Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

Vol. 61, No. 166

RUBIK STILL BARRED

Deans Nix Request
For Open Meetings

See Editorial, Page 8
Despite an opinion by
University Chancellor Robert B.
Mautz that UFs Council of
Academic Deans should be open
to the public, the deans will
continue meeting in closed-door
privacy.
Vice President for Academic
Affairs Frederick Conner told
the Alligator this week the deans
have decided to deny a request
by Alligator editors to have a
non-reporting observer sit in on
meetings in which items of
interest to the student body
were being discussed.
Mautz, who formed the
council in 1963 when he was
vice president for academic
affairs here, said Wednesday he
felt the meetings should be open
to the press.
Most of the business of the
university needs to have public
understanding and acceptance,
and 1 would hope most of the
universitys meetings would be
open to the newspapers, Mautz
said.
The chancellor stressed this
was only his opinion and not an
order from his office.
Mautz, who has a degree in
law, said the deans denial was
apparently in conflict with
recent Florida Supreme Court

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PROTESTING THE PROTESTORS
ffr
A Cuban refugee, one of several who picketed Wednesday's
Student Peace Union rally, displays sign chastising the demonstrators.
See story, page two.

University of Florida, Gainesville

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VICE PRESIDENT CONNER
... deans' council chairman
decision? greatly liberalizing
the states Govemment-in-the-
Sunshine law, which requires all
meeting? of governmental bodies
to be open to the public.
A recent high court decision
extended the scope of the law
much further than it was
previously applied. The court
said committees and groups
appointed by government
officials are also subject to the
law.
The author of the bill, former
state Sen. J. Emery Red Cross
of Gainesville, said Wednesday
he didnt believe his bill
extended to university
committees.

Friday, August 8, 1969

Id like to see it (university
committees opened), but I think
it would be futile to try to get it
through the legislature, he said.
I did not have this in mind
when I drafted the bill. I had in
mind elected officials and
appointed committees.
But Im very happy with the
courts interpretation of the
law, he said.
On June 4, Alligator Editor
Dave Reddick and Managing
Editor Dave Osier presented
their plan to the deans council.
The council agreed at the
time to supply the Alligator with
the minutes of its meetings and
took the editors proposal under
advisement.
Tuesday Conner told the
Alligator that the council had
not met, but had decided to
deny the request.
The council is made up of the
deans of UFs colleges, the
director of the library, the dean
and assistant dean of academic
affairs and the registrar. It holds
irregularly scheduled meetings.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell recently asked Atty.
Gen. Earl Faircloth if he felt
UFs executive committee, made
up of the universitys top
administrative personnel, came
under the surfshine law.
Faircloth said the meetings of
OConnell and his vice presidents
should not be requited to be
open to the public.
The University of South
Floridas student government
and its chapter of American
Association of University
Professors recently asked
(SEE 'MEETINGS' PAGE 2)

Recruitment Os Blacks
Gets 'Affirmative Action

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Affirmative action towards the recruitment of
black students, professors and staff at UF is
apparently becoming a reality.
Administrators and students involved in minority
group affairs agree actioh has been nominal in the
past but UF is now creating an image of change in
that direction, they contend.
Don Henderson, minority group coordinator, and
Larry Jordan, SG secretary for minority group
affairs, have been responsible for the progress made
this summer in recruiting black students.
Henderson has been concerned primarily with
junior college transfers and Jordan with high school
seniors. Both have been visiting and corresponding
with guidance counselors and students throughout
the state.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell issued a
memorandum July 15 to all deans, directors and
department chairmen reminding them of the Civil

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| STAFFER JOHN SUGG READS MATERIAL :5
$ ... distributed by 'militant' group :j:
! 1
Militants Break
V I S
Literature Policy
v v
$ By JOHN SUGG >!
A Alligator Associate Editor ;I;
s §
§ Could it be that our benevolent and wise leaders (usually ;j
§ called UF administrators) are not impartial in requiring ;ij
: compliance with UFs new literature distribution policy? ;ij
j; Heaven forbid! x
| The Alligator, ever trustful of the Lords of Tigert, but also ::
j: ever alert, stumbled on a group of militants distributing ;ij
ji literature in the Reitz Union this week. £
ji The literature was propaganda recruiting new members to the ::
;: militants organization which publicly advocates and makes use ::
:ji of violence as a means to its ends. u £j
j: None of the militants, members of the group usually called :j:
:: the United States Army, had ever heard of the UF policy on ;ji
: literature distribution. ::
;ji Why we just customarily do this sort of thing at regular ::
: intervals, said a spokesman for the militants. ::
ji The Alligator, delving deeper into how this sort of thing jji
ji; could have been allowed to happen, contacted Asst. Dean for ::
ji Student Affairs James T. Hennessey (who knows about Things §
j: Like This).
j:| The militants are working out of the UF placement office, :ji
ji; Hennessey :j:
ji; No explanation was given as to why UF is supporting a :ji
ji; militant organization which seems to be a reversal of a position :jj
ij: (SEE 'LITERATURE' PAGE 2) i
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Rights Act of 1964. OConnell urged that each of
you join me in ensuring non-discrimination in all
aspects of the Universitys activities and programs
through affirmative action.
The U.S. Department of Health, Education and
Welfare will conduct an investigation this fall to
audit UFs compliance with HEW guidelines under
the provisions of the Civil Rights Act. The
investigation will be concerned with UFs
affirmative action or progress in minority affairs.
The administration does not know what
questions will be asked or exactly when the HEW
officials will arrive. It will be the first such
investigation here.
Executive Vice President L.E. Grinter, named
overall coordinator of the compliance program, said
no federal quota for black students is set but HEW
will definitely consider the number of black
students here.
The UF administration has instituted several
programs for compliance with the HEW guidelines.
(SEE 'BLACKS' PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8, 1969

Rally Fosters
Cuba Debate

Heated debate between
radical students who support the
Cuban revolution and Cuban
refugees who oppose Fidel
Castros regime highlighted a
Student Peace Union (SPU) rally
in the Plaza of the Americas
Wednesday.
The rally was held to
commemorate the 24th
anniversary of the atomic
bombing of Hiroshima, Japan.
Kurt Garrett, Young Socialist
Alliance member, announced
plans for a Nov. 15 mobilization
in Washington to call an end to
the Vietnam war.
After several other speakers,
James Fine, a UF graduate, told
the rally attendance that
increasing American awareness
of Cuba is going to dispel what
he termed the propaganda propagandainstilled

Blacks Sought For UF

Efrom page oneJ
new program outlining equal
employment opportunity at UF.
The Cooperative Extension
Service is employing black
instructors at the local levels.
The problem of getting black
professors is one for which
administrators have no answer.
Conner said the nation-wide
demand for qualified black
professors has made them
extremely scarce. He said UF
is at a disadvantage in the state
because FSU, with
predominantly black Florida
A&M in the area, draws away
potential black UF professors.
UFs location in Gainesville
rather than a metropolitan area
also hampers recruitment of

Literature Rule Broken

FROH PA6C ONE
taken earlier this year when UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
denied recognition to SSOC, a
group allegedly associated with
other groups reported to be
militant in nature.
An impartial observer asked,
Is this the proper function of
the Placement Office to
support militanf/and violent
groups? Perhaps recognition of
the Placement Office should be
denied.
Diligent research uncovered
facts which indicate UF policy
allows only students, faculty and
staff (university personnel) to
distribute literature on campus
and then only after signing a
statement of intent to
distribute.
The militants, admitted
Meetings Closed
PAGE OWEjj
Faircloth to decide if USFs
executive committee meetings
came under the law. OConnell
made a similar request.
As of Wednesday night, Steve
Anderson, president of the USF
student body, had not heard if
Faircloth would make a decision
on the USF question.

instilled propagandainstilled belief that the Castro
regime is about to topple.
Referring to several Cubans
carrying placards, Fine said they
and the U.S. government cant
free themselves from the
historical fact that the Cuban
revolution succeeded.
You cant put down
revolutionary spirit, Fine said.
Before the revolution, he
said, 25 per cent of usable
Cuban land was owned by the
United States. In the rural areas,
the life expectancy was 33 years
and one out of three people
were illiterate in Cuba.
Fine said that despite U.S.
resistance, the Castro
government has transformed
Cuba until now there is less
illiteracy than here, Cuba has a
diversified economy and
everyone is entitled to an

black professors, Conner said.
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale said personal
contact is the most productive
method for recruiting black
professors or students. He said
the important selling point for
UF is the changing image of the
universitys attitude toward
blacks.
Henderson and Jordan agree.
Jordan said that when he talks
to black high school students, he
gives them a realistic view of
the campus but points out the
image of change here. Theres
a new awareness by the
university of the need for
increasing the number of blade
students here, he added.
Henderson said there is
something wrong with the

outside agitators with no official
UF connection, comply with
neither condition.
Hennessey said the filling of a
statement does not apply to
official materials of UF, but
nowhere could the Alligator find
the words University of
Florida on the literature, only
the advocacy of militant action.

Maryland
FRIED CHICKEN!

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when jit is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601!
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving .typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

fi i * IrarM VSbtjET
** rally PARTICIPANTS LISTEN TO SOS MEMBER STEVE FAHRER **
. demonstration held to commemorate bombing of Hiroshima

education, among other
advances.
Fine admitted revolutions are
never pleasant but observed that
after the American revolution,
200,000 refugees fled to Canada
and England. There they formed
biased and incorrect British
public opinion of the revolution
just as Cuban refugees have

junior college system because
blacks arent going there. He
believes deficiencies that come
from the black educational
system must be made up
through tutoring programs and
reduced course loads, not lower
admission requirements..
Hale will soon name a
permanent coordinator for
minority affairs to replace
Henderson. Henderson said this
person should have a broad
range of interest and power. He
should have enough
responsibility and authority to
take an active role in blade-white
relationships and conditions on
campus.
There is no separate budget
for operating the minority
affairs office, so the money
comes out of a general student
affairs budget. Henderson said
an emergency approach will
probably be needed to secure a
specific budget.
Conner said a request for
funds to operate a minority
affairs program should be made
when the Board of Regents
budget plan is presented.
Miami-Dade Junior College is
now conducting a minority
affairs program with a $200,000
annual budget.

