Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Prexy Names
'Action Council
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has appointed 30 members to a
newly formed council which follows in the footsteps of the Action
Conference.
The Presidents Advisory Council, patterned after the Action
Conference, will be smaller and will take up problems which the
conference failed to reach, OConnell said.
I believe this council, being smaller than the 75-member
conference, can function more efficiently, OConnell said in a letter
to the new members.
Membership on the new council will be split between students,
faculty and administrators.
Students appointed to the council included Caron Balkany, a
member of the Action Conference; Michael Hill, SG secretary of
finance; Jim Hollis, also a member of the former conference; Larry
Jordan, SG secretary of minority affairs; Linda Roberts, SG secretary
of the interior; James Royal, an agriculture student; Kathy Ruppel, a
student senator; Jeff Smith, former SG secretary of academic affairs;
Donald Tucker, president of the Benton Engineering Council; and
Steve Zack, president of the Interfratemity Council.
Faculty members named to the new council are Dr. Benjamin
Barger, an infirmary psychologist; Dr. Harold Clark, professor of
agriculture economics; Hugh Cunningham, professor of journalism;
Dr. Robert Gaither, chairman of the mechanical engineering
department; Michael Cordon, professor of law; Dr. John Greenmen,
professor of agriculture; Dr. Hal Lewis, professor of education; Dr.
Ruth McQuown, professor of political science; Dr. John OConnell,
professor of chemical engineering; and Dr. Joseph Perry, professor of
economics.
The ten administrators named to complete the 30-member council
were Dr. Edmund Ackell, provost of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center;
Dr. Frederick Conner, vice president for academic affairs; Dr. Manning
Dauer, chairman of the political science department; William E.
Elmore, vice president for business affairs; Dr. L. E. Grinter, executive
vice president; Dr. Lester L. Hale, vice president for student affairs;
Dr. William Jones, chairman of the chemistry department; Walter
Matherly, physical planning director; Joseph Sabatella, assistant dean
of the College of Architecture and Fine Arts; and Dr. E. T. York Jr.,
provost for agriculture.

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Resident O'Connell
... appoints council

STUDENTS WORK ABRO
UF Center Builds Latin Projects
$ 1 %

>: (EDITORS NOTE: This is the second ot
three articles about the UF Center for Latin
American Studies. It deals with center
* projects in Latin America.)
5
:j:j By JOHN SUGG
I; Alligator Associate Editor
S
Whether merely to lend a helping hand or
to act as an exporter of the American way of
life, UFs Center for Latin American Studies,
one of the four largest of 106 such centers in
the United States, is involved in a variety of
jij: overseas projects.
Center Assistant Director Raymond J.
X; Toner said one of the main,areas of UF
involvement is in Cali, Colombia.
Under a $230,000 Rockefeller
Foundation grant, UF and the Universidad
del Valle are participating in a joint program
in Cali. The arrangement provides for
participation of faculty and students of both
i$ institutions in the multidisciplinary research
project into problems of metropolitan Cali.
Three UF professors participating in this
project are Dr. Irving L. Webber, sociology
professor; Dr. Cornelis Goslinga, visiting

In his letter to the new members,
OConnell outlined several topics
which the council should
consider.
Included in his suggested
topics were an improvement of
the honor system, controlling
the use of drugs and recruitment
of qualified disadvantaged
students.
Lewis, who served as
chairman of the Action
Conference was asked to head
the councils organizational
meeting in the fall.
The Action Conference,
which operated for less than a
year, formed 10 task forces to
investigate areas such as
curriculum, freedom of
expression, conduct, minority
(SEE 'NEW' PAGE 2)

professor of Latin American studies, and Dr.
James C. Dixon, psychology professor.
Another project in Cali is a demographic
study under the direction of Webber and a
graduate student recently returned to UF,
Selwyn Hollingsworth.
The project results, to be published in
Spanish and English, will contain studies of
population growth and trends since 1905.
Additional projects in Cali include the
establishment of a sociology department and
school of nursing at the Universidad del
Valle.
A linguistics study in Bolivia and Peru by
Dr. Martha J. Hardman de Bautista, UF
associate professor of anthropology, hopes
to prepare a dictionary of the Aymara
language, spoken by more than one million
natives.
Toner said the linguist will return to UF
in fall, bringing two native Aymara speakers
with her as teaching assistants.
Dr. Hugh Popenoe, director of the UF
Center for Tropical Agriculture, a related
program of the Center for Latin American
Studies, said his center is also engaged in a

The j
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 164

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RAIN OR SHINE

Some people love football so much that nothing,
not even a cold North Florida drizzle, can keep
them away from an All-Star game. It's difficult to
say whether these fans, some of the nearly 8,000 at
Saturday night's game, are unhappy over the rain or

FINAL BUDGET WRAPPED UP
Student Senate Chops
17 Requests To SO.OO

See Editorial, Page Four
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Managing Editor
After four weeks of hacking
away at organizational funds
requests, the Student Senate
Thursday night put the final
wcaps om its budget by cutting
to zero the student fee resources
of 17 special interest groups.
The senate took up 51

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

wide range of projects. jjjj
There are several specific contracts in jjjj
Guyana, Jamaica, Costa Rica and other jjjj
places for development of crop diversity and jjj:
livestock production, Popenoe said. jjjj
Two large grants, Popenoe added, are jjj
from the Ford Foundation to improve jjj
livestock production in Latin America and jjj
from the U.S. Office of War on Hunger to jjj
bring together data on livestock production, jjj:
Popenoe said his center had recently jjj:
completed a bioenvironmental feasibility j:j:
study for a proposed canal in jjj:
Panama or Colombia. j|
The study was to determine if nuclear
devices used in excavation would greatly j:j:
affect agriculture. The results showed, jjj:
Popenoe said, that the greatest threats were $
to the fishing industry. jjj:
The research we do is relevant to Florida jjj:
agricultural systems, Popenoe said. The jjj;
benefits will be both ways. jjj;
Toner said additional overseas projects jjj;
and research is carried on by doctoral :j:j
candidates in Latin American studies who jjjj
(SEE'LATIN'PAGE 2) jjj:
$:

separate group budget requests
this session. Almost all received
less than expected. A few were
expanded.
Majority Leader Marc H.
Click, a champion of the
senates actions during the long
budget battles this summer,
explained that of the 17 groups
whose budgets were chopped, 14
had never been funded
previously.

because of bad fortune for their favorite team.
Many fans showed long faces at game's end. But
then wouldn't anybody? After all, two hours in
the rain, and the game comes out tied!!! That's a
little too much ... See details, page 12.

Tuesday, August 5, 1969

They were created solely for
the purpose of gleaning funds
from the student body, he said.
All groups cut fell into the
category of special interests.
This was the best budget
ever for 20,000 people, he
continued, the student activity
fee is for the entire campus
community, not for just a few of
its members.
Glick explained that in past
years, for example, the senate
had spent as much as $45,000 to
fund out of state trips for
groups.
Coupled with this were costs
for in-state junkets which
brought the total to $75,000 for
transportation and related
expenses.
This was 3214 per cent of
what we had to budget, he said,
and only 500 students, or two
and a half per cent of the
student body, were reaping the
benefits.
Further complicating the
budget sessions this year was the
fact that more than $500,000 in
requests were submitted, but the
senate had only $290,000 to
work with.
Only three projects or
organizations funded last year
were not given any money this
time. They are Florida Blue
Keys Dialogue and the Second
100 series plus the Debate
Society.
The senate also combined
UFs three singing groups, the
Mens and Womens Glee Clubs
and the University Choir, into
(SEE 'FINAL'PAGE 2)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 5,1969

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GATOR GIRL DOUGCASE
Today's smiling Gator coed is Dicca Lethan, a junior majoring in
public relations. A staff writer for this terrific newspaper that
periodically offers female charms for your viewing pleasure, Diana is
from Jacksonville.

