
lla.N.ri ,ra...
r t\ f) r\ i 'v stouMr-. tr*z*n
hem UWL bumiu \ML. v \m \ Macaroni & Cheese ... 'ST 39 c
0 \\ I Stoulfr' frozen
Borden's Assorted Flavors CrCaiYl Chipped Beef pk*. 89*
Se Cream l'. 1 .: 79* Macaroni & Beef ",£r 59'
Welchade or Grape *rtk
Fruit Shrinks 3~ $ 1 ... I?.* f 39
Pineapple-Grapefruit or Dole J|e||| A Blitter Cflkc pkg. 69*
jm 46-ox. < ww
Fruit Drinks * Gelatins nion Rin 9* s 49*
Sliced or Halves r.F.v. rci.. or *...r>, f.
F& P Peaches .4 $ l Svesl*!. Testy jj 39 C ililiheze.
fa p Bartlett Vienna Fingers ... 43* Pouch Beef Stew mT 79*
Pear Halves... # r 39 c 89
Pineapple 25* ***"*. 3 *.r i
Apple Sauce.. 19* sH|
Cake Mixes . 3 -"* s l Jeweion -* 59* Fit for an
Lkjuid Cat Food 8 *.? $ i A Chiffon Liauid ;r 39 c BWk
rTslerfsT.^/ 11 fcB liB11 # Ken-L-Ration 4 ,s r 59* I BHJ
instant Potatoes '£:. 49* instant coffee .., ~. r *i BOm



HuurVW X iSP* itfil m 'TS

Dbum FWuee Lane Potato Salad ~ r 39*
Bar-B-Cued Ribs ... ~ *1
noney q wr s tasty Treat
59 Cuban Sandwiches ." 49 c
Carrots 3 25' FiTh p*fff
For Salads or Slicing,
__ W a.- V M Mrs. Froson Deviled
Tomatoes ,r 49 c Crab Miniatures Si 69*
Fresh loader Corn 10 r 69
Bf J jI f/f M Ilik B 118 silk' v
aT | jir |g& '%di JB^^^sZ^^BHflp 1
4 sfe-- t .._ dt r j|| ;jaHiliP&''- j&sM§-'
JraffljsgjygjMaaEeK^Biy^rai/9|ft if
Proten Boneless |
Swift's Premium Proten Boneless English Cut wUkilrfeilldMfi^W^flKSli^^Bafl^S^^S^~.iim ;.-
Proten Bone-In
Armour's Star Magic-Slice, wHh Gravy light A dark moat)
(Plus 100 Stamps w/coupoa * \." S
Armour's Star Magic-Sliced, with Gravy ell light moat)
(Plus 100 Stamps w/coupoa
Assorted Varieties
(Plus 50 extra SAH Green Stamps with coupon) *nM tV MZA Bf, ^^rWdb'^'jy^MWwjiL^l.mL
s o ijp
Tornow's Whole Hog Testy (
Armour's Star RT A ~\ 1
Beef Liver o o o ThT 69 e
Now Zealand Tasty, Quick-Frozen
Premium I js M dkf I M^mL
Cooked Salami.... pC 59 e I fcOCp Q LCMID
Orange (
(Plus 50 oxtre SAH Gremi stumps with coupon) cnV.?RTrrfSarasota Grand Delicious
Time 3 Swift', Pre-hM Brown-Sw.ar Cura.
Regular or Stylo
Seafood Treat! Green #f

PUBLIX

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CBITER
1014 N. Main Street

hwnOw, Dawa Dept.
Srookfest d.k
Margarine £ 15 c
Mrs. Filbert's (4c off)
Soft Margarine o o o ***** 45*
Mrs. FMberf's (4c off) Margarine
Soft-Whipped
Swift's Margarine (4c off)
Allsweet V,'. fc 29*
PiHshery's Testy Cresceet
Dinner Rolls . 1 39*
Kraft's Philedelphie Brand
Cream Cheese 33*

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

PiUU Duiri-fmsh
Cottage Cheese ... 59*
Kraft's IsfividsollyWrsppMl Slicsd
Salami Cheese .... 69
(pint SO extra SAN Green Stamps with coupon)
Armour's Miss Wisconsin
Sharp Cheddar ...'2? 79*
Wisconsin Choose Bor Testy
Muenster Cheese.. r 97*
Fern Ota, Deficdeum
Delicious Sliced Sermon Stylo
Bologna KT 89*
Testy Kitchen-fresh

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. Univarsity Avmua at 34th Stmt
Stow hours: 9-9 Mon. thru FH. 9-7 Sat.