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formed American opinion of the
Cuban revolution.
A Cuban, invited by SPU to
reply, said Castro only maintains
power by terror. ;
The Cuban said only one per
cent of the population in Cuba
has any power. He said most
Cubans once favored Castro but
now dont want him
Stating he knew about rural
life, referred to by Fine, since he
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was a small rancher, he said rural
life had been not so good, but
not so bad either.
The reason Cubans lost faith
in Castro, he said, was because
Castro wanted to be a leader of
Latin America as well as Cuba.
Castros interests were not
Cubas best interests, he said.
Other speakers included Steve
Fahrer, SDS member, who said
SDS was building an
anti-imperialist movement.
The major contradiction in
the world is between oppressed
nations and the oppressor, the
United States.
He said oppression was
especially great against national
colonies in America, including
blacks, Mexican Americans and
Puerto Ricans.
Fahrer said the ruling class
notices the struggle in factories
and on campus and has
retalieted with repression.
Norma Munn, American
Civil Liberties Union leader, said
the denial of civil rights was
especially felt by minorities,
women, military personnel,
migrant workers, youths and
convicts.
Bob Canney, a UF graduate
student, called on the audience
to remember what Hiroshima
was all about.
The truth is that the war
was already over, he said.
The bombing of Hiroshima
and Nagasaki was racist, Canney
said, in that it was acceptable to
incinerate hundreds of
thousands of civilians to save
relatively few American lives.



m y f

A FLOWER CHILD?
:j; Father Michael Gannon, professor of religion and director of £
the Catholic Student Center, has apparently joined the "flower £
children" generation. Sporting this slightly-greying beard after a £
summer of travel and study, Canon Gannon, as many of his £
students call him, allowed us to snap these pictures when he £
:j dropped in for a visit this week.
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UF The Sexiest,
Playboy Reports
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Managing Editor
For all of this campus seeming serenity and peaceful piety, there
apparently is another side probably a clandestine
subculture indulging in rampant hedonism..
Thats according to a September Playboy magazine campus action
chart which rates UF tops in the nation in sexual permisiveness.
Screening 25 schools across the country, the chart represents
every major demographic area of the United States.
The chart leads off a Sex In Academe section of the mens
magazine, just arrived in the mails Tuesday. The article is billed as a
tripartite takeout on campus mating mores.
Playboy says the action is off-campus and that everyone goes to
Crescent Beach to practice their wanton skills in courses such as
Philosopny of the Body.
The 25 schools are rated in descending order of
permisiveness the charts upper reaches being meccas for the
scholarly hedonist, its lower depths monastaries for the sexually
meek.
The sexually meek? Last on the list is Notre Dame whose male
students are described as hale and homy.
The rating chart makes note of UFs freshmen-women-only curfew
and points out that this is not strictly enforced. Under the category of
administration, the policy is described as laissez faire.
In the same issue the Playboy sports department, headed by writer
Anson Mount, a visiting speaker during UFs Accent 69 last February,
was not so kind to the more athletic Gators.
The Playboy sports have the Fightin Gators finishing last in the
Southeastern Conference and going three and seven overall for the
season.
Back in the permissiveness arena, Playboy claims that its rating
system is based on a number of variables, some tangible (dorm hours,
availability of women on and off campus, etc.) and some intangible
(mood of the students, atmosphere generated by the faculty, etc.).
Although the tone of the chart entries is sprightly, the research
behind them was thorough enough to support a treatise in a
sociological journal, the article states.
The other two chart ratings are for campus male and campus
female.
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FOR UF FRESHMEN

Beanies Back In Fall

See Editorial, Page 8
The Gator Beanie, a tradition
at UF until it died in 1960, is
going to be revived if UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and Student Body President
Charles Shepherd have their
way.
The beanie, which all
freshmen will be required to
wear, is orange and blue with
small F on the front.
Shepherd said he would ask
the Student Senate to okay the
plan at Tuesday nights meeting.
He said the idea of reviving the
hats was OConnells.
OConnell and I have been
concerned with a lack of
identity on this campus, which
we have seen in others,
Shepherd said. Many students
have no feeling of identity with
this institution.
To many students, going
here is like going to New York
City youre just there visiting.
In addition to the beanie,
Shepherd said the Freshman
Council and the F Book will
also be revived.
The council, he said, will be
elected by representatives of the
freshman class, and will have
executive officers.
The council will hopefully
work with University College
Dean Franklin Doty, and with
the university housing office to
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further interests of the freshman
class.
The pocketsize F Book,
will be published on campus and
will contain important historical
information about UF.
In a letter to OConnell,
Shepherd said although his
cabinet was opposed to the idea,
he would support it if OConnell

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Friday, August 8, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

will agree to wear his 1938
beanie.
OConnell is on vacation, but
Shep-herd said the president
would wear the hat he wore
when he was a UF freshman.
If pompous leaders can wear
them, they cant be all bad,
said Shepherd, who is already
wearing a cap to classes.

Page 3



>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8, 1969

Page 4

Despite her battered and barren
appearance, its still too early to write
off Mars as a desolate place without any
forms of life, a UF professor who has
studied the planet for years, contends.
Dr. Alex Smith, chairman of the
Department of Astronomy, said that
while the thin Martian atmosphere
seems to preclude the likelihood of
higher forms of plant life, we might be
in for a surprise.
We tend to be geocentric in our
views and feel that if anything hasnt
developed on earth it cant develop
anywhere else. I think we are going to
find this a mistake, he explained.
is possible evolution has taken a


Lunar Soil
Studied With
UF Tester
A lightweight soil tester that
barely weighs five pounds is
giving UF a role in mans first
series of tests of lunar soil.
The apparatus was furnished
to the National Aeronautics and
Space Administration by Dr.
John Schmertmann, university
specialist in soil mechanics and
foundation engineering.
Called the Swedish Fall Cone
Testing Machine, it will be used
to test the shear strength of
moon soil its ability to
withstand stress and weight,
from a human foot to a building.
Shortly after NASA learned
the astronauts had succeeded in
retrieving samples of moon soil,
a call was placed to UF for the
machine, one of the few in
America.
We had to Tush it to
Houston so it could be placed in
quarantine before being used to
test the samples, Schmertmann
said.
The university came into the
moon soil study through one of
its engineers doing research this
summer at the NASA center in
Huntsville, Ala.
The soil tester, a simple
apparatus about the size of a
kitchen blender, measures the
strength of soil by the degree of
penetration made by a stainless
steel cone that hangs on a rod
like a pendulum.
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Life Mav Yet Be Found On Mars

different course in other parts of the
universe. It would really be surprising if
it hasnt.
Smiths department wasnt caught
napping by the impact of the swing to
space. Thanks to over $1 million from a
science development grant in 1965, the
astronomy program is at near peak
strength.
An optical observatory has been
erected, with a 30-inch reflecting
telescope, near Bronson, providing a
program of both radio and optical
astronomy. A radio astronomy
observatory is located near Old Town in
Levy County.

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Also 25 graduate students are feeding
data into the UFs complex IBM 360-65
computer about the solar system while
working toward doctoral degrees in
astronomy.
Smith is quite excited about the
moon landing and Mars Mariner flyby
missions that have radioed back the
best ever pictures of earths sister.
But photos from 2,000 miles away
arent likely to solve one of Mars most
perplexing mysteries, Smith said, which
is why do 'certain regions of Mars
systematically darken in the Martian
spring and summer and fade in the fall
and winter.

DR. ALEX SMITH
... 'don't write off Mars'



Students Unqualified To Decide NSA

V By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Referring to a bill allowing
students to choose which
national organizations they
would like to join, a senator at
Tuesdays senate meeting said
students arent qualified to make
that decision.
The question before the
senate was whether the student
body should vote on continuing
membership in the UJS. National
Student Association (NSA)
following a one-year trial
membership.
Minority Floor Leader Marvin
Sylvest introduced the bill which
will place the decision to stay in
the NSA before the voter in a
general election.
The bill passed following a

i Soul Retreat Slated i
jjjj UF black students, administrators and faculty are getting |!
together at Lake Wauburg Saturday for what has been dubbed a :
ijj soul retreat. i
Black students were invited through the mails to attend the :
gathering. UF President Stephen C. OConnell, Vice-President :
| for Student Affairs Lester Hale, and Vice-President for j
P Academic Affairs Frederick Conner are among the :
administrators who have been invited, said Don Henderson, i
5: coordinator of minority group affairs. Also invited were jj
v members of the president's Committee for Disadvantaged j
I Students, which includes several faculty members.
Many high school students are here this summer for various :
formal gatherings. Henderson said that blacks among those j
>: students have been invited by word of mouth to attend the
retreat Saturday. j
ft This is to be a social gathering, Henderson said. No j
business will be discussed formally. But Im sure that there will \
be some grievances aired and suggestions made.
The retreat is planned to last from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday. \
:$ Buses will leave the Towers area at 11:45 a.m. Food and soft \
ijj; drinks will be served. A live band will provide entertainment. j:

UF Student
- *.
Arrested
A UF student, Thomas John
Porter, 2 UC, was arrested early
Wednesday morning by UF
police for allegedly stealing 30
cases of empty bottles from the
Corry Village Store.
Charged with petty larceny,
Porter was released Wednesday
on SIOO bond.
William Brightman, 3EG,
reported to the police at 12:47
a.m., that he had seen a person
loading bottles into a black and
white 1956 Ford.
UF police Lt. Robert Martin
and another officer arrived and
found Porter with the 30 cases
in his car, according to police
reports.
Later Wednesday it was
reported that the store had also
been broken into and robbed of
an undisclosed amount but no
further information was
available. Martin said officers
were investigating.
FLORIDA
QUARTERLY
HERE NOW!

deadlock which required a
deciding vote by Student Senate
President Bob Blunt who voted
for the measure.
In debate on the floor,
Senator Ralph Glatfeher said
that if the students reject the
action of the senate in a general
election, then it makes us look
like a bunch of idiots.
Sylvest said the students
should have a right to vote on
their involvement in the ranks of
a national or regional
organization.
The senate doesnt always
know what is best for the
student, he stated.
Glatfelter compared the
Student Senate to the U.S.
Senate in that our joining the
United Nations and
Anti-Ballistic Missile proposal

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STUDENT SENATE SAYS

were not voted on by the
people.
Senator Harvey Alper,
speaking in favor of tire bill, said
there are some items of
involvement which the American
v o ter would like to
decide the Vietnam War, for
example.
The bill requires another
appearance before the senate
before it becomes law.
An amendment to the bill
which called for year to elapse
before the student body could
vote on the issue was passed
following a 16-16 tie vote which
was broken by Blunt.
Also, the senate Tuesday
passed a loan authorization of
$9,500 which will go to the
Rathskeller to help it operate
this fall.
The senate agreed to let the
Rathskeller management pay the
loan back to SG at a rate of
$1,200 per quarter with no
interest charge.
Majority Leader Marc Glick
said this will allow the operation
to offer more services to the
student.
In other action, the senate
approved $622 for the Citrus
Club to pay part of the costs for
plane fair to Washington state
for a conference.
The Association for Women
Students received approval for a
$ 151 increase in funding to
publish the Florida Coed this
year.
A request of $248 for SG
Productions for a trip to New
York to sign talent for campus
appearances was approved.
Another request for $375 to
send six cheerleaders to a

one-week clinic in Georgia was
also passed.
Passed on first reading was a
bill which may change the
rotation of bloc seating for IFC
and other groups at home
football games this year.
A bill for academic reform
received a vote of confidence
from the senate. The plan

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Muie

Friday, August 8,1968, The Florida Alligator,

organizes a committee for
conducting surveys and polls to
obtain information for
encouraging changes in testing
and academic areas.
Student Body Vice President
Charles Harris was given a
unanimous vote of appreciation
for his past services to the senate
and SG.