Final Budget Approved

f FROM PA6E ONE
one budget request and then gave
them their money with the
requirement that there will be
no more trips or tours after this
year.
The overall philosophy
behind this summers budget
sessions, Cdick said, was to fund
those projects reaching the most
students and not to fund, groups
whose interests were generally

New Council Named

Pfrom PAGE
groups and the universitys goals.
The Conference was plagued
with problems from outside the
university as well as from within
the group.

Latin American Studies Made

pROM PAGE ONE^
are required to spend at least six
months in Latin America.
Currently, five doctoral

THE QUARTERLY HAS ARRIVED!!

TFIK FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

singular in purpose or geared
toward a select section of the
campus.
Click cited the Gator Loan
Fund, Intramurals, Campus
Improvements, Accent and
Student Government
Productions as examples of
projects using student body
funds to the advantage of every
student.
He pointed out that the
SIO,OOO given to the Gator Loan

Last fall, a member of the
U.S. House of Representatives
called for the resignation of the
chairman, Maj. Russell Ramsey.
He said the conference was
hippy-oriented.
Ramsey refuted the charges
but did resign.

candidates have worked on the
Cali projects. Russell Ramsey,
former ROTC instructor and
Action Conference chairman,
will be a sixth, going to
Colombia in January.

SG Student Service Office
Plans Recreation Facilities

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Construction is slated to
begin in September on four
handball courts and two tennis
courts as part of a far-reaching
Student Government recreation
and beautification program.
SGs Office of Student
Services is also planning a
renovation of Ravine Park, a
Christmas and summer
employment referral system, a
baby-sitting program and an
architects design for a proposed
amplii theatre. <*
The new handball courts will
be built on Broward Field and
the tennis courts built behind
Hume Hall. Howard Lubel,
secretary of student services,
said the funds for the courts are
already allocated but final
approval will come from the
campus land use committee
report in August.
Lubel said improvements of
Ravine Park, located north of
the Reitz Union, will be aimed
at creating another Plaza of the
Americas. Also, the area
between Anderson Hall and the
College Library will be paved
and landscaped this fall.
Employers such as hotels,
department stores and camps are

Fund will bring an additional
$90,000 in federal matching
money for student loans.
The 14 other groups not
funded were: Agriculture
Council, Agriculture Engineers,
Livestock Judging Team, Meat
Judging Team, Association
Political Science Graduates,
Council of International
Organizations, John Marshal!
Bar Association and Law
Review'.
Others are Law School
Recruitment Council. Phi Alpha
Theta, Sigma Alpha Eta, Student
Physical Therapy Association.
U F Masters of Bus i ness
Administration and Veterans
Club.

CRANE IMPORTS

being sent letters and forms by
the student services office in an
effort to find vacation
employment for students.
Employers answering the letters
will be sent names and resumes
of students requesting such
employment.
A baby-sitting service will go
into operation next week. By
calling SG or the Unions
activities desk, a student will be
referred to one of 25
baby-sitters listed by SG. The
charge will be up to the
individual baby-sitter.
Student services is having
several UF architecture students
plan designs for the performing
arts amphitheatre. The $400,000
amphitheatre is proposed as part
of the new activities center. The
open-air theatre will be
NSA Confab
Reps Elected
Larry Jordan, secretary of
minority affairs for Student
Government, placed first in
Thursdays U.S. National
Student Association (NSA)
delegate election.
Out of a total of 502 votes
cast, Jordan led wit h 95.
Each voter had the
opportunity to vote for a slate
of five persons to attend the
convention.
Other delegates to the El
Paso, Texas, convention Aug.
19-29 are Kathy Spellman, Bill
Armstrong, Henry Solarcs and
George Seide. Robert Cusumano
will be an alternate delegate.
Therapy Funded
The D epait men t of
Occupational Therapy in the
College of Health Related
Professions has received a federal
award ol 520.007 for curriculum
support.
This is the department's
fourth consecutive annual award
from the Children's Bureau of
the Department of Health,
Education and Welfare.

constructed on the embankment
between Tolbert Hall and Flavet
Village 111.
Lubel said SG will publish a
pamphlet this fall listing the
services the National Student
Association offers. Student
Government joined NSA in July.
Services for students include a
life insurance program, record
and book clubs, low-cost travel
programs and computerized job
services.
The student services office is
also looking into the feasibility
of a minature golf course, a
driving range and a cooperative
food staples store.
(g
TURN
OFF
SUMMER
9
auto air conditioning
FIRST...and still
eostt ft* s than factory air
GODDING & CLARK
MOTORS
2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E.
378-2311
OPEN 8 P.M. MON.-SAT.



Campus Renovation Nil

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the last of a
three-part series about handicapped students at
UF.)
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The states largest health complex is located
on campus the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center yet persons in wheelchairs and on
crutches lack access to parts of the UF campus
because of physical barriers.
This situation was aptly compared Friday as
being ridiculous by Dr. Clifford Lelanc, vice
president for student affairs at Santa Fe Junior
College (SFJC).
He said the junior college is student oriented'
enough to recognize the problems of the
handicapped and to help them in every way
possible so they can participate in the college
program.
SFJC is located in downtown Gainesville in a
building formerly used as a high school, which is
similar to Peabody and Anderson Halls at UF.
The second floors are inaccessible to the
handicapped.
Despite this problem of access, the junior
college has made it possible for qualified
handicapped students to finish the first two years
of their education at the institution.
A recent example of the ability of the
handicapped to prosper at SFJC and not at UF,
was the case of the rheumatic arthritic student
who graduated from the junior college but
couldnt survive a quarter of physical barriers
here.
As far as getting funds for renovating the UF
campus, We have never received funds for this
purpose, and Congress hasnt any funds
available for this purpose now, Director of
Physical Planning Walter Matherly said Friday.
Matherly contacted the Vocational
Rehabilitation Administration in Washington
Friday and was told that because of the present
administrations austerity program, there are no
funds available for this purpose.
He said UF shouldnt let a project like this
drop. But he wasnt sure about renovating the
campus at this time. This could be done on a
piecemeal basis, maybe.
Also, Matherly suggested that requests for the
handicapped should originate at the

Hiroshima Rally Set Wednesday
A rally in remernbrance of the twenty-fourth anniversary of the
atomic bombing of Hiroshima, Japan, will be held Wednesday at noon
in the Plaza of the Americas. Sponsored by Student Peace Union, the
rally hopes to build support for fall anti-war mobilizations.
MATERNITY BERMUDAS
(A Bermuda Riot)
WHEN YOU PURCHASE THE
FIRST PAIR OF EQUAL VALUE
at OUR REGULAR LOW PRICE.
Use
Bank
Americard
' Master
//. Hours "V Charge
f 9: V
56 W. Univ. Ave. Cen,,al
ne 372-3805 / c "* r e
ianta Fe Jr. College

=UF REMAINSHANDICAPPED

departmental level with on
campus putting feelers out for obtaining sources
for funding a project of this type.
Dr. Bruce Thomason, chairman of
rehabilitation counseling in the College of Health
Related Professions said it has been five or six
years since there has been an effort here to get
funds for removing physical barriers.
He said he would be willing to serve on a
committee to study away for obtaining funds
for renovating the campus.
However, he said this coming year is not the
time for renovating the campus because of the
austerity program in Congress.
A possibility, which Thomason said always
exists, is that a large philanthropic organization
might be interested in renovating the Florida
campus on an experimental basis.
He said this should be looked into along with
trying to get funds from the federal and state
governments.
The University of Missouri in 1959, received a
five-year grant from the U.S. Vocational
Rehabilitation Administration for renovating its
campus.
Missouri now has a bus system on campus
which carries disabled students to class. The
buses have hydraulic lifts on the back to lift and
lower wheelchair students at each stop along a
20-minute route.
Wheelchairs have electric motors so students
can more easily get to class.
The University of California in recent years
has built ramps into most of its buildings so
wheelchair students can enter buildings.
California campuses are installing lowered
telephones, special parking areas near buildings
for the handicapped, modified rest rooms, and
study cubicles for the blind.
Also, in a report made by the National
Commission on Architectural Barriers to
Rehabilitation of the Handicapped to Congress in
June, 1968, members of the commission said the
future subway system which will serve
Washington, D.C., will have facilities for the
handicapped, with no physical barriers.
Under the Vocational Rehabilitation Act as
ammended in 1965, amounts of S3OO million for
1966, $350 million for 1967, and S4OO million
for 1968 were funded for the handicapped.
According to Matherly, none of these funds
for removing physical barriers went to the UF.

TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
11AM TO 9PM
LONDON BROIL STEAK
FRENCH FRIES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD Mfc A
HOT ROLLS & BUTTER U #JL
pyr 9 1225 W. UNIV. AVE
Vi BLOCK from CAMPUS
WE HAVE SPECIALS EVERY PAY
11AM TO 9PM
MONDAY. 14 SHRIMP IN BASKET F.F, Cole Slaw
WEDNESDAY- CLAM DINNER F.F., Cole Slaw
THURSDAY- LONDON BROIL -F.F, Chopped Salad
FRIDAY- ROAST BEEF F.F.,Gole Slaw
jZatU
Jf t 1225 W. UNIV. AVE.
Vi BLOCK from CAMPUS f W
WERE NOT A GIANT CHAIN OPERATION SO WE TRY HARDER

Cubans, Radicals Fight

A Fist Fight between members
of two radical student groups
and a group of Cuban students
at a recent off-campus party sent
two students to Shands Teaching
Hospital for treatment.,
One of the students, Kurt
Garrett, told the Alligator
Sunday that he plans to seek
some kind of retribution for the
incident in which he was injured.
The party, during which
money was collected for various
projects sponsored by the
Students for a Democratic
Society and the Young Socialist
Alliance, was at the home of

I y. mrn UFs REPRESENTATIVES |
'fi V~ 7 C Jim Bartlett John Potocki
1 astc£_ George Corl Skip Lujack 1
I Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson I
1 Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Unhr. Ave. |
I NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208 I
I^EFERRE^REMm^AYME^T^^^^^^^J
Wishbones August
Special
CHICKEN QUICKIE
Two pieces of our usual
crisp and juicy fried
chicken, with a slice
of hot buttered bread.
59e
AL Wishbones
16th Ave. Store only.

Tuesday, August 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Miss Norma Munn. A group of
students, reportedly Cuban,
arrived about 8:30 the night of
the party. An argument
apparently started between the
guests and the uninvited Cubans.
The guests later told police
that one of the Cubans struck a
guest with his fist and a general
fight broke out. Someone called
the police, but by the time they
arrived, the Cubans had left.
Garrett was treated for a
ripped eardrum. Paul Sutton, a
visiting student from England,
was operated on for a broken
cheekbone.

Page 3



Page 4

t. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 5,1969

The Florida Alligator

i?*f
M
j\ mihjum

M
Will The Real Dick Nixon Please Stand Up?

The Blacks Can Do It Without Washington

Whitney Young, head of the Urban League, and
other Negro leaders keep complaining that President
Richard Nixon has done little to redeem his
campaign promise that, if elected, he would do
something to promote black capitalism.
Their disillusionment is understandable, and it is
echoed by Nixons adviser on voluntarism,
Richard Comuelle, who, with Secretary of Health,
Education and Welfare Robert Finch, looked
forward to considerable White House
encouragement of black capitalist projects. But
maybe it is in the nature of things that government,
as such, cant do very much for free enterprise
beyond getting off the backs of people who have
positive ideas about helping themselves.
When it comes right down to it, free-wheeling
American individuals can do a lot of things to help
the blacks make it economically without waiting
for pronouncements from the White House. Unable
to get much cooperation from Washington, Whitney
Youngs own Urban League has organized some
twenty-five street academies in New York City
ghetto areas for young people in the 16-22 age
group who have, for one reason or another, dropped
out of the public schools before getting high school
diplomas. Significantly, the Urban League has found
sponsors in private industry without waiting for
subsidies from Washington.
There is, for instance, the street academy at
2121 Eighth Avenue in Harlem, just below 115th
Street, which owes its existence to the fact that the
Urban League has persuaded Pan American World
Airways to pick up the tab for the lease of what
used to be a grocery store. Now refurnished in
bright colors, with Pan Am emblems in the front
windows, the old grocery store has, during the past
year, been school to twenty-nine students who
showed up regularly each morning for classes in
English, history, mathematics, and science. The
twenty-nine were all drop-outs from a public school
system which they found unrepresentative.
Twelve of them have just been graduated from
the street academy with certificates that qualify

The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick
Editor-in-Chief
Dave Osier
Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
Executive Editor

EDITORIAL
Set Budget Guidelines

For the past four weeks the Student
Senate has been thrashing about like a bull
in a china shop, cutting budgets to the right
and money requests to the left. But as
amazing as it may seem, there has apparently
been little permanent damage, and the final
product appears to be a fair budget.
The senate finally completed Thursday
night the difficult job of trimming the
task required more than a month of
work when it passed the last line item
money request.
We congratulate the senators on their
job.
We sat in on several of the after-midnight
meetings during which many representatives
of the clubs came to plead for their groups
existence. Most of the representatives
were courteous, some were not.
But regardless of the representatives
attitude, the senate always heard him out.
The senators were not determined to cut
a budget just for the sake of cutting it. Jim
Reinman, chairman of the budget and
finance committee, often agreed to meet

MR. EDITOR:
Briskly into the corridor steps
the Mannikin, peripheral vision
narrowly viewing the lens
focused slightly off and
scribbling hands, taking exact
notice of the time of exactly
now.
Mr. .. uh Reams,
according to lower sources of
information the masses
are Tell us how you
intendCan you say what the
consequences They hold
the largest Simply state
all.
Plastic lips purse in reflection,

them for entrance into the so-called Academy of
Transition, which will give them the equivalent of a
twelfth grade year in Spanish, history, biology,
geometry, and algebra. Once they have completed
the Academy of Transition courses they will be
eligible for the Harlem or Newark Preparatory
Schools, where they can fulfill requirements that
would automatically certify them for any one of the
thirty-six colleges that offer scholarships to
graduates of these schools.
These Days MHH
Chamb"'- I ~ : ~
The Pan Am Street Academy is run by a
dedicated black teacher named Ronald Rasdall, who
has a staff of three including himself. Just now Mr.
Rasdalls school is engaged in summer work,
which means that it is specializing in field trips.
The most interesting thing about Mr. Rasdalls
academy is that it doesnt seem to have any
disciplinary problems. Originally, a number of kids
signed up with the idea that the blue and white
classrooms inside the old grocery store would make
a good hang-out. But the loafers were quickly driven
out by the serious attitude of the twenty-nine who
really wanted to study. The rules, decided upon by
the students themselves, specify that there shall be
no smoking or eating during class, no dozing while
the teachers are talking, and no leaving the room
until class has ended. The building is kept in spotless
order by the students themselves.
' / The motivations for accepting Mr. Rasdalls
discipline are varied. One student likes the school
because of its newspaper, for which she is writing
the entertainment page. Another student entered
the school because it was the only alternative to
being held as a delinquent in the Youth House; with

