Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
UF Center For Latin Studies Unique

(EDITORS NOTE: Hiis is the first in a
three-part series concerning the UFs Center for
Latin American Studies. This part describes the
functions of the center.)
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Associate Editor
Nestled away on the top floor of the College
Library is the headquarters of a multi-faceted
project almost unique in the United States.
The Center for Latin American Studies was
founded in 1950 as a School of International
Studies by Dr. A. Curtis Wilgus, now professor
emeritus.
In 1963 the center was given its current name
and is now under the direction of Dr. William E.
Carter, associate professor of anthropology.
The reason for the centers existence has been
described by UF President Stephen C. OConnell.
Since World War II, he said, Latin America
has experienced a rapidly accelerating social and

l?el
MA WtJMM

Vol. 61, No. 163

9
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m> %
Hr f; s- ?
DOUG CASE
TOOtS OF THE TRADE

A musical instrument and a pair of
shoes symbolize the 200-plus members
of the All-Star Marching Band on
campus this week preparing for the

Faculty Leaders Support
Prof Evaluation Proposal

By ANGELA RACKLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Governments proposal to make
mandatory teacher evaluation by students a cri criterion
terion criterion for granting tenure has received support from
UF faculty leaders.
Dr. Raymond Fahien, president of the UF
chapter of American Association of University
Professors, and Dr. Joseph J. Zeman, president of
the American Federation of Teachers, Wednesday
spoke in favor of the proposal.
I think student opinion should be given
considerable amout of weight in whether a teacher
should be given tenure or not, Fahien said.
Fahien has voluntarily used teacher evaluation in
his own classes for the past 15 years.
Zeman said that if teacher evaluation by
students is properly run, it should be a necessary
part of tenuring.
People in general shouldnt be afraid of any
evaluation program.
In a letter to the Board of Regents dated July
22, 1969, Student Body President Charles Shepherd
suggested the following proposal:

The
Florida Alligator
o
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

All-Star football game Saturday night.
See band story, page four. See football
story, page 15.

economic revolution which has affected profoundly
her position in world affairs and with the United
States. UF has met these developments with a
greatly increased commitment to Latin American
studies.
Center Assistant Director Raymond J. Toner, a
retired Navy captain, said UF has been engaged in
Latin American studies since 1890 until now 144
courses are offered in a cross-departmental program.
Participating colleges are arts and sciences,
education and law.
In addition, 39 courses are offered through the
Center of Tropical Agriculture under the direction
of Dr. Hugh Popenoe, associate professor of soils.
The center, Toner said, is almost entirely a
graduate program at this time.
We are organized horizontally throughout the
university, embracing many departments, rather
than vertically like a department, he explained.
Toner said that, as of 1968, more than 86
doctorates and 230 masters degrees have been
conferred through the center.

Each person employed in an instructional
capacity in a university must have undergone an
evaluation by his students of his teaching ability
prior to his being recommended for tenure to the
Board of Regents by the president of the university.
Such evaluation shall be considered by the
president as one of the factors in his
recommendation to the Board of Regents.
Shepherds recommendation followed an
Alligator editorial July IS which also suggested
required course and teacher evaluation prior to
tenuring.
Tenure means that a faculty member is insured a
permanent position as a faculty member and a job
with the university until he:
voluntarily leaves his job.
voluntarily retires or reaches the mandatory
retirement age of 65.
is dismissed by the regents for professional
incompetence, conduct involving moral turpitude,
neglect of duty and responsibilities, and/or failure
to perform the terms of employment without
justifiable cause.
dies.
(SEE 'PROF' PAGE 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

Credit Coming Soon
For UF Black Studies

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
A proposal for an Afro-American
studies program, modeled after existing
subject area study programs, is being
reviewed by a faculty committee in the
College of Arts and Sciences.
Dean Harry H. Sisler said students
who complete the program, if it is
approved by the faculty, will receive a
certificate, in addition to a degree in
their major study fields.
Students in the program will enroll
in Afro-American courses in various
departments history, political science,
sociology, and others in the college,
says Dr. Manning J. Dauer, chairman of
the political science department.
Faculty in the college will form an
unofficial Afro-American faculty, Dauer
said. Dr. Selden Henry and Dr. Stephen
Conroy are slated to head the
Afro-American faculty.
Requirements for a certificate would

The center has several special projects and
programs, most of them requiring the use or study
of Spanish, Portuguese or indigenous languages.
The center sponsors a monthly colloquium,
organized by graduate students, to bring
outstanding authorities on Latin America to UF.
One session last year, on guerrilla warfare, attracted
several hundred people.
A series of Latin American Conferences, held
yearly, investigates various subjects, including U.S.
involvement in Latin America. This years
conference, scheduled next February, will be about
The University in Transition.
Toner said the conference will study the
Latin American universities and the transitional
effect away from sanctuary institutions caused,
in part, by the American presence in Latin America.
Sanctuary universities led to disorders as
radicals of all kinds retreated to the universities, he
said. For example, such outstanding liberals as
Colombian President Lleras Restrepo were forced to
(SEE 'UF' PAGE 2)

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| Would You Like |
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ft/
Story, Page Twos
^XX::XX::X::XX:X:X:::X::XX:X:X::::X::::X:X:X:X::X:X::X:X-XXXXX-X-X-XX-X-X ; X : :-;

Friday, August 1, 1969

be 36 hours in Afro-American studies
and the recommendation of the faculty
members, Dauer said.
Several new courses are being
offered during the next academic year
to complement black-oriented courses
already offered.
The history department will offer
two new courses in this area next fall.
The sociology department has proposed
another course.
Two new courses will be offered by
the political science department next
spring or winter quarter, Dauer said.
Dauer also mentioned new
Afro-American courses in the English
department and in the art and music
departments of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts.
Although the proposal for an
Afro-American studies program has not
yet been approved by the colleges
curriculum committee, Sisler said he
was confident that the proposal would
pass.



Page 2

!# The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 1,1969

Prof Evaluation Urged

f HOH P*6t OWE Jj
Tenure also provides that hearings be held, due
process be observed, and that charges be proved
before a professor can be dismissed for cause.
Tenure is presently considered at UF by the
Personnel Board, which makes recommendations to
the president.
Dr. Manning Dauer, chairman of the political
science department, said that eligibility for tenure is
completely uniform throughout the state.
FSU does not grant tenure to assistant
professors, but at UF assistant and associate
professors may begin tenure after three years of
employment.
Eligibility for tenure for professors begins after
two years of UF employment.
The most important qualities taken into
consideration are research and teaching ability.
In the letter to the regents, Shepherd stated that
in the area of teaching ability there is presently no
evidence to guide the Personnel Board in reaching

UF Latin Center Unique

pROM PAGE CHET!
order in troops to the rioting
university as a result of (New
York Gov. Nelson) Rockefellers
visit two years ago.
Other projects of the center
include:
9 A Latin American Data
Bank, in cooperation with the
Division of Sponsored Research
and the Computing Center, was
founded in 1966. It contains
more than 10,000,000 card
images on Latin American social,
economic and political data.
A $250,000 Rockefeller

City To Charge FBK
For Bleachers Use
Florida Blue Key, the mens leadership honoary which sponsors
Homecoming, will have to pay for use of city portable bleachers if it
wants them at the gala weekends parade this year.
The Gainesville City Commission voted this week to charge the
student group for labor and cost of setting up the bleachers along the
parade route.
Last year the city set up the bleachers free at FBKs request.
City Manager B. Harold Farmer said other agencies using city
bleachers are required to pay for labor and equipment costs.
Roberson Not Guilty Os Rape

James Roberson, a
24-year-old Negro Gainesville
plasterer, was found innocent
Wednesday night of raping a
21-year-old UF coed.
The 8-man, 4-woman jury
deliberated nearly six hours
before finding Roberson
o Maie
WHEN IM GOOD,
IM VERY, VERY GOOD,
BUT WHEN IM BAD,
IM BETTER.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

Foundation grant for research
and teaching related to
university development at the
Universidad del Valle in Cali,
Colombia.
A demographic study of
the Departamento del Valle,
Colombia, which includes
investigation of population in
relation to age, sex, rural-urban
residence, education,
occupation, fertility and
mortality.
9 A value orientations and
socioeconomic development
study of Colombia.
9 The Publication by the UF
Press of several monographs,

innocent of seven possible
verdicts.
Roberson also faces charges
of aggravated assault and
breaking and entering that girls
apartment last March. However,
as the result of Wednesday
nights decision, those charges
could now be dropped.
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
NORTH OF ftj (A
THE MALL 'O'
376-4552 authorized
dealer
Open til 7 p.m. nightly

its decision.
Shepherd critized the board, writing that it
seems to be satisfied by the opinions of the
teachers colleagues, many of whom have never
observed his teaching ability in the classroom.
According to the letter, the students will
evaluate the teacher through the present Course and
Teacher Evaluation program financed by SG and
run by Omicron Delta Kappa, mens leadership
fraternity.
Shepherd talked about the letter in his office
Monday.
We make no judgment on other criteria, he
said, and take no position on tenure. But if we are
going to have tenure, we would like to see this
(teacher evaluation by students) incorporated into
the program.
Shepherd wrote thatit the proposal, or a similar
one, is adopted by the regents, Florida will be
taking the lead in the nation by putting life into the
tenure system.
The chances are better than even that they will
adopt this proposal or some form of it, he said.

reports of the 17 annual Latin
American Conferences, a
Handbook of Latin American
Studies, a periodical called
The Latinamericanist, and
many other scholarly works.
UF is one of four large Latin
American study centers in the
United States, Toner said. The
U.S. Office of Education
provides several fellowships in
the field each year. UF has
always received the greatest
number.
Last year UF had 33 fellows,
but it dropped to 18 this year.
Toner attributed the decrease to
Congress not appropriating
enough money and to more
universities entering the field.