Page 5



i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8.1969

Page 6

' C\ v t^£&*
HEHTHF JHHRHpprjfiHHHg^
s? Wmm
NMtfflMl wtm wSHWi
" -, \ <
, <* ' -s * . Isw I MpH*A!l§Bra&Kiis^*OT*a&A
THE FLAVETS MAY BE SHORT ON LIFE
... No conflicts forseen in building activities center.
No Flavet-Coliseum
Conflicts Forseen
By ANGELA RACKLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Plans for the location of a sl7 million activities center at UF will
not interfere with the building of new married student apartments to
replace Flavet 111, says a housing official.
William Neylans, UF assistant housing director, denied that there
will be any conflict between the two planned building sites.
He declined to give the location or cost of the new housing for
married students.
Id rather not say at this time, Neylans said. I know the area
thats been picked, but there could be some adjustments made.
This site was picked by the planning office, he said.
Plans for the center were revealed two weeks ago by a study
committee headed by UF Director Walter Matherly during a
two-hour meeting with several cahtfms and city leaders. Neylans did
not attend the meeting. KX
Neylans estimated that the minimum time needed to vacate and
tear down the 428-apartment frame units would be two or three
years. The coliseum may be ready in six years.
We obviously cant tear them down until we have a place for the
occupants to go, he said.
There are presently more than 400 families living in the remodeled
World War II barracks, constructed as temporary housing for the large
in-flux of married war veterans returning to school under the GJ. Bill.
c ' /-
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FLORIDA QUARTERLY

CANNON FIPPn, REHIRED
DJs 'Naked Contest
Prompts WGGG Fuss

By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Correspondent
Steve Cannon is back on the air.
The fast-talking WGGG radio fired
Tuesday night for planning a naked contest, was
back on the air Wednesday night after coming to
an agreement with the stations management.
Cannon was taken off the air shortly after
p.m. Tuesday night when he refused to cancel the
contest.
Station Vice President Bill Kelley said he had
been warned not to go ahead with the contest when
it was first announced Monday night.
He told me to play it straight or collect my
check, Cannon said. There was nothing wrong
with the idea, and I thought it would be a good
grabber, so I stuck with it.
Kelley called the disc jockey into his office and
gave him severance pay.
Hes been running these silly contests all along,

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but he refused to tell the management the rules of
this one, Kelley explained.
In Cannons two months with the station he has
run several contests, including belly-button and
bathing suit contests.
Station owner Robert Brown flew in from South
Carolina and met with Cannon and program director
Malcom Harrison Wednesday afternoon.
The disc jockey was allowed to broadcast the
contest after assuring them that it did not involve
human beings. He returned to the air at 8:40 p.m.
and ran the contest at 9. There were about 200
listeners at the station when Cannon went back on
the air.
The first five people to bring a naked German
dog to the station were awarded record albums.
Do you mean to tell me that we went through
all that for a naked dog? Kelley shouted to Cannon
after he announced the rules.
Cannon explained that he owns a naked
German dog.



ACADEMICS
news and views
By MAGGIE COE
Alligator Staff Writer
Cameron R. Benedict, 4JM, has been awarded a Congressional
internship, for journalism students by Sears, Roebuck and Co.
N Y C j WiU W rk n Washington staffof Re P- Seymour Halpern
* *
Dr. Hal G. Lewis, professor of education, will speak on
Implications from Automation and Cybernetics in Norman
Auditorium at 1:30 p.m. Tuesday. One of the summer faculty lecture
series, Lewis talk wil review current trends toward automation and
computerization as they relate to education.
* *
The College of Business Administrations accounting department
will host 60 accountants during a week-long workshop in the Reitz
Union beginning Monday. Dr. Williard Stone will direct the workshop.
* *
The Division of Biological Sciences has received a $197,171 grant
from the U.S. Public Health Service to train postgraduate students in
parasitology. The grant will be administered over a five year period.
The program is directed by Dr. Richard E. Bradley.
* *
The College of Medicines Department of Radiology has also
received a grant from the Public Health Service. It is a renewal grant
of $46,659 to provide a masters program in radiation biophysics.
* *
The Department of Environmental Engineering has been awarded a
three-year research grant of $142,512 from the U.S. Department of
Health, Education and Welfare for development of standard testing
procedures for examining municipal solid waste disposals. Dr. Russell
H. Susag will direct the research.
# *
An international group of 11 nurses has completed a month-long
study visit to the Shands Teaching Hospital. Sponsored by the World
Health Organization, the group observed up-to-date methods of
nursing administration and practice.
Nine of the nurses were graduate students at the University of West
Indies in Jamaica. The other two were nursing administrators from
Poland and India.
Autonomy Sought For
Law School Students

A bill calling for fiscal
autonomy of law students is
slated to be presented to the
Student Senate at its meeting
Tuesday.
We are enraged at getting no
money from Student
Government, said Jim Holmes,
student senator from the law
school.
The future lawyers will be
asking for 60 per cent of each
law student's activity fee,
Holmes said.
Law students are seriously
hampered implementing legally
oriented goals due to lack of
money, he contended.
The collective goals of law
students have little in common

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with the collective goals of SG,
Holmes explained.
Bob Blunt, president of the
Student Senate and a senator
from the law school, said the law
students were overwhelmingly in
favor of the plan although he
realized the chances of it passing
it are small.
Marc H. Glick, senate
majority leader, said he would
have to give the matter further
study and would like to hear
some arguments in favor of the
request.
However, he added after a
second of thought, the chances
of it passing are none or less,
unless some strong arguments
are presented.

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Friday, August 8,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8,1969

Education Article Incorrect

MR. EDITOR:
The story by Mr. Lee Hinnant
on page 4 of the Alligator for
August 1 quotes me in a
statement which I did not make
and which implies an insult to
my colleagues in education.
Presumably, Mr. Hinnant reports
me as hoping that eventually
affective education will be

Cycle Os Republicanism

Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare Bob
Finch was one Republican officeholder who sent for
Keven Phillipss challenging new book, The
Emerging Republican Majority, which has
Washington buzzing. And the liberal Republican
Ripon Society so the publishers at Arlington House
in New Rochelle, N.Y., tell me, was right in line for
one of the earliest copies.
Finch and the Riponites and a handful of
northeastern Republican Senators (Brooke of
Massachusetts, Goodell and Javits of New York,
Saxbe of Ohio, Case of New Jersey are among them)
are right to scent extreme danger or at least
provocation to themselves in the thesis of Phillipss
book. For if Phillips is right in his socio-cultural
analysis of voting patterns, the seat of a
triumphant Republicanism has trended away from
the old Yankee and silk-stocking strongholds of the
Northeast.
The future of the Republican Party, says Phillips,
rests on the outer South (which the choice of
Agnew for Vice President held in line for Nixon),
the growing suburban populations of the Sun Belt
(Florida, Texas, Arizorfa, California), the ethnic
groups which have risen from the ghetto to home
ownership (Italians, Irish, Germans, Poles), the
plains-and-mountains Heartland and assuming
George Wallace cant hold his local magic the
contingent South that went for Goldwater in
1964.
To be perfectly hardboiled about it, people of
the emerging Republican majority think of
themselves as the more competent members of
society and want to hang on to what they have
achieved, often with hardship and ride. They dont
want to see everything go to an ill-considered and
graft-ridden welfare.
Finchs crowd in the Administration, the
liberal Riponites, and the Javits-Goodell type of
Senator tend to doubt the lasting quality of the
newly-emergent Nixon coalition which Mr. Phillips
thinks is good for a thirty-year cycle. They argue
that an age overlay will soon rise to confound
Mr. Phillipss socio-cultural and geographic
patterns. The liberal young, empathizing with the
blacks in the ghettoes and the academic
intelligentsia, are supposedly disillusioned with
affluence.
The riotous scenes in the colleges are said to
bespeak a new radicalism which wont be
compatable with anything we have known as
Republicanism. When the baby boom crop that
was bom in the years 1945-60 begins to vote
heavily, the Democrats will return to Washington
unless the Republicans do something to win the
allegiance of the young.

accepted in the College of
Education.
Actually, such was accepted
in the College of Education long
before the College here had the
benefit of my association. What
I did say was that sensitivity
groups would shortly become
more acceptable in the College
of Education. I was specifically
referring to a program in our

That will be the burden of the Finch-Ripon
attack on the Phillips thesis. But Phillipss own
figures tend to undercut the age overlay

These Days
John
Chamberlain

argument. Youth is important, says Phillips, but
voters under 25 cast only 7.4 per cent of the
nations ballots in 1968. And while many
Northeastern young people are more liberal and
Democratic than their parents especially the
affluent and anarchic progeny of the Establishment'
the reverse seems to be true in Southern, Border,
Rocky Mountain, Catholic, lower middle class, and
working-class areas. In these locales, the young
electorates trend against local political tradition
helps the GOP, as does the blythe nihilism of the
children of the affluent society.
Phillips works for Attorney General John
Mitchell, who ran the Nixon 1968 campaign and
won by taking due note of Phillipss trend analysis.
Unless Bob Finch and the Ripomtes can do some
fast talking, it is likely that President Nixon will
edge more and more towards complete acceptance
of the Phillips thesis. The symbolism of politics
would indicate that Mr. Nixon has already made his
choice.
The President has bought new homes in Florida
and California the Sun Belt and transferred his
voting residence from New York to Florins Dade
County. In a generation the four Sun Belt states will
outvote the Northeast. Finch, a Californian, will
have to find numerous young liberals in his home
state to offset the fact that Reagan men still go on
winning in California local races. Mayor Yorty won
in Los Angeles as a conservative. Berkeley in
northern California gets the headlines, but Orange
County in the south has the votes.
The Democrats, stuck with the declining
populations of the big Northeastern cities, have
accepted their regional fate: they fired Louisianas
Russell Long as their Whip in the Senate and
replaced him with Massachusetts Ted Kennedy.
Now Teddy is in trouble. More symbolism.
A tip: watch for future changes in political
allegiance, with Mayor John Lindsay of New York
City perhaps becoming a Democrat and Senator
Harry Byrd of Virginia becoming a Republican.
Stranger things will happen if Nixon luck holds
and the Phillips cycle deepens.

