Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
I?jEt
Alt A i;t LUCOH

Vol 61, No. 162

*- Si Htttefc**. I^B^H^^b.
J fesv. ifHHHi:
B if
: b\v %
Pi bI
flHHpi> ' ; v
/ j v -at ' \ '\}. y '
DOUG CASE
LONG ROAD AHEAD FOR INVALIDS
A person who must spend his life in a wheelchair faces many
problems. Those problems are compounded on the UF campus,
because few of the buildings are made easily accessible for wheelchair
patients. A UF official has said there is no way for a person
committed to a wheelchair to complete four years of classes. For a
detailed account of the problems on campus, see page 12.
Student Senators
Elect Morgan VP
-, By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
During its quiet moments Thursday night, the student senate voted
a new student body vice president into office former Presidential
Administrative Assistant Walter L. Morgan, who replaces Charles
Harris.
This act was sandwiched between vicious floor fights over the
funding of organization requests which ended with 19 requests
receiving no funds for the 1969-70 school year.
The executive branch of Student Government, the senates Budget
and Finance Committee and Student Body Treasurer Jim Roll had
agreed to guidelines before budget meetings started July 17.
One of those guidelines was to not pay for out-of-state trips.
But the senate, upholding its tradition of not always going along
with the executive, stuck its neck out Thursday night when it justified
giving the debate team $7,060, and nothing to the Agriculture
Council, and meat and livestock judging.
This action brought the wrath of Student Body President Charles
Shepherd down on the senate, along with criticism from the senator
representing agriculture, James W. Avery.
Avery felt the organizations he represented deserved funding as
much or more than the debate team, and could not understand the
senates reasoning.
Senate Majority Floor Leader Marc H. Glick told senators he didnt
think SG should fund either group, if they were going to be fair about
budgeting funds.
The debate team has no way of obtaining funds to support its trips,
while organizations in the area of agriculture have the funds for their
support or can get the funds, some senators who favored funding the
debate team said.
Three trips were struck from the debate team schedule for the
1969-70 school year; the University of Southern California, Auburn,
Ala. and University of Miami trip.
Also, an amendment to the bill was passed which said the debate
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 2)

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

Activity Center Plans
Shown;Support Grows
See Editorial Page Six
fIfIHRTI
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Managing Editor

From all appearances, UFs grand vision
for a hub of student activities, long absent
on campus, may be materializing.
In fact, a $|7.75 million activities center
and athletic complex could be ready in as
few as six years, discounting any snags and
provided funds arrive on schedule.
The packaged program for a four component
activity center was unveiled Thursday afternoon to
an upper echelon cross-section of UF, state and
local leadership meeting in UF President Stephen C.
OConnells conference room.
The response was immediate support from those
present. Everyone liked the plan.
Attending were State Sen. Bob Saunders,
D-Gainesville, Board of Regents Chairman D. Burke
Kibler, Tampa, Gainesville City Manager Harold
Farmer, Alachua County Commission Vice
Chairman Sidney Martin, Coach Ray Graves plus UF
fiscal experts and a study team headed by UF
planning director Walter Matherly.
Despite Matherly and architecture Prof. Harry
Merritts warnings that all plans were tentative and
that no money has been committed so far, the
anxious listeners seemed pleased with what they
heard.
There is not even any money for a three-year
planning period, which would cost about $300,000,
Matherly said.
Still, the plans presented in the two hour meeting
seemed optimistic in their detail and in the way they
were put together by Matherlys group. The cost
estimates and fund resources were drawn up, Merritt
said, from comparisons of other activity centers
around the nation.
Matherly pointed out that his team had nothing
substantially solid when making the plans. The only
things the group had to go on were figures obtained
from other schools.
Here is the Matherly plan:
i A $1.5 million natatorium, with Olympic sized

i wjii .'jj
IHMBmH|^nwnHKiKi
'''' ? 3| "*
. I. y %--
I*l V 9 B
Jm '. \ ||k |B KJ| JB
lEHB
.JB SB
HBn p l'
DOUG CASE
HOUSE-WRECKER READY

"Mommy! Mommy! There's a man at the front
door, and he says he's going to tear down the
house!" Well, not quite, but this bulldozer did pull

COLISEUM AT A SOUTHERN SCHOOL
... Is UF's time coming soon with plans on horizon?
swimming pool and diving platforms.
A $2.5 million, 3,000 seat capacity performing
arts theatre.
A $400,000 amphitheatre integrated into the
whole scheme, which is rounded out by:
A sl2 million, 16,000 seat capacity basketball
arena and indoor track combined into a main
coliseum-type facility.
Matherlys study group presented its plans
focusing on piecemeal development of the center.
Manners hope the complex can be built as one unit,
but said realistically and probably it would be
constructed as funds trickle in.
The center would be located where Flavet 111 is
now. The old, World War II barracks-apartments for
married students are due to be phased out soon, but
no one will venture to say when. OConnell said lie
was reticent to try to move families out of the
village for fear of causing irreversible consequences
from the outrages of disturbed parents.
Parking facilities, accommodating 4,000 cars,
would be on the north shore of Lake Alice, adjacent
to a four-lane thoroughfare connecting Archer
Road, Newberry Road and SW 34th Street. The
planners said the State Road Department had
already offered the $135 million for parking and
highway construction.
Financing the remainder of the project is so far
nebulous. Although the planners suggested possible
routes for finding funds, none were positive about
t (SEE'UF PAGE 3)

up in front of the burned-out Sigma Nu fraternity
house last week. The house is scheduled to come
down this week.

Tuesday, July 29, 1969



!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29,1969

Page 2

V' v
J;
#>v v
x jlFlfcv ..* /iVWBr B m.
wpv £|Hh&. i.
SLOGAN DEADLINE NEAR
Last year's Homecoming queen Suzanne Rogers reminds us the
1969 Homecoming Slogan Contest ends midnight Thursday. Slogans
should be no longer than seven words and should center around a
general homecoming theme. Entries should be mailed to Florida Blue
Key, Reitz Union, UF. The Winner of the contest will have a choice of
a cruise to Nassau, a weekend in Fort Lauderdale or an Orange Bowl
Extravaganza for two. Sorry fellas, but Suzanne is not part of the
prize.
Senate Cuts Budgets
PAGE ONE J
team would not be funded by the senate in the fall for the 1970-71
*
school year.
Other groups didnt fare so well.
The John Marshall Bar Association asked for $4,381 and received
nothing, following a lengthly debate on the floor.
Also, Law Review, and the Law Student Recruitment Council were
left out of funding.
The following organizational requests were also denied Thursday:
Project Surge, a program for speeding legislation which favors UF;
Florida Rifles; Agriculture Engineers; Student Physical Therapy
Association; Phi Alpha Theta; Veterans Club; Association of Political
Science Graduates; Masters of Business Administration; and Sigma
Alpha Eta.
Second 100 and Dialogue, both sponsored by Florida Blue Key,
were cut to nothing after Jade Haikness, FBK president, told senators
because of reorganization funds were no longer needed for these
groups.
A combined request of $11,400 for the University Choir and Glee
Clubs was cut back to $2,065 and $2,170 respectively, and sent back
to committee for further study.
Dr. Elwood J. Keister, director of the university choir, said, The
choir will cease to exist if you reduce us to a minimum of funds.
The Senate Budget and Finance Committe had cut from the choirs
request all out of state tripe, which, Keister said, takes the incentive
away from students who participate in the choir.
FLORIDA QUARTERLY
on sale
AFA Complex July 28-30
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
f Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

OPINIONS DIFFER

UF Split On ABM Issue

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Associate Editor
The Antiballistic Missile
system, whose fate lies with a
closely split U.S. Senate, has
found strongly opinionated
proponents and opponents at
UF.
The Senate, which at last
count had 48 of the 51 votes
needed for passing President
Nixons Safeguard system, has
been involved in heated debates
recently over not only whether
the nation needs or desires an
ABM but over what type of
system to have.
The proposed system would
guard the sites of the missile
strike force as opposed to some
systems designed to protect
major cities.
A random poll done of UF
students showed 47 for ABM, 38
opposed and 35 who felt they
didnt know enough about ABM
or didnt care.
Dr. R.N. Braswell, chairman
of industrial and systems
engineering department, is in
favor of ABM and has worked
for the space and missile
research program for eight years
before coming to UF.
Im in favor of an ABM
system of the type proposed as a
prime deterrent from a cold war
viewpoint, Braswell said.
It is obvious, he continued,
the Russians have their entire
space program tied to their
military. In 25 years their
technology could put us in real
trouble. Now we also have the
Chinese to reckon with.
Braswell said the Sentinel
system guarded the free wodd
just like you would post a guard
at a door. He also said we have
been in the ABM business since

Sanders
I r4J^^r
Fried I
214 N.W. 13th St. 114 N.W. 34th St. I
376-6472 372-3649 I
I EVE_RYDAY_ SPECIALS I
FISH SNACK NEW LUNCHEON SPECIAL!
BOX KENTUCKY FRIED
I 4 oz. boneless fish CHICKEN SNACK BOX I
FRENCH FRIES 2 PIECES OF _
_ CHICKEN, MASHED UK>
I WITH TARTAR IQ POTATOES, AND OJV I
I Si.? 0 w7( CRACKLING GRAVY,
% HOT ROLL R O L L
I WEDNESDAY SPECIAL I
(EVERY WEDNESDAY) I
I REG. $1.25 KENTUCKY FRED I
CHICKEN DINNER
I 3 PIECES KENTUCKY B X I
FRIED CHICKEN
SERVED WITH 111 I .< ~ ..tiiiLi IjWtl I
CRACKLING GRAVY %1%l I I
HOTROLLSAND blbl> 1 o.**a* VJ U
COLESLAW WWV 1

A
A
A
1944, when developing defenses
against Germans V-l and V-2
rockets.
So why would we want to
scrap it now? he asked.
Dr. David R. Kurtz man,
professor of philosophy,
disagreed, saying, Most missile
programs are predicated on the
ridiculous theory that the
Russians are coming over here to
conquer us.
The Russians and the
Chinese know they cant control
large pieces of real estate,
Kurtzman said. We havent
even learned this much, which is
why we are losing in Vietnam.
Kurtzman said the proposed
ABM system was clearly an
escalation of 19th Century
balance of power politics.
We should look with real
suspicion on anything the Nixon
administration does that is
closely tied with business,
Kurtzman continued. Anything


which stands to benefit the
defense industry should be
investigated by people with no
interest in the defense business.
On the other side again, Lt.
Col. Clayton A. Bird, of UFs
Army ROTC department, said
we should rely on the people
who know about such things.
If the government engineers
want it, Bird said, we should
go ahead with it.
UF Young Republican Club
President Dale Anderson said the
ABM would give Nixon a better
bargaining position on arms
control.
If the Russians agree to stop
their arms build up, we can stop
ours, Anderson said. We dont
want to get behind.
UF History Department
Chairman John Mahon said he is
very strongly against ABM.
It would not serve as a
defense very long, not to
mention it is more strongly
backed by the
military-industrial complex
than anyone else, he said.
Steve Fahrer, SDS member,
said, I am against it not only
because it wont work but
because it is not in the interests
of the people of this country.
The people who will benefit
will be people with interests in
defense corporations, Fahrer
said, and the ruling class that
profits from further
militarization of American
society.
The working class, he said,
and the poor will bear the
brunt of the cost by higher
taxes, surtaxes and even greater
inflation. Estimates on the cost
range as high as SIOO billion.
Can we afford that, Fahrer
asked, and a S3O billion a year
Vietnam war and the massive
space program?