I We propose to give you the best in new literature
I FLORIDA QUARTERLY
' \
On Sale: Library Colonade Aug. 4 thru 6
U (till death do us part)

New Cards Souly
For Black People?
v
By DIANA LATHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Something for every occasion and with the marketing of
Negro greeting cards something for everyone.
For years the Figures on greeting cards have been only white
people.
The new Negro soul cards feature Negro brides and
grooms, Negro babies, and Negro children on birthday cards.
The cards, created by Norcross Greeting Cards, are available
in Gainesville, at Chestnuts Office and Supply Company
downtown and Chestnuts Gift Shop in the Gainesville Mall.
Although sales at the downtown store have not been very
well, the Mall store has reported sales as real well.
The Norcross Company puts the ckrds out in a small
everyday line.
' §3 jf 1 'Qn
The cards have met with great success throughout the
nation, said Mrs. Hannah Acker, who works in the public
relations department for Norcross in New York City.
There were no requests for this type of card until last
summer, she pointed out.
We wondered what the Negroes were using and figured they
must send cards that werent illustrated, Mrs. Acker said.
Last summer Norcross received about a half dozen letters
requesting the new cards. Three of the letters were from white
customers who wished to buy the cards for Negro friends.
Norcross started the line of soul cards for everyday
occasions, but the company doesnt have them in a seasonal
line.
Mrs. Acker noted, however, that most seasonal cards do not
use illustrative figures. Ornaments, holly and trees are used for
Christmas cards. Similar seasonal themes are used for other
holiday cards.
The cards are available throughout the country from
Norcross representatives.



Hemophilia Relief May Be Near

By JINX MCCALL
Alligator Correspondent
* Possible relief for hemophilia patients may be
near if new evidence uncovered by a team of UF
researchers is substantiated by further testing.
Two physicians in the College of Medicine
recently made a discovery about the disease which
will change a genetic truth taught in biology
classes all over the world.
Drs. Richard R. Streiff and Thomas F. Newcomb
studied a family in north Florida and found what
appears to be a genetic variant of hemophilia,
commonly known as free bleeders disease.
An inability to form blood clots is the most
common characteristic of victims of this disease.
Swelling of the joints, expecially legs, is also
common.
Prior to this discovery, hemophilia was thought
to be related to sex. Female carriers are not
clinically affected. They can form blood clots and
do not experience swelling of the joints. But males
who inherit this trait from their mothers are in
serious danger of bleeding to death from even a
small cut.
The classic case of this disorder is that of Queen
Victoria who is said to have spread bleeders

. #
Research Gives New rack
On Blood Clots In Lungs

By Alligator Services
UF medical researchers have
unearthed new facts about
pulmonary embolism blood
clots lodging in the
lungs which could lead to
lifesaving new methods of
treatment.
Some 50,000 Americans die
annually of pulmonary
embolism, the sudden blocking
by a clot of the artery which
carries blood from the heart to
the lu.ngs. The condition
sometimes is accompanied by
two unexplained phenomena,
according to Dr. George R.
Daicoff, associate professor of
surgery in the College of
Medicine.
One phenomenon is lung
swelling (pulmonary edema)
caused by leakage of blood into
the air spaces of the lungs. The
other is the early death of
patients with only partial
pulmonary embolism.
Daicoff said the Florida
research team believes the
phenomena result from spasm of
the lung veins caused by an
Fairdofh Here
For Blue Key
lIC Banquet
Florida Atty. Gen. Earl
Faircloth will be the toastmaster
at the annual Florida Blue Key
Homecoming banquet Oct. 17.
The announcement
Wednesday by Wayne Thomas,
chairman for Homecoming
weekend activities Oct. 17-18,
follows last weeks report that
the Blue Key banquet speaker
will be U.S. Sen. Joseph D.
Tydings, D-Maryland.
Faircloth, Floridas 30th
attorney general, received his
B.A. and LL.B. degrees from UF
where he was a member of
Florida Blue Key and president
of the student body from
1949-1950

UF DISCOVERY CHANGES GENETIC TRUTH

excessive release of a normal
body fluid agent, serotonin.
Previously it had been speculated
that heart failure was the cause
of this lung swelling.
While serotonin long has
been suspected of being
responsible for some of the
harmful effects of pulmonary
embolism, conclusive evidence
of its specific role has been
lacking. /-
For the first time, the UF
researchers observed and
measured the extremely high
blood pressure caused by
serotonin in the pulmonary veins
of experimental animals. By
giving animals without lung clots
intravenous injections of
serotonin, they produced a
comparable degree of
hypertension as in animals with
embolism.
They blocked this serotonin
effect in a number of animals
with lung clots by pretreatment
with methysergide, a drug used
by physicians to treat severe
headaches caused by spasm of
the blood vessels of the head.
If the pulmonary vein spasm

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ORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESV m

disease to all the thrones of Europe, perhaps
contributing to the Russian and Spanish revolutions.
Cause of the problem is the inability of the
victims body to produce the proper amount of a
vital inhibitor calfed Factor VIII.
The UF medical team discovered, through their
treatment of a Williston man, a family of at least
242 members spread throughout Florida and
Georgia in which the affected gene appears to be
transmitted from father to son in at least. 10 cases.
Streiff said that although another similar disease,
Von Willebrands disease, can clinically affect both
male and female, this is the first known case of such
a variation in hemophilia.
He is enthusiastic about the possibility of
discovering a remedy for these disorders through
their continued studies of these cases.
The researchers are currently working with
doctors at Stanford (California) Medical School
with cross transfusion tests of affected plasma.
Using plasma with varying degrees of the two
bleeders diseases, the researchers have found
evidence that many of those affected may have
latent degrees of Factor VIII.
If these inhibitors can be stimulated, victims of
both hemophilia and Von Willebrands disease may
find relief from the disorders, Streiff said.

caused by serotonin could be
prevented by methysergide in
human beings as it was in the
animals, it could have a
profound effect in saving the
lives of some patients with
pulmonary embolism, Daicoff
said.
While methysergide wont
prevent pulmonary embolism, it
may forestall death. If a clot
should occur, the drug could
prevent spasms which cause
death. Rather than facing
sudden death, the patients
would be real sick, the
cardiovascular surgeon added.
Daicoff said there may be
other ways to combat the lung
vein spasm caused by, serotonin
if the substances release by the
body can be controlled. An
understanding of serotonins
origin, what triggers its flow into
the system and what causes its
accumulation on clots will be
necessary for the accomplish accomplishment
ment accomplishment of this control. These and
other questions are now being
investigated by the Florida
research team, he concluded.

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIiIHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIHMIII
ill!
pP
Two physicians in the
College of Medicine
recently discovered what
appears to be a genetic
variant of hemophilia
commonly known as
free bleeders disease.
Prior to this time,
hemophilia was thought
to be related to sex.
Female carriers are not
clinically affected. The
UF medical team found,
however, that in a
2 42-member north
Florida family the
affected gene appears to
be transmitted from
father to son in at least 10
cases.

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NOW 1/2 PRICE

Friday, August 1,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

TURN
OFF
SUMMER
9
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FIRST*., and itilt Bart
cost* fats tfcan factory afr
GODDING & CLARK
MOTORS
2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E.
378-2311
OPEN 8 P.M. MON.-SAT.

Page 3



Page 4

The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 1, 1969

MAGNIFIED IN MICANOPY

Center Os Man Focus Is Love

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
The Center of Man, a program designed to
magnify human understanding, is conducting a
summer program in Micanopy under the direction
of three UF professors.
A brochure describes the program, one of many
similar projects which have been initiated
throughout the country in recent years, as built in
its entirety upon the idea of man as unlimited in
potential for love, creative achievement and
continued self-renewal.
A similar program at Esalen Institute in Big Sur,
Calif., attracted national attention several years ago
and has become a prototype for programs aimed at
expanding awareness of the self and the universe.
The three professors directing the summer
program are Dr. Ted Landsman, professor of
education; Dr. Sidney Jourard, professor of
psychology, and Wilmer Coram of the College of
Education.
The program is divided into two parts: dialogue
sessions in Micanopy and what the summer
brochure describes as week-end workshops for
personal exploration in Daytona Beach, Landsman
said.
The Daytona Beach workshops consist of both
sensitivity groups and task force groups.
What is the difference?
The sensitivity groups are aimed at expanding
awareness for the individual and making him more
sensitive to others, Landsman explained. There is

All-Star Band
Prepares For
Saturday Show
Marching up to six hours a
day, the 200 members of the
annual High School All Star
Marching Band have spent the
past week preparing to entertain
during the All Star Football
game Saturday night.
The band members,
representing numerous schools
around the state, were chosen on
much the same grounds as the
football team: ability, talent and
desire.
During the week, the band
members, under the direction of
Bill Moffet, past director of
bands at Michigan State
University, have put in almost
six hours a day on the practice
field. Members of the Gator
Band have worked with the
visiting bandsmen, as have
regular faculty members in the
music department.
The halftime show will
feature the theme Patterns in
Motion, in which the bandsmen
will make flowing designs on the
field.
The game Saturday night will
wrap up the week for the
bandsmen who have been living
in Jennings Hall since Tuesday,
but a banquet Saturday
afternoon will formally end the
week.
During the banquet the
winners of the most outstanding
bandsman awards will be
announced.
(Mans MVs#:
'IVE BEEN
THINGS AND
SEEN
PLACES.

FLORIDA QUARTERLY

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no specific purpose.
But the aim of the task force groups is to help
persons who normally work together to attack a
problem more creatively, to help them work
together more effectively.
The lectures on man are not lectures in the
traditional sense, Landsman noted. One person is
the speaker, but everyone in the audience is
encouraged to enter into a dialogue.
Sometimes these sessions go on all night, he
said.
The aim of both the dialogues and the sensitivity
groups is the same to give the participants a
greater awareness of themselves and of others and to
help individuals communicate more effectively with
others.
There are no sensitivity groups meeting in
Micanopy now. But Landsman said that a weekly
sensitivity group, open to everyone, is planned for
August.
Underlying the Center of Man program is the
concept of affective education, Landsman said.
Affective education relates to human
characteristics and attempts to develop human
characteristics, he said.
There has been an overemphasis on cognitive
education teaching the student external
knowledge at the expense of affective education
in the formal schooling system, Landsman said.
1 hope that eventually affective education will
be accepted in the College of Education, he said.
I would also like to see more affective education in
the public school system.

