Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
PR £
At A M)JiWJi

Vol 61, No. 159

AFTER 'STORYBOOK APOLLO LAUNCH
Astronauts Rest Up For Landing

' "iJjH
|P 3 ~ --
. IL*. a i PK* ** Sl ii> k B
B r ( P f Z&-
MOON-BOUND ASTRONAUTS ARMSTRONG, COLLINS AND ALDRIN
... flight called 'perfect' as the pioneers head for historic rendezvous
Mixed Reactions Prompted
By Regents Tenure Delay

See Editorial Page 8
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
The delay in granting tenure
to 262 state university system
faculty by the Board of Regents
has brought a variety of
reactions from some of the 119
UF faculty affected and from
other members of the UF
community.
Feelings range from
indifference to mild disturbance
to anger.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer,
chairman of the political science
department, gave what he felt
was a comprehensive view of the
situation.
Dauer said his earlier
statements, reported in last
Fridays Alligator, about there
being little immediate necessity
for concern over tenuring was
based on the premise the board
would tenure the recommended
professors.
I think the whole thing is in
trouble now, he said.
Dauer saw three main areas of
concern.
First, he said, in voting to
delay the decision, they plan to
overhaul existing procedures.
People were brought here under
a given set of conditions. This
could be a breach of contract if
they were not processed under

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTH%ASrS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

the rules they originally agreed
to.
Second, he continued,
some recommendations come
from newer universities with,
faculties inadequate to pass on
tenure. This could be a
legitimate reason for the regents
screaming.
Finally, some regents do not
favor tenure at all. This would
give us a non-standard system
incapable of competition with
other universities.
There was criticism leveled at
what was termed the arbitrary
overturning of Chancellor
w M Bk
HARRIS
... going to Harvard

University of Florida, Gainesville

Robert B. Mautzs
recommendation to tenure the
already screened professors.
Mautz had said in the
recommendation, These
individuals were recommended
according to present board
policy, and approval of tenure
should be granted in terms of
whether the present criteria as
set forth in the Regents
Operating Manual has been
achieved.
There had been several
deletions of names of professors
(SEE 'DELAY' PAGE 2)

VP Harris Resigns
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Executive Editor
Student Body Vice President Charles Harris has resigned.
In a letter to Student Body President Charles Shepherd, copies of
which were submitted to the Student Senate Thursday night, Harris
said he was resigning, effective Sept. 1, because he has decided to
attend Harvard Law School.
eI shall continue to fulfill the duties of my office until the
effective date of my resignation, Harris said in the letter. In
addition, 1 shall take careful steps to insure that my successor fully
understands the ... responsibilities involved in the vice presidency.
Harris said he is particularly interested in helping the new vice
president successfully complete several important projects now under
Harris supervision.
A new vice president will be selected by the Student Senate under
rules which Harris designed two years ago. Shepherd is required to
submit three nominations to the senate, which votes for the successor
(SEE 'HARRIS' PAGE 2)

National Holiday Set
Monday By President
By DAVE REDDICK
Editor-In-Chief
CAPE KENNEDY The Apollo 11 crew Neil
Armstrong, Edwin Aldrin and Michael Collins rested
Thursday after a story-book launch from here Wednesday
morning.
Drifting through space at an ever-decreasing speed toward
their destination some 240,000 miles away, the astronauts
made a single mid-course correction and spent the rest of
the day readying for the history-making rendezvous with
the moon Sunday afternoon.


\
V
SATURDAY
1:25 p.m. Service module engine
fires to insert Apollo in lunar
orbit.
SUNDAY
9:50 a.m. Aldrin enters LM
10:15 a.m. Armstrong joins
Aldrin
1:42 p.m. LM and command
module separate
3:11 p.m. LM begins descent
4:19 p.m. LM lands on moon
MONDAY
2:17 a.m. Armstrong steps on
moon
4:37 a.m. Aldrin reenters LM
4:42 a.m. Armstrong joins him
1:55 p.m. Upper portion of LM
begins ascent from moon
5:32 p.m. LM and command
module dock

SEE
Opt*

Friday July 18, 1969

Meanwhile, back on Earth,
President Nixon ordered all
federal offices closed Monday
and urged Americans to close
their schools and businesses so
everyone can stay up all night
Sunday to witness the historic
event.
Command' pilot Armstrong
decided not to make a course
correction late Wednesday
because he did not believe one
was necessary then.
In addition to Thursdays
correction, the trio was
scheduled to beam back to Earth
its first live television picture
early Thursday night. Another
TV transmission is planned for
today at 7:32 p.m.
Americas newest space
heroes were thrust into space
precisely on
time 9:32 Wednesday
morning after a minor leak in a
line supplying pressure to one of
the mighty Saturn 5 fuel tanks
was by-passed.
Aside from the leak, which
caused no delay, the countdown
was uneventful until die
moment of ignition and liftoff,
when the launch complex 39A
was enveloped in biflowing
layers of dark smoke and
spewing bursts of brflliant
orange and red flames from the
gigantic Saturn booster. Then,
ever so slowly, the 363-foot
rocket inched from its base and
began climbing toward the
(SEE 'MOON' PAGE 2)
* #
No Class Moonday
Monday will be a holiday
for UF students, faculty
and staff
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell made the official
announcement Thursday
morning following an
executive committee
meeting. All UF offices will
be closed and personnel will
follow the same holiday
schedule as the Fourth of
July.