UF Will Control Coliseum
FfROM PAGE ON|J r
JPfciiii Sp y 7 ;p eg# I ~"2j J
where the money would come from. law center 'Jj {*
The legislature was eliminated quickly as a source v ~ I _H Fjj
of funds m the immediate future. u ...

The legislature is controlled by urban forces
which I doubt would ever appropriate any money
for a coliseum here or at Florida State, Kibler said.
Saunders added that with an election year
coming up and everyone running on no new tax
promises it would be ridiculous to expect any
appropriations from the legislature.
County and city officials were represented by
Martin and Farmer, and both said they were
interested, but only Martin said he was certain of
county support.
I cant speak for the city commission as much
as you can, Farmer told Martin.
Martin was worried that if die project didnt get
started soon, that it never would.
Lets assume that we are going to do this and
nothing will stop us, he said.
Although the center would be available to the
city and county for cultural events, conventions and
exhibits, Farmer said he could not say if the city
commission would be willing to fund even partially
a facility located on the campus.
Kibler, also, insisted that all building? on the
campus, regardless of who pays for them, would be
under univertisy control.
Charles Shepherd, student body president, said
he thought students would be willing to increase
their tuition by $lO per term to help out.
He said the money could be used to retire bonds
yet to be paid off by the Athletic Association for
Florida Field expansion.
Kibler said the tuition supplement could bring as
much as SBOO,OOO a year and be used to generate

NSA Delegate Vote Wednesday

Five delegates for the
National Student Association
(NSA) will be elected in a
campus-wide vote Wednesday.
The six candidates who are
running are Bill Armstrong,
Robert Cusumano, Larry
Jordan, George Seide, Henry
Solares and Kathy Spellman.
Polling will take place on the
ground floor of the Reitz Union,
the Graduate Research Library
and the Towers lobby between 8
a.m. and 6 pjn. Both the picture
ID and pink fee card must be
presented before a student may
vote.
Two more delegates will be
appointed by Student Body
President Charles Shepherd.

TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
HAM TO 9PM
LONDON BROIL STEAK
FRENCH FRIES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD Jfc A
HOT ROLLS & BUTTER W #1
f 1225 W. UNIV. AVE
'/ BLOCK from CAMPUS
Wt HAVE SPECIALS EVERY DAY
11AM TO 9PM
MONDAY 14 SHRIMP IN BASKET F.F, Col* Slaw
1
WEDNESDAY- CUM HNNSt F.F., Col* Slow I
THURSDAY- LONDON BROIL -F.F, Chopped Salad I
FRIDAY- ROAST BEEF F F ,Cblo Slaw
1225 W. UNIV. AVE. M
'A BLOCK from CAMPUS f W
WERE NOT A GIANT CHAIN OPERATION SO WE TRY HARPER

The Student Senate approved
Shepherds proposal to join the
NSA on a one-year trial basis
three weeks ago.
Since then several campus
groups and individuals, led by
Jimmey Bailey, have been
circulating a petition to bring
the issue of joining to a student
referendum.
This move failed last Tuesday
when the senate voted not to
rescind it previous action.
Bailey said over 1,100
signatures were presented to the
senate Tuesday.
I have talked to (UF
President Stephen C.) OConnell
and (UF Vice President Lester
L.) Hale, Bailey said, and we

a#.
FLAVjETmtagjT T'
u* B! c i ft !/
I .Vita
* j
1 wvwt Activity Center r |
| Proposed Lott | /VI
§3333 ExMmUt | 2 \
1 111 ml 'ln i T_ 1 -1
PROPOSED ACTIVITY CENTER LOCATION
... dotted line shows thoroughfare
more in bond money.
Fred Cantrell, dean of university relations and
development, said its possible as much as $6 million
eould be raised in a concerted drive throughout the
state.
At the meetings end, Matherlys group agreed to
present their plan to a joint city-county committee
currently studying a civic center.

might get some action from
them.
We are also preparing for a
court case, he said.
Bailey reported the UF
Young Republicans and Young
Americans for Freedom are still
manning petition tables to give
students the opportunity to
express their opposition to the
railroading of the NSA
resolution.
Young Republican President
Dale Anderson said he is willing
to see how the trial membership
develops.
If after a year, he said, it
has not provided substantial
benefits, then we will oppose
continued membership.

!
the
florida quarterly
is your thing
. \ '' ' - 7 """>
do it!
i
WHEN A MAN BUYS
SPORTSCAR
HE BUYS A MAN'S
SPORTSCAR

*
Test drive a real sports car...at your Datsun Dealer!
RACING NEWS
808 SHARP CAPTURES DUAL VICTORY AT LIME ROCK
LIME ROCK. CONN.. July 5-6
Bob Sharp of Wilton, Conn, drove both his D and
F Production Datsuns to his second dual victory of
the year at Lime Rock national sports car races.
I n the D Production contest, Sharp out-dueled the
Group 44 TR4A driven by Brian Fuerstenau of Falls
Church, Va. to pull off the victory. Driving his F
Production Datsun 1600, Sharp then upset another
Group 44 car, a Spitfire Mk 3 piloted by John Kelly
of Washington D.C. Sharp had the fastest qualifying
time for any production car, outdoing even the big
bore Cobras and Corvettes.
With this D Production victory. Sharp has a firm
hold on the Northeast Divisional lead with five wins
recorded. He is second in the F Production divisional
standings behind Kelly.
G PRODUCTION DATSUN WINS
REGIONAL AT ASPEN, COLO.
ASPEN. COLO.. June 28-29
A G Production Datsun 1500, driven by Wendell
Powers and entered by Dick's Datsun Sales and
i Service in Fort Collins, Colo., won first in class and a
remarkable second overall in the combined
A,B,C,D,E,F,G and H Production contest. In
capturing the win. Powers broke the existing track
record five times.
GODDING & CLARK
DOWNTOWN BY THE POST OFFICE
1 .
2nd AVE. & 2nd ST. SI.
OPEN TIL 8 PM MON THRU SAT
"HOME OF THE NEW LEADER

Tuesday, July 29, 1969, The Florida Alligrtor,

Page 3



Page 4

l, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29,1969

ACADEMICS
'news and views
By BETH WECKERLE
Alligator Staff Writer
Nancy Kelley, a sophomore from Tampa, has been named as the
1969-70 recipient of a special $ 1,000 scholarship from the UF Alumni

Association.
Miss Kelley, along with more
than 50 other freshmen who
earned the associations tuition
grants during the year and their
parents, will be honored on
October 25 during a special
recognition luncheon before the
UF-Vanderbilt football game.
* *
The Institute for
Development of Human
Resources at UFs College of
Education has received two
grants totaling $285,000 from
the National Institute of Mental
Health.
One of the three year grants
is for studying better teaching
methods for disadvantaged
pupils, the other concerns itself

with comparing pupil growth over the summer with the school year.
* *
UF graduate student Robert Lane has been awarded a research
fellowship award by the the National Institutes of Health for
chemistry research.
* *
Celebrated artist August Kaiser of Santa Fe, N.M., has completed a
portrait of Dr. Richard Schmidt, associate dean of the College of
Medicine and chief of staff at the VA Hospital. The portrait was
presented to Dr. Schmidt by the publishers of Neurology as he
completed his term as president of the American Academy of
Neurology.
* *
Dr. John B. McFerrin, director of graduate studies in UFs College
of Business Administration, has been appointed to the United States
Chamber of Commerce Committee on Banking and Monetary Policy.
He is the only educator serving on the committee, which includes 40
members from throughout the nation.
* *
Dr. Luther Arnold, associate professor at UFs College of
Education has been named as a special consultant to the Young
Scientists Committee of the Florida Heart Association.
* *
Walt Mickler, a doctoral student in the Department of Curriculum
and Instruction has been named one of the four national recipients of
an SBOO award from the United Educators Foundation. This is the
third time a College of Education graduate student has won the award
since it was established in 1960.
* *
Dr. Didier Graeffe, Humanities professor, is attending a three week
seminar on electronic) music at University of North Carolina,
Greensboro.
* *
Dr. Tom Carpenter has been elected president of University of
North Florida. He once served in the Department of Economics from
1952-58.
* *
The Communication Sciences Laboratory has received a $40,000
supplemental award from the National Institute of Neurological
Diseases and Stroke. The purpose of the original $1.6 million grant
and the supplement is to support a basic research program that studies
human communication from various points of view.
attention $
seniors
gn
Announcements and Convocation Invitations have
arrived at the CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE.
The supply is limited so hurry!!! BOTH ARE
ONLY 25c EACH.
GRADUATION AUGUST 30

NANCY KELLEY
... wins scholarship

UF-FAMU Student Switch
Proposed By SGs Jordan

A UF-Florida A&M University student exchange
proposal has been outlined and presented to the
presidents of both universities by UFs Student
Government.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell s office
received the proposal Friday. A letter from Student
Body President Charles Shepherd to both university
presidents accompanied the proposal.
The programs goal is more effective
communication on both campuses between white
and black students.
This plan is similar to one now in operation
between Florida State University and Florida
A&M, said Larry Jordan, secretary of minority
group affairs in the SG cabinet. Jordan and
members of his staff authoried the proposal.
A program by which students at FSU and FAMU
would take courses in the opposite university, and
for which they would receive credit from their own
home university, was approved July 15 by the
Board of Fegents.
That program will begin in September, said Dr.
Roy L. Lassiter Jr., dean of faculties in the office of
academic affairs.
The UF SG-sponsored plan calls for an exchange
of UF and FAMU students on a one-to-one ratio.
The program is aimed primarily at students in
good standing in the colleges of Education and Arts
and Sciences at both institutions, although
participation will not be restricted to students in
these colleges.
On June 17 UF representatives met with the
deans of the two colleges at both universities.
Specific points of the SG plan were agreed upon
then.

The *125
Chicken dinner
that costs 99*
Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Stores everywhere will be
serving their usual crisp and juicy fried chicken at an unusual price. Only
995. includes a generous serving of cole slaw, hot bread and big,
golden brown potato pancakes. Not to mention the three plump pieces of
delicious, tender Wishbone Fried Chicken. Check for the Wishbone store
nearest you.

At These Wishbone Stores:
704 S.W. Second Avenue
U.S. 301 qt Adams, Starke, Fla.

According to the proposal, participants would
attend the other university for one full quarter. All
hours successfully completed would be accepted for
credit at their university.
Each university would be responsible for the
exchange students housing during their attendance,
Central to the plan is a proposal that both
universities sponsor a series of events designed to
bring about interaction between exchange
participants and the regular student body ...
Shepherd noted that the programs aim is
cultural. This proposal is in partial fulfillment of
one of the planks of my campaign platform, he
said. We cant clear up the ghettos, but we can at
least acquaint white students with the problems of
black Americans in a white society.
The proposal states, in part:
Underlying the entire program is a new
evaluation of what higher education means in this
society. Academia can no longer exist in the aloof
and sheltered world in which it once lived ...
Traditionally, each generation of college
students, both black and white, have had college
experiences that re-inforce the already prevailing
myths and stereotypes of American society.
Somewhere these traditions must stop.
Jordan said the proposal is a long way from
acceptance, because advisory councils on exchange
programs at each university must approve of the
program.
Details of the proposal may require negotiation
between the two universities. If the proposal is
finally accepted it may well be in some altered
form, Jordan said.

16th Avenue at S. Main St.
1021 SE 4th Ave.