The Mannikin Steps Out

considering that noble image in
the tile walls neatly arranged
about his jointed limbs. Its
Raymes, R-A-Y-M-E-S. Im sure
you are all aware that I and my
proteges are not entitled to
divulge under obligations to
my constituents however
necessitates further
consideration and will contact
at the earliest possible time.
Frenzied Fingers dash out,
R*y-m-e-s states, Control
methods are being enforced and
peace will soon be restored. Mob
rule is contrary to the heritage

her, it has been a last chance opportunity. And
for seven of the students there was the guarantee of
employment by Pan Am for the summer, and
possibly permanent airline work at a later date after
the completion of preparatory school and college
courses.
The new street academies represent rivulets in
a stream that is taking on considerable volume
without help from political Washington. Out in
Detroit, General Motors hired 15,446 of the hard
core unemployed during the last six months of
1968. Most of these are still on the GM payroll. Big
General Electric continues to encourage the black
capitalist projects of Philadelphias Reverend Leon
Sullivan by giving contracts to the Sullivan
companies and training to black capitalist
management prospects at GE Management Training
Center at Croton-on-Hudson.
Mr. Nixon might take a little of the heat off his
Administration if he would only single out
companies such as Pan Am and GE and GM for
public commendation as voluntarists who are
carrying out his hopes at a time when the war on
inflation makes it impossible for the government to
advance huge sums to set up black capitalists in
business with taxpayers reluctant money.
Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey John Sugg
Editorial Assistant Associate Editor
Gayle McElroy ~ Darcy Meeker
Copy Editor Campus Living Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
ot the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.

with the representatives the next day in an
attempt to settle problems and iron out
difficulties.
We were impressed with the sincerity of
the senate on the whole and Reinman
individually.
But no sooner did the senators take the
final action than they were told they would
have the pleasure of working on the 1970-71
budget in the fall rather than in the summer.
This year the senate adopted a number of
guidelines for budget requests, but the
problem was that the guidelines were not
announced until after the deadline for the
funds requests. If the senators will take
immediate action to again set up these
guidelines, and this time sooner, they may
avoid the headaches they had this summer.
For this reason we urge Reinman and the
leaders of the senate, along with members of
the executive branch of Student
Government, to set to work on formulating
these guidelines, and have them completed
before the term ends.
Theres no need to lead the bull back into
the china shop a second time.

of our great nation and cannot
be allowed to continue. In the
future, we will exercise every
possible precaution so that no
further incidents of this nature
can occur. 200,000
arrested nationwide
turmoil violent
uprisings Communist
inspired Fascist State Black
Power Atheist, and anything
else but.
The Mannikin was returned
to his showcase.
CYNTHIA HARTLEY



Support Spread Os Ideas, YSA Urges

MR. EDITOR:
The Young Socialist Alliance
(YSA) wishes to reply to a letter
criticizing us for having a
YSA-SDS party July 25
expressing our solidarity with
Cuba and other progressive
peoples of the world.
First the author states that
our advertisement was an
example of freedom of
expression supposedly denied to
people in Cuba. However, Huey
P. Newton, other Black Panther
Party members, the Conspiracy
Eight in Chicago, numerous
Gls and civilians in prison
because of their dissent with an
imperialist war policy and many
other imprisoned critics of the
American system are examples
of overt denial of freedom of
expression in the United States.
The author of the letter
further states that only by living
in this free country are we
lucky to be alive after doing
such subversive acts as selling
literature, openly expressing our
thoughts or having a party.
However, a few facts should be
made known to the public.

Aftermath

Mixed Economy-Capitalism ...Fascism!

In Tuesdays Alligator (July 29,
1969) John Sugg gives a dazzling
demonstration of his total mastery of
the art of argumentation by
obfuscation. The issue is, as usual,
individualism versus collectivism and
the derivative political alternative,
capitalism versus statism.
Since Sugg is an advocate of
collectivism and no rational argument
for collectivism exists, he has to resort
to some form of indirect argumentation.
The obfuscation begins before the
article, as it were, with the heading,
The Movement Left. The pretense
that policical theories can be simply
ordered, e.g., communism, socialism,
mixed economy, capitalism, fascism, has
no basis in fact or meaning.
Communism, socialism and fascism are,
in all essentials, indistinguishable; all are
variants of statism, distinguished from
capitalism.
The mixed economy, e.g.,
contemporary America, is a transient
unstable compromise between
capitalism and statism, based on
philosophical uncertainty and its
consequent, moral indecision. The linear

That Must Be Nixon"

Early in the evening on the
night of July 25, before many
people had arrived at the
YSA-SDS party, which was open
to the public and held on private
property, a group of hoodlums
came under the guise of wishing
to discuss political differences.
After ascertaining that they far
outnumbered the SDS and YSA
people present at that time, they
viciously attacked, in an
organized manner, hospitalizing
three people, two of whom may
suffer permenent injury, one to
his ear and one to his eye and
face.
The most seriously injured
was a foreign students on a
research grant from his own
university and in no way a
member of SDS or YSA. Several
others were injured and property
was destroyed.
These cowards ran before
local authorities arrived.
This group was positively
identified as consisting mostly of
Cubans but, whereas, we know
the local Cuban community
would not condone such
hooliganism, we call upon them

spectrum analogy is plainly not
conducive to conceptual clarity, but it is
not intended to be: its primary purpose
is to taint capitalism with guilt by
association with fascism, to make
capitalism appear to be, in some sense,
similar to or close to fascism. One easily
sees why the analogy is a classic among
weapons of the propagandizer for
collectivism in a semi-free culture.
Moving on to Suggs opening
paragraph (the dedication of the main
body of the article), the essential fog
factor is the same: the linear spectrum
analogy, guilty by association. The
analogy permits Sugg the pretense that
all his right-wing opponents are
essentially similar.
The views expressed by myself and
others in support of individualism are
supposed to be discredited by guilt by
Suggs association of our names with
that of Jimmey Bailey, a racist and,
hence, another collectivist. But just as
fascism and socialism are essentially
similar and distinguished from
capitalism, it is not Sugg versus Bailey
and Osteen, but Sugg and Bailey versus
Osteen.

to publicly repudiate this
criminal element.
We also call upon the
university and Gainesville
communities to support the civil
rights of all groups to hold
meetings and disseminate ideas,
free from interference, free from
an increasingly repressive
government and free from fascist
attacks such as the July 25
attack.
This violent act will not go
unchallenged as some of the
victims intend to bring criminal
and civil legal action against
these criminals.
The Young Socialist Alliance
condemns this wanton act of
violence which was designed to
suppress and intimidate people
from exercising their democratic
rights.
On August 6, Wednesday, 12
noon, Plaza of the Americas, the
Student Peace Union will
sponsor a public observance of
the twenty-fourth anniversary of
the brutal and racist atomic
bombings of Hiroshima and
Nagasaki in which the YSA will
participate. A short talk will be
given on why the YSA supports

The utility of Jimmey Bailey to the
campus collectivists is worthy of a
digression. Basically, he is their
creation: the local straw advocate of
capitalism. If an advocate of
individualism shows up, repudiate his
views by the simple expedient of
grouping him with Bailey.
When vicious attacks on capitalism
are published in the Alligator (Sugg and
Hilliker, May 6,1969), print in the same
issue an interview with Bailey,
representing capitalism. But the
individualists need not fret overly: the
collectivists have Bailey for an easy
out, but then, we have Sugg.
Turning now to the main body of
Suggs article, one may begin to
appreciate his subtlety: he combines the
fog of substitution traditionalism
(conservatism) for capitalism with the
rare (if not novel) use of the
epistemological corollary of
guilt-by-association: innocence-by-asso innocence-by-association.
ciation. innocence-by-association.
The article is actually a crude appeal
to an unfocused mind, drifting
associationally; it consists of quotes of
early American historical figures of
stature, e.g., Lincoln and Jefferson,
among which are shuffled miscellaneous
quotes, especially of twentieth century
collectivist revolutionaries, from
Euguene Debs to H. Rap Brown to
(incredibly) Bob Dylan, folksinger. The
quotes are more or less unified by two
themes: use of the term revolution,
and anti-capitalism, the latter being
rather obviously more prevalent among
the contemporary quotes.
The line of his associational
non-argument is, basically: rights to
revolution (Lincoln); revolution to the
destruction of rights, collectivism
(Debs). Conclusion: the yippies are the
true traditionalists, the real American
patriots not the traditional
traditionalists. After all, the Founding
Fathers were revolutionaries and the
Contemporary Cruddies are
revolutionaries what further proof
could be asked?