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I COUPON GOOD THRU AUG g
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516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET

Library Colonade
August 4-6

S ALES-SER VICE-RE NTALS
"Authorized
"Authorized <* Smith Corona
Adler Dealer Dealer"
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
FORMERLY Hancock Office Equipment
582 N. Main St. 376-5551
f Climb aboard
The S.S. Winnjammer/J
i Meals served from 11:00 AM to it
1* Midnight wi
'J Bernie Sher //
f at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday 1 1
j Oysters & clams on the half shell
< Michelob on draft
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
V/
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton. Manager A /
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. /I
Closed Sundays
jH
Hm B§yjsS| k i Bb * Hi Hm a
If r -:v: :MsMax' W*' > ?A.
- iMWSv £ .%^POT'
j
Hpi* JP* x I Ik
Sr :
y ..
m if|gg^^HL
I Levi s"I Double X denim, cop-
USE YOUR BELK, CENTRAL,
OR MASTER CHARGE IN THE
GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER^



DURING REGISTRATION

Handicaps Face
Campus Problems

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second of a three-part series
on the life of the handicapped at
UF.)
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Many UF students, after
going through the registration
process here for the first time
would like to spend a week in
bed recovering.
Last quarter, a rheumatic
arthritic student entering her
first quarter at UF following
graduation from Santa Fe Junior
College had to do just that.
Why? Because of a
misunderstanding between her
and the registrars office.
It seems that during the trial
of registration for both the
student and those employed by
the office the student whose
condition normally requires the
use of crutches and was at the
time on crutches, was told by a
clerk that she would have to go
through registration like
everyone else, even though the
student explained her condition.
Following two days of going
through the normal
registration process, she suffered
a flare up; a condition
brought on by over exertion.
Her doctor confined her to
bed.
She missed the first week of
classes while recovering from an
anemia and swelling of the major
joints which may have caused
permanent damage to the joints,
according to a medical source
who asked that his name be
withheld.
The pain associated with her
condition is described by her as
being similar to rubbing
sandpaper against cartilage in her
joints, making it extremely
difficult for her to maneuver
across campus.
Because she missed the first
week of classes, she was unable
to keep up with the class
schedule and work load. She
dropped one class at first, then
half way through the term she
had to drop out completely.
She is no longer enrolled at
UF.
Normally, the policy of the
registrars office is to give
assistance to the handicapped on
campus during registration. In
this case, there was a slipup,

|SMRTS^9^
I (SAVE-510
MENS & WOMENS
I SHORTS-19C
I (SAVE-510
I SWEATERS-19<
TROPICAL CLEANERS
402 N.W. 13th St. 209 N.E. 16th Av.

according to the Director of
Records and Registration,
Vernon Voyles.
We work with each student
on an individual basis. A person
in our office is assigned to each
handicapped person who asks
for assistance during
registration.
Usually, they dont want
special consideration and
want to take care of
themselves, Voyles said.
He said the personnel in the
registrars office are under
directions to help the
handicapped or anyone
physically unable to go through
the process of registration.
In this case Voyles doesnt
know what happened.
The registrars office at this
time, he said, does not have a
person whose job it is to help
the handicapped, has no way of
making sure that the student is
given classes on the first floor of
buildings, and has no way of
determining which buildings
have elevators for the student.
A counselor whose specific
area of concern would be the
handicapped student, was what
the rheumatic arthritic student
says she needed most to help her
through registration.
Also, when going to classes,
she found Little Hall to be
impossible to walk through on
the upper floors where
classrooms are sunken below the
hallway level.
The campus police
designated certain parking areas
for her car during her class
periods, which doesnt guarantee
her a parking place she was
put in the same category as
faculty and employes of the uni university
versity university who have fewer parking
places than their total number
during fall, winter and spring
quarters.
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
(Volvo)
W
Good Sorvice Starts
CRANE IMPORTS
So6E.Untv.Ave. 372-4373

1 IH-FASHION^/? 1
vPar GAINESVILLE MALL fl
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. injg|j|i&sS
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iraHKf
FENCED IN?
ft L DONT BE!! Lemer Shops has I
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Choose your fall wardrobe now
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HHf | Sweater $6.99 mm
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p jl/ fi | \ Wicker Pouch Bag $3.99
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YOUR FASHION HEADQUARTERS J

Friday, August 1,1968, Tbs Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 1,1969

AS AN ADDED Gtcltcm&i & AD WILL BE EFFECTIVE THRU WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 6, 1969 ~V /
YOU MAY NOW SHOP PUBLIX FABULOUS SPECIALS FOR V* DIIDIIX I \/ Vi \
A FULL WEEK!
|PWlllj| K E
tiJWIN IHCASUFt
pzjjj ' F.'f.V.cookies . 43'
its L'YWrVMI jpwf/ if' X ' Instant Tea ;:: 99<
£q£r....:r
Holly weed Candy Borden's Sherbets KunTTiJ
Ujr Bar Sale! 5 *" $|
fjft Payday,
11 I i I \
Brownie Mix .... .7 49 c I jjggJjgjggjgg M \
Bar-B-Q Sauce 'bM* 39 c A2t & BEjJIpjHJjTrBB
Freestone
Van t
Pork & Beans ... 41 B 'iiMT TTIM. IP- W. A H Cu Greeneans 5
\ Lima Beans 29
Tomato Catsup .. : 29 H
Paper Towels '"'29* "' J M' stuffed olives .... *- 39
White or Assorted Colors, Demure \ fj l
Bath Tissue pkg. 25 c I \ fJ Marmalade > 39
.... . HLa Tasty
White or Assorted Colors, Demure \ f ib CO c
Facial Tissue .... ST 19* Pre se e !, ,
Aluminum Foil ... 29



wfIJK

,;% '"Or f T
Thompson Seedless

White Grapes
19*
Sweet Jumbo Western
Cantaloupes 3 89*
Fresh Salad-Perfect
Tomatoes sir 49*
Sweet, Juicy Sunny-Slope
Peaches 10 59*
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT.
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
Swift's Premium Proten Bone-In

Pot Roast 7" 79*
Swift's Premium Proten Boneless English-Cut
Beef Roast IT *1.09
Swift's Premium Proten Beef
Short Ribs 59*

. J
I JI I \
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU ill
AUGUST 6, 1969. Kjl
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED Ms

P U BLI a

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street

Rath's Mack Hawk Tatty
Sliced Bacon pkj: 79
Copeland'! Zesty Flavored
Wieners 'ST 49 e
Tarnow's Famous Whole-Hog
Bag Sausage ss o o pkg. 79*
Rath's Black Hawk Boneless
Smoked Dainties i: r 89*
Swift's Premium Tasty Fresh Sliced
Beef Bologna ... t£ 59*
Swift's Premium Skinless
Link Sausage ee e e pkg. 63*
Herman's Orange-Band Chunk
Braunschweiger 1 1: 49*
Sarasota Brand Chipped Beef, Ham or
Turkey 35*
Fresh Seafood Treat, Green
Small Shrimp .... T 89*
Fresh Seefoed Tr.et, Fill.t of
Red Grouper 1" 89*

BP -s 1
[sandwich W
[ Time )
C

V

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

OiHy 2 -1
more
weeks flStl Ba
-for
FREE art 'y* Wn
masterpices from Publix!
UCFMS COUPON' our FINN RT MASTERPIECE!
B GOOD FOR ONE Fl3*l !
8 xlO PICTURE |j I
f ETK3 ETET Goooolmuirl
I IX Era El 31 AUG 6.19691
(WITH PURCHASES Os $5 OR MORE
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES) F
LIMIT ONE COUPON PER FAMILY. PLEASE! | J

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Stores hours: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.


Miniift Maid Froxen Florida Concentrate
Grapefruit Juice 4f.V.89
Morten's Sugar Spiced or Powdered Sugar
Frozen Donuts ... 'X 39 c
Sara Lee Froxen Assorted
Dessert Cakes 6 e e e pkg< 69 c
(German Choc., Choc., Brownies, Banana or Orange)
Pictsweet Froxen
Mixed Vegetables 49 e
Green Giant
Buttered Rice .... 33'
Fish '.S' *1
Singleton's Froxen
Breaded Shrimp C 87 c
Treasure Isle Froxen
Stuffed Flounder X l 39 c
rt ffl II
gj LJ
"l];MlfiVti-TO^VT 1 1 1 ]!!. v \
Delicious Fresh or Smoked
Liverwurst 99*
Tasty Kitchen-Fresh
Macaroni Salad .. U' 39 c
Fresh Zesty Flavored
Cole Slaw T 39'
Flavorful Beef or Park k
Bar-B-Cued Ribs .. ir $ 1 49

Friday August 1,1900, Tha Florida AMgator,

EXTRA |P H^I
| Solis. Steak, Veal, Gravy & SI. Beef, ;
! Gravy & SI. Turkey Freezer Queen
; Assorted Meat Items 2-lb. Pkg.
1 4
: > 1 (fnpiree Wed., August 4, 19*0) <
*aaaaaaaaaaaAftk*aaaaaaaaaaaaaa*
EXTRA |F"9|
JyGreenStampsPll
! Booth's Frozen
Lobster Tails
9-oz. pkg.
2. Ilipm WaP., *<. I*A*)
xa EXTRA
JyGreenStamps g§]
lUltra-Brite
Tooth Paste
5-oz. or 5%-oz.
(ixpir.. Wa,., A.,,11 A. I***)
EXTRA
| Bufferin |
| Tablets |
| 60-ct. pkg. I
S A. WH., *) , lIM| S
Xft&eea.aaaAaaaaeaaal'aaiaeeaaaafta^aQ^AAit
EXTRA --gpu'u.fa
gi|
Calm Spray
Powder Deodorant
> <
! 5-oz. or 7-oz. _ <
I 5. (IxpiraA WaA.. A.(*.t A, lAAA) J
<
xaastMtMMatftaashiaaaatfttaitAMftaair
EXTRA
JySiwnSlamps pg
Lysol Spray
Disinfectant
7-oz. can
A <
\ (lap*res Wed., August 4, 1949) <
xaAaaaaaaaaaaaaaWaaitftaaaaaaaaaaaaa*
PH
O'Cedar
Sponge Mop
aeh
! T. (Ixpira. WaA., A.f.it A, I AAA)
*AQB A AO Aft V
- EXTRA IF"*!
Green Stamps |9j
Pine-Sol <1
Disinfectant
28-oz. bot. ;
| I*' W.X., A.fwil A, lAA9) ] j
x^aaaftftaaaaaaeeeallaeiuzaaaaa^afaoa^ft^
BijjySreeiTstamps Pi
> <
Lambrecht's Pizza ;
with Sausage A Cheese
14-oz. pkg.
| 9. (IxpirAi WaA.. A.,..l A, lAAA) i
Dairi-Fresh or Breakstone's
Cottage Cheese A Cup 59 c
Kraft's Cracker Barrel Mallow
Cheddar Cheese A Atick 69*
Armour's Miss Wisconsin Mad. Agad
Longhorn Cheese X 69*
Wiscansin Chaasa Bar Random Weight
Longhorn Cheese ll' 89*
raakfatt Cluk
Margarine V.; 15*
Kraft's Parkay (4c off)
Soft Margarine a a ctn. 43*
Pillsbury's Crescent p
Dinner Rolls 39*
Pillsbury's Orange
Danish Rolls Mr 43*
Buko Assarted
Cheese Spreads ..*2s*
(Mushroom, Salman, Shrirng, lobster or Mam)