African Educator
May Teach Here

By KEN ANDERSON
Alligator Correspondent
UF may get its first
African-trained instructor next
fall. Jane Tully, a teacher at
Rosary Secondary School,
Mwanza, Tanzania, for the past
five years, has contacted several
UF departments to obtain an
assistantship to complete a
masters degree.
Before going to Africa, Miss
Tully earned a bachelors degree
in education from Marymount
College in New York and then
attended the Department of
States language school to leam
Kiswahili, the language of East
Africa.
She went to Africa as a
Maryknoll nun. Soon after she
arrived, the newly-independent
Tanzanian government
nationalized all the schools and
Miss Tully became a contract
teacher for the government.
Rosary, the only girls* school
in Tanzania, accepts students
from all parts of the country to
live at the school until they
complete high school.
Miss Tully admits that
teaching in Africa is

New Facet For Fall Frosh

The 1969 Freshman
Orientation Program features
small discussion sessions for the
incoming freshman.
This new facet of the
program has been devised by
Dean of Women Betty Cosby
and H.C. Riker, director of
housing. It consists of discussion
periods of 15 freshmen led by
upperclassmen to answer any
questions the new students may
have. There will be four sessions
before the classes begin and will
continue throughout the Fall
Quarter.
There will also be a reception
with student leaders and
University deans and directors
held at Florida Field, and an
open house at the religious
centers.
Phi Eta Sigma and Alpha
Lambda Delta will set up help

Ittzzaimt
Now you can enjoy Americas
favorite pizza, Pizza Inn
Pizza prepared from a secrete UO
recipe, flavor baked to
perfection served fresh> hot and /fijr* \
delicious! Your choice of LaSk
cheese, olives, mushrooms,
peperoni, sausage, hamburger or
anchovies. j J)
Special
r r Good July 29 August 1
Utter now only QQjL
Rog. $1.65
Bring this ad u mi ,2P.,cuom.,
Open 7 days a week Dine
in or take out Phone Orders
Ready in 20 minutes.
Pizza, juui
316 S.W. 16th Ave. 376-4521

considerably different than in
America. On numerous
occasions she has awakened at
night to find a leopard prowling
about the garden just outside her
window and once, on a trip to
visit anthropologist Dr. L.B.
Leakey, at Olduvai Gorge, her
small car was caught in a flash
flood and she had to abandon it
in the center of a dry stream bed
that had suddenly become a
raging torrent.
On another trip, this one
across the Serengeti Plain, her
Beetle was charged by a bull
elephant.
Jane is an accomplished
writer, photographer and
musician. She plays the guitar
and has arranged the music for
many guitar Masses, has sold
several articles and photo-essays
to national publications and
recently she sold a set of slides
on African dress and customs to
the UF Teaching Resources
Center to be used in the African
Studies program.
Jane has been granted a leave
of absence by her order to
return to school, but she must
underwrite all her own expenses.

tables in the Gym to aid new
s tudents having difficulty
registering. Tables will also be
set up at various points on
campus to give general
orientation information.
All beginning freshmen will
check into their respective
dorms on Sept. 10 and register
Sept. 11 and 12.
IMiller-Brown
I
I ONE MILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL
1 376-4552 authorized
9 DEALER
§ Open til 7 p.m. nightly

K;
JANE TULLY
... may bring African teachings

100% TEXTURED HUMAN HAIR
$29 VALUE
CASCADES H I
$1 £BO 9
I if FU c . OK 1
CHOOSE FROM THE STATES LARGEST } \ UlMidjl I
QUALITY HAIRGOODS DEALER T f 11|
m ALL NEW . \ H
I $25 VALUE 111
S.T.R.E.T.C.H £
WIGS 12
1 100% TEXTURED HUMANHAIR |
t WIG LETS 4L-J
I TRANS-WORLD |
| HAIRGOODS IMPORTERS I
I corner uNWERsmr 4 i3thST s m rrrJl
I GAINESVILLE li
Sf OTHER SHOWROOMS IN JACKSONVILLE, DAYTONA BEACH
|jj| -j, g COCOA BEACH &OR LAN DO j

College Life Holds
Weekly Meetings
Every Sunday night a group of college students meet at 9:13 for
the College Life program.
College Life is a non-denominational Christian organization that
meets to promote Christianity.
The group sings songs and talks about such things as what Chrat
means and is to each one.
Sometimes the group has speakers and they are usually people with
an unchristian background who have turned to Christianity.
Last year a former member of Hells Angels, the motorcycle gang,
addressed the group. Other speakers have included former members of
ghetto gangs.
The group meets for one hour weekly. During the regular school
term, they meet in fraternity or sorority houses. During the summer
they try to find an air-conditioned house to meet in.
The average number of members during the summer quarter
averages between 25 and 50 people. During the regular term, the size
is usually about 150.
College Life members also take beach trips and skiing trips
together.
In order to join the group, one simply has to go to the meetings.
Construction To Begin
On New M usic Building

Construction should begin on
a new building to house the
Music department in 35 to 40
days, according to Dr. Reid
Poole, head of the department.
The Drake Construction
Company of Ocala was the
apparent low bidder Thursday
for work on the long-planned
three story building.
Drakes $1,487,690 base bid

Tuesday, July 29,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

was close to the budgeted
$1,427,000. Estimated figures
for the entire project total
$1,689,200 with $458,976 from
the U.S. Office of Education and
the remainder coming from the
state bond funds.
We are delighted that the
low bid came in, Poole said.
The building can be built as
drawn. The department is very
pleased with the plans.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29, 1969

For Laugh
; x $
1 Doing Dylan |
I I
: : ''**:::'::: : :: : : : ::::: : ::: ; : : : : : ; : : A ; : ; : : : ; :-:- : ; : ; : ; : : i : i : :^-:*:^: ->: ; :-:*:-:-:-: ; : Ray D 6 fl fl I S*W? : :

Yes, John Wesley Harding
really is Jesus. The lady by His
side, His Father. You heard it
right. Tom Paine, Hes Jesus too.
But the fairest damsel that ever
did walk in chains is the lonely
harlot sitting by the well.
Late at night He walks down
along the cove to the Garden at
Gethsemane. There He will offer
His prayer for deliverance to His
Father, the Landlord.
Then Judas Priest suddenly
sells his soul for a roll of tens.
Meanwhile Christ, posing as the
famous outlaw Frankie Lee,
follows His benefactor and
meets His death at the hands of
four and twenty prostitutes. The
little neighbor boy was
convicted 2000 years later at
Nuremberg. At the end of side
1, the Drifter meets Pontius
Pilate. But it doesnt work out.
The watchtower becomes the
cross. The beggar and the thief
hanging beside the Man are
forced to watch the festivities.
The last band celebrates the
death of Christ with a message
of hope for mankind: Ill be
your baby tonight.
A few days later the
Carpenter from Nazareth
assumes the appearance of a
ghostly saint, wandering through
the countryside with a blanket
underneath His arm and a coat
of solid gold, comforting those
who will listen with the news of
His own death.
The lonesome hobo is Peter.
He is wailing in the night,
teaching the sad lesson of his
denial. Then he wanders off in
shame. Mankind is the poor
immigrant. Forgive them,
Father, for they know not what
they do. The song is printed in
red.

The New Culture And The Old In Battle

The Foreign Minister of Ruritania was busy
musing on the U.S. political scene and its
embroilments stemming from what he calls cliche
liberalism.
From a distance, he said, it is obvious that
your country is splitting into two cultures. There is
the Old Culture, which doesnt mind being
ostentatiously patriotic. It buys and displays decals
of the American flag. It thinks of gun-owning not in
terms of assassinations but of the right of
self-defense. It is against pornography. It doesnt
like the Vietnamese War, but its objections to it are
rooted in distaste for the flabby way it has been
fought, not in any moral condemnation of fighting
the spread of Communism as such. It is not, as I see
it, anti-Negro, but it is troubled about what it calls
reverse discrimination. It has always been in favor
of the best in education for its children, but after
looking at the riotous Ivy League scene it is
beginning to wonder whether the game is worth the
candle.
This Old Culture is in revolt, and if Nixon
knows where his bread is buttered for 1970 he will
ponder the statistic that tells him the voting
majority still holds to Old Culture ideals. After all,
the under 21 college and high school kids havent
yet been accorded the vote, so the fact that the SDS
and the hippies constitute parts of the New Culture
is not yet a serious election-day fact.
But dont get me wrong, the Foreign Minister
continued. I take the New Culture in your country
most seriously. It is still a minority culture, but it
gets the big play in the so-called media. Its cliches
dominate all your political arguments, and it seems
to have conquered just about half of the UJS.
Senate.

The
Florida
Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick
Editor-in-Chief
Dave Osier
Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
Executive Editor
yAif y\ici um
And you will find the wicked
messenger in the same pulpit
every week, saying the same
things. Dont blame him. How
could he know otherwise?
The three kings on both sides
of the record jacket will arrive
too late to make their selfish
offerings to the Child.
Read your New Testament,
kiddies.

EDITORIAL

There is a great deal of and
spirit currently being generated? over the UF
dream a student activity center, the hub
of campus life.
We join in that spirit, and look with
excitement in that vision, especially now
that such a centerappears on the horizon.
We congratulate Walter Matherly and his
study team for their efforts in trying to
breathe life into the dream. Well done.
But, theres a catch to all this. There
seems always to be a catch.
We were told at last Thursdays meeting
that the multi-million dollar complex would
be centered on student activities. A story
was told, using the University of Tennessee
as an example, a picture was presented of
several hundred students just milling
around such a center, using it as a base for
their campus activities.
We doubt that a student activity center at
the University of Florida would be geared
primarily for students, despite the use of
student activity in its name, and the use
of student money to generate funds to build
it.
We need only look at past experiences in
projects focused on students at this


I SOLUTIONS TQ-.\
humg&hi \
rovismf \
jpsawssoM \
"Too Bad We Don V Try An Earth Walk

We in Ruritania, so the Foreign Minister went
on, are particularly perturbed by the feelings of
the New Culture about the nature of power. Your
New Culture adherents are against the so-called
military-industrial complex. They would like to kill
off the ABM. They want you to liquidate the
John Chamberlain
Vietnamese War at-once, by compromise if possible
but by a disguised surrender if necessary. They talk
about using money saved on the military budget to
rehabilitate your cities, which admittedly are filthy
but they dont seem to care about the effects the
pornographic rot might have on the minds of your
children. I refer to such publications as Kiss and
Screw and the New York Review of Sex.
My country of Ruritania, the Foreign Minister
said with a rush of feeling, lives in the geographical
interstices that exist between the two great power
groupings that are run by Washington and Moscow
We can be neutral now. But if your New Culture
should happen to win a signal victory over your Old
Culture, through. If you even manage to
liquidate your military-industrial complex, just how
will that improve things for yourself, let alone
Ruritania? Practically the whole of the Soviet Union
happens to be a military-industrial complex (half of
;+ s Gross National Product goes to sustain the army

Please, Please Me

campus.
Take the J. Wayne Reitz Florida Student
Union for example, built after 20 years of
planning and after student activity fees were
put up to form a base for floating bonds for
construction. The union is run with student
fees, also, but do students really use it? No!
The union is not geared satisfactorily to
students. Its location is isolated from most
of the campus. Although its directors try,
most of the unions activities, besides the
games area, and occasional good movies, are
not taken advantage of by students.
The idea of a student union is great, and
the idea of a student activity center is grand.
But will it work? We have doubts.
Before Student Body President Charles
Shepherd is ready to ask students to commit
$lO extra in fees to pay for the center, he
will have to make sure the planners are
already committed to the students, to
tailoring the center to student needs and
wants for their pleasures and pastimes, not
to those of the Gainesville Dinkyfoo Club or
the Gainesville Chamber of Commerce.
Although were not from Missouri, theyll
have to show us, before any commitment of
support is rendered.