Friday, August 15, 1969, The Florida All^ator.

pi
EXTRA W***
dWGreenStampsP^
WITN INIS CSVtCH AM* DNBCNASB Os HfiiH
| Armour's Star Magic-Slice
I Turkey Roast w/Oravy
f (white meat or light A dark)
I 2Vh-lb. pkg.
K Cmplraa Wsdu August N, IMS)
xeeeeeeeeeaeeasaeehaeaaeeneeneeeeuu*
j[lllU^GreenStampsM
UJmI WITN THIS CONDON AMO HBSHB
1 Brilliant Frozen
Cooked Shrimp
10-os. pkg.
JJ a SolwWM,lM|
M*A*AAhhAAAA< huh AAU aOAAAAAnAAAAA
Py
AmJI WITN TMtf CONDOM AMO DNBCNASB OD HbBSH
| Ferns
Sanitary Napkins
12-ct. pkg.
£ 56. uei*e w*. ie. ieee
prri, EXTRA
llMljdWGreenStampsp^
UykJ WITN TMIS CONDON AMO DNtCNASI Os BMH
| Assorted Flavors $
I Funny-Face
I reg. pkg, I
sjr_ (i*ir.. we., *.*.. w, i*eex 9
KAAAAAnaai>aftaaonn>hAAa M~ EXTRA
4ttGreenStampspxj
WITN TMIS CONDOM AN* DNBCNASB OF BHbB
| Glad I
I Sandwich Bags f
I SO-ct. pkg. |
j| a swim wee.. m, teeei 9
MiMMMMSSSSMdWIMSSMMSaSMM
EXTRA
Stamps pyj
WITN TMIS CONDON AMO DNBCNASB OF Hh
I Chef Boy-Ar-Dee
Pizza with Sausage
13Vh-oz. pkg.
S 9. (Izpirsi Wsdu Am*uuF 18. Iffl 2
nnnnnonAAAAAAAAAnlMuuuuianAnnssnsnnHf
M~ EXTRA PTI
WITN TMIS CONDOM AMO DNBCNASB OF SMB
I Assorted Varieties
Tarnow's Pizza
each pkg.
60. (Tire* WeC. Aeeeet M, IMH |
MSMMMSSMMMhSMMMMMUIMT
M EXTRA
d^GreenStampsPW
WITN TMIS CONDOM AMO DNBCNASB OF HHflil
I Herman's Oranga-Band
Sliced Spiced Luncheon
1-lb. pkg. a
61. U eeeeeaeeeeaeeeeeelmaeaehaaaasaaeee*
M EXTRA P llllJ
Stamps py
WITN TMIS CONDOM AMO DNBCNASB OF HUH
I Kraft's Ind.-Wrapped 1
Sliced Salami Cheese J
12-oz. pkg. |
62. OerUeaWee. A-neM M, IMO |
eeeeaeeeeanuauennlmeeeaeeeaanheanniif
o&leaAute,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

--- B ~-
I FOR SALE j!
YAMAHA 250 cc. PERFECT: Street
model -4500 m. $450 or BEST offer.
Call Mike (nights) 378-6431.
(A-st-165-p)

Florida Players present
THERE COMES A STRANGE FOUL
A
NO EXIT
August 18 & 19 Constans Theatre
8:00 p.m. Admission is free.
L
II N.W. 13th St. at 23rd RD J*
| || Talaphona 375-2434 1r 1
mm mami
|||
hE& Jmmms'
ftglplii*HllOL
mm&r ROBBINS
nLi
pusufe In AVCO EMBASSY*. I
tarring
I HAROLD ROBBINS' STILETTO" ALEX CORD BRUT EKLAND
I co-stamng
I JOSEPH WISEMAN BARBARA McNAIR PATRICK O'NEAL m KKS
Sotwpta* by AJ. NUSSEU EkoHm Produce JOSEPH l tEWK illftft TIHI lOBW
I Phaducrt byWQMIA|IHOSttICTIPPetIrihYMWURDKOWAISIghtKRIgY^TBtCoIerAn^M^fDfcMBASSYj^^^
§|| SitVth'Todouf I
A FILM OF OUR TIME .
PROVOCATIVE, SPELL-BINDING
MIREILLE DARC!
rXvX.
_______
x*\x*x-x*x*x-x*X'V*v.y.\y.v.v.v.v. .xxvx-x'xH
I v to* MIREILLE PARC HARPY KBUBEB Directed by GEORGE LAUTNER |

k -V-'fc.
p

FOR SALE
:
x:x;?xxjxwYxyx*x*x*x*x*x&x*x*x*x*x*x.
For sale: window air conditioner
$3 0; complete set army officer
uniforms for man sft. Bin. tall, wt.
160 lb. call 378-5402. (A-3t-166-p)

Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1969

>*x*xxx*x*x*x-x.x.r.sssrxxwsv;*x*x*x*x'^
FOR SALE
:: >
:-x*x-xxyx*x*x*x-x*xxns*x*w*x*x*x*x*xx-:
1 yr old air. cond. unit 1800 BTU
Good for 3 room apt. Going to Maine
must sell. Call 378-4797.
(A-2t-166-p)
Black and white TV, very good
condition, 15 serene, portable. Call
376-4809, after 6p.m. Ask for
Ashley. Asking S4O. (A-2t-166-p)
WHY PAY RENT 3x40 trailer with
Bxl6 bedroom addition (2
bedrooms) AC carpeted
clean-attractive $1595 furnished. Call
378-5781 NOW (A-st-165-p)
Three all black kittens, seven weeks
old, need new homes. Ph. 378-3093.
(A-4t-164-p)
1968 Yamaha Trailmaster 80, just
broken in, excellent condition, not a
scratch with new tags included. Call
376- 17 9 6 Marty Stinger.
(A-2t-166-p)
1964 VW yellow convertible, best
offer. Call 372-1656. (A-3t-166-p)
GunsGunsGunslnventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies, Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-163-ts-p)
window fans, $lO ea.; kitchen table
& 3 matching chairs, $10; bookcases,
$3 & $7; arm chair, $5; clock radio,
$5. In good shape. Call 376-4952
after 5 p.m. also 3 multicolor boxes.
(A-2t-166-p)
CARPETS a fright? Make them a
beautiful sight with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-167-lt-c)
KITTENS!! KITTENS!!! AND
MORE KITTENS!!!! TAKE
ITAKE THEM ALL!! FREE!!
376-3852 weekday evenings &
weekend afternoons. (A-lt-167-p)
1969 Triumph 650 motorcycle
TR6R. Excellent condition S9OO.
Call 475-2811. (A-lt-167-p)
66 Triumph 650 2 helmets 2 extra
tires extra sprocket extra set of trail
pipes all excellent condition $650.
Call 378-4574 after 6 pm.
(A-2t-167-p)
SIAMESE KITTENS Those
precocious beautiful Aristrocrat
babies again. Bluepoint mother,
sealpoint father, trained, S2O.
376-9911. (A-lt-167-p)
AKC poodles 3 males silver black and
silver beige. Must see to appreciate.
Stud service and poodle grooming.
Call Miss Wiley, 376-4614.
(A-3t-167-p)
1 968, New Moon, 12x47, 2
bedroom, air condition. Early
American decor, electric range,
$3600, 372-9601. (A-3t-167-p)
S USE THE GATCB l
ij CLASSIFIEDS |
iX-v-v-r.v.v.v.y.v.v.v.v.v.v.v.'.v-v

i
#: r r-nw Mfewr -.- 1 *rM a w
.-, Mviiti DaBKJr jA*- m
gfc S
*m*< *
4|^Kj l
r if jjkt-
Hr'tij|4d B "Do the very, very
o/c/ /?ai/e a monopoly
npi^H
INTERNATIONAL AWARD WINNER
Sunday, August 17
Jsfijjj^Ki^L'*!. 7.00 and 9:00 p.m.
MtWmmSmmM Union Auditorium
Admission: 50c

|* J "'" U ' "for RENT I
fex-ra-xjQ a iinwttwwwwwww**w
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)
UniversityApts.justnorthofesearch
Li b. 2 sizeseff ~2sty leslbdrm.and2bdr
m .a lla.c.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
.LeaseQuarterlyratesyearlyaverage7s
- 120/m 0.3 76-8 9901536NW3rdave.
(B-12T-158-P)
Privacy is the emphasis, but w/o the
expense. Gainesvilles newest
apartment idea is LA MANCHA,
nearing completion at SW Bth Ave. &
9th St. Renting for Sept, on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Fridays,
3-5 pm at the site. Ph. 372-5346 or
372-2662. (B-3t-167-p)
Two-bedroom duplex air-conditioned
apartment behind Norman Hall. $125
per month. 1117, 1119, 1125 S.W.
7th Ave. 376-5381, ext. 435.
(B-3t-167-p)
University Gardens Trace now with
two pools and new furniture . two
bedroom apts. from $l6O per month.
Models open daily 9 to 5 p.m.
(B*3 t-167-c)
Available Sept. (Ist) first, large
comfortable rooms in private home.
Mature students or faculty. See 202
NW I.2th Terr. Call 376-5368.
(B-167-3t-p)
:w-x>MiiWM Kiiiwwwa: wwwww
1 WANTED
One female roommate to share Gator
Town apt. with 3 seniors. Rent $45 +
*/ util. Call Sally, 376-7129.
(C-3t-167-p)
Need 3 painters immediately, $1.65
per hour. See Paul Mattison, 708 SW
16th Ave. No calls. (C-3t-167-c)
Need 2 coed roommates for fall
quarter. Two bedroom Tanglewood
townhouse, pool. Call Diane or
Teresa, 376-1015. (C-3t-167-p)
Med. Student needs 2 roommates for
fall Spacious new 3br. house, central
A/C & heat, patio, big shaded yard,
N.W. sect. Jeff, 378-4635.
(C-3t-167-p)
We buy, sell, trade used paperbacks,
magazines, Playboys. Laurents Book
Shop, 1634 W. Univ. Ave., 3 76-9755.
(C-3t-167-p)
One male student to share one
bedroom French Qtr. apartment
(already leased) beginning in Sept.
The junior pre-medical student wants
a non-smoker only. Rent is $70.00
per. month, plus phone
1-305-864-4107. (C-3t-165-p)
Two female roommates needed for
fall quarter in LaMancha. Located
two blocks from campus and have
your own bedroom. Call 392-7661.
(C-4t-166-p)