ml
R K E T S^jjji
Where shopping
is a pleasure

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 1, 196 C

Hungry Squirrels
MR. EDITOR:
Kindness is a genuine pleaser.
* v Oberohn, UAC. 1969
What is hunger? What doth it mean to be continually in search of
food? Agony? Distress? Torment? Despair?
What doth it mean not to be able to feed ones children?
What is ones reaction? Chagrin? Horror? Sorrow?
I represent a multitude of mute, hungry creatures. The general
consensus among the creatures is that they will not condescend to
humans. I am not human, therefore, Im accepted into their society.
Yancy Squirrel is bewildered because nearly all of the nuts have
been gone for years. What the squirrels have conserved is rationed to
the children. He has to eat garbage from behind a local diner.
Consequently, his pride is hurt.
Mrs. Brown Cardinal informed me that she is in despair; she never
knows where the next meal will come from. Her home has broken up
because two of her children have died.
I wish to reconcile this; to bridge the gap between the creatures
and humans. Yes, it is an arduous task. Humans doth not seem to
desire to cooperate.
What doth I request? I have attained permission from Mr. Cross, to
solicit contributions in the Plaza of the Americas. The creatures and I
are elated for that. However, this newspaper has the potential to
ameliorate the condition much more rapidly than I singularly. Please,
either purchase a loaf of bread or contribute.
I importune you to participate.
Spare no price conserve no energy, when a life is in question!
Oberohn, UAC. 1969
OBEROHN

ifcSE ' n

WASHINGTON ln view of Senator Ted
Kennedys own statement about his troubles,
nobody should indulge in persona l comments on
what befell the luckless Democratic Senator
Majority Whip when his car plunged off an
unlighted bridge on lonely Chappaquiddick Island at
the eastern end of the larger Massachusetts island of
Marthas Vineyard. But the quirks of personal fate,
however reluctantly they may be explained or
judged, often work in a quite callous way to shift
the course of history. This, despite ones first
impulse to say nothing of any sort about the
Kennedy involvement in tragedy, demands
comment.
It so happened that the accident in
Massachusetts effectively removed the captain of
the anti-ABM forces in the Senate at a most critical
moment. True enough, Ted Kennedy had not taken
a front-stage position in the forensic battle over the
limited deployment of an anti-ballistic missile. Like
Democratic Senator Burt Wheeler (Montana) in the
days of the big fight to block Franklin D.
Roosevelts plan for packing the Supreme Court,
Kennedy, a canny parlimentary strategist, had
deferred to his allies among the Republicans.
It was the Republican Senator Cooper of
Kqfttucky who put his name to the amendment
intended to keep the anti-ballistic missile in
research and development status. And it was
Republican Senator Aiken of Vermont who tried to
kill the ABM outright. Meanwhile, Democrats such
as Senator Gore of Tennessee did more talking in
committee and on the floor than Kennedy himself.
Even so, the anti-ABM crusade was bound up
from its inception with Ted Kennedys felt need to
oppose President Richard Nixons first important
military policy decision. Kennedy had sponsored
the Dr. Jerome Wiesner-Professor Abram Chayes
anti-ABM book which had kicked off the whole
rumpus.

Anti-ABM Forces Lose Their CaDtain

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick
Editor-in-Chief
%
Dave Osier
Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
Executive Editor

J\ll

Kennedy men toured the country to present the
Wiesner-Chayes arguments; they turned up on
campuses and at forums with well-oiled regularity.
Anti-ABM letters poured in on Congress, many of
them suspiciously uniform in both arguments and
phraseology. It was all a snow job, quite in
keeping with Kennedy-organized crusades in the

These Days
John
Chamberlain

past. And Ted Kennedy, as Whip, stood ready to
marshal the Democratic votes at the close.
The Nixon forces moved into action somewhat
belatedly. Their literature -a sharp study by
Herman Kahn of the Hudson Institute, presenting
the case for a thin ABM deployment, and a
well-reasoned document called The ABM and the
Changed Strategic Military Balance: U.SA. vs.
U.S.S.R., put out by the American Security
Council has only recently begun to move through
the mails. Weeks after the spate of letter-writing
provoked by the Wiesner-Chayes crusade had started
to dribble off, a flood of pro-ABM letters descended
on Congress.
The day of decision on the ABM, which may
have come with a vote on the Cooper amendment
by the time this coluifrn is in print, was fast
approaching amid frenzied counting and
counter-counting in the Senate anterooms. And
Vice President Spiro Agnew was girding to break a
possible fifty-fifty tie when Ted Kennedy, the quiet
leader of the opposition, faded to step on the brake
or jerk the drivers wheel around in time to save
himself and his passenger from disaster on a

EDITORIAL
City Vs. UF ?
more we are reminded of the deteriorating nature
of one of the most important facets of a university
community the town and gown relationship.
We noted with more than a little trepidation a statement
by the City of Gainesville this wesk that Florida Blue Key
will have to pay for the temporary installation of bleachers
for the Homecoming Parade. Before this year, the city has
loaned FBK the stands, and city employes have erected
them.
And now the city has given notice that it will no longer
do the work free. This conies in a year when all student
groups are suffering from a bad case of budget cut, and
follows countless years when the Homecoming Committee
has participated in a little deficit spending on its own.
Agreed, the expenditure for the setting up of the
bleachers will be small -a mere drop in the FBK bucket,
but the decision by the city council points to a greater
problem: the refusal by many of the powers that be in city
hall to cooperate with the University.
Though it may not be the case, this announcement,
coupled with others, give one the feeling that the UF is
being taken advantage of.
We are reminded of the Carnigras fiasco, in which the
city required Student Government to pay $1,200 tax on
carnivals, and rent portable rest room facilities.
Only through the generosity of a dozen Gainesville
citizens who each donated SIOO, was Carnigras saved from
financial disaster.
These are not merely isolated events, but examples of an
ever-growing trend toward alienation of the student.
Oppressive utility deposits levied by the city, and even
more oppressive breakage deposits slapped on by landlords
are two more examples which lend credence to our charge.
An even more evident example is the citys refusal to apply
its own housing codes in the area called the student ghetto,
where substandard housing is rented to students who must
live near campus.
One remarkable aspect of the whole problem in general
and the bleachers incicent specifically, is that the city
appears to be to use the old phrase biting the hand
which feeds it.
Is it not Homecoming which brings thousands of people
to Gainesville to stay in hotels and motels; eat in restaurants
and pour countless dollars into the economy? The answer,
of course, is yes.
This apparent trend must be reversed. Just how long do
the city fathers expect the student body and administration
to stand by while our hands are being gnawed off?

Massachusetts weekend.
You couldnt get anyone on Capitol Hill to say
very much about the effect of the Kennedy accident
on the fate of the ABM. But the comment of an
administrative assistant to a hitherto uncommitted
Democratic Senator who had just decided for the
ABM seems pertinent. With Ted Kennedy out of
the fight, he said, the anti-ABM team is without a
head. Dick Goodwin and Jerome Wiesner cant very
well carry the ball without their leader.
Sticking my neck out, I would say that the ABM
should carry by a 55-45 vote. It should go that way
partly because Ted Kennedy was out of the fight on
the eve of St Crispins Day, and partly because of
the successful return to earth of our moon
conquerors, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, and
Mike Collins, who proved that with rockets,
computers, and electronics you can home on the
most unimaginable targets, even, possibly, on an
incoming Soviet missile. Nixon, once considered a
bom loser, has turned into a most dramatic sort of
winner. Who would have guessed it in 1960 or
1962*>
I Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey John Sugg
Editorial Assistant Associate Editor
Gayle McElroy Darcy Meeker
Copy Editor Campus Living Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opini 0 ", expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.



> FORUM:^^
C -Aitiui mi Vii&ut J
hope for the
Playing At Revolution
MR. EDITOR:
To those who advertised a July 26th Celebration in the Alligator and
by other public means:
Because of the freedom of public expression in the country of the
imperialismo Yanqui you were able to advertise your celebration.
Because of the freedom of thought and speech in the country of
the imperialismo Yanqui you are able to think of, and give your
Government such a name.
Because of the freedom to sell and distribute anti-American and
subversive publications in the country of the imperialism Yanqui
you are able to set up a booth in front of a library or any other place
and do so.
Because you live in the country of the imperialismo Yanqui you
are alive today, after such acts...
Try to advertise anything against the TOTALITARIAN REDS in a
Cuban newspaper, or simply express any sign of being
Contrarrevoludonario. .
Gentlemen, you dont make revolution by growing a beard,
wearing blue militia shirts, or solidarizing with other alleged
revolutionaries by having a party. If you really want to solidarize with
them, why dont you go down there? Are you afraid you wont have
much to eat? Or is it the thought that youll be deprived of the
advantages the imperialismo Yanqui offers...
Again, gentlemen, thats no way of making revolution, hear it from
me -1 made it when I wasnt able to sport a beard, which is why I
must withhold my name, since it may affect those of my folks who
are still enslaved in the so called Free Territory of America.
A CUBAN STUDENT AT UF
f Campus Calendar I

Friday, August 1
Engineering Science Mechanics
Luncheon, 150 D, 12:00 p.m.
Muslim Student Association, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Afro-American Student Association,
123 Union, 12:30 p.m.
Union Movie, Lonelyhearts", Union
Aud., 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, August 2
Afro-American Student Association
Picnic, Camp Wauburg,
12:30-4:30 p.m.
Florida All Star Marching Band
Luncheon, 233, 234, A, 243, 244
Union, 12:302:30 p.m.
Union Movie, Lonelyhearts, Union
' Aud., 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Sunday, August 3
University Film Series, Belle of the
Nineties, Union Aud., 7:00 &
9:15 p.m.