and the dictatorship), and without any
counter-power poised against it the Russian
military-industrial gang would overrun everything
right up to your borders.
Just think what will happen if you skedaddle
from South Vietnam before the Thieu-Ky
government has the military capacity to defend
itself and the police power to ensure fair elections.
Ho Chi Minh will move to Saigon, Laos will
disappear, and Prince Sihanouk of Cambodia will
immediately proclaim himself a Marxist. But that is
not what worries us in Ruritania. What will matter
to us is what your surrender in Southeast Asia
would do to Ruritania as a principality that is on
the fringe of the Middle East.
Your surrender in Southeast Asia would surely
e taken in the Kremlin as evidence that your New
u ture had gone completely isolationist. Satisfied
at you would not come to the rescue of Israel, the
rem in boys would hardly think they were risking
very much if they were to throw a couple of
mate es into the Middle East powder keg. The
\ ra s Wol ild be permitted to light the matches, and
ppor srael would make the most convenient sort of
w C he new Soviet Navy would bar the eastern
e 1 erranean and the Red Sea to any gun-runners
o might want to go to the aid of Israel on a
private asis. Meanwhile, having used all its logic to
g you out of Southeast Asia, your New Culture
rici "U not be in a position to advocate
mg the U.S. Mediterranean fleet to open a sea
corridor to the embattled Israelis.
C w, are my curf ent musings, said the
oreign Minister of Ruritania. Now if only I could
York Xhnes Washin B ton Post and the New



Regents Want A Biaaer Sav In Tenure

MR. EDITOR:
I feel compelled to reply to Mr. Alpers letter
criticizing your editorial entitled Regents Blow it
Again. My good friend and law school colleague
took a series of positions which beg of disputation,
pleas which I now hope to answer to his
satisfaction.
Mr. Alper is severely critical of tenure, saying,
Tenure is an antique method of protecting
professors. Accepting this proposition as his
touchstone, Mr. Alper concludes that anything done
against tenure is good. Thus he said of your
FORUM:^^
( Aiuia ml VtAiUit J
hope for the
editorial, Instead of condemning the regents
undiscemingly it might have suggested that they
take the lead in American education by investigating
the entire tenure structure.
I not only question the initial proposition, but
find the regents action reprehensible even if tenure
is indeed an antiquated system. Why? To find out
why, let us first ask the question, what does tenure
mean to the 262 professors involved by the Boards
decision? It means that they have been passed on by
their peers and superiors at the schools where they
work, and have been found worthy of the highest
trust and confidence these institutions can bestow
upon their faculty. With it comes not only job
security, but recognition arid prestige within and
without the academic world.
It relieves them from the vulnerability of, say,
the untenured Dr. Megill. That tenure is not a
measure of teaching ability no one would deny.

The Movement Left'

Today my entire column,
commemorating the recent
Independence Day, will be the thoughts
of historical and i contemporary
Americans. I dedicate it to Jim Hollis,
Jimmey Bailey, Billy Montsmain, Allen
Frye, Darcy Meeker, R.E. Osteen, Jan
Bellows, ROTC, Nixon, the Congress,
Tom Slade, J. Edgar Hoover, and all of
those nice people who fight for decency
and law and order
There is nothing more common than
to confound the terms of the American
Revolution with those of the late
American war. The American war is
over but this is far from being the case
with the American revolution. On the
contrary, nothing but the first act of the
great drama is closed. (Benjamin Rush,
1787)
We are the true Americans reborn at
a fimg when it is almost a crime to be
truly American. Those creeps who drove
by the church in a Cadillac waving an
American flag and calling coward, why,
they dont even know what it is to be an
American. I say it is a crime for them to
misuse such spirit. Only the
raggle-taggles of it is theirs, because
while we burned those cards with our
hands, we ( carried that spirit in our
hearts. (Wavne Hansen, Draft-card
burner, 1967)
God forbid we should ever be twenty
years without a rebellion. (Thomas
Jefferson, 1787)

It Was Said By Good Americans

If by the mere force of numbers a
majority should deprive a minority of any
rights, it might, in a moral point of view,
justify revolution certainly would if such a
right were a vital one. (Abraham Lincoln,
1861)
v=

It is an observation of one of the
profoundest inquiries into human affairs
that a revolution of government is the
strongest proof that can be given by a
people, of their virtue and good sense.
(John Adams)
If the State cannot survive the
agitation, then let the State perish ... If
the Republic must be blotted out from
the roll of nations, by proclaiming
liberty to the captives, then let the
Republic sink beneath the waves of
oblivion, and a shout of joy, louder than
the voice of many waters, fill the
universe at its extinction. (William
Lloyd Garrision, 1840)
Revolution is the only thing, the
only power, that ever worked out
freedom for any people. (Wendell
Phillips, 1848)
If by the mere force of numbers a
majority should deprive a minority of
any rights, it might, in a moral point of
view, justify revolution certainly
would if such a right were a vital one.
(Abraham Lincoln, 1861)
Full opportunity for full
development is the unalienable right of
all. He who denies it is a tyrant, he who
does not demand it is a coward; he who
does not desire it is dead. The earth for
all the people! That is the demand.
(Eugene Debs, 1904)
The most heroic word in all
languages is REVOLUTION! (Eugene
Debs, 1907)\
We cant have education without
/'

That it should be is a proposition worthy of debate.
But we should all recognize that there is no scale on
which teaching ability can be universally measured.
And even if there were, who would be impartial
enough to apply it? Mr. Alper incredibly states,
In this age of student power is it too much to
demand that students have some voice in tenure
guarantees? Is it possible he is assuming thatUie
Board of Regents denied tenure to these professors
so that students can pass judgment on teachers?
Surely he realizes that the reason tenure was
denied in these cases was so the Board of Regents,
not the students, could have a bigger say in the
matter. One regent has already been quoted as
questioning the Americanism of some professors,
and is anxious to look into this matter. Is this
surprising? Os course not. The Board of Regents was
bom in political controversy, has lived in political
controversy all of its life, and will die or be
reformed as it has lived, in political controversy.
Such is not the stuff a great university system is
made up of, and such an atmosphere is in no way
conducive to the careful evaluation and selection of
professors. It is better to evaluate them where they
teach, and by those who know of them and their
work on a personal basis, than it is to evaluate them
by a Board of Regents investigative body, using
criteria other than academic.
The Board of Regents is even now proposing a 1
year moratorium on tenure. This too strikes me as
incredibly short sighted. One of the best professors
at the law school was recently lured to Florida by
an offer which included a generous (by our
standards, not his) salary offer, and tenured status.
For at least a year this kind of offer will not be
possible. So what if it hurts faculty recruitment? At
least theyll be cracking down on the tenure system.
Os the regents it must surely be said by the people
of the state of Florida, Forgive them. They know
not what they do.
BARRY DIAMOND, 3LW

By John Suaa***

revolution. We have tried peace
education for 1,900 years and it has
failed. Let us try revolution and see
what it will do now. (Helen Keller,
1916)
Those who won our independence by
revolution were not cowards. They did
not fear political change. They did not
exalt order at the cost of liberty. (Louis
Brandeis, Supreme Court Justice, 1927)
That circumstances sometimes justify
it (revolution) is not Communist
doctrine but an old American belief.
(Justice Jackson, 1950)
I consider myself neither legally nor
morally bound to obey laws made by a
body in which I have no representation.
Do not deceive yourselves into believing
that penalties will deter men from the
course they believe is right. We stand on
the eve of a BLACK REVOLUTION.
(H. Rap Brown, 1967)
The poverty of the country is such
that all the power and sway has got into
the hands of the rich, who by extortious
advantages, having the common people
in their debt, have always curbed and
oppressed them in all manner of ways.
(Nathaniel Bacon, Rebel leader, 1676)
No man is naturally entitled to a
greater portion of the earth than
another... (property) was made for the
equal use of all (Pennsylvania farmers,
1740)
The most common and durable
source of faction has been the various
and unequal distribution of property.
(James Madison, The Federalist, No. 10)
These capitalists generally act
harmoniously, and in concert, to fleece
the people. (Abraham Uncoln, 1837)
Whenever there is a conflict between
human rights and property rights,
human rights must prevail. (Abraham
Uncoln)
Who are the oppressors? The few:
the king, the capitalist and a handful of
other overseers and superintendents.
Who are the oppressed? The many: the

MR. EDITOR:
a.'
Mr. Chamberlain: Your seeming blind devotionalism to the U.S.
military posture in Vietnam yes, yes, I know, Damn the
torpedoes compelled me to disagree. You talk of ultimate
defeat; are we now, or do you ever expect we will be, winning?
It makes me thankful that nothing happened in 95% of Vietnam;
in fact, it should be put on every coffin. And, do you honestly believe
we have no censorship? Your naivete shocks me, Mr. Chamberlain; I
should think someone in your position would have made at least a
slight effort to question these reports.
GEORGE F. WILSON

Tumtay, July 29,1909, The Florida Alligator,

nations of the earth; the valuable
personages; the workers; they that make
the bread that the soft-handed and idle
eat. Why is it right that there is not a
fairer division of the spoil all around?
Because laws and constitutions have
ordered otherwise. Then it follows that
laws and constitutions should around
and say there shall be a more nearly
equal division. (Mark Twain, 1886)
I would not be a capitalist; I would
be a man; you cannot be both at the
same time. (Eugene Debs, 1905)
I am opposing a social order in which
it is possible for one man who does
absolutely nothing that is useful to
amass a fortune of millions... while
millions of men and women who work
all the days of their lives secure barely
enough for a wretched existence.
(Eugene Debs, 1918)
Money doesnt talk, it swears. (Bob
Dylan, folksinger)
Assault compels defense. I shall never
ask the colored people to be lambs
where the whites insist upon being
wolves, and yet no man shall outdo me
in efforts to promote
kindness... between the races, but I
know there can be no peace without
justice, and hence the sword. (Frederick
Douglass, 1871)
We are the aggressors. We must cease
to be the aggressors. (Charles Sumner,
UJS. Senator, 1846)
We Americans have no commission
from God to police the world.
(Benjamin Harrison, 1888)
If Fascism came to America it would
be on a program of Americanism. (Huey
Long, 1935)
The highest virtue is always against
the law. (Ralph Waldo Emerson)
... that whenever any form of
government becomes destructive of
these ends, it is the right of the people
to alter or abolish it... (American
patriots, 1776; Ho Chi Mihn, 1946;
Black Panther Party, 1967)

Page 7



t. Tha Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29,1969

Page 8

s*
STAG AND DRAG
Have anything in mind for those September days ahead? Stag and
Drag does! Lightweight and washable are the key words for this
multi-striped jersey dress. Feel cool and comfortable in this outfit as
you cheer the Gators on in the Fall! Modeled by Charla.

:. ;**
4|||~ I
y ~t£' ''
; :%M I
' '<*r* v
K v '- :
MAAS BROTHERS
Subtle elegance comes to us casually in this Howard Wolf creation for
t e Young Sophisticate. The smartly styled jumper is made from
on e rayon with the look of ivory linen and is complimented with
its own brown crepe blouse. Modeled by Sandi.
BBBmiKl^^ilM u ' [HMmW|BMBjMWBHmMH [|B|^^i?
Villa" r ' '
- s Jl|j||^^^ ii>
H
' K, sjyifflff; .^K.f;'*- /J * ''''' 7, A v ,-j*"'yj- £*?V #ji';'*\*'Vf 4^'i'*^''^v '**-<*)'.
u oa%# I THE university shop
with "/*, WOrd for Youn 9 Victorian's 100% acetate pants outfit
Z1 "wf $, r VeS Wide bell a fitted bust and a scoop
*s e most divine outfit for comfort and coolness.