The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18,1969

Page 2

Medina Named
Dentistry Dean

Dr. Jose E. Medina, who
since 1967 with Dr. Edmund
Ackell has been primarily
responsible for the
organization of the UF
College of Dentistry, has been
named dean of the new
college.
He replaces Ackell, who
was recently named provost
of the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.
Recognized as one of
clinical dentistrys
outstanding educators,
Medina has been instrumental
in curriculum development,
faculty recruitment and
overall facility planning.
He has served on the
building committee which is
coordinating plans and
developing programs for the
proposed $33 million
expansion of the health
center. Facilities for the new
dental school are a principal
part of the expansion
program and is to be
completed by September,
1971.
Ackell said of the
appointment: Floridas new
College of Dentistry is

Harris Resigns
Vice Presidency
by secret ballot.
A majority vote for any one candidate elects him. However, by a
two-thirds vote, the senate can reject all three nominees and request
the president to submit a new list.
Since rumors of Harris pending resignation began circulating a few
weeks ago, several names have been mentioned as possible candidates
for the vice presidency.
Among them are Walt Morgan, Shepherds administrative assistant;
Steve Zack, president of the Interfraternity Council; Joe Hilliard,
Accent 7O general chairman, and Larry Jordan, Student
Governments secretary of minority group affairs.
Harris agreed to run for vice president with Shepherd after being an
early, unannounced candidate for the presidency himself in last
springs student election. Harris, a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon
fraternity, bowed out of the race for the top spot when some 15
fraternities pledged their support to Shepherd.
When Shepherd requested he join the ticket, Harris and his
supporters lined up behind First party, creating the largest political
party in recent campus history.
A member of Florida Blue Key, mens leadership honorary, Harris
has been involved in campus politics three years.
Two years ago, he was floor leader of University party in the then
Legislative Council. Last year, he was chairman of Forward party,
which backed Bill Mcride in a losing contest against Clyde Taylor.
Harris then became leader of the majority forces in the renamed
Student Senate, the post he held when he decided to run for vice
president with Shepherd.
The senate, under Harris leadership, was noted in campus political
circles as coming of age.
Harris and his lieutenants flooded the senate with legislation which
reformed many phases of Student Government and with resolutions
which spoke out strongly on wide-ranging campus controversies.
Harris and the senate became powers to be reckoned with.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion. ____

si?
I Ip 3
dflH jHI
MEDINA
... new dean
extemely fortunate in
continuing to benefit from
Dr. Medinas talents in the
expanded role of dean. For
21 years he has been
significantly involved in
dental education and is in the
vanguard of educators taking
a new approach to the
education of the dentist of
tomorrow.

Delay: 'Contract Breach

one^
who did not meet regents
criteria, including adherence to
American principles, Mautz
said.
Arts and Sciences Dean Harry
H. Sisler said, I believe that it is
unfortunate that the
recommendations for tenure
which have already been
screened at the university are
being delayed. This delay can
produce a deterioration in the
morale of the faculty.
Other administrators, such as
Provost E.T. York Jr., saw no
danger.
York said, I am not greatly
concerned about this. The board
is just exercising its just
responsibility. It is not an
attempt to harass the
university.
Os the 119 UF professors
affected by the delay, some were
indifferent.
Assistant Pediatrics Prof.
Mary C. Vaughn said, Im not
too surprised or concerned. Our
tenure will be approved. The
action of the regents is
consistent with its relation to
the university.
Os the 24 professors
contacted, only four took a
similar position. Most of the
others felt much more strongly
toward the issue.
Psychiatry Assistant Prof.
Dorothy Collins summed up one
attitude.
I guess Ill find a better
place to go. They can have their
position, she said.

Moon Landing On Schedule

PAGE ONE^j
cloud-dotted sky.
The craft and its crew of
space pioneers are scheduled to
enter lunar orbit at 1:25 p.m.
Saturday, followed by another
live TV broadcast at 4:02 p.m.
Armstrong and Aldrin will
enter the landing module, Eagle,
at 1:42 p.m. Sunday. Eagles
four spider-like legs will be
opened, and it will separate from
the command module to prepare

Semi-Annual Sale
from the
University Shop
Continues
Mens and Womens Depts.
Savings of 20, 40 and 60 %
... &
?§j|§ mbersitp g>f) 0 p iHg!?
1620 WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE UNIVERSITY PLAZA

Dr. Melvyn New, assistant
professor of English, took a view
shared by 16 of the 24
professors contacted that the
boards action constituted a
breach of contract.
Its a breach of promise, of
my contract, New said.
New said the board does have
a point in that universities have
been slow in improving tenure
policies. Many professors are
tenured too soon, he said, and
suggested tenure be tied into
promotion.
No major university tenures
our way, New said. It puts us
in double jeopardy, for ten-e
and for promotion.
New said if his tenure is
turned down, he will leave and
go to a place where the regents
dont have control over tenure,
especially where political
implications are involved as at
UF.
Assistant Prof, of Chemistry
William R. Dolbier said some of
his reactions to the regents
might be unprintable.
I am greatly irritated, he
said.
Dolbier said he objected to
the meddling of politicians.
The regents go through
motions to impress the public,
he said.
Dr. John F. Brandt, assistant
research professor of speech,
said it was obvious Mautz
recommendation should have
been followed.
Dr. Lodewyck Van Mierop,
professor of pediatric
cardiology, asked, What more
information could these people

for its 3:11 p.m. descent to the
moon.
After landing near the crater
Moltke in the Sea of Tranquility,
a relatively smooth portion of
the moon, the explorers will
spend 10 hours preparing the
craft for immediate takeoff in
case of emergency.
At 2:12 a.m. Monday
Armstrong will open the hatch
and climb down nine ladder
steps to history.
Before stepping onto the
moons surface, Armstrong will

(regents) want after
recommendations went through
faculty committees, deans and
the administration?
Two faculty organizations are
preparing statements on
tenuring. An American
Association of University
Professors spokesman said a
statement will be available soon.
The American Federation of
Teachers (AFT) decided
Tuesday to issue a position
available for next Tuesdays
Alligator.
AFT member Dr. Paul
Adams, professor of child
psychiatry, said, The university
has reneged on the conditions of
employment. The faculty are
freed from any agreements they
have made. As long as they defer
tenure, we are not bound.
The trouble with the
universities, Adams said, is
incompetence of regents, not
faculty.
JRHP*
BHjip
SISLER
'... morale decline'

open a small hatch to expose a
television camera aimed at the
small area of the moon where he
will take mans first step on any
heavenly body.
Following the
long-to-be-remembered first
step, Armstrong will set up
scientific > experiments, take
pictures and gather rock and soil
samples.
He will be joined by Aldrin a
half hour later, and they will
spend about two and a half
hours exploring the moon.