the Cuban Revolution and
future student anti-Vietnam
war activities will be announced.
We call on all groups and
individuals to join with us in this

COST OF LIVING 1969 j

Tuesday, August 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

observance and to support the
democratic expression of ideas
by all people.
YOUNG SOCIALIST ALLIANCE

By Robert E. Osteen

The semi-conscious reader whom
Sugg addresses is expected to make the
prescribed associations via the mere
word, revolution; he is not expected
to recall that the purpose and
justification of the American revolution
was to establish a government based on
and limited by rights, while the purpose
of the contemporary collectivist
revolutions and would-be revolutions
(there is no justification of them) is to
establish a government based on brute
force, and limited by nothing.
The reader may have noticed that
Sugg's argument of innocence (or
value)-by-association contains an
implicit admission that the American
revolutionaries were right that the
argument is an attempt to steal the
virtue of individualism for collectivism,
to use individualism for the destruction
of individualism. In that case, the reader
is not measuring down to the estimate
of him implicit in Suggs argument of
obfuscation.
In fact, it is Suggs estimate of the
intelligence of his reader which mars his
monument to obfuscation. Believing the
reader to be incompetent even to make
the obvious indicated associational
links, Sugg collapses from obscure
subtlety into childish blatancy in his
closing paragraph and lets the strategy
out of the bag: he quotes the
Declaration of Independence, and
attributes the quote to American
patriots, Ho Chi Minh, and the Black
Panther Party.
LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear in the Alligator,
letters must be typed signed and
double-spaced and should not exceed 300
words in length. A writer's name may be
withheld from publication only if he
shows just cause. No letters signed with a
pseudonym will be accepted for
publication. The editor reserves the right
to edit all letters in the interest of space.
Addresses and telephone numbers must
accompany all letters.

Page 5



Page 6

Tha Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 5,1969

ECLECTIC! A COL
styles with lots of freedom for mu

Jfif ,
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Sai jh...-1' 1
~* ~ <<.i.- \ ,^ J ,l-\, r 7n V,, tT£)'\ SEAR'S
Sharon models the bell slacks in 100% wool plaid topped
with a heather-toned turtle neck sweater. For the cool
breezes a vinyl jacket in the new wet-look.

HBi
m \m n #
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S .V 1 S^g
FIGURE FAIR
What's new in sleepwear? This beautiful sleep set of daring
panels of opaque and sheer combine in fashionable nude
look. Encircling rows of Val lace join the body panel and
decorate the sleeves and hemline. Matching bikini pants.
Color ice blue. Extra-small, small, medium. Price... $9.
Modeled by Bev.

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MBEgf ffiiK^Hf
STAG AND DRAG
?& down s ssz

Mm
* ', ?
SILVERMAN'S
Start the fall off with a form-fitting sweater dress and let
your imagination run wild for accessories. The outfit is
available in purple or black. Body vest jewelry from $7.50.
Modeled by Andrea.



EGE COJLLAGE ...
h-demanded student "individuality.

W&-
mmmm m ,m v
SUSAN SCOTT
Corduroy rides the fashion range for fall with this matching
pants and vest set by Thermo Jac. Leather laces up the sides
of the Apache pants, and draws and reins on the vest front.
The vest can be worn "injun style, or let a blouse hitch a
ride. Modeled by Lynn.


...
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THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
Karen captivates fashion in the special" dress by Arpeja.
Made of rose colored simulated crepe with bell sleeves and a
cape-like effect around the shoulders, and double-tie bodice
front. A great outfit for special occasions.

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MAAS BROTHERS
Begin on the eve of new adventure by wearing a "Simply
Smashing but daringly bewitching black knit dress
imported from England. Designed by Marlborough found in
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note: ECLECTICthe most
n
often voiced adjective for
%
todays young lifestyles!
\
fashion layout by ... joyce gehrke
photography by ... aaron law

Tuesday, August 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, August 5, 1969

Page 8

Ken Megill: Growth Os A Radical Perspective

By LEESINOFF
Alligator Correspondent
Allen Levin was in my first
class and taught me more than I
taught him, says philosophy
Prof. Kenneth Megill while
discussing his development of a
radical perspective.
He says when he came to UF
he rapidly became involved in
the radical movement. This had
a strong impact on formulating
his analysis of society now.
Allen Levin was the founder
of Freedom party on campus and
an inspiration to the left wing
consciousness which followed
since 1964.
Megill was at the focus of
much controversy six months
ago when his immediate
dismissal was called for by a
state legislator.
The ensuing fight caused
much grief on the part of both
the administration and the
student left wing.
The legislator was la ter joined
by several others who wanted
Megills release because they said
he advocated overthrow of the
university and adhered to radical
beliefs.
UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell later rebuked the
legislator's charges when he
absolved Megill of any
wrongdoing and said that the
right of free speech must be

L iJtV).

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, August 5
Elementary Education, 150 C
Union, 10:00 a.m.
Investigation & Information
Committee, 150 G Union,
3:30 p.m.
Computing Machinery Meeting,
355 Union, 7:00 p.m.
Student Senate, 349 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4, Union,
7:30 p.m.
Union Summer Symphony,
Union Ballroom, 8:15 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta, 7:00 p.m., 1806
< N.W.2lstSt.

C3REAT EXUMA, MOIM ?
l J vv ydSX Or any of the Bahamian "Out Islands"
\ / /C \ for an adventure in paradise...constant
\l / \ Trade Winds...crystal waters...and the V /
l| 1 peace of being. "away from it all." \\ /
fHP Check with your travel agency and see \\l\/
vl 'Ttor how > nex P ens ve vacation can be! M 'i/
1\ Bfcr We'll set you up with a vacation loan.
*- GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

maintained on the college
campus.
Me gills statements at an
Accent '69 dialogue had become
the rallying point for the
legislators displeasure. Megill
reportedly said that he
advocated black power and
thought radicals were saying the
relevant things today.
In commenting on the crucial
steps in the growth of a radical
outlook, Megill outlines his
background in small Kansas
towns.
The son of a Protestant
minister who tried to rescue
small towns from oblivion,
Megill gives the analysis that the
towns were being destroyed by
the effects of the capitalistic
society.
.There was nothing for which
the youth could stay, except the
sons of wealthy farmers, he
says.
Megill credits his father with
instilling the value of the
necessity of community control.
The. first intellectual and
critical awareness of his
background came at the
University of Kansas. There a
professor not associated with
todays movement taught him
about new Marxism.
While visiting the Soviet
Union during the summer of
1960 on an exchange program
sponsored by the national
YMCA, Megill found he had
many friends among the Soviet
youth.