.
*
: t s fmi?tw-&su, 4g&. f h
I jg ,\-
"" .. M BffijUg:
, ; "1 QOKSBHi
**''** m
SILVERMAN'S
"Denise" took a splashy paisley bordered print, sewed a zipper up the
front, tied the belt high, gathered the skirt and added full
sleeves ... and gives this great look to you for just S2O. Modeled by
Carol.
asaesaaSwMHHMWmTT 1 l l' 11 MI i ~
y;*, *%>> ; > ?M%m & ~>;; ^£# *-
lf; T ?Xkr./-:jl*ys?K*Z-&ft'i. 'Sm jjg^jfigll^Hl
Hrn < w
isp
fl,' \
f 1111 l a IP I
£ am %jww i ¥... -- j jb j
SEARS
The latest in the fashion world is the i"!^^,^,^ 0
contrasting Moose. The off-white jumper wth a navy bloe blouse
be worn dressy or casual. Sizes 5-13. Modeled y

BLo^
ft BBB^k
flt .. ||B^^Bg^HS;
."*" b BBS 881
-
- l|i BBKii BBbKbK
!^:: **~mllnnrifflrai .BBBBBiffifc HB^BmBBBBI[
9 BRII Sbbb Ifiv i
B BHBBi
ip b b^Hbblbll
x mBR b Bp I*v/ # I
B^BgsraiisP
nj \ " j BR
FIGURE FAIR
Want to be comfortable while you lounge? Then you need the 100%
acetate lounge pajama. Buttons below the waist. Self belt and the
saucer neckline makes it a must for comfort. Paisley print in green and
yellow shades. Sizes 8 to 18; price $19.00.
^ SCOTT
Irvington Place presents a rich wine-colored velour dress to shine in.
It's slinky, clingy, and absolutely fabulous! This softly, sexy dress is
the best thing that's happened to a girl since the first kiss. Modeled by
Lynn. Vj I "''
w
fashion layout by... joyce gehrke
>a photography by ... aaron law

Tuesday, July 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29, 1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Administrative Notices

PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CBS PROGRESS TEST 261
will be given Tuesday, July 29,
at 7 p.m. in Little 101 and 109.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, July
30, at 7 p.m. in Little 101 and
109.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, July 31,
at 7 p.m. in Little 101, 109, 113
and 121.
CHN 253 PROGRESS TEST
ESSAY will be given Thursday,
July 31, at 7 p.m. in Little 215,
217 and 219. All CHN 253
students are expected to report
for this test and each must bring
his own pen.
ETS FOREIGN LANGUAGE
EXAM will be given Saturday,
Aug. 2, at 9:45 a.m. in 207
Leigh Hall. The exam will be in
French, German, Russian and
Spanish.

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, July 29
College of Education, Faculty
Lecture, Norman
Auditorium, 1:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Student Senate, 349 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Student Rights Committee, 150
A Union, 4:00 p.m.
Student Government, 305
Union, 4:00 p.m.
University Personnel, 150 C & D
Union, 9:30 a.m.
Wednesday, July 30
Mensa Discussion, "Welfare
Economics," 361 Union,
8:30 p.m.
Law Dames Bridge, 150 C
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Childrens Arts & Crafts Class,
G-41 Union, 9:30 a.m.
Student Government Cabinet
Meeting, 305 Union, 3:00
p.m.
Speleological Society, 346
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Athletic Dept. Luncheon, 400
Union, 12:15 p.m.

V 0) ITS NOT TOO early/
f -41 o\ y Plan ahead for those "back to school"
cf flj\ /Yb expenses for your young genius! That's
Gy Jl \ /MS-p, where we come in...to help you plan
- i //oJ \ IF your money needs! Drop into YOUR>
: CREDIT UNION. We'll help you plan.
V. X y GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

AFFIRMATIVE ACTION
COMPLIANCE PROGRAM: The
University of Florida is
committed to equal treatment in
the admission and education of
students, employment and
promotion of teaching and
non-teaching personnel,, use of
facilities owned by the
University or under its control,
including student housing,
irrespective of race, creed, color
or national origin.
The University of Florida is
an Equal Opportunity Employer
and will conduct a positive
program of non-discrimination
concerning race, color, sex,
creed or national origin in all
areas of employment recruit recruitment,
ment, recruitment, hiring, termination,
training, promotion, use of
facilities and privileges. Robert
A. Button will be the
coordinator of the Equal
Opportunity Employment
Program.
To achieve these objectives I
have named Vice President L.E.
Grinter as the overall
coordinator of an Affirmative
Action Compliance Program.

Thursday, July 31
Christian Scientists, 357 UnionV
6:30 p.m.
Childrens Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 11:00 a.m.
Veterans Club, 150 B Union,
7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, C-4, 7:30 p.m.
Public Functions Authority, 150
D. Union, 3:00 p.m.
Friday, August 1
Union Movie: "Lonely Hearts",
Union Auditorium, 7:00 &
9:00 p.m.
Muslim Student Association,
123 Union, 12:30 p.m.
Afro-American Student Assoc.,
349 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Extension Home Economics
Luncheon, 150 C Union,
12:00 p.m.

BLUE BULLETIN

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
Schedule
Summer, 1969
Monday Friday Saturday /* Sunday

College Library* Bam ll pm Bam ll pm 2pm ll pm
Research Library Bam llpm Bam ll pm 2pm llpm
PKY Lib. of Florida History B:3oamspm Closed Closed
Special Collections B:3oaml2N
Ipm spm Closed Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. & Fine Arts Building 7pm-10 pm Bam l2 N -10 pm
Chemistry Library Bam- 5 pm 9am -12 N 2pm spm
216 Leigh Hall 7pm lO pm ** Ipm 4ppi 7pm lO pm
- -
Education Library Bam 10:30pm ** 9am spm 2pm-10:30pm
341 Norman Hall
Engineering & Physics Library Bam spm 9am -12 N 2pm spm
410 Engineering Building 7pm lO pm Ipm 4ppr 7pm lO pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. Bam spm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6pm-10 pm *** Bam -12 N 7pm -10 pm
Health Center Library
Med. Sci. Bldg. LlO2 Bam -12 M 8:30 pm spm 2pm -12 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall 8 amllpm Bam spm 7pm llpm
Journalism & Communication R. R. Bam spm
Stadium 337 7pm -10 pm *** Bam -12 N Closed
Law Library Bam -11 pm Bam-11pm B:3oam-11pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School
Library) Yonge Bldg, F Bam -12 N Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
- Office Bam spm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam -12 N, 1-5 pm, 2pm spm
6pm -10 pm Closed 6pm -10 pm
The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nights from 11pm-12M
* The Chemistry and Education Libraries close at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
** The Reading Rooms close at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES



* G ATO R CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE I
Sale! Everything must go. TV 10$,
Singer sewing machine $lO, RCA
ctpreo w/4 speakers $75, beds, chairs,
Lamps, etc. 242-T Flavet 3.
(A-3M61-P)
Tov poodle white male 2 lbs 3 mos.
Duppy shots. Clipped. AKC &
Pedigree SBS or best offer 392-0930
after 6:30 475-1329. (A-3t-161-p)
Wire hair terriers AKC registered
shots & wormed. Six weeks old.
Phone 372-6690 after 5 p.m. Only
S6O-00- (A-2t-161-p)
3 Dachshunds 2 black 1 brown AKC
regestered temp, shots SSO. Call
378-3330. (A-4t-160-p)
Will future moon landings
expose our astronauts
to strange lunar germs
that could grow...
AND GROW...into
THE GREEN SLIME?
lap
Green
.^ime
Invaders From
Beyond the Stars!
From MGM^
__ IN COLOR
* f THE^U^MY^

florida players production
R -*
V MNTII'I J
s'* 1
Wfl
*N

FOR SALE
£
GET AWAY CAR Get away from the
heat in an air conditioned cheap car.
$325 It runs fine. Godding & Clark
Motors 2nd & 2nd S.E. Ph
378-2311. (A-ts-159-c)
TREAT rugs right, theyll be a
delight if cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-162-C)
Diamond ring set. Marquise cut
center stone / two baquettes. Match
wedding ring. 50 pts. S4OO. See Jim
1324 SW 13th St. (A-2t-162-p)
Excellent buy. 1968 New Moon
mobile home 12x47, 2 bdrm, on
shady lot. Small equity and assume
low payments. Hillcrest Trailer Park
lot B-3 378-5791. (A-2t-162-p)
DATSUN STATION WAGON.
$1,490, only one available like this.
GODDING & CLARK MOTORS,
Inc. Home of the new leader. SE 2nd
Ave & 2nd St. (A-3t-162-c)
Sale Lil* monster Slalom 20.
BOGEN amp. 70-watt S7O. Call
378-3120 afternoons and evenings.
(A-3t-162-p)
:^wx<^x-MJ!vx*x*x-:.xxsssss;^
| FOR RENT I
foXXwc>6WgRMWM'X :xxwww?s
A few units of privacy remain at LA
MANCHA for the fall. 4 bedrooms
provide maximum luxury at
minimum expense. Rental trailer is
open 35 p.m. Tuesdays,
Wednesdays, & Fridays at SW Bth
Ave. & 9th St. Great new idea!
(B-lt-162-p)
Sublet Village Park, 2BR, Poolside,
Upstairs, $l4O. Available now to
Sept. 1, 1969. 376-1835.
(B-lt-162-p)
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)
Spacious 2 Bedroom Furnished apt.
Married Couple Only Poolside Porch.
$126 Month. 1405 SW 10th Ter.
Apt. 36. 378-8019 After 5 P.M.
(B-st-159-p)
UniversityApts.justnorthofesearch
Lib. 2 sizeseff ~2sty leslbdrm.and2bdr
m .a lla.c.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
.LeaseQuarterlyratesyearlyaverage7s
-120/m 0.3 76-89901536NW3rdave.
(B-12T-158-P)
I RED PM aft I
NIGHT V
8-10 PM Qfc
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

Tuesday, July 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,
I'l'MvVrVAVi'iV.V.V.*.*-*

E WANTEB^
rawwawiM q o o bo ibob ieeoeraaiwci c-wos
2 female roommates wanted fall
quarter La Mancha Townhouse. Call
372-2890 between one and five p.m.
(C-2t-160-p)
GIRL SINGER interested in night
club duo. Good money, work over
breaks. Need good voice and
harmony ability. Call 376-2344.
(C-2t-161-p)
Female roommate for fall, La Bonne
Vie Apts. SW 16 ave. $47.50 per
month. Most utilities incl. Call Joann
392-7589. (C-3t-161-p)
Roommate 4 bedroom house have
your own room for only 35/month
plus V* utilities. 2 airconditioners.
Call Phil or Kerry 392-1681
376-0802. (C-lt-162-p)
,;.>Xv:-:vxx-x.x.x.x.sxxwx*xxx-x-x-
1 HELP WANTED
!y: x*xvx*x-x*x'x*x*xxxsvx x-x x-xxwj
Medical technologist. Salary good to
8000 depending on experience.
Contact Mr. Clark, Munroe Hosp.
Ocala. Phone 629-7911 ex. 19.
(E-162-3t-p)
FULL TIME CLERK-TYPIST II
position open with Student
Publications, University of Florida.
Must be able to type minimum of 45
wpm and pass other requirements of
the state classification. You will be
schooled in the use of computerized
typesetting equipment. You will be
setting type for the various student
publications. Clean, new
surroundings. Many cutlural and
educational opportunities. A chance
to work with interesting people and
to learn special skills. Call or write
for appointment: Mr. Richard P.
French, Production Manager, Student
Publications, University of Florida,
Gainesville, 32601. Call: 392-1681.
(E-Tf-nc-162)
Listeners wanted will pay $2.25
for 11/2 session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Univ. ext. 2-2049
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. (E-st-157-p)
Male over 21 part time Mon. Wed.
Fri. nights 4p.m. l2 mid. Apply in
person Woodys 3458 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-3t-161-p)
4 year old & 8 year old subjects with
normal vision needed in visual
research. $3.00 per hour. Call
392-3031 Visual Sciences Lab.
(E-4t-c-15 )
WANTED COCKTAIL
WAITRESSES! Must be 21 yrs of
age. No experience necessary. Full or
part time. Apply Dubs 4560 NW
13th. St. Ask for Mr. Thomas.
(E-l 59-7 t-p)
.:sx;xx x*x*x*x*X"X*xx-:*x*! x*x*X'X*xx-nw
PERSONAL I
a ..... X
X,.....;.; K X.X.X*X*X.SS X*X*X*XX*Xi!WX :*>M
Dial 378-5600 and hear an electronic
factorial. Any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-Bt-158-P)
Sale Lil monster slalom S2O, new
ladies bike S4O, bongo board SB,
odds and ends cheap! Phone
376-8524. Barbara (J-lt-162-p)
Free! 5 wk old kittens. Call 378-6282
after 5:30 p.m. (J-3t-162-p)
FREE!! 7 week old kittens looking
for good home. 1 black fern 1
black and white stripe male.
392-3051 (work) 376-2509. (home)
(J-2t-161-p)
C LOST FOUND I
Lost at pool. Mans gold Signet ring.
Reward open. 378-5626 after 10
p.m. Great sentimental value.
(L-4t-l 58-P)
j
HORSEBACK RIDING
HAYRIDES PARTIES!!! SE 15th
St. 372-8460. (M-st-159-p)
Florida Quarterly
HERE NOW!