Action Conference: One Year Later

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs once glorious idea of
faculty-student-administration participation in
running the university, the Action Conference, is
dead.
Its life span was somewhat under one year.
The conference began as an idea somewhere in
Tigert Hall last spring. The first meeting was called
June 12, 1968, and the three constituencies of UF
were each represented by 25 people.
Maj. Russell Ramsey was elected the first
chairman.
The conference formed 10 task forces to
investigate such areas as curriculum, freedom of
expression, conduct, minority groups and the
universitys goals. Appropriate resolutions were
referred to and made by these groups.
All told, 41 numbered resolutions were presented
to the Action Conference. Os these, about 17 have
received some type of concrete positive action
although many more have had final reports made
on them.
Notable successes were creation of Office of
Coordinator of Minority Affairs, removal of
unconstitutional clauses from the loyalty oath,
creation of pass-fail grading system for elective
courses, revision of literature distribution policies
and credit for physical education courses.
There were some unnumbered resolutions not
included in a release from UF President Stephen C.
OConnells office. Among these was a resolution
passed when the firing of controversial Prof.
Kenneth Megill was demanded by a state senator.

Honor Court Establishes
Free Student Legal Aid

A defense counsel has been
set up by the Honor Court to
protect UF students with
university problems.
Jack Klausner, chief counsel
for the defense, has initiated the
program that gives free legal aid
to any student seeking
arbitration and advice
concerning student and
organizational disputes within
the college community.
In the past it has been my
observation that students with
law school friends fare better in
legal disputes than students who
defend themselves, Klausner
said.
As chief counsel for the
defense I organized this service

ftSSSf
J .
WE'VE GOTTEN A LITTLE OF THAT
MOON MADDNESS, TOO, AND MARKED
ALL SUMMER DRESSES
Vi PRICE

for the benefit of every student
on campus who may need help.
When students seek help on the
outside it costs as much as $750
for a minimum law fee,
Klausner said.
Law students who are in the
Honor Court Bar Association
have volunteered their time to
help UF students.
Klausner will be in charge of
all the cases and if the load isnt
too heavy, he will be defending
each student himself.
This aid should allow
students to take full advantage
of their legal rights and privileges
in potentially oppressive
situations, Klausner said.
Problems can be handled such

DID MOST PROPOSALS DIE?

V.>
:!!§**& -i.

ACTION CONFERENCE CHAIRMEN
... Hal Lewis succeeded Maj. Russell Ramsey(R)
["""interpretive I
The resolution supported academic freedom and
university autonomy from political pressure.
Os the resolutions not directly acted upon, some
were simply conference endorsement of a project
such as a second campus newspaper.
Most, however, are still under consideration,
being reported upon by a conference committee,
ad hoc committees created by OConnell or reports
are due from various university officials.
Some proposals have gone absolutely nowhere.
For example, resolution 1035 called for the
creation of college-level grade appeal boards. The
Council of Deans recommended it be handled by
colleges and OConnell called on all deans to provide

as parking tickets, Honor Code
violations, bad check charges,
and dorm cases.
Civil and municipal legal
problems will still require a
qualified attorney.

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Friday, July 18,1968, Tha Florida ANifator,

means of reviewing grades.
However, the Alligator discovered that only two
colleges have actually established
boards architecture and fine arts and health
related professions, although all colleges made some
provision for appeal, usually informal.
OConnell last summer said, I would caution
against impatience. Change is not for the short
winded.
What has been the effect on the campus?
The Alligator conducted a telephone interview
with 124 students randomly selected from the
student directory.
Two questions were asked. The first was, Has
the Action Conference had great/some/very little/no
effect on UF?
Six students said the effect was great, 37 some,
60 very little and 15 none. Six had no opinion.
The second question was, Has the Action
Conference affected you as a student? Os the
replies, 90 said no, 22 said yes and 12 had no
opinion.
Dr. Hal Lewis, last chairman of the conference,
said most resolutions have been acted upon in some
way.
There is no doubt about the positive influence
of the Action Conference, he said. It was very
constructive.
Lewis also said he hopes to see the conference
continued. At a recent conference with OConnell,
he said he recommended an interim committee, of
10 people each, from faculty, students and
administration.
OConnell has agreed to this, he said, but no
meeting has yet taken place.

Page 3



Page 4

i, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18,1969

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TWISTER DESTROYS STORAGE SHED
... at McCoy's Lumber Supply
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REPAIRMEN SIGNAL LIGHT
... damaged by high winds
Twister Cleanup
Near Completion
Most of the debris left by the twister that hit north Gainesville
earlier this week has been cleared away.
The unofficial Civil Defense estimate of damages was $50,000. City
utilities damages were estimated at $3,000 and Melton Motors
received damages estimated at SIO,OOO.
The storm touched down on North Main Street and 23rd Boulevard
about 4 pjm. Monday and ripped through a lumber yard, causing
extensive damage and demolishing four vehicles that were in route on
NW 23 rd Blvd.
It then blew the metal siding from McCoy Building Supply Center,
2200 N. Main St. across power lines, which caused power loss in
several areas of the city.
EA. Schrupp, 53, and his stepson, Jimmy Kirkpatrick, 7, were
figured slightly when the high winds flipped their car off the road.
Six plate glass windows at McDuff Appliance Store were knocked
out, a number of TV sets were damaged and the ceiling ripped.
The roof was ripped off a new sendee building at Melton Motors,
damaging about a dozen cars.
McCoy Building Supply Center, the hardest hit, lost three supply
sheds when the siding and roofing ripped off and slammed into cars
traveling on NW 23rd Blvd. The siding and roofing was found some 30
feet high on utility poles where it came to rest.
Five cars at Caribee Motors, 2110 N. Main St. were also damaged.
At Tropical Motors gravel from the lot was blown up and pelted the
windows of 54 new cars on the lot.
Further information on the total damages is not yet available.