While visiting the
Soviet Union on an
exchange program in
1960, Megill found he
had many friends
among Soviet youth.
O A A &

Wednesday, August 6
University Personnel, 150 C
Union, 9:30 a.m.
University Personnel, 150 C
Union, 3:00 p.m.
Fla. Engineering Society, 356
Union, 7:30 p.m.
College of Education, 355
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Florida Players "The Birthday
Party", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Thursday, August 7
Clinical Psychology, 150 B
Union, 12:00 noon
Agricultural Economics, 150 A
Union, 12:00 noon
Student Government Luncheon,

The major intellectual
experience in relation to
Marxism came while studying in
Germany, where much
theoretical Marxist work was
being done. He was enrolled in a
West German university and an
auditor in an East Berlin
university.
Megill believes firmly in the
need for a union for professors.
They have to get over the
idea that they will be protected
by those above them. They must
realize the only real strength
they have is from their
colleagues.
He continued to say another
reason for professors to unionize
is to show they are workers like
other people, and dont have any
special claim to particular job
security (tenure).
He holds that everybody has
the right to job security, the
right not to be fired for arbitrary
reasons.
Jimmey Bailey, outspoken
critic of the left wing, in a phone
conversation had no good words
for Megill.
Kenneth Megill is a Marxist
fool. His ideals are totally
irrational and impractical. There
is no possibility of success for
him or his followers, Bailey
said.
Steve Fahrer, local SDS
member, took an opposite view.
He considers Megill a good
teacher, who helped the radical
movement in Gainesville.
He (Megill) got many people
thinking by analysis of problems
rather than by attack. His ideals
are more than practical. They
are necessary for society,
Fahrer commented.
Megill sees the university
being treated as any other
institution where people do
useful work, much like a farm or
factory.
Those who live and work in
the situation would have the
control over the institution. He
is for unions for professors,

400 Union, 1:00 p.m.
General Dames, 150 C Union,
8:00 p.m.
Phi Kappa Phi, 357 Union, 4:00
p.m.
Florida Players "The Birthday
Party", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Friday, August 8
College of Education Luncheon,
Arrendondo Room, 12:00
noon
Fla. Players "The Birthday
Party", Constans Theatre,
8:00 p.m.
Music Dept. "The Mikado" PKY
Aud. 8:15 p.m.

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students and non-academic
personnel.
His ideal structure for a
university would allow the
students to be a major force in
determining the educational
system and the direction in
which it would go.

Oliver,
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush. For an
unparalled flight of the imagination catch the
Florida Quarterly as it lights at the Hub, Mike's,
Circus, and the Florida Book Store.
On sale now at Library Colonnade
I i
j |4
"<.. %. r "?)A.,f-, j *| -%.**

Megill concluded his
interview by advocating that
deans be elected by those
involved and responsible to
them. He says the deans should
go back to teaching after a few
years, to where the university
really works.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

*S&iiiMiwmi
for sale
NEVER used anything like it," say
Os Blue Lustre for cleaning
rpTmets Rent electric shampooer sl.
Srv Furniture Co. (A-164-lt-p)
hatsun station wagon.
*i iQO only one available like this.
rODDING & CLARK MOTORS,
inr Home of the new leader. SE 2nd
A ye & 2nd St. (A-3M62-Q
Sale Lil* monster Slalom 20.
BOGEN amp. 70-watt S7O. Call
378-3120 afternoons and evenings.
(A-3t-162-p)
G ET AWAY CAR Get away from the
heat in an air conditioned cheap car.
$325 It runs fine. Godding & Clark
Motors 2nd & 2nd S.E. Ph.
378-2311. (A-ts-159-c)
Little Pussy Cats; 5c each. Orange
striped, calico, or blotchy. Phone
495-2226 before 6:00 or 495-2479
after 6:00. (A-3t-163-p)
Yamaha 305 cc. In excellent
mechanical condition 12000 m. With
rack and two helmets s4Bs. Come
to no. 411 at 1225 S.W. Ist Ave. or
call 378-9167. (A-4t-163-p)
"Havt
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men in hex life.
One to take
one to lew hes Mi
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HENRY JASON
FONDA ROBARDS
CHARLES [=
BRONSON m
[ONCEUPONATIME I
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WHH NOW!
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FOR SALE |
Three all black kittens, seven weeks
old, need new homes. Ph. 378-3093
(A-4t-164-p)
2 yr. old air cond. unit 5500 BTU
Good for 1 medium sized room
Bargain price! Call Tom 378-5673
(A-st-163-p)
Guns Guns Guns Inventory over
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COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
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Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
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Privacy is the emphasis, but w/o the
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Wanted 2 rmmates for Sept.
Landmark Apts. Poolside. $47.25 per
mo. Call Sandy 378-9954 after 5
p.m. (B-3t-163-p)
UniversityApts.justnorthof Research
Lib.2sizeseff.,2styleslbdrm.and2bdr
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(B-12T-158-P)
| wanted" I
FEMALE roommate wanted. 1 bdrm.
apt. 3 blocks from campus. Washing
machine air conditioned ranch style.
Call now. 378-5993. (C-2t-163-p)
Wanted 1967 Seminole. Will pay.
Call 372-6790. (C-2t-163-p)
One female roommate wanted for
immediate occupancy in 2-bedroom
Landmark s4s/mo. Call
378-3518. (C-3t-163-p)
I RED PIN OAI
NIGHT V
8-10 PM
win free games
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

florida players production
N. .
. k ->. r W

Tuesday, August 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,
V.V.VAM.. j

HELP WANTED
itoTn-f,.... v.v,y.y; : ;-;-,;ii>v/riVi:i oo 0 r, CiOOCT
Highly qualified secretary for
builders office. Shorthand, good
typing and other secretarial skills
essential. Permanent job. Many
company benefits. Salary open. Only
thoroughly qualified persons need
apply. Phone 376-2444 days or
372-8576 evenings. (E-164-3t-p)
WANTED COCKTAIL
WAITRESSES! Must be 21 yrs of
age. No experience necessary. Full or
part time. Apply Dub's 4560 NW
13th. St. Ask for Mr. Thomas.
(E-159-7t-p)
4 year old & 8 year old subjects with
normal vision needed in visual
research. $3.00 per hour. Call
392-3031 Visual Sciences Lab.
(E-Bfc-159)
Medical technologist. Salary good to
8000 depending on experience.
Contact Mr. Clark, Munroe Hosp.
Ocala. Phone 629-7911 ex. 19.
(E-162-3t-p)
COED with own transportation
needed for housework and child care.
Good working conditions and good
salary. Mrs. Anderson 376-8788.
(E-2t-163-p)
Giant Slide Opening Soon Need Male
and Female Help Full and Part Time
Contact Marvin Julius. 372-6232 or
475-5771. (E-3t-163-p)
>#:W?>X X*X >X*X*XvX.X*X*X*X*XXXX^i
PERSONAL
V
%
:r-Nsxw ;*>x*:*x*x*sxw*:*x*x*xx*xw x :*>x
Bargains slalom ski, bike, clocks,
clothes (size 10), scarves, patterns,
records, books, card table, towels,
purse, grill, all cheap! 376-8524 BK
(J-2t-164-p)
Free! 5 wk old kittens. Call 378-6282
after 5:30 p.m. (J-3t-162-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear an electronic
factorial. Any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-Bt-158-P)
Sacrificial Offering! Stereo
equipment: 50 watt Kenwood
amp/AM-FM $l5O, Monarch 60 watt
solid state, $75, 2 Criterion 50
Speakers, S4O, Telefunken turntable,
S3O, 8-track tape players Lear Jet,
$45, Motorola, $65, tapes
availableCall 378-5125. (J-2t-163-p)
X*>X<*>>>X X*X X X*X*XX*X*X>X*!^
OST & FOUND |
Found at Quik Save: Navy Peters
jacket, size 36L. Call 378-1001 or
come by Quik Save and identify
initials to claim. (L-3t-nc-p)
r SERVICES |
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)