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick
Editor-in-Chief
Dave Osier
Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
Executive Editor

Department of Counselor
Education which will be utilizing
such groups.
Otherwise, the story is quite
accurate and the Center of Man
is most appreciative of your
interest.
TED LANDSMAN
PROFESSOR OF EDUCATION

FDITO RIALS
Secret Council
The inner sanctum of UF s academic deans remains
unmolested.
And the public students, faculty and staff of this
university have once again been denied free access to
information which vitally affects them.
The Council of Academic Deans, made up of the chiefs
of each college, has reportedly denied an Alligator request
for a non-reporting observer to be present at its meetings.
The request specifically stated that the observer would
not report on the meeting itself or on the discussions
therein. The observer would later be able to check the
accuracy of related news stories, he would understand the
background development of a decision and he would
represent, to some extent, student opinion.
We viewed the request as a fledgling step towards
opening the centers of power and decision-making to the
sunlight of public scrutiny.
Our request was, we thought, a small one, requiring little
concession from men of good will.
Apparently, we were wrong.
The request was denied.
Or so Vice President for Academic Affairs Fred Conner
told us, although in the same breath he admitted the council
had not met since the proposal was presented.
Conner said the council believed the presence of an
observer would inhibit candid discussion of important
issues.
We find the argument non-persuasive, although we
recognize that at rare times, such as during discussion of the
pending hiring of a new president or dean, the council
should meet privately.
But for general purposes, the business of the deans is also
the business of the people they lead. Thus, those people
have a right to information about the deans decisions.
Opening the meetings to a single observer would, we felt,
lay the foundation for opening them to the entire university
community.
Our appeal was not a legal one because it is questionable
whether Floridas Govemment-in-the-Sunshine law applies
to university committees. The premise of our request was
moral:people including students have a right to
participate in the decisions which affect their lives.
In principle, Chancellor Robert Mautz agrees and he
created the council of deans.
President Stephen OConnell would also apparently
agree.
After all, it was he who ordered all university committees
with student membership to open their meetings to the
public. The principle then was participation.
The principle now and always is the same.
It is ironic that in a day when there are more forces
dividing us than forces uniting us, the deans would choose a
course of action which joins hands with the forces of
divisiveness.
It is ironic that President OConnell has urged
re-institution of the defunct rat caps to give frehman
identity with the university, while at the same time the
council of deans has ordered its door to remain closed to
students and faculty who wish to identify with their
university, to understand how and why its decisions are
made.
In light of this, we can only hope that the Council of
Academic Deans will reconsider its decision and that its
members will permit their meetings to be as open as their
minds should be.
We urge them to join the cause of fostering a greater
spirit of unity at the University of Florida.
Beanies Back
Student Body President Charles Shepherd and UF
President Stephen C. OConnell have come up with an idea
they hope will make the UF a better community.
Since he took over the reins of the university, OConnell
has attempted to create a more pleasant atmosphere he
tried to speak to more students, urged students to
communicate more with their fellow students, and recently
instituted Friendship Walk.
Now he has proposed the perhaps dubious-sounding pl an
to revive the freshman rat cap.
O Connell feels students here just dont identify with the
campus, and he thinks the idea of having new students wear
the orange and blue beanies will go far in fostering a feeling
of unity and friendship.
We agree.
Although many students will peer down their noses at
t e plan, calling it infantile and repressive, we feel the
beanies can be beneficial. But this can come about only
with the aid of the entire student body.



Revolutionaries Arent Just Plavina Games

MR. EDITOR:
I am writing in reply to a letter
written to the Alligator Friday which
was signed A Cuban Student at UF.
In this letter, the writer criticized those
who advocate a Second American
Revolution and those who attack
American Economic Imperialism
because (1) they dont realize how
lucky they are and (2) they are not
really revolutionaries but are merely
playing games.
With respect to the first point, this is
not true. I realize very much that I do
have much more freedom than most of
the countries of the world, but every
day I see this freedom growing less and
less. Everyday there are more laws,
more regulations, more police. The only
reason that radicals have the right to say
things and set up literature tables is
because the pigs have not yet figured
out a satisfactory way to shut us up, but
dont worry, they are working on it.
The things radicals say are hitting
home. The Vietnam War is being fought
for Business and not for freedom. The
US Army could accidentally wipe us all
out with the secret germ and chemical
research and stockpiles that most
civilians dont even know about. Big
Business does love the Arms Race and
spurs it on for profits and then yells
foul whenever the Russians try to
catch up.
These are all things the pigs cant
stand to hear. Why? Because they are
lies? No, because they are true and
because the American masses get all
riled up when they find out the truth;
when they find out how American Big
Business is willing to risk the lives of all
just for the money interests of a few.
If you want to talk about our
material freedom, then you have to
realize that much of it comes about
precisely because we are screwing tJie
Third World countries. We take
advantage of Asian, African, and Latin
countries in their poverty by using our
wealth to control their economies. We
get our companies in there, keep wages
down, and suck out all the profits we
can. This is done with the cooperation of
puppet governments which are
controlled largely by American Business
and its willing accomplice, the American
government.
Os course, the exploited people dont
like the situation and occasionally try to

I 4 ; :
.Jd ''' "... I
W^~j**7*
/
aMI^S.
-One Small Step For A Man, One Giant Leap For Mankind"

The things radicals say are
hitting home. The Vietnam War
is being fought for Business and
not for freedom . Big
Business does love the Arms
Race and spurs it on for profits
and then yells ~f ouT> whenever
the Russians try to catch up.
These are all things the pigs
cant stand to hear. Why?
Because they are lies? No,
because they are true and
because the American masses
get all riled up when they find
out the truth; when they find
out how American Big Business
is willing to risk the lives of all
just for the money interests of a
few.

overthrow their own puppet
governments and kick American
business out but this is extremely
difficult because of the police states we
support and finance throughout the
Third World.
You speak of the lack of freedom in
Cuba. Why dont you also speak of the
lack of freedom demonstrated in Brazil
when the government prevented any
newspaper from drticizing Rockefeller
and his economic interests. Police were
used to smash unions and students who
tried to expose the method and extent
of American imperialism in Brazil as
they were also used in all the other
countries Boss Rockefeller hastily
visited.
I havent been radical all my life. I
became radical chiefly as a result of my
Army stay in the Republic of Korea.
When I got off the boat in Inchon, I saw
a huge sign which said, Welcome To
Freedoms Frontier. I spent the rest of
the next 13 months I was over there
laughing about it. What a joke. College
students are dragged off in the middle
of the night by the secret police and
nobody ever hears of them again;
elections are so poorly rigged it is a
wonder they even bother to have them;
South Korean officials snatch bribes
faster than you can say Park Chung
Hee.

No More Cheap Housing?

MR. EDITOR:
As a resident of Flavet 11, I should like to note
several ramifications of the planned student
activities center reported by the Gator (Tuesday,
July 29).
Little need be said about the suggested $lO charge
of each student for funds for the center. Such a tax
following tuition increases of $25 for
undergraduates and twice that for graduates is
anything but a popular measure.
More needs to be said of the location of the
center since it only affects directly about 400
families of married students. The proposal is to
replace the WWII barracks-apartments, Flavet 111,
with a student activities center. Flavet I and Flavet
II have been replaced by other building projects. No
cheap housing projects replaced these villages. By
cheap, I mean rents of $26 to S3O per month as are
paid in Flavet 111 now, I do not mean rents of S6O
per month and upwards as are charged for other
university married quarters.
The need for cheap and good housing for married
students is extreme. A student family living on
$2500 teaching assistantship for 10 months must
scrimp; it cannot do so on the babys food or the
childs regular and expensive visits to the doctor.
Tuition of SSO to S6O per month and rent are the
highest fixed expense items for a student family;
pay for part-time jobs and jobs for wives have no
obvious relationship to living expenses and rents for
private apartments except disadvantageous to a

X
v^

The South Korean college students
who visited North Korea from Europe
not too long ago know all about that
kind of reception, because thats what
they got after they were kidnapped and
forced to return to Fascist South Korea.
Why was Park so scared that they went
to Pyongyang? Thats a simple question
any South Korean should be able to
answer.
You mention TOTALITARIAN
REDS but you dont mention
TOTALITARIAN WHITES. I think
Fascists have always made much better
totalitarians than Communists. In the
brutal sense of the word, I dont believe
the Chinese Reds have been totalitarian
at all. So many lies have been told about
that country it is incredible. One minute
were told they are all starving to death
and the next minute were told they are
a modem militaristic nation about to
conquer the world.
We also have the most fantastic
notions about the Chinese Revolution
and the nature and reasons for Chinese
participation in the Korean War. It
seems as though the brainwashers in
Washington could figure out more
plausible lies, and Im sure they are
frantically working to correct their
errors. (See The Nation, July 14, 1969,
China in Our High Schools.)