Page 11

m # o
1
i KSWXC*X.NSNWXX*X>WWW*X"X
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
* St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-c)
EXPERIENCED ACCURATE
TYPIST .45 per page. Call
LORRAINE 372-7973. (M-161-2t-p)
TYPING IBM electric rates according
to material. Call Nancy at 392-0761.
(M-4t-161-p)
TYPING ALL SUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. ELECT. IBM TYPEWRITER
ALL TYPES CALL JEAN 376-7809.
(M-st-162-p)
BABY CARE! 311 N.W. 15th
Terrace, (infants under 1 yr. old)
Monday through Friday. Ba.m.-sp.m.
sls per week. .75 pr. hr.
Experienced, trustworthy, Christian
home. Ph. 376-2072. (M-2t-162-c)
My office 3s small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
519Vz SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-155-2t-p)

KIMM I NOW' THE COUNTDOWN
IS ENDING!
If the Charm* dosrtUltar...ttS.-BnslHte!Wi fcrteSgemewi!
A ( \* c
r >--y£f.- 20th Century-Fox presents
EMES crecorv peer
iIF nnnE hevuiooo
An Arthur P. Jacobs Production
if-Hr the [Hnimnn
Panavlsion Color t> r o*.u
HURRY...LAST 3 DAYS
s|f p
pi. \y \ SPECIALS ||
jCTT tuesday SPECIAL ||
FRIED I
I CHICKEN (
|§| ALL YOU OCA £|l
||| CARE TO EAT JV\ |||
m WEDNESDAY SPEOAL |1
g|| LUNCH AND DINNER ||§
1 JUMBO CHOPPED 1
i STEAK ,~ 1
flf WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY Q L |||
||| AND YELLOW RICE |||
I MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I
||L GAINESVILLE MALL j||

i
Sfr>:MNNWWWOWe i i>>s Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M55-P)
live life to the limit
I g pmjl nEuimnnl
uonnnE woodward]
I illiniums I
R J|TECHNICOLOFr/PANAVISION*W B
I ALSO I



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29, 1969

UF Not Built For Invalids

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first of a
three-part series of the life of handicapped people at
UF.)
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The wheelchair student, an extinct species at
UF, apparently doesnt stand much of a chance of
being resurrected and allowed to roam the campus
in the near future.
This is the verdict given to veterans of Vietnam,
victims of car accidents, those with heart
conditions, the elderly, or anyone else confined to a
wheelchair.
Officially, no one in the administration has
handed down the verdict, but to a wheelchair
student, all he has to do is try and find a sufficient
number of designated parking places on campus for
the handicapped, ramps for getting his wheelchair
on the sidewalk, or find enough elevators on campus
to get him to a class.
On a confidential level, in private letters and
interviews, the wheelchair student is advised of the
luuuiniiuiiiiiiiinimiiinimiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiii
"A man in a wheelchair couldn't make it
through four years here" Assistant
Registrar Thomas A. Graham.
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII
impossibility of maneuvering across
campus provided the applicant makes a special
effort to inquire into facilities for the handicapped
here.
No, a man in a wheelchair couldnt make it
through four years here, said Thomas A. Graham,
assistant registrar.
Graham said there arent enough elevators on
campus to help the handicapped student. They are
mostly on their own. However, We try to help them
as much as we can.
The facts are that students on
crutches Canadian or conventional in design or
with leg braces, or even a cane or blind, are at a
disadvantage when traveling the long distances to
class at UF.
Opening the doors of freight elevators in
buildings without passenger elevators and crossing
dangerous streets add to their dilemma.
In Norman Hall the handicapped face opening an
elevator door held back by a spring which makes it

Black Courses Available In Fall

By RICK SMITH
Al ligator C orrespondent
A new dimension in
American history will be
presented at the UF this fall in
the form of courses in
Afro-American history, said Dr.
John K. Mahon, History
Department chairman, last week.
The courses to be offered are
listed as Colloquium, History of
the Afro-American; and
Problems in Afro-American
History. These courses are
being offered in response to
requests made by black students
Scuba Divers Meet
The Barnacle Busters, a scuba
diving club, will sponsor a
program on diving safety tonight
at 8 oclock in the second floor
conference room of the NASA
building.
The guest speaker will be
David Desautel, a Gainesville
diving expert. Anyone interested
in diving is invited.
Hav
/ Your Generator
OVERHAULED Soecial
*ASO /
INC LABOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
508 NW Bth AVE. GAINESVILLE
Mon.Frl. Bam*7 pm Sat. til 5 pm

about one year ago, Mahon
said.
Teaching the courses will be
Dr. G. Selden Henry, who
studied black history at Yale
University, and Dr. Augustus M.
Bums, who is currently enrolled
in a black studies program at the
University of North Carolina.
We would prefer to have a
black scholar teach these

- ~~ t
JML £ STEAK HOtJSB Z
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
Lost youp Contact?
Qatop AOs make Contacts!

difficult for them to maneuver. One observer at the
building has seen the unsteady struggle
desperately with the door.
The only building on campus built to
accommodate a person in a wheelchair or on
crutches is the new Research Library.
Equipped with ramps, easy opening doors,
buttons in elevators at waist level, plus special
bathroom facilities, the new library is the
handicapped persons answer to a minimum of
physical barriers in a building.
All new buildings at UF, according to Campus
Planning Consultant William Munson, are being built
to specifications laid down by the American
Standards Association (ASA).
However, he said that funds for rebuilding
present structures to ASA specifications are not
available.
The buildings we are renovating, are being done
so that the handicapped are taken into
consideration, but these funds are only for certain
academic areas where the building qualifies for
special funds. We just cant renovate all the
buildings on campus to help the handicapped, he
said.
Under Florida law, UF is on legally safe ground
with its present building policy as it relates to the
handicapped.
Florida Statutes state that where economically
feasible, the state shall provide facilities and
features for the physically impaired. Jurisdiction in
this matter is left up to the contracting authority
overseeing the building project.
The University of South Florida at Tampa, is the
only upper division university in Florida which
comes close to meeting the requirements set down
by the ASA for making buildings accessible and
usable to the handicapped.
The Vocational Rehabilitation Center in
Gainesville estimates that 175 of 200 student
patients on active status at the center, are attending
UF, half of whom have difficulties climbing stairs,
stepping over curbs and walking long distances.
Mrs. Jennifer Cook, a rehabilitation counselor,
said there are many more handicapped at UF who
do not come to the center for help.
An accurate estimate of the total number of
handicapped students at UF is not kept by the
infirmary, the registrars office, or any other known
source.
(Friday: An Individuals Experience)

courses, but one is simply not
available to us at this time,
Mahon said.
A pilot black history course
previously offered was hindered
because too many of the
students had insufficient
knowledge of American history,
he said; to enroll in next years
courses, one needs the
permission of the instructor.

I OF Gracl Receives |
1 Top National Award |
S AUF graduate student in the College of Education has been $
named one of the four national recipients of an award from the
United Educators Foundation.
;:j Walt Mickler, a doctoral student in the Department of |:j
Curriculum and Instruction, has received an SBOO check from :
United Educators, Inc., a publisher of encyclopedias and
:j reference books for teachers and children. ;j:
Announcing the award, Dr. Glen Hass, who is Micklers j:|
advisor, noted that this marks the third time a College of :j
Education graduate student has won the award since it was
$ established in 1960.

i
Mary/anef
FPIEDCHICKEN

WELCOME ALL U of F PERSONNEL
gs MtSSSask
jHyipgi Llsiviill
l""" CITY V
" bank
1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
THE CLOSEST FULL SERVICE
BANK TO CAMPUS
V Climb aboard W
yThe S.S.
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to it
1* Midnight Tj
/ Bernie Sher //
k at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday i i
] Oysters 8t clams on the half shell #M
Michelob on draft \
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty
f t
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager Ai
Reservations Accepted 520 s w 2nd Ave t
Closed Sundays X))
. Join the Swing to Wings
LEARN just $c
kkifAn 11 for our Spocial
Introductory Flight Lesson
* Discover why the swings to wings.
CT| I Try our introductory flight lesson in a modern
Piper Cherokee. Come see us today.
VETERANS!! Your G.l. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot
Training. For full details, call Gainearille's only approved
school
378-2646
ICL CASSELS IN THE AIR, inc.

11 'MMX.VI W
S WITH THIS COUPON ONE g
g COMPLETE $1.15 CHICKEN §
j§ DINNER 1
I COUPON GOOD TUES. 29th & 1
1 WED. 30th FOR IN |
|| STORE PURCHASE IS
516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET



MCCANN AND GOLDBERG
... roughly bringing Stanley to earth.
Theatre Is Essence
By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Its hard to get actors to feeling natural and relaxed doing the
things they have to do in a Pinter play, says James Lauricella,
director of this Florida Players production, The Birthday Party I do
a lot with improvisation, and we often have frank open talk about
bodies.
Lauricella, with a masters degree and doctoral work in theater
behind him, describes his personal essence as a theater person.
Everything I like to do, except for the usual relaxation things, is
connected with the theater. Even when I go fishing, I m talking
theater.
People ask me why I never do anything like Barefoot in the
Park. Im not paid enough for one thing. If somebody paid me lots of
money to go through the boredom of directing the superficial
characters, Id be glad to. Since Im not paid very much to do the
work here, I want to do something I can get deeper into every day.
Then, too, since this is a university I feel I have to put real
demands on the student actors, to make the work demanding for
them.*
Does he plan to stay in universities? My plans aren t that definite.
My only intention is to stay working with theater, whether in the
university system or not.
\ ii Hill 1 >
Wishtoome
Theres a new Wishbone Fried Chicken t
704 S. W. 2nd Avenue or 16th Ave. at S. Mam Street.
FLORIDA QUARTERLY
Litde-Walker Plaza July 21-23


Florida Girls Introduction

Up, Up, and Away ... Women students theres a
SPACE for you on the Florida campus.
This fall as part of the new more personal
approach to orientation there will be a Campus life
Conference for Women Students, Tuesday,
September 16, at 4:00 p.m.
Its purpose is to acquaint entering women
students with the activities and various leadership
opportunities open to them on the UF campus.
Using the air-conditioned Reitz Union Ballroom,
various women leaders will deliver short speeches.
Included in the list of speakers are: Linda Mogge,
student chairman of the Conference; Jo LynnPijot,
Miss UFf Joan Dowd, president, AlphaLamda Delta;
Dianne Baron, president, Panhellenic Council and
Debbie Moschell, coordinator, Womens
Cheerleaders.
Speaking on behalf of the administration is Dean
Betty Cosby, Dean of Women; Dean Phyllis Meak
and Dean Loyce Katz, Assistant Deans of Women;
Representing the Housing Office is Phyllis Mable,
Assistant Director.
Susan Johnson, the first woman president of
Interhall and Kathy Waldman, president of AWS are
the guest speakers from student government.