Bailey Attacks Shepherds
Handlina Os NS A Issue

Jimmey Bailey, who calls
himself a moderate conservative,
Wednesday attacked Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd, charging him with
trying to railroad UFs
membership in the militant U.S.
National Student Association
(NSA).
Bailey is currently leading a
campaign to bring the question
to a campus*wide vote. His
vehicle is a 33-word petition
which, if signed by 25 per cent
of the student body, will require
the calling of a special
referendum election.
Charles Shepherd is
operating a one-man
dictatorship, Bailey said. If
Shepherd can railroad the entire
student body into membership
in NSA or anything else, then
for the next year we will have
government solely on the whims
of Charles Shepherd.
We, the undersigned students
of the University of Florida,
the petition reads, do hereby
petition for the opportunity to
decide by constitutional ballot
the trial membership of our
student government in the said
SG Seeking
Student Help
Student Government needs
interested students to fill several
positions on the presidents
staff, including a director and
committee members for Score,
director of alumni affairs,
secretary of academic affairs and
students to work for the housing
authority.
Interested students may apply
at the SG office, room 305,
Reitz Union, afternoons from 2
oclock to 4:30. Positions will
correspond with interest and
experience.
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r -4s
BAILEY
... opposes NSA

A
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National Student Association
Lou Tally, chairman of the
NSA study commission, said he
was in favor of the idea of going
to the people to decide the issue.
Bailey called the commission s
report one of subtle plagiarism.
The facts in the report were
taken from NSA materials, but
all opinions were those of
members of the committee,
Tally said.
Even if the petition drive nets
the required number of valid
signatures and the student body
votes against membership in a
referendum election, the vote is
not binding on Student
Government because the
Student Body Constitution
provides only for opinion
referendums.



ACADEMICS
news and views
By BETH WECKERLE
Alligator Staff Writer
Thomas F. Murphy, associate director of training and management
development for Kaiser Foundation medical care program in Oakland,

Calif., has become director of
UFs Business Associates
organization.
The organization was created
in 1965 by the College of
Business Administration and UF
Foundation, Inc. to assist
Florida firms with their activities
and projects and to expand
programs within the college. It is
composed of business leaders
from throughout the state.
* *
Dr. Frederick A. King,
director of the Center for
Neurobiological Sciences, has
been named professor and
chairman of the Department of
Anatomical Sciences in the
College of Medicine. He will
assume his new position Aug. 1.

* *
UFs College of Medicine has received a $107,474 grant from the
John A. Hartford Foundation, Inc. of New York City to support
research on kidney transplantation.
Announcement of the three-year support of the colleges research
in renal transplantation and graft rejection was made jointly Tuesday
by Harry B. George, president of the foundation, and Dr. Emanuel
Suter, dean of the college.
* *
Seven administrative appointments four for new positions have
been announced by UF President Stephen C. OConnell following
approval by the Florida Board of Regents.
Taking new offices are Dr. Paul Elliot, assistant dean, College of
Medicine; Dr. Morton Smutz, associate director, Engineering and
Industrial Experiment Station; Dr. Harold Stahmer, associate dean,
College of Arts and Sciences, and Dr. Ernest St. Jacques, assistant
dean of academic affairs.
Named department chairmen were Dr. Ruth Alexander, required
physical education for women; Dr. James Hensel, vocational, technical
and adult education, and Dr. Arthur Lewis, curriculum and
instruction.
* *
Miss Martha Wroe, assistant professor and chief of physical therapy
at Shands Teaching Hospital, has been selected chairman of the
Northeast District, Florida Chapter of the American Physical Therapy
a % m ' -m

' (PC,

FREDRICK KING
... Named chairman. Anatomy

A $2,000 giant from the U S. Naval Oceanographic Offices has
been given to Dr. Donald Bunting to evaluate a wave forcast of the
North Atlantic.
JUL l STEAK HOtTSB
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
, m^ ;

THOMAS MURPHY
... new director, UFBA

* *
A fourth-year student in the
College of Medicine, Edward S.
Halpert, is recipient of a
National Foundation March of
Dimes Health Careers Award.
The $250 award from the
Alachua County Chapter of the
organization comes from the
Mothers March held in January.
* *
Dr. Charles Browning was
named dean for resident
instruction of the UF Food and
Agricultural Sciences Institute
by the Board of Regents. Dr.
Daniel Spinks was appointed
assistant dean for resident
instruction for IFAS.
* *

A

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Friday, July 18,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18, 1969

Page 6

By ANGELA RACKLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Nature hikes, swimming, ball games, movies,
story telling, relay races...
Laughter, excitement, fun....
Underprivileged children.
Summer camp at Lake Wauburg is underway, and
representatives from Samson, Vista, and the
Neighborhood Youth Corps Workers are making this
anti-poverty fun program possible for some 150
underprivileged children.
The camp is divided into three two-week sessions,
with 50 children in each, and is in the first week of
the second session.
Every weekday morning the children are taken by
bus to the camp. For three hours they play and
swim, and at noon they receive free sandwiches and
milk.
After lunch they are taken to either the Reitz
Union for a movie, the First Presbyterian Center for
an arts and crafts session, or to Florida Field for
more sports activities.
Every other Friday they go on a nature study at
Camp OLeno.
How do the children like summer camp?
Twelve-year-old Albert Ketchen summed up their

Summer Camp:
Relief For Ghetto Kids

festive mood.
Its lots of fun, he giggled, and then raced back
into the water where his Vista swimming instructor,
Ken LeDonne, waited to teach him more about
breathing in the water.
The representatives serve as counselors,
instructors and friends to the children.
Five of the representatives are Lincoln High
School athletes working as Neighborhood Youth
Corps workers under Coach Tom McPherson, camp
director.
They view the camp not only as a step in
promoting racial harmony, but also as a constructive
outlet for young energy.
Its great for young children, Larry Williams, a
Lincoln High senior, said. Once they get together
in a camp, they can play and swim. It keeps them
out of trouble and off the streets.
Ed Cason, also a senior at Lincoln High, felt that
the camp gave the children something fun to do.
I remember when we had nothing to do in the
summer just goof off just stay in the house.
But the children participating in summer camp
didnt hear his words.
They were too busy learning different swim
strokes, playing games, and thinking about those
pictures they would paint in the afternoon.