QumlmjQ. QwmmMv Q>bh
<
Tremendous Values for
CmhMMJ
Womens Dept.
Up to 75% Savings
Bathing Suits
dresses
all Summer wear
nibersitp ££>f)op
1620 West University

Student Peace Union Meeting, 349
Union, 7:3011:00 p.m.
Monday, August 4
Elementary Education Workshop,
Aud. & West Gallery, 8:00
a.m. 5:30 p.m.
Lobby, 9:00 a.m.5:00 p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Ballroom Dancing, 256, 245 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Modern Interpretive Dance, 245, 246
Union, 7:30 p.m.
REITZ UNION BOX OFFICE
Tickets are now on sale for Florida
Players THE BIRTHDAY
PARTY, August 6-9, 1969. I.D.
25 cents, F&S&GP $1.50
The Music Dept, presents THE
MIKADO" August 8-9, 15-16,
1969. Family night August 8 &
15, $3.00 family. Adults $2.00,
Students SI.OO

My Teacher.-
MR. EDITOR:
I came into the crazy mixed up world in the
1890s. My parents were what was known as
religious, god-fearing people. They did their best to
see that I was brought up a good citizen. I was
taught to respect my elders, the law and be
considerate of the rights of others. I was taught to
honor and respect my country and its flag.
I dont think anybody was ever prouder of being
an American than I was. I firmly believed that God
has chosen America to lead the world and proudly
memorized Barbara Fritchie and Paul Reveres
Ride which I accepted as gospel.
I went to school in California with Chinese,
Japanese, Negro and Mexican classmates. I had no
illwill against any of them and learned that they
were people just like I was. They were all subject to
the same problems that I was. Color of skin or
religion meant nothing to me. They were friends
and playmates and buddies.
My family was considered middle-class, not rich
and not poor. Like most families we experienced
money problems which were frequently discussed in
my presence. I was fed. housed and clothed and
enjoyed an allowance of 25 cents a week to spend as
I wished. If I felt I needed more I was permitted to
earn it in any lawful, respectable maimer. However I
had certain duties and obligations at home and was
given to understand that these must be met
efficiently before I sought outside income activities.
I soon learned that opportunities were unlimited
for a boy who was ambitious and willing to work. A
widow in our block offered me 5 cents to sweep her
sidewalk each morning. It gave me an idea and I
soon had a similar arrangement with seven neighbors

Wishbone
August Special
At our 16th Ave. store only
Wishbone Chicken
Quickie.
59C
Two pieces of our usual crisp
and juicy fried chicken, with
a slice of hot buttered bread.
The QUICKIE is in effect through
August at our 16th Ave. store.
Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii)iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniininiinmiiiHimiiini
FLORIDA QUARTERLY $1.25 LIBRARY COLONADE
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimmiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimimmiiiiillllllllllllHlliiiiiiimiiiiimimiiimiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimiHlilllllliimmiuiHiieiiMHHii

Friday, August 1,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Hard Work
which netted me 35 cents a day. I arose early,
romped through my early chores at home, then
fulfilled my sidewalk sweeping contracts before
shoving off for school. I mowed lawns and did yard
work during afternoon free time. Sold papers and
eventually carried a regular paper route. My
personal income soon averaged $5 a week.
A Negro kid and classmate operated a shoeshine
stand and did very well, I made a deal with him to
take over his stand in the evening after he quit
work. A shoeshine netted me a dime less cost of
polish. I learned to play a tune with a shine-rag and
learned a lot about human nature in my dealings
with customers. Some were difficult and hard to
please, others easily satisfied and generous. I
followed family advice and started a savings
account. Before long I had over SIOO in the bank. I
dont Ucnow who was the proudest, myself or my
Dad.
Now I am glad my folks encouraged me to earn
my own way, to recognize the value of a dollar and
give value received. This lesson has served me well
all my life. Hard work and enterprise didnt do me
any harm. As I grew older and assumed more
exacting jobs I learned how to get along with
people, how to hold my job through efficient effort
and to stay alert for opportunity.
Sure I was a square, a poor dumb cluck and a
simple soul in the eyes of some of my friends. But I
consider such titles most complimentary today even
though they are quite unpopular in some circles.
RUSSELL KAY
FLORIDA NEWS SERVICE

Page 9



Page 10

I, Tho Florida AlNgator. Friday. Aufust 1.1909

in-fjAt CfUtM diMMhWML
MARK OF QUALITY
GRAIVADA

try Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Thursdoy thru Wednesday July 31 Aug. 6
WINN-DIXIK STORES, INC. -- COPYRIGHT .. 1908
All Grinds MAXWELL HOUSE
ftjfeg

Limit one coffee of your choice w/$5.00
or more food order excluding cigarettes.

Giant Size BLUE, WHITE or COLD WATER ARROW
Limit One Detergent of Your Choice with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes.
DETERGENT... ....39'
King Size LEMON FRESH FAB
Limit One Detergent of Your Choice with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes.
DETERGENT. .99'
48-Ct ASTOR Limit One with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes
TEA BAGS. 39'

No. 303 Con THRIFTY MAID Apple .cmt
19-oz. Dixie Dorlinq Lemon, Yellow. £ g /# V m JK Igt m 8-oz. Thrifty Moid
X White or Devil Food X JUIICC 0/51 f JlllCe. 3/SI W TOMATO SAUCE 10/sl.
CAKE MIXES 4/sl. | No 300 Con THRIFTY MAID Tomolo I 32 oz LILAC Liquid ***** N lA /*
13/2-oz. Dixie Dorlinq White or Fudqe I g g /A a I 320 z. LILAC Liquid .. I NORTHERN BEANS
FROSTING MIXES 4/Sl. I SOIICB 0/51 I Ppfpf'llPlS# f /SI I No. 303 Con Thriftv Maid
TOMATO'cATSU P 4/*,. I I JEKKKaJ'J* S'SrSSrS-SSUS
$ CRUSHED PINEAPPLE 4/sl. I TotthrifTy m?d G, Tmo bTs / 1 No 303 Con Thrifty Moid Whole or SI.
FRUIT DRINK 4/sl. \T G */* V Suit PpflC ft/ TOMATO JUICE 4/H Jl r""" Jl J 300 c '**" ,D ntoj J\ PORK B.BEANS ....JO/S l
No. /z Cons Blue Bay ak I a !g m hAMNC ft / 1 %lw inVj-02. Thrifty Maid Chic. & Rice or
TUNA FISH 4/sl. T DlUlll 4/SI T 1*60115 0/ 5 I T Chicken Noodle SOUP. 10/fl.
h K V *Mt A /*1 22-oz. DEEP SOUTH wh. o, Hamb. SI. M Co THRIfTY MAID WK Gold lOVz-nz Con Thrifty Moid Bean or
CUT GREEN BEANS 4/$l- I I '%/+1 fi (Am 7/xl Veaetable SOUP .10/Sl.
No. 2 '/ 2 Con Thrifty Mold Cut PICKIGS. ... . j/5 I Wi11.... 1/ f I lO'/z-oz. Can Thrftv Moid Tomoto nr
SWEET POTATOES 4/sl. owT*ay Y No 303 # Con thrifty maid Mushroom SOUP ...10/sl.
454 Starch....... 3/$l |A $1
I hr^i^nrfa£:v l nrlll In

28-oz. CHEK No Relurn Bottles TWIST OFF TOP
SOFT DRINKS 5/sl.
12-oz'. CHEK ALL FLAVORS
CANNED DRINKS 15/sl.
12 Qt. THRIFTY MAID INSTANT
POWDERED MILK 99*
SOUTHERN BISCUIT SR. OR PLAIN
FLOUR 5 .1 39*

GEORGIA RED
Peaches J
OF *pfl
SEASON" R IBS \W

B T f STAMM
TWO QT* DIXIK WHIP
GOOD THRU AUG. 6

1401 N. MAIN ST.

1 PRICES GOOD ALL WEEKI

48-oz ASTOR Limit One with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes.
COOKING oa..;A9'

-20-Gal. PLASTIC
GARBAGE CAN $1.99
Large COLGATE
4oz RIGHT GUARD
DEODORANT 58*
12V.0Z. LUSTRE CREME
HAIR SPRAY 48*

i C r.Til e
; | [ljlft TOP VALUE STAMPS
Beef Steakettes
' W 6 GOOD THRU AUG. 6
* *' ,eut ioc *
jl uni.:

130 N.W. 6TH ST.

fTW VALLHS STAMM
TWO PKGS RICH'S
Choc. Eclairs
GOOD THRU AUG. 6
4 OV lOCM WMM.Sia.I

3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

Half Gallon WHITE ARROW PLASTIC
Limit 2 with $5 or more purhase excluding cigarettes
Arrow BLEACH...I9'
Quart DEEP SOUTH- Limit One with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes.
MAYONNAISE 39'
PINEBREEZE GRADE "A" FRESH FLA. ALL WHITE MEDIUM
EGGS .2- 89'

40-oz DEEP SOUTH
PEANUT BUnER 89*
ISW. SLICK
DOG FOOD 10/89*
ISh oz CLICK
CAT FOOD 3/29*
14 oz. BLUE ARROW
CLEANSER 10*

FUU OF JUICE FRESH PERSIAN
Limes 12/49*
VINE RIPE JUMBO SIZE CANTA
Loupes 3/sl.
VINE RIPE EXTRA LARGE
Honeydews... 69 <
MOUNTAIN GROWN HARVEST FRESH CUCUMBERS OR
Peppers.... 5/39*

frol | VALUE STAMM
PKG. BYRONS BAR B Q
CMP. PORK OR BAR B Q
Sandwiches
GOOD THRU AUQ. 6

aw*
can

fTIEXTRA
B*! 1 M TOP VALUE STAMPS
TWO PKG 9.
CRACKIN GOOD
GOOD THRU AUG 6

HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

Limit one can Crisco shortening w/$5.00
or more food order excluding cigarettes.

12 oz. THRIFTY MAID
CORNED BEEF 2/89*
200-0. ARROW WHITE OR ASSORTED COLOR
FACIAL TISSUE 5/sl.
2 Roll Pkq ARROW PINK OR YELLOW
BATH TISSUE 5/sl.
BIG JUMBO ARROW WHITE OR ASSORTED Pk
PAPER TOWELS 5/sl.