BOWLING
WEEK-END
SPECIAL
Sat. 9am-6pm
All day Sunday
3*r SI.OO
35c per game
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
Hunting down their
prey with a quarter-ton
of hot steel between
their legs!
POKED
RjIGBLS
Mk jF*



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

|^^WANTED W W |
IjjigijWW IQifIBOB fI'SHUIM Q WMWWHsI
One Female roommate 3 bedroom
house 1 block from campus own
bedroom $42.00/mth. Plus utilities.
Call Jane 378-2828. (C-3t-166-p)
2 coed grad students would like to
share 2 bedroom apt. with 1 or 2
others in Sept. Prefer Williamsburg,
Tanglewood, etc. Call Harriet at
305-758-2194 collect after 6 p.m. or
write 945 NE 138 St. No. Miami, Fla.
(C-4t-165-p)
Coed $45 per month for own room
in AC 2 bdrm apt. 3 blks from
campus for Sept. Prefer grad student.
378-1 83 7, 909 SW 6 Ave.
(C-3t-165-p)

Ik \ SPECIAL 11
IXJ FRIDAY 1
SPECIAL I
H LUNCH & DINNER if
I SAUTEED FISHi
I ALMONDINE 8
ff WITH TARTAR SAUCE §|
680
( MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS |

If you were a real Spencer, you just naturally
did your growing up on Spencers Mountain.
&%'
* HUH DM MN rS|*y^ll^P^*y
Ifa^mn
HENRY MAUREEN C ?: s a S IWDTUIID. fIMIAI 11 rPICP WrHlenloithe reen and Directed by DELMER DAVES I
rnyni ri'UADA JAMESMacflKIhuk uunaluuKiar B^OTll ei^ivllHttie ,j,. taic i, ltoSleine
rummu riAHA wallycox ntroducing MIMSY FARMER I TECHNICOLOR* PANAVISION* Presented by WARNER BROS.
ADM. lAu-an. Ouditi/wnz
Cuyutf I6~t 4*4 -r:eom~t -.OOr~.

Friday, August 15, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

rare*:*:*;.:*:
WANTED |
COED NEEDS APT. to share with 3
girls Landmark or French Qtr. fpr
next year starting fall qtr. Call: Susan
376-2129. (C-st-165-p)
PERSONAL
V Jl
Atlanta, Woodstock and now Harry
Tea Tours is going to the Dallas Pop
Festival. Information on who will be
at this most groovy of gatherings now
available at the Record Bar, 923 W.
Univ. Ave. Captain Platter will
answer all or call 372-0976.
(J-lt-167-p)

Page 15

I PERSONAL l
Graduating male, moving to Atlanta.
Need roommate to share apartment
and expenses. Contact Bob, 1111-27
16th Ave., 378-8518. (J-3t-167-p)
TRUCK to MIAMI via TAMPA. Will
take your trunks, boxes, cycles, etc.
after finals. Door to Door. Very
reasonable. Call Jim, 378-8625.
(J-3t-167-p)
SACRIFICIAL OFFERING Motorola
8-track tape player, $65, tapes, $4.
For Golfers Blue Ridgedon irons &
woods, bag & putter, S3O.
(J-2t-167-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear an electronic
factorial. Any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-Bt-158-P)
Splitting for Chicago on my Honda,
after finals, could use company. If
youve got a large cycle, S3O, like to
travel, call Doug Olander 372-6598.
(J-2t-166-p)
EMTOMQI i II 111 iiBW!Q?W!fl^-SS?8i§
HORSEBACK RIDING
HAYRIDES PARTIES!!! S.E. 15th
St. Cowboy riding stables 372-8460.
(M-3t-166-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eyeglasses at University Opticians
5 1 9Vz SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. (M-155-ts-c)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electricai systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-C)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Ca ?FloridaQuarteri^t
| ON SALE! |

I
£6 k cfl
I ifl| % FLY AWAY intoT Xndlrland I
OF FANTASY AMD SON 6! |
J|'peterS|
BEAUTIFUL! The entire film is a poem of youth,love and!
violence...a Renaissance recapitulation of West Side Storyl
played with pure 1968 passion! -playboy I
Jp,
i""' MI '"* s|l
BS TODAY
dUfcb
liMMraHHK smp
J ml Ip mF jgm W%m
. B