Friday, August 8,1969, Ths Florida Alligator,

Its funny how some people say this
is a free country and you can say
anything you want and then as soon as
you open your mouth to say something
they start yelling get out, get out,
love it or leave it. Maybe the ones
who yell freedom the most, practice it
the least.
We already know that the most
violent anti-communists are the people
who know the least about communism.
Theyve never been to a communist
country, theyve never read Marx,
Lenin, or Mao and yet they feel more
than qualified to deprecate what these
people have said and done.
Two of my non-radical friends who
have been to Russia say that they were
pleasantly surprised and that they
enjoyed their visits very much. Their
testimony is in direct contrast to the
hate -h y s teria which the
military industrial complex tries to whip
up in order to get SBO billion a year.
Now who do you believe someone
who is making loads of money spreading
hate and lies or someone who is
motivated merely by academic
curiosity?
You ask why I dont go down
there to Cuba. I would like to go down
there for a visit but not to live because
(a) I dont speak Spanish, and (b) I
personally dont identify that closely
with the Cuban Revolution. Certainly I
will visit Cuba at the next opportunity,
possibly next summer, just so I can see
with my own eyes whether or not the
Cuban masses are enthusiastic about the
future.
The idea that this is a really free
country is basically wrong. Black people
already know it and more and more
white workers and students will come to
realize it when the police jump on them
in the fall.
Finally, I am not anti-American but
am very much pro-American. That is I
think the American people should be
able to run their own country and not
have the Duponts, the Rockefellers, the
mi lit ary-industrial complex and the
Kennedys, among others, run it for
them. Anti-American is a very
dangerous word to use because it implies
being against the American people. No
one is against the American people but
many are against the American system
of capitalism.
A UF STUDENT

students family. It is no wonder that there is a
waiting list for Flavet 111.
Gone are the days when married students were
just the temporary vets (war may be with us always)
or the merely irresponsible (we tend to stay at
home, not in university administration buildings).
The university administrator valuing order could do
worse than hope students marry rather than
demonstrate.
Given an inventive planning board, a concerned
administration and a selfless group of private
apartment owners, there may be a solution. The
university has a sure supply of tenants for cheap
housing. The federal government is seeking new
ways to house families cheaply; it may provide loans
or grants for an experimental housing project in
which truly original ideas for cheap and good
housing may be attempted. What a name UF would
win for itself by erecting housing which fulfills the
needs of the future.
As much as an eyesore as one may think Flavet
111 is, it partially meets a need. Let us recognize that
its destruction means the discarding of the concept
of cheap housing for married students. The
university does not need an activities center without
a proper replacement of Flavet 111. Let us resist the
pressures of owners of unfilled apartment projects
and ensure education of married students because it
is right, not because of the fear of reaction oft hose
concerned to the loss of a concept.
i A. TODD
FLAVETT 111

Page 9



Page 10

L Thu Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8. 1969

Wfe uMwafe kifM. rnddirnfaM
is?cP3uEs.in]- rWffrMli
GRANADA

TwEiuui" ll |n u |w| "" ll \
MBfl
BSfiM
nsSBS^KI

28-oz. No Return Bottles CHEK ALL FLAVORS "Twist Off Tops"
SOFT DRINKS 5/*1
1 /2-Lb. Loaves DIXIE DARLING
Sand. BREAD 2/49/
12-oz. Cans CHEK ALL FLAVORS
SOFT DRINKS Isl

2 Lb. CRACKIN' GOOD
FIG BARS. 39*
12 Pit. DIXIE DARLING TWIN BROWN A SERVE
DINNER ROLLS 2/49*
20-oz. DIXIE DARLING
RYE BREAD .....29*
10-oz. DIXIE DARLING
ANGEL FOOD CAKE 29*
4-02. RIGHT GUARD
DEODORANT 58*
5 02. Large COLGATE
TOOTHPASTE 58*
12'A-oz. LUSTRE CREME
HAIR SPRAY 48*
Yh Can STOKELY YC HALVES OR
SLICED PEACHES 3/89*
2_Roll Pkg. SOFT WEVE ASSORTED COLORS
BAtH TISSUE 4/sl.
32-02. STOKELY "GIVES YOU ENERGY
GATORADE 3/sl.
No. 303 Con STOKELY GOLD CS OR
W.K. CORN 5/sl.

GEORGIA RED
PEACHES!
I 6 pak ww&i
OLD MILWAUKEE 1202.
BEER 99< /

i*
_
(munk
JflFn

20-ox. STA-FLO
Fabric Finish
12-ox. TY-D-BOL
Cleaner

1401 N. MAIN ST.

iroCESGOOPALL WEEM

11 [lllf kTp VALUE STAMM
1 il S|t*ll AMP M(H|
| ONE HORMEL CURE 81
; Boneless Ham
0 -000 THRU AUG. 13
5. IBEpCbSH^^^^

ASTOR ALL GRINDS
foffe
I Limi* I with $5 00 or More
*\ Purchase Excluding Cigarettes
I 1-LB.
CAN

Hlj TOPVAuS STAMK
IsSlatey " ,H toi'fOA amo 'inoiM oi
mU&fiSS IF OZ JAR ASTOR
IBjfcjPw l Coffee Creamer
W&Sf-ISIU GOOD THRU AUG. 13
#1
* T >ovt ioc*i winn omi
rs-s--< JjT", ...i . i

24-ox. SNO-BOWL TOILET
Bowl Cleaner
12-ox. JACK'S
98? Oatmeal Cookies
0

130 N.W. 6TH ST.

Check yheM JantaAtic
free/ JftentA
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! BUY ONE GET ONE FREE' BUY ONE s uart
HILL'S HORSE MEAT 'MAO'/ i Skip SEALER
WITH GRAVY or CHICKEN UV 0 r CLEANER .
DOG FOOD CLEANER y "
14-oz. SIZE HALF GALLON LILAC LIQUID
. FREE!
"v
BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! BUY ONE GET ONE FREE!
MEFTY HEFTY HEFTY
GARBAGE TRASH TRASH CAN
BAGS BAGS BAGS
25-CT PKG. | 15-CT. PKG. | t-CT.pSf

Quantity Rights Reserved Prices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wpd. Noon. August 6-13
WINN-DIXIE STORES. .NC. COPYRIGHT 1 9

Thompson seedless
White Grapes.. 29*
CALIFORNIA SWEET JUICY
Nectarines.... 3 *sl.
MOUNTAIN GROWNVINE RIPE
Tomatoes 29*
WESTERN VINE RIPE JUMBO
Honeydews .69*
Cello YOUNG 4'TENDER
Carrots 2 39*

jl JjJ VAuSe stamps
rUNCMASE SI. OO WORTH
#2 coot) THRU AUG 13

10 Vi -ox. NABISCO COOKIES
45? Lorna Doone
I-Lb. BLUE BONNET SOFT''
39* Margarine

3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

GIANT DETERGENT
or more purchase

Limit One Detergent of Choice With $5.00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes
Giant BLUE, WHITE or COLD WATER ARROW
DETERGENT. 39'
24-oz. ASTOR Limit One Oil of Choice With $5. or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes
COOKING 01L...35'
24-oz. ALL VEGETABLE Limit One Oil of Choice With $5. or More Pur Excluding Cigar
WESSON 01L...39'

INTITE*rr R *J
LI4JI TOP VALUE STAMPS
2l|OZ.
JBs&JgKj #3 GOOD T RU AUG 13
* ir T*"


No. 300 Con. VAN CAMPS
PORK & BEANS 7/sl.
Jumbo KLEENEX BOUTIQUE T
PAPER TOWELS... 4/sl.
No 2A Can SWEET TREAT SLICED
PINEAPPLE 3/SI.
No !h Can VAN CAMPS
VIENNA SAUSAGE 5/sl.
l2oz. BUBBLE CLUB
BUBBLE BATH.... 4/sl.
HOLLYWOOD MILKSHAKE. PAYDAY OR BUTTERNUT
CANDY BARS 19*
240 z. LYRE'S
BEEF STEW 49*
46-oz. OCEAN SPRAY OOi off)
CRANBERRY JUICE 69*
ALI*STRAINED BEECHNUT
BABY FOOD 9*
2Lb DEEP SOUTH STRAW STRAWBERRY
BERRY STRAWBERRY PRESERVES 69*
Ql. KRAETS
MAYONNAISE 59*

GOLDEN BANTAM
Fancy Corn 5 39*
Large FRESH HEADS
Lettuce 2 49*
HARVEST FRESH
Bell Peppers..s/39*
U.S. N(X 1 WHITE OR YELLOW 7
Onions 3 .= 49*
California Bartlett
Pears 2 39*

It | BIb:XTRA
"I'M TOP VALUE STAMPS
SB* offlSl ,3,/, OX. CAN RAID
HOUSE ft
Garden Spray ;
0 good thru AUG. 13 I
A? '*** Rww.gtm

- <
I-Lb. MRS, FILBERTS 6-STICK WHIPPED
47? Margarine 3/*l.
No. 300 Con ROTEL
39? White Acre Peas 21?

HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

i
I
MMX
WIT*



vL^F^^iflS^r
.
_ J£Li=£§ii. -ll ;~V^==Hlf
TjfcT ix'lmaE

' WD ,RAND GRADE A
QUICK FROZEN
Quantity Rights Reserved PHces Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon, August 6-13
WINN-DIXIE STORKS. INC.*-. COPYRIGHT .. ISSS

O
808 WHITE REGULAR
SLICED BACON -69>
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE CORN FED
POT ROAST .79-
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE CORN FED
SH'LD. STEAK -99

W D BRAND QUICK FROZEN CUBED BEEF
Steakettes 2 $1.89
6oz. BORDEN'S-PROCESSED'AMERICAN
Sliced Cheese...43*
10-0. BORDENS BUTTERMILK CANNED
Biscuits 4/43*
SUPERBRAND COTTAGE
Cheese 2 65*
14 oz. CUP PALMETTO FARMS
Pim. Cheese.....s9*
9'A-oz. PILLSBURY CINNAMON (With Icing)
Rolls 2/65*
DRESSED
Whiting.. 29*

SUPERBRAND SHERBET OR
ice ca
crem*'~9 7

t

i j i ---------------
6-Pkg.
Apple Beer
2V4-OZ. FRENCH'S HAMBURGER
Seasoning
UOl N. MAIN ST.

I Wednesday Thru Wednesday §

fiol VALIK STAMPS j
Eggo Waffles ;
GOOD THRU AUG 13

cbashda
Bread & Butter PLATE
\ with each
H $3 purchase
L Each week a -piece of distinctive Granada dinnerware
L/j Wl ** featured for just 295. For each $3 in grocery
L-1- purchases, you are entitled to one piece at this low
price. Theres no limit . with a $6 purchase you can
get 2 pieces .. and so on.
j r '- sx ~~ Excluding: tobacco, liquor and liquid dairy products.

Broi yAujjTSTAMPS
TWO GOLD KING
Onion Rings
GOOD THRU AUG 13

12-oi. RONCO
99* Thin Spaghetti
8-oz. RONCO
33* Sea Shells

130 N.W. 6TH ST.

W-fc Stand team
Gr. Beef
to *4 w ijfcs9
PKG.

WVLL^"S^S
I'M COvlk *~P M(H o*
PK6 & SOUTHrRN BELLE
Deviled Crabs
GOOD THRU AUG. 13

3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

This schedule wiH be repeated three times
I during the next T 5 weeks
*W DINNER PLATE OOf with .very
I S week DESSERT DISH JS ?Qr with.v.ry I
4TW S 3 purchasa*
1 THIRO
W K SAUCER " )Oe with .very
_______ 89( A $3 purchasa*
I fourth ~ ~ I
WEEK COFFEE CUP * OOr with .very
69< S 3 purchase* I
fifth Bread t Butter R ___ I
I L^!i K PUTE % 29c S3 w a,& I
I The above items will be sold at these special I
prices only in the weeks they are featured. j
tobacco, liquor and liquid dairy product*.