DESPITE STIGMAS OF REJECTION
.. W. 0
Jordans Goal Is 1,000 Black Students By 1970

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
One thousand UF black students by
the fall of 1970.
Thats the goal of Larry Jordan,
Student Government secretary of
minority group affairs.
Jordan and his undersecretaries
including Reginald Randolph, Bob
Pratt, and Ray Lawrence have been
occupied this summer with what Jordan
called fact-finding visits to some high
schools and junior colleges in the state.
Beginning in October Jordan and
members of his staff, along with other
students who are interested in recruiting
black students, will start a campaign to
bring more blacks from high schools and
junior colleges to UF.
A member of the Afro-American
Student Association, Jordan noted that
his office is working closely with AASA
members.
This will be entirely a student

Ik
LARRYJORDAN
... majority don't apply

Laughter, fun ...
hikes, movies ...
underprivileged
children

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'SAY, ARE YOU COOL?' SUMMER CAMPERS MESS IT UP
... at Lake Wauburg two weeks camps for underprivileged children

effort, said Jordan. No administrators
will accompany students on trips to
high schools and junior colleges.
UF students on the recruitment trips
will present to black high school and
junior college students both the
advantages and disadvantages of coming
to the UF, Jordan said.
The greatest thing you have to
overcome is the stigma which this
university has in the minds of black
students, he pointed out. The
majority of black students dont apply
here because they think their
applications wont be accepted.
The recruiters will also inform blacks
about available financial aid. In Brevard
and Pinellas counties, Jordan noted, the
UF can offer grants from privately
endowed scholarship funds.
Jordan said his office has mapped the
state into target areas, including
Jacksonville, St. Petersburg, Tampa,
Miami, Orlando, Dayton?, and the
Gainesville-Ocala area.

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'NOW THIS IS WHAT NOT TO DO'
... swimming teacher says, 'Don't go over you head.

UF students will visit the target areas
in October to recruit black students.
We will be going to predominantly
black institutions or to integrated
institutions with a high percentage of
black students, Jordan said.
Bob Pratt, undersecretary in charge
of the recruitment project, is working
on the financial details of the trips.
All of our money comes out of the
cabinet fund. We dont know yet how
much money we will have, Jordan
said.
The trips this summer were
fact-finding visits rather than
recruitment efforts because September s
freshman class had already been
selected.
Noting that there is now only one
black professor at the UF, Jordan
contended that large scale recruitment
of black students would represent a
new awareness by this university which
might encourage black professors to
come to UF.



-*** j.iiMf
: 1
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THE LAST LAP
Ralph, a mischievous Yorkshire terrier, takes his final evening run
on Florida Field after being expelled from school for living in the
girls' dorm.
Enrollment Up 1 ,500

Past summers at UF have
been long and hot especially
hot. This summer promises to be
even hotter with an enrollment
increase of more than 1500
students. Last year at this time,
there were 7,067 students
walking on campus, but this year
there are 8,570.
The latest statistics from the
registrars office show the men
outnumbering the women more
than two to one. The total
number of men enrolled is
5,784, and the total number of
women is 2,786.
The top three colleges in
enrollment are University
College with 1,190 students,
College of Arts and Sciences
with 994 students, and College
of Education with 919 students.
Colleges showing the greatest
increase in enrollment over last
WWi
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How to bandage a war.
You do it a wound at a time.
A person at a time. With all
your skills as a nurse. With
all the cheerfulness in your
heart. You do it because you
want to. You do it because
youre an Army Nurse.
The Army Nurse Corps.
1M.1.M.. .Mm tt mmd Ml Ik. -
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MO 111 AAMY MM MCWITWO MITOCT | |
I.M VaOJNIA AVI., COUKM f AM. OA MM7
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summer are University College
with an increase of 320 and
College of Education with an
increase of 232. The Graduate
School also showed a large
increase of 201 students.
There were only two colleges
showing an enrollment decrease.
They were the College of
Pharmacy with a decrease of 18,
and the College of Nursing with
a decrease of five.

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OPEN 9:30-6:00 DAILY
2401 Southwest Thirteenth Street Village Square

/
Dorm Pools On Schedule
As Plans Near Completion

Steady progress is being made
toward the construction of two
new swimming pools for campus
residents. Regents Planning
Consultant William Munson said
Wednesday an architect,
appointed in June, is nearing
completion of his plans.
Munson said a meeting is
planned for next Thursday or
Friday to discuss and review the
progress of the project.
A previous estimate for
completion of the pools by
September may have been a bit
premature because it was
impossible to appoint an
architect, draw up the plans and
$3,000 Theft
Still Unsolved
A number of items have
recently been discovered missing
from the Teaching Resources
Center in the library and the
College of Engineering, campus
police records show.
On July 7 RA. Keppel of the
College of Engineering reported
the theft, or misplacement, of
more that 30 items. Exact
am out of the loss has not been
determined.
Jack S. Funkhouser, director
of the Teaching Resources
Center, reported the loss of
approximately $3,000 worth of
materials including 10
projectors, three tape recorders,
two screens, and numerous
other items.
Marathon Race
The marathon race was first
introduced at the Olympics in
Athens in 1896.

complete construction in three
months, Munson said.
But, he added, everything
that has been done so far is
right on schedule. All plans
should be completed by
September with construction
beginning shortly thereafter.
A construction period of

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Friday, July 18,1869, Tha Florida AM^tor,

three or four months is
expected, and the pools should
be ready by the end of the 1969
fall quarter or the start of the
1970 winter quarter.
When completed, the pools
will serve residents of the
Broward-Yulee and Graham
areas on campus.

Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator. Friday. July 18, 1969

Page 8

/ggjk The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick Dave Osier
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
PaW At( Ammm Executive Editor __
If You Ever Need Any Help Just Whistle
Fulwood Is A Deserter

MR. EDITOR:
We notice with very little
surprise that Mr. Fulwood is
leaving this town for the less
hostile if more hostility-imbued
safety of a Black Panther camp
in New England. He is no fool;
the hills of New England are
very pleasant and cool at this
time of year. This pusillanimous
desertion of the people of
Gainesville whom he claimed to
be trying to aid is no particular
surprise.
He bleats like a sheep about
his persecutions; one bleeds,
primarily from the ulcer that

For Five years the U.S. has had the military
option of bombing the dikes of the Red River Delta
country in North Vietnam. As I have been briefed
on the damage that might ensue, this would flood
the land to a depth of a few feet. People could wade
to safety, but the farms wouldnt produce for a
while. It would inhibit Ho Chi Minhs ability to
wage war, but it wouldnt be like hitting Hanoi and
the port city of Haiphong with atom bombs, or even
with the sort of conventional iron bomb raids
that mined Germany back in World War 11.
The humanitarian U.S., however, has never
chosen to exercise even so mild an option as to hit
at Ho Chi Minhs food supply. But do we get credit
for it in world opinion? We do not.
When it comes to the case of Nigeria versus
Biafra, however, the double standard takes over.
The British and the Russians have backed Nigeria to
the hilt with arms shipments. The Nigerians, closing
in on the beleaguered Biafras territory, have struck
at the Biafran food line. For more than a year now
Biafran children have been dying in the thousands
from diseases that result from protein defiency.
Private citizens m Europe and America have
kept some food and medicine moving into Biafra by
plane, and the Red Cross has done what it could.
But on June 5 the Nigerian Air Force shot down a
Red Cross plane in broad daylight. The pilots of
three other relief planes who witnessed the attack
say there was no evidence that the Nigerian jets
gave the Red Cross aircraft any warning. All they
heard was'the radio signal from the Red Cross pilot,
I have been attacked. I have two engines on fire.
Then contact was lost.
Commenting on the dirty business of shooting
down food planes, Chief Obafemi Awolowo, the
Vice-Chairman of the Federal Nigerian Executive

such nonsensical noises have
given ones stomach. Were he
actively sincere in wishing to be
with the people of the black
(Editor, please substitute
whatever word for that variety
of people is fashionable at press
time) community in their
attempt to attain human dignity
he would behave in a different
fashion.
Mr. Eldridge Cleaver may have
had a fully valid reason to run
when he did; leaders of
movements these days have an
alarming propensity for being
assassinated. Mr. Fulwood does
not. He is both a coward and a

The Able Africans Seem Doomed

wretch, leaving people and
tarnished principles, such as they
were in a tired heap.
He hardly fulfilled the
obligations- that he made of
himself to his people. I most
fervently hope that they
remember it when he comes
slinking back to them full of
false new or at least newly
fashionable promises and
platitudes. Perhaps he will get
what he most certainly deserves
from those whom he has treated
so shabbily.
C.Y. WELLES

Council, said, All is fair in war and starvation is
one of the weapons of war. I dont see why we
should feed our enemies fat, only to Fight us
harder.
There is a grisly logic to Obafemi Awolowos view
of warfare. But the British and the Russians dont
have to support that sort of thing. Where has world
opinion been while the Nigerian government
starves the children of the ablest tribesmen in what
used to be united Nigerian territory? Why doesnt
Senator McGovern get just as angry about the
imminent closing of sick bays and clinics in Biafra as
he does about the alleged sins of President Thieu of
John Chamberlain
South Vietnam, who has never sent commandos
into North Vietnam to blow the Red River dikes?
The Biafrans were the enterprisers and the
workhorses of Nigeria, or at least their Ibo
tribesmen were. Strange how the ablest Africans
invite the enmity of their less productive comrades.
Moise Tshombe, who magnanimously put the Congo
on its feet after a UN -led rabble-in-arms had driven
him out of his native Katanga, died in Algeria from
a mysterious cause. The West let him die rather than
fight to extradite him from a government which
complaisantly allowed him to moulder in jail after a
kidnaping that flagrantly raped international law.

editorial
Revise Tenure
The reactions anger, disappointment, caution, and
indifference which have swept the university community
since the Board of Regents decision last week to delay
approval of tenure for 262 professors have slowly begun to
ebb. .
The wake of calmness might be conducive to rational
discussion and evaluation of the entire tenure problem.
And its definitely a problem to the faculty who seek
it, to the administrators who recommend it and to the
regents who grant (or deny) it.
But the regents unexpected and ill-advised action may
have some beneficial repercussions. If nothing else, it has
focused widespread attention on Floridas antiquated
system of granting permanent job security to professors.
Hopefully, out of the ruckus will be bom a new,
improved system with clear-cut guidelines and criteria.
To this end, we add our suggestions for revised policies.
i The granting of tenure should be the responsibility of
the presidents of the individual institutions, with the Board
of Regents retaining the power to review any specific case
upon the request of a majority of the board.
Recommendations for tenure should be directed to
the president via the dean of the professors college.
I Review of a candidates qualifications should be
conducted by a five member committee comprised of the
department head, two tenured colleagues from the
department and two tenured professors from outside the
department.
Criteria a candidate must meet in order to be eligible
for tenure should include rank of assistant professor or
higher, five years teaching experience at the institution,
demonstrated professional competence in his field (research
and publishing), participation in at least five Course and
Teacher Evaluations (by students) and favorable approval of
his departmental faculty.
A four-fifths vote of the review committee should be
necessary for favorable recommendation for tenure to the
dean.
i After the granting of tenure, a professor should be
required to submit to Course and Teacher Evaluation at
least once every three years. Repeated failure to
demonstrate adequate teaching talents should constitute
grounds for further review of his case and possible removal
of tenure status for professional incompetence.
i Policies governing the granting and review of tenure
should contain strong safeguards for academic freedom.
Inclusion of these guidelines in new tenure policies
would, in our. judgment, raise tenure to its proper
perspective: reward for conspicuous service to the teaching
profession.
In the process, it would weed out the incompetents who
haunt Florida campuses merely because they have large
quantities of hanging around power.

And now comes the news that Tom Mboya, the
ablest young political leader in Kenya, has been
assassinated.
Two years ago I sat in Tom Mboyas office in
Nairobi. He told me why tribal individualism
should not be confused with dictatorial socialist
planning. The African pattern, Mboya said, could
be a fluid combination of tribal land holding (giving
social security to anyone who was willing to pick up
a hoe), farm marketing cooperatives, collectively
owned tractor stations, and private initiative. Mboya
was interested in the Israeli Kibbutz, or group farm
collective. But he said: I doubt whether I could go
so far in communal spirit as to enter a kibbutz for
life.
Mboya was a Westerner in spirit. He did a
first-rate job in Kenya as Minister for Planning.
Strange that he should be struck down about a week
after the extinction of Moise Tshombe. Why should
Africa devour its ablest children?
, Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey Gayle McElroy
Editorial Assistant Copy Editor
Darcy Meeker Tom Eason
Campus Living Editor Sports Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
o the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.