1
Dick Hclmej
Jtwn.cc/ I
LOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
REPAIRS I
TROPHIES-ENGRAVING 1
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
V^^O^RO^CAMPU^^J

SOM-or-a-BUH!
DATSUN/2
Mils Best S 2OQO Car!
Like it just blasted its way out of Tombstone, Datsun/2 door charges in on 96
galloping horsepower. Rides easy on a fully independent rear suspension. Stops
quick with safety front disc brakes. Sporty and spirited, its fun to drive. Snubs
gas stations, too. At over 25 miles per gallon you can tour a lot of territory
on a tankful. Front buckets, all-vinyl interior, flow-through fresh air (air (airconditioning
conditioning (airconditioning available). Frisky all-synchro 4-speed puts you in charge. Two Twospeed
speed Twospeed wipers and washers, and lots of other no-cost extras. Load up your
family or four friends and take off in a goin son-of-a-gun. And check out the
other dudes in the Datsun corral. Theres 6 spunky ones all told!
P.O. E.. plus tax, license, local freight, D & H.
Q /2 4-Door Sedan
Make the sound move to Datsun today!
GODDING & CLARK
"Home of the New Leader" MON fhrM SAT
2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S. E. Ph. 378-2311

| u a, UFS REPRESENTATIVES |
sle L George Corl Skip Lujack 1
I Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson I
1 Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave.
I NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
J

Tuwdoy, July 29,1968, Thu Florid* Alligator,

An addition speech will be given by Kathy White,
secretary, Gator Band.
The special guest of the Conference is Mrs.
Stephen OConnell.
Also on the program will be a Gator Pep Band to
help get up spirit for the Houston game to be played
on the following Saturday. A Pep Band is any
playing segment of the Gator Band.
[The Florida Alligator
Following the Conference students may visit
booths set up by all the womens organizations and
get information on the groups that interest them.
These booths will be on the second floor of the
Union.
The purpose for these displays as well as the
entire Conference said Dean Katz, is to make the
new women students feel welcome and acquaint
them with the opportunities present at UF. I feel
that last years conference was a real success.

Page 13



> Ths Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29, 1969

Page 14

n | | v .;,
I m
I
a \ B >.,.4 I |
fe* m 11 jA b^
t ) If 1 --*'/,av
i'JflpW'' £ i|^Hk 'X /
H§jL Ips^v/v. .* Jp -kai
;,; :f#p f**\ * y\
AT WORK BEHIND THE SCENES
... building the set to suit the play.
Birthday Party Underway

By JOE BRADSHAW
Alligator Correspondent
The Florida Players is in
production for the summer
quarter. The Birthday Party, a
three act play written by Harold
Pinter, will be presented in the
Constans Theater, August 6-9.
The Birthday Party, the first
full-length play written by
Pinter, takes place in a worn-out
boarding house which is located
by the sea. The play is a
tragic-comedy.
The play is centered around
Stanley, a man /in his late
thirties. Stanley is unexpectedly
called upon by \wo rather
mysterious strangers. The two
men put Stanley through a
merciless cross-examination,
throwing at him every kind of
accusation.
They conclude the
cross-examination by showing
up at Stanley's birthday party
and humiliating him to no end.
Stanley, denying that it is his
birthday party, finally collapses
from the strain.
Next morning, numb and
silent, Stanley is led to a waiting
car by the two mysterious men
and carried away to some
terrible punishment.
The Birthday Party has been
performed both on stage and
over television with great
success.
James Lauricella, speech
department assistant professor
directing the play has previously
directed After the Rian and
Imaginary Invalid, here on
campus. According to Lauricella,
Stanley the piano player is
forceably thrust back to reality
by McCann and Goldberg Thats
part of the meaning of the plays
title. has curled himself
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS SALES-SERVICEREPAIRS
Good Service Starts
At
CRANE IMPORTS
506 East University 372-4373
MMMdi

up foetus-like, in a little world
of his own making. He goes
through birth pains getting bom
back into reality. Theres hope
at the end of the play, that he
can accept himself, and go on
living.
Six people make up the cast.
Stanley is played by Stew
Solomon; Dan Jesse is McCann

Movie Times
otten mediocre
good excellent
Center I Lovebug, Disney fantastic. 1, 3:09, 5:18, 7:27,
9:40.
Center II Romeo and Juliet, Franco Zeffirellis production,
with highly rated young actors. Not one of Shakespeares best
plays, but still Skakespeare. 2:03,4:32,7:01,9:40.
Florida lce Station Zebra, with McGoohan, Brown and
Hudson. Gadgetry is too much, script weak, and coexistence
moral tacked onto the end. 2,5,8.^^
Gainesville Winning. Paul Newmans movie of winning race
driver with a life and love relationship as they really are,
which never means the way youd be proud to make yourself
be. 8:52. Counterfeit Killer, with Jack Lord and Shirley Knight.
11:17. Opens Wednesday: Young Runaway, with Patty
McCormick. 8:47. The Wild Bunch, with Holden, Borgnine and
crew. Has nothing but a little nostalgia for the good old days
before the dirty capitalists (so portrayed) stopped letting you
rob their trains, and a lot of gore. Gore like youve never seen. A
technical masterpiece, if thats your bag. 10:30,^J
Plaza I The Chairman, with Gregory Peck. Worth seeing for
some nice dialogue, and a very interesting picture of Red China.
The gadgetry interferes with the end, as does a poorly thought
out speech, but all in all, rates a G. 1:57, 3:53, 5:49, 7:48,
9:47.@
Plaza II 2OOl Space Odessey. If you must go, read the
book first to supply the story more clearly. 2:23, 5:59,8:35.
Suburbia The Green Slime. 8:50. The Mummys Shroud,
10:35.
I ROBBIES I
The Best In Steaks.
Meals & .JrtK^andwiches
TV & BILLIARD^H
I 1718 W University Ave. I
I On The Gold Coast

and Rick Council is Goldberg.
Eileen Drillick portrays Lulu, a
girl in her twenties. Meg and
Petey, sixty-year-olds, are played
by Joan Mueller and Lou Tally.
Tickets go on sale at the
Reitz Union box office today.
Admission is 25 cents for
students and $1.50 for faculty,
staff and the general public.

Mensa To Discuss Welfare
An informal discussion of Welfare Economics Wednesday at
8:30 P.M. in room 361, Reitz Union, has been announced by John
Mayer, Program Chairman of the local Mensa chapter. The discussant
will be John Leppelmeier, a Mensa member who has taught economics
at university level in the United States and Mexico. All Mensa
members and potential members are cordially invited. The organization
is now affiliated with the national Mensa, so permanent membership
requires an intelligence test.
I FBI HOME WHO VALDEIIEI6 VlSlffJl 1
'T?Antyn-BECKUM OPTICIANS
22 West University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Phone 376-3516
l~ COMPLETE VOLKSWAGEN
I REPAIRS
Factory trained mechanics
I Complete parts department |
I Bring This Ad With You --j
Service Maintenance Only $ 7.95 I
376-4261 |
i BUSH GARAGE miim.*!*** {
I TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
I SAVEI
I 1 STARKE, FLORIDA
SOONER Or la ter your fa VORITE DEALER
I HOURS
J WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM 6PM-1
-1 6PM-1 SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
fc
LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
WED THRU SAT
9 PM ON..
"THE REUNION
i
1 NW 10th AVE.
FLORIDA QUARTERLY
AFA Complex 28-30



FOR SATURDAY'S NORTH-SOUTH TUT
Defense Is Top Concern

Defense seems to be the
major worry of the coaches of
both the North and South
All-Star teams as they prepare
for their annual battle, at
Florida Field Aug. 2 at 7:45
p.m.
The South has a pair of
speedsters in their backfield who
have been clocked at 9.4 and 9.7
seconds in the hundred. From
Coral Gables comes speedy

All-Star
Football Rosters
NORTH

Andy Andersen T 6-1 230
Ed Barnwell T 6-0 198
Lamar Brinien HB 5-8 188
Tom Chambers HB 5-10 170
Tom Crompton C-LB 6-0 200
Danny Daniels T 64 230
Jerry Deloach HB 6-2 175
Ruddy Dixon SE 510 177
Jan Gowlend LB 6-0 210
Ron Graves LB 6-2 220
Mike Green LB 5-10 170
Noah Jackson LB+T 6-1 230
Abe Johnson FB 5-9 Vi 210
Bernard Kelly LB 6-0 238
Bill Thompson HB 5-10 190
Mike Milo BE 4-*Vi 210
Eddy Moore LB 6-4 235
Larry Morris LB 64 210
Clint Parker HB 4.2 190
Jack Posted QB 64 165
Jerry Richardson QB 64 196
Jessie Roberts HB 54 160
Jim Roundtree FB 6-1 210
Jeff Rouzie G 64 215
Dennis Tucker t 64 205
Wayne Wheeler IE 6-1 Vt 180
Steve Wilson T 6-2 190
David Yowell TB 64 195
Jack Standridge HB 6-1 165
Robert Miller F 54 140
Tteve Dean HB 64 180
Sinilar Hill G 5-10 180
Ed MacAshan QB 6-2 110

Oscar Anderson FB 519 180
Bill Baggett FB-DFB 5-9 180
Mark Beddingfield DE-T 6-3 214
Gary Bryan LB-G 64 210
Roger Chambers DE-F 8 5-11 198
Joe Clark DB 64 165
John Clifford DB 6-2 155
Ed Davis DB 6-1 170
Myron Davie T 6-2 224
Mike Dely DE 6-3 195
Ron Doll G-T-LB 6-2 210
Rick Dunn E 6-1 185
Rufus Ferguson HB 54 186
Bob Flanders G-LB 64 210
Larry' Freseh AB 6-5 190
Laonerd George HB 5-11 170
John Goerger SE 6-1 165
Tarry Heninger LB 6*l 196
John Kok AB 6-1 180
Joe Miller HB 5-9 175
Doug Muirheed C 6-2 177
Gary Parrish E 6-3 Vi 210
Dava Peff T 6-0 190
Ktifh Redan C 6-2 200
Barry Smith SE 6-1 190
John Tucker G 6-1 200
Eddy Williams LB 5-11 195
Cleve Winn HB 5-11 170
Mike Rosinskl DT 4-1 190
Gordon Ready OT 6-1 225
Ron Chadwick DLB 6-0 185
Gerald Tinker FL 5-10 165

LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
CHUCK CONLEY
GUITAR
MON WED
9 ON
RICHARD PARKER
PIANO
THUR SAT
9 ON a
Alibi
LOUNGE
34th & W. UNIV.
| Florida QuarterM
joN SALE! J

flanker Gerald Tinker. He is a
5-10, 165-pounder who led
Gables to the Class AA title with
his sure hands and 9.4 speed. He
competed in the finals of the
National AAU track meet and
has signed a football scholarship
with Memphis State.
Rufus Ferguson of Miami
Killian has the 9.7 time.
Although only 5-6, the North
will have to stop his 186 pounds.