W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE CORN FED BONE IN NEW YORK
STRIP STEAK...-. 5 4
214 -Lbs W-D BRAND ALL MEAT STEW OR
GR. CHUCK ;. 5 1
W-D BRAND USDA CHOICE CORN FED
CHUCK STEAK 79^

6 s $l $l
- $l oz. LIBBY'S LIMEADE OR
LEMONADE 9/99*
MORTON REGULAR SIZE
MEAT DINNERS 2/89
MORTON ALL FLAVORS
CREAM PIES 3/sl.
5 Lb. Bog FRENCH
FRY POTATOES 89*
10-oz. ASTOR
GREEN PEAS 6/sl.
MORTON
HONEY BUNS 3/87*

8-oz 6A MAID CANDIED KR.
23* Pickle Chips
. 4 Roll Pkg.
2/31* Como Tissue

Lb. Pkg. SUPERBRAND Vi's
MARGARINE £tcu/f/ferA preAenti the Hoed

STAMM
with Miws**ts cooro- -o vchw o*
3 LB. OR MORE USDA
CHOICE BONELESS
Beef Roast
GOOD THRU AUG. 13
At TOUI lOCAI (MM Mill
----iiiEi a ajirri

Friday, August 8, 1960, The Florida Alligator,

2-Lb- FREEZER QUEEN Salisbury Steals, Veal Patmogian. Meot Lool or Gravy &
Sliced Beef $1.49
FLA. GRADE 'A 1 FRYING
Chic. Backs 15*
12-oz. PURE PORK SUNNYLAND CUT LINK SMOKED
Sausage.... 75*
8-oz. OSCAR MAYER BRAUnWiWEIGER OR
Sand. Spread... 49*
COPELAND ALL MEAT DINNER
Franks..... 79*
TARNOW SLICED
Bologna 79*
12-oz. TASTE O' SEa
Fish Cakes....3/sl*

TO WM.UE STAMM
wit- MwtMni couea- amo rveouu a*
ONE QUARTER LOIN
SLICED INTO
Pork Chops
GOOD THRU AUG. 13 J
et rove local wmweiatt I
- -1

2-Lb. CHASE and SANBORN Regular or Electro Perk
29* Coffee T 9
No 300 Con ROMAY W/Snops
29* Blackeye Peas 2/35*

HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

N

REQUESTED IT NASA MR TW ASTRONAUTS
Pkg. STOUFFERS MOON FOOD CLUB STYLE POTATOES OR
MAC. & CHEESE 39*
Pkg. STOUFFERS Moon Food Scolloped Apples, Au Grotin Cauliflower at
POTATOES 39*
Pkg. STOUFFERS MOON FOOD BEEF OR CHICKEN
POT PIES 2/sl.
Pkg. EDWARDS NEW! DELICIOUS! CONDENSED
LEMON PIE.. 99*
Pkg. HOWARD JOHNSON
CORN TOASTEES 29*
Pkg. HOWARD JOHNSON FUDGE COCONUT OR
ORANGE CAKE 85*

Page 11

I
I



*GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I fgpli|\ FREE BEER I
I ySSga EVERY MONDAY I
I NIGHT 9-10 PM I
f
JML STEAK HOUSE 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
flKitM!! Il rorrufinl
lILVMJlIiSra3lr!w/7|
T -*~y^4>4JasJl extra days
There were three life. One to take her...
one to loy|K|p|p& one to kill her.
\m WT ''''''' Ik
HENRY FONDA W.# JASON ROBARDS
I [once utonathew THE WEST |
mmhl St .t 23rd HO | 1 j I "'|
' T,, ph -S 7X£rg i iwas to put his two boys I
in a rowboat and set
them adrift in the ocean. I
MO -RUBEN FIGUEROA
RiNE' HERBERT B LEONARD ARTHUR HILLER

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8,1969

Page 12

| FOR SALE |
Little Pussy Cats; 5c each. Orange
striped, calico, or blotchy. Phone
495-2226 before 6:00 or 495-2479
after 6:00. (A-3t-163-p)
Yamaha 305 cc. In excellent
mechanical condition 12000 m. With
rack and two helmets s4Bs. Come
to no. 411 at 1225 S.W. Ist Ave. or
call 378-9167. (A-4t-163-p)
Three all black kittens, seven weeks
old, need new homes. Ph. 378-3093.
(A-4t-164-p)
V
GunsGunsGuns Inventory over
450. BuySellTradeRepair.
Reloading supplies, Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-163-ts-p)
IF carpets look dull and drear,
remove the spots as they appear with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-165-lt-c)
WHY PAY RENT 3x40 trailer with
Bxl6 bedroom addition
bedrooms) AC carpeted
dean-attractive $1595 furnished. Call
378-5781 NOW (A-st-165-p)
TAPE DECK ampex model 750
walnut base and dust cover plus tape
collection. $l5O, price firm. Call Bob
378-7479 after 3 p.m. (A-st-165-p)
Basset hound puppies now ready to
claim their people AKC registered,
make offer 378-4480 -378-1068.
(A-2t-165-c)
Siamese kittens healthy romping
and lovely. Litter trained. 8 weeks
old sls. See eves and weekend at
309 NW 15th Avenue. (A-lt-165-p)
Good quality used furniture. Moving,
must sell. Any reasonable offers
accepted. Hurry! 376-9592.
(A-2t-165-p)
Yamaha 250, 67, 10000 mi. new
chain & sprockets, complete tool kit
& rack. 2 helmets, mechanically
perfect. S4OO see at 1614 NW 3rd
Place. No Phone! (A-2t-165-p)
3 air conditioners, 18,200 BTU 220
volt, 6500 1 lOv., 8000 110v.;3 room
size rugs, IBM executive typewriter,
clothes, & misc. items. All day
Saturday, 1510 W. University Ave.
392-6024 or 392-6108. (A-lt-165-p)
y&JL GREEN
figSgBLOOD
/y&gsrs> potion
MINK
yYFOR THOSE WHO
" DARE
TO DRINK THE
BLOOD
- Q£ the mad Dr. 1
WaD DOcToR
<* BLQOD
T
l&f 1 -A
THE
THAT HAS
EVERYTHING!
| For Those Who Think
I a They Cant Be Scared! i
{L '/
3oth in

FOR SALE
£
1964 Honda 90 SSO or best offer,
helmet, shield and tools included.
Call Pete 372-5007. (A-2t-165-p)
YAMAHA 250 CC. PERFECT: Street
model -4500 m. $450 or BEST offer.
Call Mike (nights) 378-6431.
(A-st-165-p)
| FOR RENT ]j
Corner room 4 windows 2 blocks
campus 2 closets lavatory private
entrance semi-private bath. Day week
or month kitchen. 378-4645.
(B-lt-165-p)
Room for rent in priv. home for
mature male student. Linen and maid
service. Air cond central heat.
Separate entrance. Off-st. parking.
Call 376-5360. (B-lt-165-p)
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)
Wanted 2 rmmates for Sept.
Landmark Apts. Poolside. $47.25 per
mo. Call Sandy 378-9954 after 5
p.m. (B-3t-163-p)
Privacy is the emphasis, but w/o the
expense. Gainesvilles newest
apartment idea is LA MANCHA,
nearing completing at SW Bth Ave. &
9th St. Renting for Sept. 15 on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, & Fridays,
3-5 p.m. at the site. (B-6t-164-p)
UniversityAptsjustnorthofesearch
Li b. 2 sizeseff ~2sty leslbdrm.and2bdr
m .a llax.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
.LeaseQuarterlyratesyearlyaverage7s
- 120/m 0.3 76-8 9901536NW3rdave.
(B-12T-158-P)
I****
One female roommate wanted for
immediate occupancy in 2-bedroom
Landmark s4s/mo. Call
378-3518. (C-3t-163-p)
Coed $45 per month for own room
in AC 2 bdrm apt. 3 biks from
campus for Sept. Prefer grad student.
378-183 7, 909 SW 6 Ave.
(C-3t-165-p) i
One male student to share one
bedroom French Qtr. apartment
(already leased) beginning in Sept.
The junior pre-medical student wants
a non-smoker only. Rent is $70.00
per month, plus phone
1-305-864-4107. (C-3t-165-p)
An experienced Drummer for
established trio. Have job. Swing,
popular nightclub style. Call
376-9738 after 5. (C-165-2t-p)
2 coed grad students would like to
share 2 bedroom apt. with 1 or 2
others in Sept. Prefer Williamsburg,
Tanglewood, etc. Call Harriet at
305-758-2194 collect after 6 p.m. or
write 945 NE 138 St. No. Miami, Fla.
(C-4t-165-p)

florida players production
Bp.-' rIN T * 11
'i H |
js
~^Bi jJ '*" "****** l *?C ..
v
4-

Cm *w* h
WANTED I
COED NEEDS APT. to sruue with 3
girls Landmark or French Qtr. for
next year starting fall qtr. Call: Susan
376-2129. (C-st-165-p)
Male roommate for fall qtr. Prefer
senior or graduate student.
Comfortable brick apt. in
convenient location. Call 378-9790.
(C-2t-165-p)
Roommate 4 bedroom house have
your own room for only 35/month
plus V 4 utilities 2 airconditioners. Call
Phil or Kerry 392-1681 376-0802.
(C-lt-165-p)
One male graduate roommate. Share
VP 2BR apt. carpet, ac, pool COLOR
TV. SSO/mo. + utilities. Start
September Call 378-0503.
(C-lt-165-p)
I J
Highly qualified secretary for
builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job. Many
company benefits. Salary open. Only
thoroughly qualified persons need
apply. Phone 376-2444 days or
372-8576 evenings. (E-164-3t-p)
WANTED COCKTAIL
WAITRESSES! Must be 21 yrs of
age. No experience necessary. Full or
part time. Apply Dubs 4560 NW
13th. St. Ask for Mr. Thomas.
(E-159-7t-p)
4 year old & 8 year old subjects with
normal vision needed in visual
research. $3.00 per hour. Call
392-3031 Visual Sciences Lab.
(E-Bfc-159)
Giant Slide Opening Soon Need Male
and Female Help Full and Part Time
Contact Marvin Julius. 372-6232 or
475-5771. (E-3t-163-p)
1 PERSONAL
>;
Bargains slalom ski, bike, clocks,
clothes (size 10), scarves, patterns,
records, books, card table, towels,
purse, grill, all cheap! 376-8524 BK
(J-2t-164-p)
Dial 378*5600 and hear an electronic
factorial. Any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-Bt-158-P)
I LOST A FOUNiD *1
W HIWWiH 880 M i
Found at Quik Save: Navy Peters
jacket, size 36L. Call 378-1001 or
come by Quik Save and identify
initials to claim. (L-3t-nc-p)
P SERVICES 1
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)