Tenure Needs To Be Investigated

MR. EDITOR:
You blew it in your recent editorial Regents Blow It Again. You
blew it because you only saw the problems presented by the Florida
Board of Regents recent denial of tenure temporarily to 262
Florida University instructors.
You blew it because you failed to see the possibilities.
Tenure in Florida, and elsewhere, has become a guarantee of
life-long employment almost automatically approved by Regents. The
entire philosophy behind tenure, and the grounds for its approval, are
rarely questioned. This is most unfortunate.
Tenure is an antique method of protecting professors. In an age
when we reach for the moon it is very possibly entirely un-needed.
Without question, it is in need of revision.
Tenure can protect incompetents, perpetuate mediocrity and
preserve lackluster teaching by instructors who have perfect job
protection. Indeed, if tenure is warranted, the basis for its approval
should be revised. The privilege of tenure should be made a true
privilege granted to those who have distinguished themselves in the
classroom.
In this age of student power is it too much to demand that
students have some voice in tenure guarantees? Is it too much to ask
that each professor seeking and attaining tenure be subject to a
periodic Course and Teacher Evaluation, done scientifically, to test his
true fitness to teach?
*
The answer is obvious. The teachers who grade the students need to
be graded on their own performance. As to what they do in the
classroom there is no better judge than the student.
Certainly, Course and Teacher Evaluation by itself is not a
complete method of selecting those fit for tenure. But, it should be an
aide.
Moreover, in an age when thinkers are no longer condemned to the
gallows for their ideas the entire idea of tenure needs to be carefully
studied. Perhaps teachers should be hired on long-term contracts.
Perhaps tenure remains the best way.
Regardless, in a day when educators are so busy telling us whats
wrong with everyone else, they might stop and look inward.
Let us apply science to teaching through proper evaluation.
To date, at this University, the statistics indicate only about half of
fITS
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MR. EDITOR:
A prominent American recently said, Men shield themselves from
truth.
After 100,000 American deaths in Korea and Viet Nam from
combat, disease and wounds, plus an expenditure of 100,000 millions
of dollars, the majority of Americans still feel they are containing
communism.
Like incompetent gardeners, we hack at the branches of the
problem and exhaust ourselves making war on little Asiatics who
present no military threat whatever to our country. Meanwhile the
root of the challenge to our freedoms and security, communist Russia,
grows apace and gleefully supplies the weapons to kill our men.
While spending 30 billion a year in Viet Nam, we quibble about a
few billion to protect ourselves from the modem Soviet missiles
without and our cancerous poverty within. A nation that will not
protect itself or cure its social ills, is headed for the scrapheap, as
countless others before it.
Are we bereft of our senses?
Are we mature enough to admit our mistakes?
Are we fit to survive?
KENNETH D. TOMKINSON

our instructors are willing to submit themselves to an examination of
their skills.
What are they afraid of?
Yes, the Alligator blew it. Instead of condemning the Regents
undiscemingly it might have suggested that they take the lead in
American education by investigating the entire tenure structure.
Students deserve a better break. Not everything thats wrong with
the American University is in administration. Many faults lie in the
classroom.
HARVEY M. ALPER
PRESIDENT
OMICRON DELTA KAPPA
SPONSOR OF UF COURSE & TEACHER EVALUATION
The unwillingness of the Board to recognize the
nature of academic tenure well illustrates its refusal to
act as part of and in the interests of the state university
community. The Board has done its best to perpetuate
the pernicious myth that tenure is some sort of special
privilege which is best eliminated or at least weakened
to the point of meaninglessness. This attitude ignores
the fact that freedom from arbitrary dismissal from
employment is a right not only of professors but of
every worker. ...
Our position, then, is that a just tenure system
managed by the faculty alone is an inalienable right of
the professor and indeed an absolute necessity to a
viable university system. And we emphasize that such a
tenure system must be only part of a restructured
university system, a system that is truly of the
university community.
American Federation of Teachers

NSA Services Benefit UF

MR. EDITOR:
The following comments are in regards to your
editorial of July 8, 1969.
Having had the privilege to serve on the NSA
Study Committee and being present at the senate
meeting in which the preliminary NSA legislation
was passed, I feel compelled to give an opposing
view to your emotionally worded editorial.
I assume that you have ridden many trains before
and know the inner workings very well. You
commented that debate lasted only twenty minutes,
but I remind you that the first twenty minutes of
the forty-five minute debate were devoted to a
monologue by the minority floor leader which
ended with a non-debatable motion to table. This
move was very inconsiderate of the right of his
fellow senators to discuss the issue. Maybe this too
could fall under your classification of a
representative democratic railroad.
The law which passed the senate gives the
University of Florida for only a five dollar fee, the
use of all NSA services for the coming year. The

Just For Laughs
Education Must Live
By Dennis Anson-

Education is an activity by
which one attempts learning
how to live life. At its best it is
an ever continuing and intensely
personal endeavor to leam
oneself as intimately and as
honestly as circumstances will
permit. It guides one to cultivate
for himself and to portray
adventurously a style of life
most nearly in harmony with his
own temperament and with the
sensitivities of his fellow human
beings.
As such, education is never
truly attained. Nor can it be
granted or even earned. Badly or
well, it must be lived. In order to
live it well, a person must
actively seek to acquaint himself
with the knowledge, the
experiences and the opinions of
others his forebearers as well
as his contemporaries to the
limits of his intellect, his energy
and his patience.