U S No I Venl Vu REGULAR
Potatoes 1059*
THOMPSON WHITE SEEDLESS HARVEST FRESH
Grapes 29*
MOUNTAIN GROWN VINE RIPE
Tomatoes...., 29*
MOUNTAIN GROWN HARVEST FRESH POLE
Beans 2 49*

j
*.* r.Ol K)e MO PvKMCIt 0*
nut GT. aox
# Borateem
GOOD THRU AUQ. 6
O V* iOCai im< D.xif
..jm ii



J
gf^

-s.'s
Quontity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Thursdoy thru Wednesday July 31 Aug 6
WINN OIXIK STORES. INC. - COPYRIGHT .. 1|

USDA CHOICE WD BRAND CORN FED TENDER
CUBED STEAKS.... $1.49
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED BONELESS SIRLOIN
TIP STEAK fluirlr Dn^fl
RUMP ROAST $1.39 VIIIICK KUfljl
ROUND ROAST $139
POT ROAST 79* totes C
CALIF. ROAST 89* CP pit T
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED BONELESS
rilllAtf BAACT AA< w-dmandwef U WD ****o All MEAT stew or
VnUVn KUAoI 7 SHORT RIBS 69* GROUND CHUCK $1.99
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED ROUND BONE W-D BRAND ALL MEAT STEW OR GROUND W-D BRAND LEAN-Ptui 100 Fr*. Slompi -/coupon Irom ne-paper
SHOULDER ROAST >B9* round steak 99* ground beef s $2.59
CUT* ROAST '* // STEAKETTES 2 > $1.89 GROUND BEEF... 10 $4.99
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED EZ CARVE OVEN READY ~T /
' / CWIBT'S PREMIUM CANNED
g 1.19 J .***£-, in AflC SA99
MORTON or OCOMA H
Beat Pi *= 5-1
MRS SMITH LfMON. APPLE. COCONUT. DUTCH APPLE PEACH orCHERRY Q uo rti DIXIE WHIP-.Plus 100 Free Slump* -'coupon Irom ne-tpoper
FRUIT PIES 2/sl. DESSERT TOPPING 2/sl.
Ouurls RICH'S King Sue DOWNYFtAKE
COFFEE RICH 39* WAFFLES 2/79*
JENOS SAUSAGE OR CHEESE 10-Pock ROMAN CHEESE
PIZZA PIES 69 PIZZA PIES $1.19
Poly Bogs DIXIANA CUT CORN. GR PEAS. GR BEANS or GREEN GIANT RICE VERDI. PtLOF.MEDLEY OR
BABY LIMAS 2/sl. SPANISH RICE 2/69*
DIXIANA MIX VEGETABLES OR SPECKLED Pkg OF 18
BUTTER BEANS 2/$ 1. MORTON DONUTS 2/69*
DIXIANA Poly Boys MUSTARD. COLLARDS OR W/Roots 2-Lb. Poly 800 FROZEN FRENCH
TURNIP GREENS 3/sl. FRY' POTATOES 2/77*
16 or. TASTE O SEA 6-oz BBYS LIMEADE OR
FISH STICKS 59* LEMONADE 8/sl.
BwvauSTiSKm jfcLV^ Y*FS!SMS* jEliljuJ?sxsTs£ i 1 [ill Jwv£SsffA i
Cleaner llbl Spray Starch j WL;SZL GiwnkTSiaf : WnrfTerf :
(.COD THRU AUG. 6 J GOOD THRU AUO. 6 J aOOOTMRU AUG COOOTMRU Alt HSunT ***** PPTtPI^
B a tout LOCAL WNNMII At row. lOC.i NIMN CHI.) f . I
-r -- uttttt's -- - 1- 'r t 1 twirsTTtTrp i'i ' iTb'iTi

1401 N. MAIN ST.

Wednesday Thru Wednesday!

GRANADA
COFFEE CUP
with
$3 purchase
|jrj Each week a piece of distinctive Granada dinnerware
fj# Wlll Matured for just 290. For each $3 in grocery
purchases, you are entitled to one piece at this low
Kte-.. pr c ?' here's no limit. . with as 6 purchase you can
Bet 2 pieces . and so on.
i r Eicluflirn tobacco, liquor and liquid dairy products.

130 N.W. 6TH ST.

This schedule will be rtpejtedthreMime^
I during the next 15 weeks j
I k DINNER PLATE OOt *' " c ATP S 3 purchdl.*
S ws DESSERT DISH OOt ry I
A7 S 3 purctldf.* I
f THIRD V E
WtEK SAUCER '? 9Or wltll dvdry
,9c Ayki S 3 purchOM*
POURTH 71 I
week COFFEE CUP *2 OQr
9< Aar S 3 pure haw*
I WICK Brtad fc Butter ~TT I
I plate *u 29c rgg. I
| Thi abov# 'tens will be said et thase special I
prices only in the weeks they art featured.
tobacco. ii quof tnd | iquid Mfy produrtf

W-D BRAND USDA 1
Corn Fed BONELESS ROUND
* ____
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED TOP
ROUND STEAK $1.39
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED CLUB OR
SIRLOIN STEAK $1.39
USDA CHOICE W D BRAND CORN FED
T-BONE STEAK $1.49
USDA CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED BONELESS
DELMONICO STEAK $1.99

3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

Friday, Aufort 1.1989, Tha Florida AMlter.

gl

HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

109

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE I
DATS UN STATION WAGON.
$1,490, only one available like this.
GODDING & CLARK MOTORS,
Inc. Home of the new leader. SE 2nd
Ave & 2nd St. (A-3t-162-c)
r~
Sale LiIV monster Slalom 20.
BOGEN amp. 70-watt S7O. Call
378-3120 afternoons and evenings.
(A-3t-162-p)
Diamond ring set. Marquise cut
center stone / two baquettes. Match
wedding ring. 50 pts. S4OO. See Jim
J 324 SW 13th St. (A-2t-162-p)
Sale! Everything must go. TV 10$,
Singer sewing machine $lO, RCA
stereo w/4 speakers $75, beds, chairs,
Lamps, etc. 242-T Flavet 3.
(A-3t-161-p)
Toy poodle white male 2 lbs 3 mos.
puppy shots. Clipped. AKC &
Pedigree SBS or best offer 392-0930
after 6:30 475-1329. (A-3t-161-p)
GET AWAY CAR Get away from the
heat in an air conditioned cheap car.
$325 It runs fine. Godding & Clark
Motors 2nd & 2nd S.E. Ph.
378-2311. (A-tf-159<)
3 Dachshunds 2 black 1 brown AKC
regestered temp, shots SSO. Call
378-3330. (A-4t-160-p)
LOFTY pile, free from soil is the
carpet cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-163-lt-c)
Basset Hound Puppies for sale. Have
developed smaller strain SBS and up.
Call 378-4480 before 5 378-1068
after 6. (A-3t-163-c)
Little Pussy Cats; 5c each. Orange
striped, calico, or blotchy. Phone
495-2226 before 6:00 or 495-2479
after 6:00. (A-3t-163-p)
FREE kittens black or ginger. Call
378-7977. Hurry limited supply.
(A-lt-163-p)
Yamaha 305 cc. In excellent
mechanical condition 12000 m. With
rack and two helmets s4Bs. Come
to no. 411 at 1225 S.W. Ist Ave. or
call 378-9167. (A-4t-163-p)
2 yr. old air cond. unit 5500 BTU
Good for 1 medium sized room.
Bargain price! Call Tom 378-5673.
(A-st-163-p)
Guns GunsGuns Inventory over
450. Buy Sell Trade Repair.
Reloading supplies, Custom,
reloading. Harry Beckwith, gun
dealer, Micanopy. 466-3340.
(A-163-ts-p)
FOR RENT |
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)

'R&dty <^lltviGrv\s^ pAeA&vfc |
SLEEP DWELL UPON THY BREAST
FOR I SHALL N0T!... i
"... 1 i
Thou Shalt EBJcovet Thy Neighbors Wife...
4B MONTGOMERY | MYRNA
Clift Loy
% ROBERT DOLORES
Ryan Hart jh
WHY IS IT THAT MOTION PICTURES oGfc Bllff C£
WHICH DEAL WITH LIFE AS IT REALLY
IS...ARE CALLED SHOCKING! {
f-r J, i £liAoCut&^MM^
CfajlMtT 1 <**d- 2 facbvuMt&rt*' : 4* O

Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 1,1969

I FOR RENT |
& wwfrwc; o; Baas i'wwwww
Wanted 2 rmmates for Sept.
Landmark Apts. Poolside. $47.25 per
mo. Call Sandy 378-9954 after 5
p.m. (B-3t-163-p)
A few units of privacy remain at LA
MANCHA for the fall. 4 bedrooms
provide maximum luxury at
minimum expense. Rental trailer is
open 35 p.m. Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, & Fridays at SW Bth
Ave. & 9th St. Great new idea!
(B-lt-163-p)
Spacious 2 Bedroom Furnished apt.
Married Couple Only Poolside Porch.
$126 Month. 1405 SW 10th Ter.
Apt. 36. 378-8019 After 5 P.M.
(B-st-159-p)
U n i v e r s i ty A pt s j u st n ort h of R esea rc h
Li b. 2 sizeseff ~2sty leslbdrm.and2bdr
m .a llax.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
.LeaseQuarterlyratesyearlyaverage7s
- 120/m 0.3 76-8 9901536NW3rdave.
(B-12T-158-P)

Ik VV \ SPECIAL ||j
fOJ FRIDAY I
§^ tr SPECIAL I
1 SAUTEED FISHI
I ALMONDINE 8
H WITH TARTAR SAUCE §1
680
I MORRISON'S I
9 CAFETERIAS 9
||L GAINESVILLE MALL J||

f WANTED |
WW IWWtWWMI MWinrow Q WOO?
FEMALE roommate wanted. 1 bdrm.
apt. 3 blocks from campus. Washing
machine air conditioned ranch style.
Call now. 378-5993. (C-2t-163-p)
Wanted 1967 Seminole. Will pay.
Call 372-6790. (C-2t-163-p)
One female roommate wanted for
immediate occupancy in 2-bedroom
Landmark s4s/mo. Call
378-3518. (C-3t-163-p)
Female roommate for fall, La Bonne
Vie Apts. SW 16 ave. $47.50 per
month. Most utilities incl. Call Joann
392-7589. (C-3t-161-p)
HELP WANTED
WANTED COCKTAIL
WAITRESSES! Must be 21 yrs pf
age. No experience necessary. Full or
part time. Apply Dubs 4560 NW
13th. St. Ask for Mr. Thomas.
(E-159-7t-p)

l HELP WANTED
kcowaowiiiiw
Male over 21 part time Mon. Wed.
Fri. nights 4p.m. l2 mid. Apply in
person Woody's 3458 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-3t-161-p)
4 year old & 8 year old subjects with
normal vision needed in visual
research. $3.00 per hour. Call
392-3031 Visual Sciences Lab.
(E-Bfc-l 59)
Giant Slide Opening Soon Need Male
and Female Help Full and Part Time
Contact Marvin Julius. 372-6232 or
475-5771. (E-3t-163-p)
COED with own transportation
needed for housework and child care.
Good working conditions and good
salary. Mrs. Anderson 376-8788.
(E-2t-163-p)