Snakes, Hawk Pets For Student

A South American Hawk, three snakes and the
son of a Hungarian refugee share an unusual student
life style in a landbound housboat here.
Bela DeMeter, 22, feels the animal decor of his
houseboat habitat is uniquely appropriate for a
Navy veteran studying zoology at UF.
The snakes are living accessories, built into
tropical cabinets in the safari-styled main room. The
patterned skins of the 7-foot python, and a 4-foot
boa constrictor form a kaleidoscope in the glassed
habitat, focal point for the room.
A tiny Eastern diamondback rattlesnake is
isolated in a book shelf case.
Their setting is zebra plush upholstery, primitive
leathers and woods, collected during Belas overseas
tour with the U.S. Navy.
The large Dominican Republic Red Hawk guards
the silvery sun deck roof of the unusual student
pad. DeMeter is training the hawk to hunt rabbits.
The snakes are just clean, carefree and
decorative pets, conversation pieces, he said. Girls
seem to like reptiles. ;
He currenlyt walks the hawk around campus,
where the hawk and coeds are mutually fascinated,

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but apprehensive.
DeMeter wears a gauntlet to protect his arm from
nearly two-inch-long talons. A local leather shop
donated the protective garment. No hood seems
necessary for the large bird, which is less volatile
than the faster falcon.
DeMeter considers the snakes excellent pets.
You dont even have to feed them in the winter,
and there is little mess. The hawk, I wouldnt advise
for kids. They could get hurt with him, he
explained.
All of the animals on DeMeters ark are from the
Underground Zoo, an animal import service run by
a fellow zoology student at UF.
For a while, DeMeter kept the zoos lion, when
the collection and its proprietor were evicted from
their home.
I put the lion in a shed, but pretty soon the
neighbors complained. Seems they dig the hawk
more than the liofi, DeMeter mused.
As for the trailer courts management, he said,
Well, they only say no dogs allowed. lions arent
much like dogs.
Nor are hawks and exotic snakes.

I H|£hl
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MB
finin' I 1 i I, 1 I i)i 1 ii 1
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ZOOLOGY STUDENT BELA DeMETER
.. plays with pet snake at his houseboat

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Friday, August 8,1989, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

l The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8,1968

AS ADDED CuAtami Bo+uU,, THE ITEMS AND PRICES IN THIS
ad WILL BE EFFECTIVE THRU WEDNESDAY NOON
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Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8, 1969

Prof Lecturer Discusses
Existence Os Child Myths

A College of Education professor cited for
outstanding teaching said Tuesday that, Its
amazing how many myths still exist in child
development.
Dr. Betty Siegel, assistant professor in the
Department of Foundations and one of three
university professors recently cited by a student
committee for superior teaching, presented her
remarks to an audience of about 150 at a summer
faculty lecture.
Three of the most prevalent myths include:
That We anticipate that the child will march
to the same drummer as we march to. Explaining,
she said children come into the world with their
own bent toward individuality and are not
passive.
That a child gets ready for school or the first
day of September of his sixth year. Recent studies
have shown children in the first grade to be five
years apart in reading ability, Mrs. Siegel
commented.
That learning must be drudgery. This is an
obsolete, 40-year-old idea, she said.
Its ridiculous when we teach a child to be
receptive rather than actively involved, she said.


Prof Pre-Judgment Serious,
Author Tells 200 Educators

A well-known social psychologist told an
audicence of about 200 educators at UF this week
that pre-judging the ability of students has serious
implications.
Dr. Robert Rosenthal, Harvard University
professor and author of Pygmalion in the
Classroom, spoke at the opening day session of the
College of Education's Innovations in Elementary
Education Conference.
Explaining his research and widely-read book,
Rosenthal said his work has led him to the belief
that if a teacher expects a student to do well, the
student will bloom intellectually.
However, he said, if a teacher believes at the
outset that a student will do poorly the student
likely will.
Rosenthal's study concerned itself with
California school children who were selected at
random.
The following fall we went back to the teachers
and told them these children we chose would have
an intellectual spurt within the next school year,
Rosenthal said.
Every one of them did.

SG Surveying Use Os Trains

In an effort to prevent
elimination of passenger trains in
Gainesville, Student Government
is conducting a survey to see
how many students, professors
and UF personnel take trains to
or from Gainesville.
A request for the elimination
of the trains was made by
Seaboard Coastline Railroad Co.
to the Florida Public Service
Commission. If granted,
passenger trains would be
eliminated not only from
Gainesville but also from
surrounding towns.
Students wishing to
participate in the survey may
Miller-Brownl
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NORTH OF btfjl
THE MALL
T 76-4552 authorized
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Open til 7 p.m. nightly

AT EDUCATION TALK

contact Ralph Glatfelter at
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If SG acquires a sufficient list
of users, a statement may be
presented at the next Public

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Michelob on draft Vu
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Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager \/
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What are we doing to creativity?
We want a child to be creative but still operate
on our own terms, she said.
Commenting on the role of the father in child
development, Mrs. Siegel said research has
established that higher achieving boys tend to come
from homes with warm, supportive fathers, while
lower achieving boys tend to come from homes with
cold, distant fathers.
On down the line, she continued, the role of
the father is extremely important.
She suggested this is the reason for the great
number of under-achieving, culturally deprived
black students since young boys, seeing their
fathers who have never had any dignity, pick up this
self-concept.
Mrs. Siegel explained that teachers can be
extremely helpful in combatting this lack of
adequacy in children by trying to be more
friendly.
Correcting a hair bow. winking at a child or
asking to borrow a child's pencil can do an
enormous amount of good, she said. A day
shouldn't go by without the teacher touching a
child either emotionally or physically .


On the other hand, he said the children not
expected to show any special gain were noted less
favorably by the teachers at the end of the year.
Switching to the teaching of children in ghetto
schools, Rosenthal suggested that if teachers werent
so pessimistic the children could learn and progress.
Quoting American Psychological Association
President Kenneth Clark, Rosenthal said, The
plain, sad truth is that teachers teaching these kids
just don't think these kids can get it.
One study involving the Head Start program
randomly picked half of the children and told the
teachers those picked were smart while the other
half were said to be dull, commented Rosenthal.
As with the Pygmalion study, these
classifications had no basis in fact, he emphasized.
The results of the Head Start study showed that
77 per cent of the children randomly classified as
smart did learn as compared to only 13 per cent
of those classified as dull.
Rosenthal said these findings lead to the
conclusion that V. .if you treat a man what he
ought to be and could be, he will become what he
ought to be and could be.

Service Commission meeting,
scheduled Aug. 19 at the
Gainesville courthouse. The
meeting will be open to the
public.

JU Prexy To Speak I
At Aug. Exercises
The president of Jacksonville University. Dr. Robert Harry II
Spiro Jr., will speak at summer quarter commencement |
exercises Aug. 30. jl
The announcement was made by Fred Cantrell, dean of ||
University Relations and Development and coordinator for II
commencements. jl
Spiro will be the first speaker since the university changed to 1
a format of ceremonies at the end of each academic quarter ||
rather than an annual graduation program. I
President of Jacksonville University since 1964, Spiro received II
the bachelor of science degree from Wheaton University in II
Illinois and the doctors degree from the University of ||
Edinburgh in Scotland. He also attended the University of
North Carolina and Union Theological Seminary. j|
The processional for commencement will begin at 6:40 p.m. I
and the program at 7 p.m. on Florida Field. In case of inclement 11
weather, the ceremonies will be transferred to Florida Gym. jl
Candidates for degrees who plan to participate in |
commencement exercises will meet Thursday, Aug. 19, at 4 |
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o
New: Scholar, Professor

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the second part of a
two-part series on Dr. Melvyn New, assistant
professor of the English department.)
By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Dr. New finished his doctoral dissertation in
, 1966 at Vanderbilt, but it had not finished with
him. The manuscript has had to be re prepared and
sent around, for criticism, possible publication, and
publication.
Now he is on the final step reading galley
proofs for Laurence Sterne as Satirist: A Reading
of Tristram Shandy, published by the University
of Florida Press and scheduled for release this fall.
Im beginning to feel Ill never escape that
thing, says New of his dissertation.
But it has made him an authority, and he is now
general editor of definitive editions of Sternes
works. His advisory board and other editors is an
international group of scholars. The editions, also to
be published by the University of Florida Press will
demand his attentions for the next five or more
years.
Where to then? Sam Johnson. Johnson was
one of the only 18th Century authors essays,

plays, poetry, satire who aid
not depend on patronage for his
support.
As a scholar of the 18th
Century New does not believe
ideas become obsolete with the
passing of time. These works
are not good just because theyre
old. There was hack work then
just as there is now, but the ones
I teach have lasted because they
have something to say to people.
They continued to be read.
One kind of literature course
he objects to. The professor
starts out the class without a
reading list because next weeks
now book wont be published
till next week. Students dont
need help to understand this
years books, he said. A
professor doesnt have to give
the student anything to get them
into the works. The books arent
chosen because theyre art, but
because the professor agrees
with the authors ideas, or he

Wishbone
There s a new Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Store at
704 S. W. 2nd Avenue or 16th Ave. at S. Mam Street

Society Film
Opens Tonight
How does one make it in the
business world? Robert Morse
does it as an untalented and
unemployed business executive
when the Cinema Society
presents How to Succeed in
Business without Really Trying
in the Reitz Union Auditorium
tonight and Saturday, 7 and 9.
Morse stars as J. Pierpont
Finch, a little known
businessman who rises to
fortune as his firms executive
with the help of his attractive
secretary (Michele Lee). Finch
succeeds J.B. Biggley (Rudy
Vallee) as the companys
advertising manager, but
manages to fall in love with the
office secretary.

knows the author.
University courses of this kind are artificially
creating modem classics. Will it fool time? No.
When New argues his point with colleagues, he
says, It s amazing how fast the discussion gets
down to philosophy.
What does he expect from students? Well, what
I like from students is a serious attention to
literature, and an acceptance of the difference
between students and teachers: the teachers have
something to teach and the students have something
to learn.
Student independence is talked up a lot, as a
right to differ from the professor. To me,
independence is a student learning to work by
himself, to make the grade, not by playing the
teacher along, but by mastering the material. This is
real independence of thought.
One thing bothers him about todays intellectual
climate. Inattention to dress used to be a mark of
the intellectual. Now the people wearing the label
intellectual go around in costume. It seems to me
that something must be wrong.