>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1969

Page 16

DAN JESSES ONE-ACT
Students Play Produced

By DARCY MEEKER
v Campus Living Editor
Dan Jesse has written and is directing a one act
play, There Comes a Strange Fowl, which will be
presented with Sartres No Exit, Monday through
Wednesday nights in the Constans Theater at 8
oclock. The presentation is the Florida Players
One-Act Experimental project for this quarter.
Twenty-one years old, and graduating at the end
of the summer, Jesse describes his play as an
existential statement. Its theme is: man must
destroy all belief that life could have been more
meaningful before he dies.
The setting is a banquet attended by five guests.
Two waitresses, one base and coarse and the other
with higher aspirations, neither good in themselves,
represent the duality of man. A girl entertainer
symbolizes to the guests what they could have
been.
Jesse has curly reddish brown hair and an equally

curly moustache. His eyes are
large and expressive-the
impression he gives is that of a
person really awake, and he
seems more than 21 years
mature.
All men, he explains, start
out with dreams and ideals of
things to be and greet the great
things they will accomplish.
The guests are
uncomfortable for the
entertainer. Four of the guests
have structured themselves in,
but the fifth guest is a nihilist
with no structure who makes
fun of them. The guests battle to
justify their existence, but the
fifth has no reason to justify his
own. The structured ones drag
down the entertainer and kill her
symbolically because of the
theme.
The nihilist sees that what
they did was senseless and looks
over into death to see the
difference between life and
death. He then convinces the
guests of the meaninglessness of
their act.*
The host, who is death, says
of death, It is nothing but a
reflection, and says a poem
from which comes the plays
title. The poem, says the
young playwright, shows death
as gentle ebbing away of life.
AH the way through the
play, the guests keep playing
games, keep revealing
themselves. They say they have
to, but the host never forces
them, as he says. He only does
whats asked of him, like a
reflection. Hes representative of
death.
Whats the purpose of the
play? To state that action must,
be taken if life is to be
worthwhile. The protagonist
being greatest in his tragedy is
in the tragic Greek tradition.
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Its basically hopeful. It says, dont wait for
death, act now.
Why did he choose to write in the absurdist
school? I admire Albee, Pinter, and Kopit.
Absurdist theater is not the only theater, but its
where the creativity of today is.
Why write? To create characters, then see how
they interact. It gives me insight into my own
psychology. Jesse has been writing stories, poems,
and plays since childhood.
What bugs him? People lack the ability to react
in a completely honest manner.
Thats one reason I like theater people. They
know that when theyre talking to other theater
people their act will be spotted, so theyre free and
open.
How is university life for creativity? You have
to get away from people to get the idea and let it
stew. The main thing a university does is gets good
minds together. Im not sorry to be leaving school,
but I feel Im going away from people.
A. A A A a A A a a a

GLT To Hold Tryouts
Tryouts for Hallway Up the Tree, the Gainesville Little Theatre s
first play of the 1969-70 Season, will be held at 2:00 p.m. and 8:00
p.m., Sunday, at 4039 N.W. 16th Blvd.
This is a generation gap comedy by Peter Ustinov with paits for
two young men, three middle aged men, two young women, and one
middle aged woman. People are also urgently needed to build and
paint the set and help with costumes, props, makeup, lights, and even
sweeping floors. Tom Godey is the director, and performance dates
are September 25, 26,27, October 2,3,4 and October 9,10,11.
22 Years of Independence
The India Club will celebrate Indias 22nd year of independence at
7 p.m. today in the Baptist Student Center.
The program will include a fashion show, movies, and a music
presentation. Homemade Indian sweets will be served.
Admission is free, and the public is invited.
ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks.
Meals & J^Sandwiches
TV & billiard^H
I 1718 W University Ave. I
1 'On The Gold Coast |



the MIKADO

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Make your get-away in an MG MIDGET
A lot of action for a little cash. That's the MG Midget.
With 1275 cc engine, four-speed gearbox, dual orak oraking
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suspension. Plus such luxuries as an electric tac
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sporty wire wheels. See it. at... /j*\
CRANE IMPORTS Sk
506 EAST UNIVERSITY AVE

UFs music department presents Gilbert
and Sullivan's operetta Mikado in the P.K.
Yonge Auditorium tonight at 7:30 and
Saturday at 8 o 'clock.
As Act I opens, Nanki-Poo (Richard A.
Jackson), who has fled the court to escape
marriage with an elderly lady is rushing to
Yum-Yum to see if she is free to marry him.
But she is betrothed to Ko-Ko (Denis M.
Jensen), Lord High Executioner. Since she is
betrothed, she sings with Nanki-Poo, they
musn't hold hands, so they hold hands, they
mustn't kiss, so they kiss.

Ko-Ko has been ordered to execute
somebody or lose his positon. Nanki-Poo volunteers, but Ko-Ko can't do
the job since hes tfever had any practice. He has to let Nanki-Poo marry
Yum-Yum to stop his insistence on being executed.
Mikado (Jack Rice) appears looking for his son who was supposed to
be executed. Ko-Ko describes vividly the execution he couldn't perform,
thinking to protect his job. Fortunately he hasn't and Ko-Ko keeps him
from having to marry Katisha (Dorothy Ogburn) by offering his hand to
her. Kevin Groth is Mikados little attendant.
Earl C. Groth of the music department directed the production.
Students of the department provide the musical accompaniment.
Gilbert and Sullivan, artists of Queen Victoria's time, are beloved for
their charming music and light nonsense.