Downtown Gainesville ) mm |
FiyJSf fit*"*# 7 L DAYS
[NEVER SO TIMELY! NEVER SO GREAT!!
I SEE IT DURING THE 2STH
[ANNIVERSARY YEAR OF D DAYi
DARRYL F ZANUCKS gj i
I Mw JV DAY WITH 42 INTERNATIONAL STARS/
I Jr < Based on tht Book by CORNELIUS RYAN Released by Oth Century-Fox
J
BElBBil 1] HELD OVER last i
H" w w.7'sV v l A DONT MISS IT! 7 DAYS 1
I THE HAPPIEST EOTE-IV [
Starring
I DEAN MICHELE DAVID BUDDY
: JONES LEE TOMLINSON HACKETT [
as Tennessee Steinmetz m
l c,, joe FLYNN BENSON FONG ANDY GRANATELLI |
i s "-"; BILL WALSH w DON DaGRADI BILL WALSH <
i -t ROBERT STEVENSON J
B2Thd
I ion n. w. im st. \ewi OVER 1
i'BEAUTIFUL! The entire film is a poem of youth, love and |
violence...a Renaissance recapitulation of 'West Side Story B
J ".iiiiii i
Franco Zeffirelli
I J'tttlwHoo of M 4
| flfc |gj j|[ J
MJ \oo?'tljniin )(>\< s m

BOWLING
WEEK-END
SPECIAL
Sat. 9am-6pm
All day Sunday
3 t SI.OO
35c per game
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

' '
r "h^WANTW^
Medical technologist. Salary good to
8000 depending on experience.
Contact Mr. Clark, Munroe Hosp.
Ocala. Phone 629-7911 ex. 19.
(E-162-3t-p)
| PERSONAL 1
Free! 5 wk old kittens. Call 378-6282
after 5:30 p.m. (J-3t-162-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear an electronic
factorial. Any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-Bt-158-P)
Sacrificial Offering! Stereo
equipment: 50 watt Kenwood
amp/AM-FM $l5O, Monarch 60 watt
solid state, $75, 2 Criterion 50
Speakers, S4O, Telefunken turntable,
S3O, 8-track tape players Lear Jet,
$45, Motorola, $65, tapes
availableCall 378-5125. (J-2t-163-p)
CLOST FOUND^I
frWM; BO D 8
Found at Quik Save: Navy Peters
jacket, size 36L. Call 378-1001 or
come by Quik Save and identify
initials to claim. (L-3t-nc-p)
'services ***""}
HORSEBACK RIDING
HAYRIDES PARTIES!!! SE 15th
St. 372-8460. (M-st-159-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
519V2 SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-155-2t-p)
TYPING ALL SUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. ELECT. IBM TYPEWRITER
ALL TYPES CALL JEAN 376-7809.
(M-st-162-p)
BABY CARE! 311 N.W. 15th
Terrace, (infants under 1 yr. old)
Monday through Friday. Ba.m.-sp.m.
sls per week. .75 pr. hr.
Experienced, trustworthy, Christian
home. Ph. 376-2072. (M-2M62-C)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
TYPING IBM electric rates according
to material. Call Nancy at 392-0761.
(M-4t-161-p)
For the slave slavecourage
courage slavecourage knewnochains-
For the master masterdesire
desire masterdesire knew no color
in the savage world
of^ej^South!
rr ix / / Mi jb
Stephen Boyd Dionne Warwick
fleeip npwie COLOR by Movielab
UuOIGUQVIO Released By Continental^
ij IU r M

Friday, August 1,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Alternators Generators Starters
- Electrical systems tested repairs
Service 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-c)

ITHE TECHNICOLOR V
|o:3sWILD bunch!
UNDER 16 NOT ADMITTED IB|
"II I"*] UNLESS ACCOMPANIED BY PARENT OR ADULT GUARDIAN flip
WILLIAM HOLDEN ROBERT RYAN I
ERNEST BORCNINE EDMOND O'BRIEN I
ITHE 177771
YOUNG I
RUNAWAYS, I
TIL Qjam phuviti
| 1-
W
- yfM ,7,7;
11 7' 7 1 | lij TtH
~ !
KX mW ft m
m If 1#
IK §1 m ms
$ 7%tlf 7 ?Mr w pY* Ip |l j|
VJf I L, pt
Ji J i , jfl
wWst
IN
BELLE OF THE 90S
2iWm, Aij..3 ilnmTluatu
700 ml VOOp.*. Aim.so'

Page 13

services 1
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)

fj V
SicUtfaTodouf
I There were three
I men in her life.
One to take her**
one to love her
-and one to kill her.
.: :V I
w I
llw^T!/.&:: = x
,< s f T I
CIMiHi
HUM UtiilM
fIMsM atotoatk sk iswan -
o
iliMf H|||m| m Mtf IMtHMMdttMM f ....
w 11 strooe A v
Mtqoif nonoor ttfcuf* nosuen ausc*
1 w"-*^"* < y^ ) WRAft-SM MARCO PWMUCHO* TECHMBCOPE* tECHNCQU** PARAMOUR! PICIURE .G-wJU*
V J/a -
| Telephone 378-2434 |J | VUvStO /(/Vvdw
'^?''ur si J^Hp';,ggf J^Hp';,ggf---i.
--i. J^Hp';,ggf---i. ST wKbm iAijHfej4 ytr sOpiwU
'.: ; y'VfcjlMg t ; |l .
t y o I T \ y *r V
starring



Page 14

K The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 1,1969

CAMPUS WORKING

MarkehYour Voice And You

How much does your voice
reveal about your personality?
Norman Markel, doctor of
psychology teaching courses in
the speech, anthropology, and
psychology departments, is
seeking the answer in the
Communication Sciences
Laboratory. The question is an
essential one in his
dicipline psycholinguistics.
Markefs current experiment
seeks to establish the
relationship between speaking
loudness and interpersonal
distance. The norm he
discovers will be used in future
studies with psychiatric patients.
Earlier experiments rated
individuals loudness, tempo
and pitch. The relationship
between these scores then
determined which of three
voice-quality profile groups the
individual belonged
to peak-loudness, peak-tempo,
or peak-pitch. The groups
represent three personality
types.
We hope, after many more
replications of the study, that
these tests can be used with the
standard battery of
psychological testing.
We want to compare people
across the world too, he said.
When a Russian talks loudly to
you, it may not mean that hes
angry; he may just like you.
What does a Zuni do with his
voice when hes depressed?
Most communication breaks
down, not because of content,
but the way its put across. The
speaker may give the impression
of being a liar, a phony, or under
pressure, to the person of the
other culture, when hes just
using the voice-qualities he
learned from his own culture.
These experiments could result
in defining a cross-cultural
speaking style.
When individuals interact,
content is often not as
important as the stylistic cues of
speech. When somebody starts
asking you for definitions, its
usually a sign of communication
breakdown.
Psychiatrists and
psychologists have for years
listened to their patients with
what they call a third ear,
explained Markel, indicating the
importance of voice-background
characteristics.
We are interested in
pin-pointing individual style,
too, as well as helping the
individual in his personal
adjustment.
The most general and
positive effect our work could
have on the general public, he
said, would be to make people
aware of what is happening
behind the words, to teach them
to identify and understand all
the little clues a persons voice
qualities and manner offer to
understanding completely what
the other person is saying.
~ Hovt
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Speaking voice is not
Markels only interest. In the
past four years he has been
working on voice quality in folk
songs. Three thousand songs
from 250 different cultures were
studied, he said. Were going
into cross-cultural speaking

Movie Times
Plaza I Once Upon a Time in the West, with Fonda,
Robards, Cardinale, Bronson, and Wynn. By the Italian
movie-makers of Fistful of Dollars and A Few Dollars
More, notable for their non-stereo-typed plots, good music and
good acting. The story is of a railroad moving West. 2:29, 5:46,
9:03.
Plaza II Bridge at Remagen, with George Segal, Robert
Vaughn, and Ben Gazzara. True story of the bridge Hitler
thought so important he ordered it dynamited with his entire
15th Army. 1:36,3:39, 5:42, 7:48,9:52.
Suburbia Drive-In Slaves, with Dionne Warwick and
Stephen Boyd, an historic drama about slavery in the South.
8:50, 12:35. Lady in Cement, with Frank Sinatra and Dan
Blocker. Incredibly stereo-typed in dialogue and action, this
Tony Rome is one to miss. 10:55.
Union Lonelyhearts, with Robert Ryan and
Clift. Tonight and Saturday, 7 and 9. Belle of the Nineties, with
Mae West reminding Roger Pryor that Its better to be looked
over than overlooked. Sunday, 7 and 9.
Center I Lovebug. Disney flick with sentient car trick. 1,
3:09,5:18,7:27,9:40.
Center II Romeo and Juliet. Zeffirellis production. Highly
lauded for its young actors, costuming and cinematography.
2:03,4:32,7:01,9:40.
Florida The Longest Day, with John Wayne, Robert
Mitchum and crew. A revived D-Day movie. 1,4:25, 7:50.
Gainesville Drive-In Young Runaway, with Patty
McCormack. 8:47. The Wild Bunch, with Holden, Borgnine.
Free cussing, and free flow of blood. The love of slaughter and
killing motivates the protagonists; movie offers, for those in the
audience who love it, splashes and streaks of gore and mass
slaughters to open and close. Weak story, and not for weak
stomachs. 10:30. l
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styles because we found
different singing styles related to
culture. For example,
complexity of music is related to
complexity of culture, and a
rasp, vocal noise, seems to be
correlated with severe
child-rearing practices.