Deland Murray State
Jacksonville Englewood Citadel
Palatka Bethune Cookman
Orlando Bishop Maora Tampa
Jacksonville Ribault Undecided
Pensacola Escambia Louisville
Panama City Bay Undecided
Gainesville Memphis State
Winter Garden Florida
Jacksonville Englewood Tennessee
Pensacola Senior Florida
Jacksonville Fletcher Tampa
Apalachicola Fla. A. 8> M.
Tallahassee Rickards Fla. A &M.
Jacksonville Welfson Duke
Jacksonville Englewood Ga. Tech
Orlando Edgawatar Florida
Pensacela Senior Florida
ansacala Senior Florida
Daytona Mainland FSU
High Springs Undecided
Orlando Bishop Moore Memphis St
Ft. Walton Fla. A. & M.
Gainesville Georgia Tech
Jacksonville Wolfson Alabama
Crestview Florida
Orlando Boone Alabama
Orlando Edgewater Georgia Tech
Orlando Edgewater Georgia Tech
Wiiliston Florida State
Dayfona Mainland Ferrum College
Orlando Boone Undecided
Milton Undecided
Gainesville Georgia Tech

SOUTH

Miami Jackson, Wla. A.M.
Cocoa Bch., Naval Prep School
Winter Haven Austin Peay
Hardee Senior .undecided
Lakeland Kathleen Gordon Military
Ft. Myers Senior, Tampa
Coral Gables, Florida
Lakeland, FSU
Sarasota Senior Kansas
Miami Springs Undecided
Riviera Beach, Florida
West Palm Leonard, Undecided
.Miami Killian, Wisconsin
Eau Gallie, Undecided
Sarasota Denier, Florida
Tampa Jesuit Florida
Tampa Hillsborough Kansas State
West Palm Sr., Undecided
Winter Haven, Austin Paay
Clearwater, Morris Brown
Ceral Gables, U es Penn, er VMI
Vero Beach, FSU
Titusville, Florida
Hollywood McArthur, Citadel
Miami Coral Park, FSU
Miami Palmetto, Florida
Tampa Hillsborough Undeeided
Naples, Kansas State
Hollywood Cbaminade, Undecided
Delray Beach, Tennessee
Ft. Lauderdale Nova, Undecided
Coral Gables, Memphis St.

SURPRISED?
... YOU MIGHT BE IF
YOU HAVENT LISTENED
TO 1390 RADIO FOR A
WHILE
WUWU
IS NOW PROGRAMMING THE
SMOOTHEST
POPULAR MUSIC IN TOWN
JOIN THE CROWD CROWDMOVE
MOVE CROWDMOVE UF TO THE SMOOTH ONI

He averaged 8.3 yards per carry
last year.
With these two dangerous
offensive threats staring North
coach Jim Niblack of Gainesville
in the face, his major emphasis
has been on defense. He is
hoping his huge defensive line
will be able to cope with the
Souths speedy basics.
Noah Jackson of Jacksonville
Fletcher, 6-1 and 230, is
expected to stand out at middle
guard Bernard Kelly of
Tallahassee Rickards, 6-0, 238,
will be at right tackle and Andy
Anderson of Deland, 6-1, 230,
will be at left tackle.
The Norths strength should
lie in its linebackers. Niblack has
seven talented players that could
play that rugged position. Ron
Graves, 6-2, 220, from
Jacksonville Englewood, Mike
Green, 5-10,170, from Pensacola
and Toby Williams, 6-2, 195,
from Jax. Wolfson will bring
Niblack a strong nucleus to work
with.
Niblack also plans to use Jan
Gowland, an All-State selection
from Winter Garden- Lakeview,
Larry Morris, from Pensacola
High, and Jackson. They will be
used on offense as well as
defense.
At the defensive ends, the
North will have Steve Wilson,
190, from Orlando Edgewater,
and Mike Milo, 210, from
Jacksonville Englewood, to
contain the Souths speed.
The South will also have
running back Cleve Winn, 5-10,
170, from Naples in his
backfield. Winn scored 31
touchdowns last season. He is
headed for Kansas State.
Joe Miller, a standout running
back for Clearwater, will also see
plenty of action. Miller led
Clearwater to a 9-1 record while
scoring 22 touchdowns.
The North will also be trying
to put a strong rush on Winter
Havens quarterback, John Kok,
who will head the Souths
attack. He is considered an
excellent passer.
The North will also have a
strong offense revolving around
Gainesvilles All-American,

Eddie McAshan. Tom Atwell,
South's head Coach, has been
working hard on defense and
will continue to do so until the
two powerhouses meet Saturday
night.
Weve got some good
defensive backs, Atwell said
Saturday. But weve got the
same problem the North does in
that well have to play our speed
against theirs. Anytime you have
this short a period to get a team
together, thats all you can do.
McAshan will have the
running skills of two
Jacksonville Wolfson backs, Jeff
Rouzie, 6-0, 210, and Bill
Thompson, 5-10, 195, to base
his running attack around.
Rouzie is headed for Alabama
and Thompson will go to Duke.
Atwell has a crew of ends to
try and contain the Norths
offense. Gary Porr of Titusville,
Mike Dely of Miami Springs,
Roger Chambers of Lakeland
Kathleen, Mike Rosinski of
Hollywood Chaminade, and
Gary Parrish of Vero Beach will
all be competing for starting
positions.

SALES-SER VICE-RENTALS
1 i gl
"Authorized "Authorized
Adler Dealer" Smith Corona
Dealer
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
FORMERLY Hancock Office Equipment
582 N. Main St. 376-5551
*~\ :
And escape from the high
cost of high performance
The lowest-priced true sports car you can buy. With the
powerful 1275 cc engine that made it Class G Cham Champion
pion Champion in 1967. Plus 4-speed close ratio gear box.
Responsive rack-and-pinion steering.. Sure-footed
heavy-duty,suspension. And dual braking system with
fade-free disc brakes up front.
All these luxury extras included. You also get foam foampadded
padded foampadded bucket seats. A new quick-and-easy folding
top. Tachometer. Two-speed wipers. And a heater/
defroster that really works!
Test drive the Austin Healey Spritethe lowest-priced
"SPRITE
CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY 372-4373

Tuesday, July 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Focmer UF
Athletes Hired
Mike McGinnis and Terry
Stroemer, former UF athletes,
have been signed to coach at
Santa Fe High School.
The small north Alachua
County community has been a
Class A athletic powerhouse in
the state for some time. Last
years football team finished
with an impressive 9-1 record.
Their basketball team had a
reputable 18-7 season.
McGinnis, a starter on last
years NIT basketball squad, will
take over as head basketball
coach for the Rebels. He is
replacing Dawson Brown.
Stroemer, captain of the
1968 baseball team, will become
head baseball coach as well as
assistant football coach. He will
be teaching either health science
or drivers education.
Stroemer coached the UF
B-team last season to its first
winning season against some of
the top junior colleges and
college B-teams in the state. He
led his team to an early season
victory over the Jacksonville
University varsity who two
weeks later defeated UFs varsity
baseball team in Jacksonville.

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 29,1969

Spurrier is All-Timer

- By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
Steve Spurrier, Charlie Trippi, Don Hutson,
Herman Hickson, Buck Flowers and Ray Morrison
are among 31 players selected to the All-Time
Southeastern area team.
The team selection made by a seven-man
committee, one for each state in the Southeast, will
be presented to the Football writers of America
jjtfp £ '$? s : 3y r < §x
i:
fPMSSpifek;. X'^N
FORMER TROPHY WINNER STEVE SPURRIER
... named to All-Time Southeast football team

QwmjimMv Qck /C^J^
Tremendous Values for
r\ Dl) excellent selection v-CJ wi7
SllMMMlit/ CwMjMJ women's dept.
Bathing Suits to dresses
Up to 75% Savings including all Summer wear
Be First \| /
get the Best Bargain in Town I A
ik y
Uuiticrsitp g>()op
2
.. ' i
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE UNIVERSITY PLAZA

Association which will pick an All-Time
All-American team to honor 1969, the centennial
year of college football.
The team actually represents two eras of
Southeastern football competition, one for the
period 1869-1919 and a modem era team selected
from the period 1920-1969.
For the old-timer squad, 60 players were
nominated and 13 were selected from seven schools.
The modem era 18-member squad represents 10
schools dominated by Georgia and Alabama, each
placing three players on the All-Time team.
UFs 1967 Heisman Trophy winner Spurrier tied
for quarterback honors with Kentucky great Babe
Parilli.
Cannon, Heisman winner form LSU, beat out
UFs All-American Beattie Flowers by one vote to
join two Georgia all-purpose men, Frank Sinkwich
and Trippi in the modem back-field.
Also representing the Bulldogs is Bob Etter,
place-kicker at Georgia in 1963-64-65.
Lee Roy Jordan at center, Fred Sington at tackle
and Hutson at end represent Alabama on the
All-Time modern squad.
While Hutson ran away with the balloting for one
end on the modem squad, there was a three-way tie
for the other end position among Lynn Bomar of
Vanderbilt, Gaynell (Gus) Tinslye of LSU and Ron
Sellers ofFSU.
Vanderbilt placed five of the 13 on the old-timer
team. They are Bob Blake, end; Josh Cody, tackle;
Frog Megzger, guard; J. N. Stone, center; and
Morrison, quarterback. Morrison was a dual
selection at punt returner as well as quarterback.
Others in the oldtime backfield were Flowers of
Georgia Tech and Bob McWhorten of Georgia at
halfback and Joe Guy on of Georgia Tech at
fullback.
Indicating the quality of the team is the list of
those who didnt make it such greats as Feathers,
Dixie Howell of Alabama, Tucker Frederickson of
Auburn and Steve Van Buren of LSU at halfback;
John Rauch of Georgia, Jake Gibbs of Ole Miss and
Pat Trammell of Alabama at quarterback; Fred
Biletnikoff of FSU at end; Bob Gain and Lou
Michaels, both of Kentucky, at tackle; Zeke Smith
of Auburn and Ed Molinski of Tennessee at guard,
George Morris of Georgia Tech and Vaugh Mancha
of Alabama at center.

Arthur Ashe Almost
Boycotts Davis Cup

NEW YORK, July
17 Negro tennis star Arthur
Ashe, Americas top-ranked
player, almost boycotted Davis
Cup play in 1968 because of
South Africas participation,
according to an article in the
current issue of Sport Magazine.
Ashe, who claims that South
Africa, with its official
government policy of apartheid,
has informed him that he would
not be issued a visa to enter the
country and compete "in the
South African open
championships later this year,
reveals his thoughts on
boycotting Davis Cup play last
year in the Sport article.
I seriously considered not
playing in 1968 as my personal
form of protest against South
Africa in the competition, says
Ashe. I talked this over with a
lot of leaders, white and black,
in tennis and out. Some
recommended a boycott and
some disagreed. At the time, it
looked like the U.S. would have
to play South Africa in the
semi-finals.
Finally USLTA President
Bob Kelleher suggested that we
could score a first by my playing
in South Africa with our team,
continues Arthur. He said the
USLTA would stand behind me.
You see, for that match we
would have had the privilege of
choosing the site, and Kelleher
said the USLTA would insist on
playing in South Africa.
South Africas alternative
would have been to default the
match, which we felt they
wouldnt do. So I decided to
play, feeling that I could at least
make a small dent in South
Africa which I felt would have

been better than nothing.
Unfortunately, concludes Ashe
in the Sport article, South
Africa was upset in the quarter
finals and we never had a chance
to test this strategy.
TURN
OFF
SUMMER
9
auto t./conditioning
FIRST...and still 9M
costs hit thn factory air
GODDING A CLARK
MOTORS
2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E.
378-2311
OPEN 8 P.M. MON.-SAT.