( a
W7L

(((?)>
Photos
By
Doug
Case

LUNCH SPECIALS
FROM THE COLONEL
\ CHICKEN
\ SNACK U|| 7
FISH
214 N.W. 13th St. 114 N.W. 34th SI.
376-6472 372-3649

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x t ft
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w y.-*Yi S§£y- Ij|^

Friday, August 15,1969, The Florida Alligator,

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378-2311
OPEN 8 P.M. MON.-SAT.

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15, 1969

Thirsty Gator Shows Experimental Movies

By CAROLYN HARRINGTON
Alligator Corresponderit
The Thirsty Gator, a cocktail lounge on NW 13th Street, recently
started showing short, experimental films. They had been presenting
sports films and W.C. Fields movies regularly and decided to widen
their program. Every Wednesday and Saturday nights, after 9, a
student art film is presented several times during the evening.
Experimental or underground are general terms for short
(sometimes no longer than ten minutes), low-budget films produced
by college students or semi-professional directors. They may be
produced in a movie studio or the directors garage. There is usually a
de-emphasis of characterization and plot, with a heavier accent on
subjective use of music, color, rapid-fire kinetic flashes and other
technical devices.
Many such films are being produced across the nation but there are
limited opportunities for exhibiting these productions. Ernie Cramer,
owner and manager of the Thirsty Gator, feels that through the
Thirsty Gators showings he can help to give the young directors the
audience that they need.
Cramer acquires these films from personal contacts he has in the
movie business. He has produced several off-Hollvwood films himself
'Hair In Fall?
By GARRY MOSKOWITZ
Alligator Correspondent
Hair, a musical now completing its first year on Broadway, may
play at the University of Florida this fall.
The New York company of Hair is now forming a road show
that will begin touring the country sometime during the late fall,
according to Alan Howes Student Government Production
Coordinator.
Howes says that he has been trying to book the company to
preform here during the fall quarter.
The touring company will consist of some of the principals now
appearing in the Broadway production along with stand-ins.
Howes will be going to New York near the end of August to
negotiate with the William Morris Talent Agency, the representative
for Hair.

The most important
Consideration right now,
Howes said, is to negotiate a
rice that will get this act here
for students at a low price. So
far our negotiations have been
successful.
He explained that the
Student Government is budgeted
to lose money in order to get
Hair.
Howes also said that In
keeping with our policy of
offering top entertainment at
the lowest possible price there
" will be inexpensive seats, some
as low as $2 for the performance
ofHair.
He added that such a
performance will have to be held
in the Florida Gym because of
the unique stage that the
production requires. Because of
this stage, the seating capacity in
the gym will be cut to about
4,500 persons.

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When asked if he considered
any censorship problems Howes
said, I have given censorship
some consideration, but Hair
falls into the category of art and
I feel that the administration
cant consider this anything else
but art.
There has never been any
nude scenes in any production at
the University.

and is the author of a number of filmscripts.
Cramers purpose is to present for the viewer the works of student
filmmakers exactly as they produce them. As he states in a short,
explanatory speech before he shows the films, he does not edit them
nor personally agree or disagree with their content. The viewer is given
the opportunity to see the ideas that are prevalent among young
people and then he has the responsibility to decide their value for
himself.
With any group of young artists, there will be found new ideas and
designs. The viewer himself decided if the innovations are justifiable
and effective.
With the recent closing of the State Theater, there is no longer an
art or intellectual theater in Gainesville. This program at the Thirsty
Gator which will continue during the fall, will aid moviegoers who are
interested in keeping abreast with student experimentation in the film
media across the nation.
The films I have seen the first few weeks have been both strong and
weak artistically but all have been interesting and alive with novel
ideas and technical devices. The films are highly recommended for
those who wish to keep in touch with what is rapidly becoming the
foremost American art form.
w
Hr \ laA
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GATOR ADS



*r
Stilletto: Unreality Ruins Suspense

By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
It was disappointing to see
Stiletto, currently playing at
the Plaza.
Since it was based on a
Harold Robbins novel, the movie
promised some suspense, and a
certain grandeur and depth of
character.
The grandeur was not there,
though Mateo, the super-cool
and wise leader of the Society