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The Florida Players' summer project, "The Birthday Party/'playing
tonight and Saturday at 8. Directed by James Lauricella of the Speech
Department, the play is Pinter's first full length drama.
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Friday, August 8,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8,1969

; ; : ..
Y Hifl W | h : 'S^VjSBr
. ggg&jgp^i
* t ,' - 1 >,MI. H ,/ //'
m^', *'f X X-jL jg^A aa-lv _ -'* ?V -*X 'V'Y*' ie %t -X
J$ jfl | x.
Harold Pinters 'Birthday Party At Constans Theater Staged By Florida Players

WEAK SCRIPT ONLY FAULT

Birthday Party Played Well

By IRA LEE RIDDLE
Alligator Correspondent
Playing to a near capacity
audience in the Constans
Theatre, Harold Pinters The
Birthday Party opened to a
rousing welcome Wednesday
night. The play will continue
through Saturday night, with
performances at 8 p.m.
The play suffers from one
important weakness: its script.
The Birthday Party is not one of
Pinters stronger plays; it lapses
in both the dialogue and action.
Combatting this weakness is a
strong cast, which does a most
creditable job.
Strongest performance of
opening night was turned in by
Dan Jesse, who played McCann,
a cool, well-dressed, member of
the Organization, an unnamed
group of people hunting for
Stanley, a defector of a year
past. At least, this is what the
dialogue says. Both McCann dftd
Goldberg represent all that is
oppressive in the world, dressed
up in their finery, full of
compliments, with the knife
hidden away.
In tandem, McCann and
Goldberg (Richard Council)
were very effective. By himself,
Goldberg sometimes lacked
believability. At other times,
Councils portrayal was quite
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poise somewhere along the line.
Stewart Soloman played
Stanley, the hunted man. He
tells a lot of his personal history,
but it, like Goldbergs
revelations, are to be taken with
much salt. The character was
weak at the start of the play, but
became stronger as the evening
progressed.
Eileen Drillick was acceptable
as Lulu in the first two acts, but
did not seem believable in the
final act. Her anger was much
too forced.
Rounding out the cast were
Lou Tally as Petey and Joan
Mueller as Meg, who both were
excellent. Petey comes on quite
strongly at the end, while Meg
was strong throughout the play.
Overall, the play is quite well
done, even though it is a hard
play to do. The set was as good
as any this reviewer has seen,
ahd kudos must also go to Lou
Tally for his audip
accompaniment.
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MARKED BY DRAMA
Once Upon ATime
By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
To characterize Once upon a Time in the West in a single
adjective: dramatic.
Sergio Leones earlier Clint Eastwood westerns were characterized
by excellent music, and acting, and imaginative plots. Once upon a
Time is better still than they were, on all points.
Leone spent a year researching the movie before he made it,
gathering authentic flavor and color of the times in America, then
shot the movie in Spain, adding red Spanish dirt to match the Wests
characteristic baked clay look. The costuming, too, looks authentic.
And it is chosen for its drama. The long riding raincoats wrap and
tangle around the long legs of the spooky killers in the first scene; the
bright expanse of the desert is behind them, and the cry of the ever
present wind is in your ears. The mechanical screeching of the
windmill grates on your nerves as you wait and the bad guys wait.
Then comes the confrontation, and a first line of dialogue like youve
never heard before.
Charles Bronson delivers the line which is very mysterious until
the conclusion of the movie explains the reason for it and all his
lines with superb style; it seems natural and easy, but dramatic effect
is driving his performance. Theres some very nice photography
connected with the portrayal of this character.
Jason Robards, quick witted and perceptive, not only good, but
clever with his gun, does a great job. His dialogue highlights the
psychological values of the movie.
Henry Fonda as the killer and real villain also performs with great
finesse and interesting touches.
The way these characters become involved with each other is

wonderfully integrated the
plot proceeds from the
characters of the characters,
which is essential to
believability, to good quality,
and to suspense.
All stems from two men, who

are related by the railroad. One of them sets the story rolling years
before the movie takes it up with an imaginative cruelty that he
perpetrates on a young boy. Another man complicates it by bringing
home a whore to mother his children.
Then the railroad brings them together and the movie begins. With
the whine of the windmill, howl of the wind, and the creak of a
slowly opening door. The scene is set. Youre caught up, and not put
down till the end of the movie.
Why does Leone seek to be dramatic, intriguing, exciting,
interesting? Why is it the values of the human beings in the story, not
a didactic purpose, which moves the story along? Why are his
characters unusual, not people you meet every day of your fife? He
seems to have a romantic theory of art.
Says Henry Fonda, Leone never plays a scene without a reason.

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ADVERTISERS I

Movie Times
>tten good
ffi) mediocre 0 excellent
________

Center I Peter Pan and The Horse with the
Flying Tail. Peter Pan, the main feature, is an
enchanting animated cartoon in lovely color. A
happy thing and well done, after the heart of any
one young at heart. 2:10,4:38,7:06,9:34.
Center II Romeo and Juliet. Zeffirellis
highly rated production of Shakespeares much
cherished play. Young Romeo and Juliet are
played by lauded young actors. 2:03,4:32,7:01,
9:40.0
Florida-Che, with Omar Sharif and Jack
Palance. Made by the makers of The Detective
and The Boston Strangler has inspired anger from
both wings of political spectrum. 1:30, 3:30,
5:30,7:30,9:30.
Gainesville Drive-In Rascal, a Disney story
of boy, pet and family. 8:47. Savage Land with
George C. Scott and Barry Sullivan. 10:32.
Plaza I Once Upon a Time in the West.

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Friday, August 8,1969, Thu Florida AlHgstur,

Good acting, good music, good story and great
dramatics by a man who really understands the
romance of the West, not a celluloid version of it.
Stars: Henry Fonda, Jason Robards and Claudia
Cardinale. Charles Bronson plays The Man
wonderfully well. 2:29,5:46,9:03.
Plaza II Popi. Alan Atkin stars in this
one hes one of the greatest actors around, and
the previews promise an exicting, strong story.
1:39,3:43,5:47,7:54,10:00.
. *
Suburbia Drive-In Mad Doctor of Blood
Island, 8:52,11:45. Blood Demon. 10:27.
Union How to Succeed in Business Without
Really Trying, with Robert Morse, Rudy Vallee,
Michelle Lee. Tonight and Saturday, 7 and 9.
Ashes and Diamonds. Movie from the Polish film
renaissance bares the conflict of idealism and
instinct in a young resistance fighter who
assassinates the wrong men at the end of World
War 11. Sunday, 7 and 9.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 8, 1969

K x \ %
||||| W
Magazine Features
Gators Tannen
This years Gator representative on the Playboy All-American
football team is defensive back Steve Tannen.
The Gators No. 22 is featured in Septembers issue of Playboy
magazine in a half-page color picture with 10 other defensive players,
including Auburns Dave Campbell, Tennessees Steve Kiner and
Mississippis Glenn Cannon.
This marks the sixth straight season that UF has placed a member

on the Playboy squad. Last year
Larry Smith and Guy Dennis
were selected by Playboy
sportswriter Anson Mount.
Smith was also on the Playboy
team in 1966.
Tannen, a 6-foot-2 senior
from Miami, also played offense
during spring training.
About the only other august
thing Mount did for UF was to
name defensive tackle Jim
Hadley to the Souths top player
list. He predicted a 3-7 season
and last place in the
Southeastern Conference for the
Gators.
For Florida, 1969 will be a
year of reconstruction, he said.
Lack of depth, coupled with
injuries, proved the downfall of
last autumns promising squad,
and most of the key players have
graduated. Depth is still a
problem, so injuries, if they
occur, will be more devastating
than ever. It will be difficult for
a y oung and thin squad to
survive the rigors of a
particularly rough schedule.
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No Unbeatables In Softball

Gresham Drugs puts little
faith in that old adage that a
rose by any other name is still a
rose. They took the Unbeatables
to task last week, ignored the
obvious, and came out on the
long end of an eight-inning, 6-5
decision.
Greg Eppleman was the long
stem who trimmed the
intramural softball aces with the
unbeatable name. Eppleman had
a perfect day in three trips, in
addition to scoring the tying
run.
Seven teams still have a shot
at the bracket championships
with one week to go. In other

Color Gator Athletics Red

Who would have believed the Year of the
Gator could have fallen any further than it did
before Georgias 51-point barrage. But, apparently it
has.
The UF athletic program operated in the red
about $25,000 worth last year, Norm Carlson,
assistant to the athletic director, said Tuesday.
Carlson said the switch from the trimester to the
quarter system plus increased costs per scholarship
for athletes led to the deficit. The athletic
department had a profit of more than $170,000 in

diamond action, the Mighty
Burners, paced by Marty Gartell,
upset the Latin Club, 8-1.
Reid Hall mauled the
Marauders, 11-0, and the Meats
walked over the Pedagogs, 11-0.
Meats victory ties them for
eighth place in the bracket.
Other league action saw the
Old Timers fall before the
College Kids, 11-1; the
Subterraneans defeat the Reds,
8-1; ENE down the DTs, 12-0;
the WASPs thump Delta Chi,
74; and the Tallywhackers crush
Georgia Seagle, 164.
The Nameless Wonders held
onto their first place grip in

1967. Its annual budget is near $2 million.
Ray Daniel, athletic business manager, said the
audit" for the fiscal year closing June 30 is not
complete and that the final figures may be smaller
than $25,000.
Carlson said the Southeastern Conference
authorized 10 additional scholarships for athletes
which UF used.
Carlson said there would be some re-examination
to see where costs might be trimmed but he also
said that UF was not going to cut back its program.

intramural basketball last week
behind the hot hand of ex-Gator
guard Mike Leatherwood.
Leatherwood, whose name is
more, rather than less known by
UF basketball followers, tossed
in 12 points to lead NW by the
Boston Celtics twice, 15-8 and
15-9.
Corry Village soured the
Sweet Papas, 15-2 and 15-13 to
stay abreast NW in league
standings. Meanwhile, around
the league, MICX had to go the
distance to beat Chi Phi, 18-16,
13-15, and 15-10; and the
Guzzlers outran the Directors,
15-11.