Page 9

* 9.9 M a m m 9 a a
\[_ SERVICES j
WWWffIX'WSWWWi jiMWIKWW i OOW"
TYPING ALLSUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. ELECT. IBM TYPEWRITER
ALL TYPES CALL JEAN 376-7809.
(M-st-162-p)
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Catl 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
TYPING IBM electric rates according
to material. Call Nancy at 392-0761.
(M-4t-161-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-c)
I Dick Holmes
Jewel ecs
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
I REPAIRS I
TROPHIES-ENGRAVING I
I 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I

final two days
DONT MISS THIS
hi i mii 11 drama
plus LADY IN CEMENT Ri
FRANK SINATRA RAQUELL WELCH DAN BLOCKER
ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks.
Meals & J^Sandwiches
pCOLOR TV & BILLIARDS^
I 1718 W University Ave.
| On The Gold Coast
||i 1 SPECIALS ||
ll\_ TUESDAY SPECIAL ||
FRIED 1
I CHICKEN I
||| ALL YOU AO/ iff
if CARE TO EAT WJ \ fM
M WEDNESDAY SPECIAL f||
gp LUNCH AND DINNER |||
1 JUMBO CHOPPED 1
i STEAK 0 |
if WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY ft £ W
|p AND YELLOW RICE
1 MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I
||L GAINESVILLE MALL V

| i |
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)
ITHE TECHNICOLOR I
loasWILD BUNCHI
(Mint SIOIOFO HIhSONn VRlOt* l- NO AOMitUD
Mm scloMemmtr i *' os *l**' v.ua*u fl WILLIAM HOLDEN ROBERT RYAN ||
U ERNEST BORCNINE EDMOND O'BRIEN B
|THE AT 8 47 I
young
Iruimaways l
Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!



Page 10

I, The Florid* AUigrtor, Tuwctov. August 5.1969

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DOUG CASE
THE BIRTHDAY PARTY
The Florida Players r summer production, a Harold Pinter
play, opens Wednesday night, in the Constans Theater. Directed
by James Lauricella, the play b Pinter's first three act drama.
Birthday Party will be presented each night through Saturday at
8 p.m.
I Movie Times
Center I Lovebug. Volkswagen capers by Disney. 1,3:09,
5:18,7:27,9:40.
Center II Romeo and Juliet. Zeffirellis highly rated
production. 2:03,4:32,7:01,9:40.
'Floritla The Longest Day, with John Wayne, Robert
Mitchum and crew. A revived D-Day movie, 1,4:25,7:50.
Gaiinesville Drive-In Young Runaway, with Patty
McCormack. 8:47. The Wild Bunch, with Holden, Borgnine.
Free cussing is not bad, but love of killing motivates
protagonists, and the gore is far more realistic and extensive,
than story can justify. 10:30.
Opens Wednesday: Rascal, raccoon, boy and family movie by
Disney. 8:47. Savage Land, with George C. Scott and Barry
Sullivan. 10:32.
Plaza I Once Upon a Time in the West, with Henry Fonda,
Jason Robards, Claudia Cardinale, Charles Bronson and Keenan
Wynn. The story has a railroad moving West. 2:29, 5:46,9:03.
Plaza II Bridge at Remagen, with George Segal, Robert
Vaughn, and Ben Gazzara. True story of the bridge Hitler
thought so important he ordered it dynamited with his entire
15th Army. 1:36,3:39,5:42,7:48,9:52.
Suburbia Drive-In Slaves, with Dionne Warwick and Stephen
Boyd. An historic drama about slavery in the South. 8:50. Lady
in Cement, with Frank Sinatra and Dan Rbcker, Incredibly
stereo-typed in dialogue and action, this Rome is one to
miss. 10:55.
Wishbone
There s a new Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Store at
704 S. W. 2nd Avenue or 16th Ave. at S Main Street.

Florida State Museum Is Packing

Florida State Museum has
closed the downstairs east hall of
the Seagle Building which houses
it, to begin packing for the great
move. The Florida Indian
collection is the first to go.
The great move comes in the
fall of 1970, when the museum
takes residence in the new $2.4
Concert Tonight
The UF Music Department
will present the University
Summer Symphony tonight at
8:15 in the Reitz Union
Ballroom.
Mensa Discussion
Harris Samuels will lead a
Mensa discussion of A Systems
Approach to Environmental
Protection, Wednesday at 8:30
p.m. in room 357 of Reitz
Union.
IMiller-Brownl
I I
I I
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NORTH OF RXA
THE MALL
I 376-4552 authorized I
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| Open til 7 p.m. nightly

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But has 4 doors, undercoating,
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And rated above Volkswagen
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For the same price of Volkswagen
we will add airconditioning and
give you back five dollars in cash!
Make the sound move to Datson today!
GODDING & CLARK onup
Home of the New Leader MON ,hru SAT
2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S. E. Ph. 378-2311

million museum building on
UFs campus. Preparations begin
so soon, because items on
exhibit have to be replaced in
storage in a certain sequence.
Many small shards, breakable
objects, and fragile clothing
exhibits require special
attention. All pieces must be
counted and checked with the

SALES-SERVICE-RENTALS
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JUL I STEAK HOUSB
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

catalog; 32 years have gone into
collecting the approximately
two million articles.
Exhibits in the new museum
will all be new, governed by a
new over-all concept and
employing old and new articles.
University departments are
already at work preparing new
articles.



New Calls Relevant Insipid. Meaningless

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
part one of a two part series on
Or. Melvyn New. Next
time Dr. New as professor.)
By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
The whole word relevant
has become insipid, meaningless
and cheap, according to Dr.
New assistant professor in the
English department. The way
the term is used, there are only
two or three relevant aspects of
human life ingestion,
procreation, and defecation.
The additional aspects of
human life give the meaning to
civilization. To link utility to
relevance is to reduce human life
to a materialistic level.
The people who use the
word think theyre moving in the
other direction, he said, going
on to back up his point in
another manner. All those who
discuss relevance are only
interested in the here and now,
the present moment thats
moving toward body and matter.
Im talking about ideas
here, and part of education is
learning the relevance, the
. tv..
PROFESSOR NEW
... reading proof
connection, of ideas which seem
superficially unrelated.
New is an open man, ready
to state his views in clear terms.
He pauses to organize his answer
before he speaks, but not long,
and if the question is not precise
enough, he says, Do you
mean ...
The scramble to be relevant
amuses him. People called the
moon shot The proudest week
in the history of man. They
think the world didnt even start
until five years ago. Do you
mean like when Kennedy was
shot? That was the saddest
week in the history of man.
But he does not stand back
to be amused from a distance at
the folly of the world. One of
the things which currently
bothers him is the problem of
V? T Help run the
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academic freedom. His
interest stems from what he calls
a dual threat.
Student violence, which I
think is destruction for its own
sake, is creating an even more
destructive force on the right.
And those people make all the
noise. The moderate faculty
members stay quiet and let the
Administration define academic
freedom.
But the Administration
should not dictate to faculty.
They are only there to oil the

People talk as though the world didnt begin until
five years ago.
Dr. Melvyn New
IStlvlv:*:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.:.;.:.;.;.:.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.-.-.;.;.;.;.:.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.;.:.;.;.;.;.;.;

wheels for the faculty who do
the educating.
How did the administration
acquire such standing? They
used to get paid more than
faculty because they had such a
thankless job, being servants in a
way of the faculty. As time went
by, since they made more
money, they came to be
considered the important ones.
Most faculty members dont
appreciate their own position. If
you asked a professor who hired
him, he would probably say
either UF or the College of Arts
and Sciences. But its really the
faculty of his department that
decides to hire him and decides
his salary; the department then