Cinema Society Brings Film
Want to see what the modem American West is like? See Spensers
Mountain.
The film is showing tonight and Saturday in Reitz Union
Auditorium at 7 and 9 both nights.
Spensers Mountain is the title and setting for a warm-spirited
drama about the loves and triumphs of a modern-day Western family.
To the characters of Spensers Mountain, as to many in modern
America, education becomes a status symbol. In the film, education is
a much sought after commodity by those who traditionally have very
little. Henry Fonda stars as Clay Spenser, one of a flock of sons but
the only one left on Spensers mountain. Clay inherits the mountain
from his father. Maureen OHara, James MacArthur, Donald Crisp and
Wally Cox also star in the film.
Written and directed by Delmer Daves and based on a novel by Earl
Hamner, the movie is two hours in length.
Movie Times Times(s)
(s) Times(s) rotten good
mediocre 0 excellent I
Center I Peter Pan and The Horse with the Flying Tail!
Peter Pan, an animated cartoon, is the main feature. It is well
done, colorful, and a light, happy thing. 2:10, 4:38, 7,9:34.^Jj
Center II Romeo and Juliet. Zeffirellis highly rated play
based on Shakespeares cherished play. Not over-dramatized.
2:03,4:32,7:01,9:40. Q
Florida Daddys Gone A-hunting, with Carol Wight and
Paul Burke. Girl comes to San Francisco, falls in love, then
begins to realize her lover is a psychotic. She turns him aside. So
he hunts her down. Promising.
Gainesville Drive-In lf Its Tuesday It Must Be Belgium,
with Suzanne Pleshette. 8:42. The Detective, with Frank Sinatra
as the straight cop and Lee Remick. 10:43.
Plaza I Stiletto, with Alex Cord. Little story and that hard
to follow or care about because of a dream-like quality, poor
continuity and shallow characterization. 2, 3:50, 5:42, 7:30,
9:3. 0
Plaza II Femmina, with Mireille Darci.
Suburbia Drive-In Naked Angels. 8:52, 12:08. Pit Stop.
10:36.
Union Spensers Mountain, a modem day western with
Henry Fonda and Maureen OHara. Tonight and Saturday, 7 and
9. Umberto D. Vittorio de Sicas neo-realistic technique and
Carlo Battistis tour de force performance combine in a brutal
portrayal of life in post war Italy. Sunday, 7 and 9 p.m.
t Climb aboard
..je S.S. Winnjammer* d
l Mmls Mrvad from 11:00 AM to M
U Midnight "J
J Bernie Sher //
r at tho Organ on Thursday; Friday 81 Saturday It
j Oysters & clams on the half shell
Michelob on draft 0
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty J
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton. Manager 1 /
520 S.W. 2nd Ave. k ft
Reservations Accepted l\\
Closed A)'

had some potential however,
he was on the screen such a
short time, that his strength
wasn t given a chance to carry
the movie.
No one had a chance to carry
the movie, in fact. Two
characteristics of Robbins
novels make them difficult
material for movies they are
richly populated with interesting
characters and they are long.
This reviewer has not read the

novel Stilletto, but the movie
spreads itself too thin among its
leading characters its not
clear whose story is being told.
And you never get into any
character enough to really care
or understand the significance of
whats happening.
The weak characterizations
undoubtedly contributed to the
weakness of suspense. In
addition, events were presented
in such a haphazard tangled
manner as to make the story so
hard to follow, that any
suspense the story might
promise is dissipated. The
impression is well, nothing
has happened yet, even after a
couple of murders.
For example, it takes 12
minutes to get to Directed
by ... in the title sequence.
The aesthetic style of the
movie is set by the opening

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Its the sound move!
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It costs just 1,896.* or s4lo less
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Any wonder we keep running
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GODDING & CLARK Th New Leader!
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sequence before the titles. A
black and white picture filtered
blue was shot with a strange
lens that makes everyone look
like zombies or were werewolves-to-be.
wolves-to-be. werewolves-to-be. There are many
instances of the up-from-the up-from-theground
ground up-from-theground photo angle with no
reason for being so shot except
that it makes the people lode
weird.
The sequence is a flashback,
so some dream-like quality is
justifiable. But the rest of the
movie is weakened by the
dreamizing done on it. Tinkly,
unconnected music with no
sense of progression, and no
movement of time,-tinges what
you are seeing, makes it seem
static, unreal, far away. The
movement of people from place
to place is often done so jerkily,
with such a lack of means or
connection of any sort that the

Friday, August 15,1969, The Florida Alligator,

viewer is distracted from the
movie by the question, how did
he get here?
An unanswered why
contributes to the unreality of
the movie, too. Mateo saves
Stilletto from a band of peasants
who are beating him to death in
the flashback sequence, which is
not too incomprehensible after
all, but why does the Society set
him up with Mercedez importing
etc.? He was nothing to them.
Fancy photography at the
end which is amazingly
undramatic for what happens in
it again heightens the sense of
unreality.
All the movie has to offer is
jet set plus setting, a couple of
bare breasts, and a brief curse
which didnt bother me but set
the audience laughing like guilty
children.
Weak.

Page 19



Page 20

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, August 15,1969

Gators Getting Irish Up On Track Team

Floridas successful young track coach, Jimmy
Carnes, has invaded Ireland once again to sign a
4:08 miler to a Gator scholarship.
Kevin Humphreys, the fastest prep miler in
Ireland and All-Irish Prep record holder in the 1,500
meter, will join former teammate Eamonn OKeeffe
at UF this fall.
Last season OKeefe ran a 1:48.8 halfmile, which
was the fastest freshman time in the nation. Both
OKeeffe and Humphreys are frum Dublin, Ireland.
Im very pleased with the signing of
Humphreys, Carnes said. He has tremendous
potential and I hope he will be the first sub
four-minute-miler in the State.
With the signing of Humphreys Carnes ended a
very successful recruiting season. Eight blue chip
athletes are expected to join the Gator track team in
the fall.
Mark Bir, a two-miler from Lafayette, along with
Humphreys will give the Gators great potential in
the distance races. Bir, one of the most highly