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by south, north coaches

No. 1 QB, Co-Captain
Dropped From Squads

By LEON BLOODWORTH
Alligator Sports Correspondent
The Souths number one quarterback and the
Norths co-captain in the annual All-Star game
Saturday will not be allowed to play because of
class conflicts at UF.
Orlando Edgewater High School All-American
linebacker, Eddie Moore, signed a football contract
with the Gators and is presently attending classes
for the summer term.
Moore was selected to the All-Star team after
making All-State this past year, but his summer class
schedule has prevented him from attending morning
practices, and the coaches of the All-Star teams have
ruled that he can not play in the game. Moore had
been chosen by the coaches to co-captain the North
squad.
Sarasotas Larry Frosch has been placed in the
same situations Frosch is also attending summer
term and will be playing for the Gators in the fall.
Frosch was selected to quarterback for the South
and was to have played a big part in leading the
Souths strong offense.
Frosch will be replaced by Winter Havens
Johnny Kok. Moores replacement as linebacker and
co-captain is Steve Hardin from Delray Beach
Seacrest.
The Gators have signed nine of the All-Stars, and
expect a strong freshman team in the fall.
There will be more than one Moore on the Gator

CAMPUS CARNAGE

Scores Scramble Standings

Last weeks softball play
really scrambled the standings in
almost every bracket.
The Silver Streaks raced by
the Bulldogs 11-6 as Ralph
Fernandez and Jim McClave
each collected four hits. MBA
squeaked by Towers Powers 8-5
behind three hits by Dick
Vandermeersch.
Pi Kappa Phi squashed
Microbiology 19-6 as Bemie
Barton hit for the cycle. The
Flavet Tigers scored early and
held off the 13th St. Gang
11-10. Tom Toler homered
twice for the winners.
Don Sayets three.hits helped
the Braves scalp ENE 11-2. It
was the Engineers fliist loss of
the season. Jim Liles and Will
Stokes led the P.E. Petes to a 5-2
win over the Subterranean
Circus.
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Leftover Lammies blanked
Guidance Institute 15-0. Alan
Kan led the way with four hits.
Jim Moneys two homer, four
hit barrage paced the
Unbeatables to an easy 17-9 win
over the Pedagogs.
Injury and Disease racked the
Civil Engineers 124 behind Bob
Grossmans four hits. Frank
Ebrights four hits included two
homers as the Old Timers routed
the Neutralizers 17-3.
Ted Gottfrieds two hits
paced Georgia Seagle to a 12-8
triumph over Delta Chi. In a

j" time in the South
AA/Fuel Dragster
vs.
Funny Car
Shirl Green's nitro burning Charger
vs.
Squeeky-a supercharged AA/Fueler
THAT BACKS UP
See Squeeky burn across the line and
back up with a special reverse gear.
Sat. Nile Aug. 2
time trials 5-8 pm races at 8:30
3% Miles north of Municipal

football team this fall though. Eddie Moore also has
a brother, Harold, who plays for the Gators,
Harold was redshirted as a sophomore and will
be a junior in eligibility in the fall. He has been
converted into a tight end and has possibilities of
starting because of the graduation of Jim
Yarbrough.
Eddie, like his brother Harold, also has played
different positions but stated that he expects to
play linebacker for the Gators.
The six-foot-three, 230-pound linebacker made
All-State his junior year at Edgewater, a class AA
school, and was noted for his quickness as a
linebacker. He sprints the 40-yard dash in 4.8
seconds. His senior year, Moore was voted All-State
again, Central Floridas High School Player of the
Year, plus being chosen for the All-American High
School Team.
When asked how he felt about playing on he
same team as his brother, Eddie stated, All my life
Harold has been just far enough ahead of me in
school to prevent our playing on the same team at
the same time. Im looking forward to the
opportunity of playing together.
To follow up the question, Eddie said, If I
should ever have a choice, Id rather play with him
than against him.
Eddie Moore was offered scholarships to
Alabama, Georgia, Auburn and Florida State before
deciding to sign with Florida.

battle of unbeatens, the
Tuttlingers edged the Wasps
15-13 in a real slugfest.
Dave Barnhart led the
winners with three hits while
Tom Simmons had the same
number for the losers. Bill
Beckermans two-run homer in
the bottom of the ninth enabled
the Mighty Burners to defeat
Gresham Chugs 7-5.
Jack Yant stroked three hits
in leading the Miller Memorials
to a 14-10 win over 1.E.E.E., and
the College Kids crushed the
Marauders 16-5.

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Friday, August 1,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, August 1, 1969

IN NORTH-SOUTH TILTS

Teams Have Speed, Height

By Alligator Services
North basketball coach Edd Poore will use his
speed and excellent shooters trying to offset the
Souths height, when the two all-star teams meet
Saturday.
South coach Jack Wilson of Clearwater will have
the height advantage at every position. Gene
Bodden, a 6-foot 9 center from Clearwater heads
the South roster.
Wilson has 6-5 John Haslem from Miami
Northwestern and 64 Mike Stump of Plantation in
the starting line up.
Bodden, Haslem and Stump give us good height
in the front line, Wilson says. We hope to take
advantage of our superior height.
Poore feels he has the speed and shooters to
overcome the South height.
Heading the list is Bruce Boler from Pensacola
Escambia and David Langston of Port St. Joe. Boler
averaged over 30 points a game in high school and
on many occasions scored over 40 points in a game.
Im pleased with our speed and I feel we will be
able to get our share of the rebounds, says
Gainesville Highs Poore. We dont have any 6-9
boys, but we have a couple of 6-5 kids that can get
the job done.
Poore will count on 6-5 Jim Niblack of
Gainesville, 6-6 Barry Wilson of Jacksonville
Jackson and John Ladner, a 6-6 from Pensacola
Woodham to do the rebounding. Niblack played for
Poores Class AA State Championship team and is
the son of Jim Niblack, who is the coach of the

College Mentors Here
To See Their Recruits
By Alligator Services
Many college football coaches will converge on Gainesville next
week to watch their future players participate in the 21st annual
all-star football and basketball games set Saturday.
Georgia Tech and UF have the most athletes playing in the
football game. The Gators and Yellow Jackets each have nine, they
are followed by Florida State (7), Florida A & M (4), Memphis State
(3), Tampa (3), Alabama (3), Austin Peay (2) and Kansas State (2).
The following have one player in the game: Ferrum College, Duke,
Bethune Cookman, Tennessee, Louisville, Murray State, Kansas,
Wisconsin, Gordon Military, Citadel, Pennsylvania, Furman and
Presbyterian.
In basketball Houston, UF, Western Carolina and Seminole Junior
College claim two players while Texas Southern, Gulf Coast Junior
College, St. Johns River Junior College, Georgia Tech, Florida State,
Eastern Kentucky, Butler Junior College and Yancey State have one
representative.
Jacksonville sends the most representatives to the North squads
with 11 players entered in the annual classics. That city is followed by
Orlando (8), Pensacola (6), Gainesville (4) and Daytona Beach (3).
The Miami area heads the South roster with eight players
participating in the games. The Miami area is followed bv the Fort
Lauderdale-Hollywood area with (6), Clearwater-St. Petersburg area
(6), West Palm Beach area (5), the City of Tampa (5) and the Winter
Haven-Lakeland area (4).
All-Star Teams
Basketball Roster
' V- -v:
NORTH HIGH SCHOOL ALL-STAR BASKFTBALL TEAM
NO. NAME POS. HT. WT. HIGH SCHOOL COLLEGE
10 David Langston G 6-1 155 Po,t St. Joe -> Ouif Coast JC
11 Dick.e Appieyard G 6-2 160 Pensacola Senior Alabama
12 Ken Bryant F 6-4 V? 168 Greensboro Seminole JC
l- 3 Dean Bass G 5-10 160 Gainesville St. Johns JC
14 Gary Hampton G 6 -1 150 Orlando Evans Sem.noie JC
15 Jim Hinson F 6 -5 200 Pensacola Florida
?0 Bruce Bole. G 5-IO 150 Pensacola Escamb.a Mercer
21 j,mN, black *C 6 -5 2 00 Ga.nesv.lle Auburn
22 John Ladner F 6-6 190 Pensacola Woodham Undecided
23 C.a.g Nelson C-F 6 -4 185 Daytona Seabreeze Georgra Tech
24 HansTanzle. G 6-3 185 Jacksonville Lee Fior.da
25 Barry Wilson F 6-7 200 Jacksonville Jackson E. Texas St.
SOUTH HIGH SCHOOL ALL-STAR BASKETBALL TEAM
NO. NAME POS. HT. WT. HIGH SCHOOL COLLEGE
10 Larry Rains q 5.2 165 Clearwater Senior Houston
11 Charlie Green f 6 180 Tampa Hillsborough FSU
12 Dave Wells F 6-3 190 Largo Yancey St.
13 Pat Jarvis G 5-11 160 Ft. Lauderdale Nova W. Carolina
14 Vernon Taylor F 6-3 170 Pompano Beach Undecided
15 Robert Matheny g 6-2 185 Stuart Martin Co. Undecided
20 Charles Washington g 6-2 175 /Arcadia DeSoto Butler JC
21 John Haslem C 6-5 195 Miami Northwestern E. Kentucky
22 Mike Stump F 6-4 175 Plantation W. Carolina
23 Gary Knight C 6-2 165 Tampa Chamberlain Florida
24 Louis Williams C 6-4 187 West Palm Beach Undecided
25 Gene Bodden C 6-9 235 Clearwater Senior Houston

North All-Star football team.
Wilson feels his South team also has plenty of
speed to bum. Charlie Green, an All-American guard
from Tampa Hillsborough is one of the brightest
college prospects to come from Florida.
Green has exceptional speed and movements,
Wilson says. Its a great experience coaching these
boys, they are all great players.
Wilsons point-man Larry Rains has excellent
speed as does Gainesvilles Dean Bass for the North.
The North and South basketball teams will meet
Saturday at 4:00 p.m. in Florida Gym followed by
the football game on Florida Field at 7;45 p.m.
* *
The coaches for the 21st annual Florida High
School All-Star games bring to Gainesville excellent
records and credentials.
Leading the list is Poore, who in his first year of
coaching took the State Class AA Championship
with a 26-1 record. Poore played college basketball
for the University of Florida. 0
Clearwaters Wilson will coach the South
basketball team after leading his high school cagers
to a 26-3 mark and a district championship.
North football coach Jim Niblack of Gainesville
High School is considered one of the top prep
coaches in Florida. The former Florida tackle
coached the Hurricanes to a 9-0-1 record this
season. Niblack played in the first all-star game in
1949.
South football coach Tom Atwell led Lakeland
Kathleen to a 10-2-1 record. His team was runner-up
for the Class A State Championship.

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