WELCOME ALL U of F PERSONNEL
ihmha (lIY
1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
THE CLOSEST FULL SERVICE
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tells the administration whom to
hire and how much to pay him.
Now the administration
administers to its own
convenience, continues the
thirty-year-old professor. It
makes rules to make their own
lives simpler, not the lives of the
professors. Theyre taxing the
professors to solve the student
parking problem, for example.
The professors dont have a
parking problem, and will not
benefit.
Last spring Dr. New

organized the University Center
for Rational Alternatives, which
now has about 45 members, all
faculty, from all departments of
UF. The Centers first project is
to define academic freedom in
away acceptable to the whole
university community what is
meant by academic freedom? by
academic responsibility? When
does student unrest become
illegal? The threat of force
destroys thinking, and opposes
everything a university sets
about to do.
Universities have long been
strongholds of the free exchange
of ideas. The threat of force
would destroy that.
The Rational Alternatives

group is currently working on
their definition. Harvard and
Columbia (too late) have defined
academic freedom, taking
stronger stands than previously.
We are not reacting to anything
on this campus, but not having
the problem doesnt mean we
should not make the stand now.
Its certainly better than waiting

l.l I'-II
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' 516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET
V Climb aboard w
HThe S.S. Winnjammer* /
Jr Meals served from 11:00 AM to
Midnight Ts
i Bernie Sher //
k at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday II
] Oysters & clams on the half shell ....
Michelob on draft
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty j
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager \/
Reservations Accepted 520 s w 2nd Ave. /I
Closed Sundays

Art Show Paintings and sculptures
on trees, on grass, surrounded by
the Hudson valley, will be dis displayed.
played. displayed. Accomplished artists,
"Ghetto" artists, and would-be art artists
ists artists will be glad to discuss their
work, or the unspoiled splendor of
the surroundings, or anything else
that might be on your mind. If
youre an artist, and you want to
display, write for information.
Crafts Bazaar ls you like creative
knickknacks and old junk youll
love roaming around our bazaar.
Youll see imaginative leather, ce ceramic,
ramic, ceramic, bead, and silver creations,
as well as Zodiac Charts, camp
clothes, and worn out shoes.
Work Shops ls you like playing
with beads, or improvising on a

f 1
, Please Print
| Send me information on the WOODSTOCK MUSIC & ART FAIR
I Send me tickets for Fri., Aug. 15, at $7.00 each
Send me tickets lor Sat., Aug. 16, at $7.00 each I
I Send me tickets lor Sun., Aug. 17, at $7.00 each
Send me 2 day tickets for Fri. & Sat., Aug. 15,16,
I at $13.00 each |
Send me 2 day tickets for Sat. & Sun., Aug. 16,17,
I at $13.00 each a
Send me Complete 3 day tickets lor Fri., Sat., Sun.,
Aug. 15,16,17, at SIB.OO each
I I
| Name ;
I Address _|
City State Zip
L I
Be sure to enclose a self-addressed, stamped envelope,
with your check or money order (no cash please) payable to:
WOODSTOCK MUSIC, P.O. BOX 996
RADIO CITY STATION, NEW YORK 10020

Tuesday, August 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

until the problem arises. x
A clear definition of
academic freedom puts things in
perspective, and, hopefully, if
trouble does, arise, the
legislators will keep out of it.
The amount of direct control
the state government has over
the university is UFs weakest
point.

guitar, or writing poetry, or mold molding
ing molding clay, stop by one of our work
shops and see what you can give
and take.
Food There will be cokes and hot hotdogs
dogs hotdogs and dozens of curious food
and fruit combinations to experi experiment
ment experiment with.
Hundreds of Acres to Roam on
Walk around for three days without
seeing a skyscraper or a traffic
light. Fly a kite, sun yourself. Cook
your own food and breathe un unspoiled
spoiled unspoiled air.
Music starts at 4:00 P.M. on Fri Friday,
day, Friday, and at 1:00 P.M. on Saturday
and Sunday-lt'll run for 12 contin continuous
uous continuous hours, except for a few short
breaks to allow the performers to
catch their breath.

Page 11



Page 12

I, Tlm Florida Alligator, Tuartay. August 5,1969

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.s WINNERS OF OUTSTANDING PLAYERS TROPHIES DOUG CASE
... (left to right) McAshan, Dixon, Smith, Kok
Late Rally By North Stars
Gains First Tie In History

Spurred by the second half
galloping of Palatkas Lamar
Brinson and the pin-point
passing of Gainesvilles Eddie
McAshan, the North All-Star
team rallied late in the fourth
quarter at Florida Field
Saturday night to wrest a 20-20
tie with the South All-Stars.
Brinson, a small (5-8, 188
pounds) fullback built like a
tank, repeatedly smashed into
the South defensive line during
the Norths fourth quarter drive
for the come-from-behind score.
Brinson finally bulled his way
over from the one-yard line with
48 seconds showing on the
clock.
The Southerners, entering the
South Cagers
Romp, 77-56
The South romped to an easy
77-56 victory over the North in
the 21st annual North-South
All-Star high school basketball
classic at Florida Gym before a
crowd of nearly 4,000 Saturday.
Gentle Giant Gene Bodden
from Clearwater High led the
scoring, booming in 20-foot
shots to give the South the
second biggest margin in the
series history. Only the Norths
30 point victory in 1967 was
larger.
The North lost an early first
period lead when the Souths
Charlie Green hit a jumper from
15 feet out and Mike Stump
made a layup to give the South a
6-3 lead it never lost.
The South pulled far ahead
with high scoring in the first and
third quarters, outscoring the
North nine points in the first
quarter and 13 in the fourth.
Bodden, the unanimous
choice of the South for Most
Valuable Player, scored 19
points on nine field goals and
one free throw and also pulled
down 16 rebounds.
CRANE ff|jp[j
IMPORTS |j llj
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
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506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville

game as slight underdogs, were
not to be outdone by the
Norths fourth quarter heroics.
After Brinsons touchdown,
the South took the kick-off and
began some fireworks which
held most of the crowd of nearly
8,000 glued to their seats.
Quarterback Gary Kok swept
right end and got to the North
35-yard line before being
upended. Then Kok stepped
back into the pocket and heaved
a bomb to Gary Parris, who was
standing all alone by the
sidelines at the North 18-yard
line. Parris grabbed the ball and
took one more forward step,
which carried him out of
b ounds.
JP >. jPPPBHHUnraj£: v 'i"
EDDIE McASHAN
... scampers for yardage

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With three seconds remaining,
the South called on placekicker
John Goerger of Tampa
Hillsborough for a field goal
attempt. Goergers boot drifted
to the left of the goalposts just
as the final buzzer sounded.
It was the first tie between
the two teams since the series
began 21 years ago. The South
holds the edge, having won 13
and lost seven.
Most of the scoring 33
points was done in the second
half. A slight drizzle hampJfed
both teams during the first naif.
The only score before the
intermission came in the first
period after the South had twice
stopped the North attack inside
the South 30-yard line.
John Clifford of Coral Gables
intercepted a McAshan pass at
the South 11-yard line. Two
runs carried the ball to the
South 20. Then quarterback
Steve Hardin spotted split end
Barry Smith barreling down the
middle of the field with two
defenoers in frantic pursuit
about five yards behind.
Hardin lofted a perfect strike,
which Smith snagged without
breaking stride. But he was
caught from behind at the North
31-yard line.
Two plays later, someone in
the South backfield miscued and
Hardin was left standing alone
with the ball still in his hands.
He escaped from several
linemen and
scrambled around left end
untouched for a touchdown.

UF Si gns Two Tennis Stars
UF has signed two top prep tennis players, Athletics Director Ray
Graves announced recently.
Ralph Hart of St. Louis, Mo., and Buddy Miles of Jackson, Miss.,
will enter UF in the fall.
Hart attended University City High School in St. Louis this year,
where he captured the Missouri High School Singles Championship.
Miles attended Provine High School in Jackson and is ranked
nationally in the 18 and under group.
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376-6472 372-3649