Fast Field Meets At Dragway

The fastest super stock field ever assembled in
Florida will stage three rounds of super
excitement Saturday night at the Gainesville
Dragway.
The super stocks, called junior funny cars
because of their lightweight design and high
horsepower output, are capable of 130 mile-an-hour
terminal speeds, completing a quarter mile in ten
seconds.
Many factory cars have preentered, including the
Hemi Darts and Hemi-Cudas, of which there were
only 110 units produced. These cars have fiberglas
front ends, acid-dipped bodies and extremely thin
widows in order to save weight. Four hundred
twenty-six cubic inch Hemi engines power these
3,020-pound cars.
Hemi-Dart representatives include Bill Tanner in
the Lenox Dodge of Atlanta, Ga., J.C. South, The
Liberty Bell, Birmingham, Ala.; The Barnett
Brothers, Atlanta, and Melvin Yow of Lillington,

Wideouts-Name Os Gator Game

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is the first in a
series on the UF Gator football team for 1969.)
Last year Florida learned painfully about
something which has become an axiom in modern
day football. To move the ball you must be able to
throw and catch it with exceptional ability.
The Gators didnt do either often enough last
season to catch and scare defenses. Consequently,
defenses drew in to concentrate more heavily on the
running game and to harass even the short passing
game.
Chalked up as an area where improvement must
be forthcoming is that which has come to be known
as wideouts, the split end and flanker, to be
specific.
Chances are, if sophomores can come through
and everybody stays healthy, there will be
improvement in this area. The key rests with two
sophomores and two relatively inexperienced
veterans.
Senior Paul Maliska of Winter Park opens as
number one split end in September. He played
defense as a sophomore, saw duty late last year on
offense and did a good job catching nine passes for
132 yards.
Junior Ted Hager, a defensive back last year who

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RONNIE JOURDAN
. ... returning letterman

sought distance runners in the nation, has run
9:03.8 two mile.
Benny Vaughn, a 1:53.0 halfmiler from
Columbus, Ga., could earn a place on she Gator

N.C.
Hemi-Cuda entrants are Tom Smith, Hemi Power
from Atlanta; Robert Nance, Mr. Plymouth,
Ringgold, Ga., and Stewart Pomeroy of Tampa in
the Sox and Martin Barracuda.
Heading the independent list is Reid Whisnant in
Holton Dodge; Lawton Davis, Firebird, Chat
Hunter, Hemi Dodge, Jay Collins, Chevelle, Roman
Stalka, AMX, and Bill Kellum, Chevelle.
In addition to the $1,600 super stock purse, two
rounds of stock and street will compete with
altereds and rails in competition eliminator. E.G.,
Powder Puff and Motorcycle classes will receive
handsome trophies plus cash eliminations.
Time trials begin at 5 p.m. with the first super
stock round at 8:30.
Gainesville Dragway is sanctioned and insured by
the National Hot Rod Association and is located
three and a half miles north of the Municipal airport
on State Road 225.

CARLOS ALVAREZ
. ... 28 passes in 4 games

was moved to offense to inject some speed into the
lineup, backs up Maliska and should push him.
Hager caught seven passes for 55 yards in 1968.
Sophomores man the flanker spot. Top man is
Carlos Alvarez of Miami, whose spring practice was
what you would expect out of a boy who caught 28
passes for 393 yards in four freshman games. He is,
coaches say, an athlete whose name Gator fans
should remember.
Backing Alvarez is a better-than-avarage
youngster, Andy Cheney of Branford. Cheney has
tremendous broken field running ability once he
catches the ball. He caught 11 passes for 221 yards
for the frosh.
Others have a chance to play, according to Gator
coaches, but these four will likely carry the load.

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JIMMY CARNES
.... reids Ireland again

ANDY CHENEY
. . better than average

two-mile relay that was ranked fourth in the nation
last season. oKeeffe and Bob Lang, a 1:48.6
halfmiler along with veterans Ken Bumsed Mid John
Parker will be vying for spots on the four-man team.
Carnes landed two top sprinters in Jimmy Mims
of Baton Rouge, La., and Alan Baybick of South
New Jersey. Mims has run the 100-yard dash in 9.7
while Baybick has been credited with a 9.8.
Two of the nations better prep pole vaulters
were added to the Gator list when Carnes signed
Orlando Edgewaters Gary McCall and Ocalas Mike
Cotton. Both boys have been 15-feet or better.
Steve Barnes, a former Florida Relays prep
champion in the triple jump is the eighth UF signee.
Bames is also considered a top quartermiler.
Its been a banner recruiting year, Carnes said.
These boys will add a great deal to our 1969-70
squad.
Add the UF freshman list with the varsity
members such as high jumper Ron Jourdan and the
1969-70 Gator squad should better Tennessee for
SEC honors.

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