Today it is almost as
important for one to avail
himself of a great deal of
technical or scientific
knowledge as it is for him to
develop and test constantly the
validity of his other human
experiences against the totality
of his environment as he leams
to perceive it.
The technical knowledge
serves as a base from which he
may relate to an increasingly
technological world. It might
also provide part of the means
with which to earn a living.
Though the latter consideration
is far from incidental indeed,
ones livelihood is a fundamental
part of his relation to the world
learning the rudiments of a
trade should not be confused
with education.
The less technical or less
formally structured knowledge
one learns may serve to keep the
individual apprised of the status

Friday, July 18.1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

benefits will be worth much more than our
investment. Our membership also comes up for
review next year at which time the University of
Florida can weigh the advantages of the past year
against the disadvantages.
To clear up another point, it should be known
that all the material used by the committee was not
from the USNSA. I personally read articles from
Ramparts, the University of Maryland, the S.D.S.,
and others. On a personal basis, I discussed it with
students from FSU and USF. They felt we couldnt
go wrong on the one year trial basis, and they were
surprised to learn that we were not members.
Both FSU and USF belong to the USNSA as do
many of the larger universities in the United States.
Whats wrong with the University of Florida? Do we
think were too good for them and can do without
them? Granted we have done without them so far,
but there comes a time when every individual must
become a member of society.
HENRY SOLARES

of his own temperament and
attuned as closely as possible
with the sensitivities of his
fellow humans. But the
continual exercise of ones own
best judgment is crucial to his
education, as it is in his life.
As claimant to the role of

educator, the membership of
the university has a certain
special responsibility: Its
directors, its administrators, its
faculty, its students and its
visitors are obliged to treat each
other as human beings rather
than as abstractions to be
cynically manipulated. For
otherwise no education can take
place there. It would seem quite
natural that the people of the
university should develop a sense
of genuine community in their
mutual search for understanding.
They ought to be not only
permitted, but also encouraged
to do so.

Page 9



Page 10

I, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18,1969

B f
' jBfPT' |H| | | I j"g |B |B
|B
:...£ f
UFS GRADUATE RESEARCH LIBRARY FOCUS OF SYSTEM
... committee formed to establish better communications
Library Committee Formed

By JIM CONGLETON
Alligator Staff Writer
A new, nine-member Student
Advisory Library Committee has
been established to study library
problems and promote more
communication between
students and library
administrators.
Bryan Danese, committee
chairman, reported that he was
asked to start the committee at
the end of the spring quarter by
Dr. GA. Harrer, director of
libraries.
Danese said Harrer has been
pushing for this for a long time.
The committees first meeting
was held recently and was
mainly a get acquainted
meeting, Danese said.
Danese noted two problems
which need immediate
attention: more education of
students in library usage and
revamping of the College
Library reserve book system.
Danese said book theft is
becoming a major problem in
the College Library reserve
room.
Sometimes certain pages of
books assigned by teachers for
required reading are tom out
and stolen. The main thing is
that this keeps other students
from using the bodes, Danese
said.

f '
J. Wayne Reitz Union Presents
Free
a
Dance on the Terrace
Featuring
The Opposite Sexes
. / a
<* J
Friday, July 18
r?
1
9 :00 p.m. -1:00 a.m.

The College Library reserve
room now operates under an
open system.
Under this system, anyone
can walk in and use the books
on reserve without having to
check them out through the
librarian, Danese said, adding
that the system allows students
to walk out with the book
undetected.
Denese said the only solution
he can see to the problem is to
revert to a closed system
under which the student must
check out the books, giving his
name, student number, etc.
This way, the librarian will
know which books are being
used and who is using them,
Danese said.
Danese also said the present
open system was initiated as
an experiment, and that most

JSL
Maryland
fiFKIEP CHICKEN,

other schools use the closed
system.
Another library problem is
outdated books especially in
technical books, which are
important to graduate students
who need the latest up-to-date
information on technical
subjects, he said.
Other problems include
funding and card catalog
accuracy. Danese said many
students go to the card catalog
to look up a bode, only to find
that the library doesnt have it,
or that its in another library.
378-57241
Dick Holmes
Jewelebs I
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
REPAIRS I
TROPHIES ENGRAVING I
1230 W. UNIVERSITY fi VE. I
Vz BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

§ WITH THIS COUPON SI.OO 1
% OFF ON THE PURCHASE OF 1
g BUCKET OR BARREL |
COUPON GOOD THRU JULY jg
31 FOR IN STORE §
PURCHASE. |
mm wflML jimsmmM
516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET

More Student Loans
Due From Fee Hike
By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
New financial aid resources for many students will come as a
result of the tuition hike beginning in September, reports Ira
Turner, director of student financial aid.
A stipulation in the tuition increase recommended by the
Board of Regents provided for a percentage of every students
tuition to go for a new financial aid program. Although the
percentage has not yet been officially set, Turner said about
$4.50 of very $l5O tuition will be used for the new loan fund.
Turner called this allocation a real exciting, significant break
in student financial aid in the state. He said these funds would
provide some relief from the declining national defense loan
program.
Turner said a snowball effect would be created when
payments on the loans reverted back to the fund. A $1 million
fund is expected to be generated within 10 years from this
effect, said Turner.
This year, national defense loan appropriations approval
arrived three months late. Turner said this was probably due to
new Nixon administration review. He said the student financial
aid office was behind in notifying 1969-70 recipients but hopad
to have them notified by Aug. 15.
FLORIDA EXPERIMENTAL
COLLEGE
SOME COURSES STILL OPEN
FOR REGISTRATION
1969
SUMMER COURSES
ENCOUNTER GROUP
Unstructured, interpersonal, relating & sharing on a gut level;
not a therapy course. Coordinators: BRUCE SCHELL &
CAROL BUTLER. 376-1739 & 376-7670. TUES. 7:30 PM.
SEX AND SEXUAL MORALITY
An exploration of various social and personal implication of
our learned attitudes toward sexuality, so that we may begin
to attain to a level of self-awareness and personal freedom
requisite for a rational evaluation of our sexual attitudes.
Focus of attention will depend on the particular desires &
hang-ups of the group members. Coordinator: RICHARD P.
HAYNES. 392-2081 & 378-8916. THURS. 7:30 PM.
TRIPPING
Cool down a hot summer in the city. Weekend caravans to
Crescent Beach, tubing on the Itchtucknee, crab & fish fry at
Cedar Key, etc. Ist trip: Crescent Beach, July 13.
Coordinator: NANCY GRABENSTEIN. 378-0310. Open to
regular or sporadic membership.
AN INVESTIGATION INTO SEX AND SEXUALITY
Open discussion group on topics such as: Who are we
sexually and who do we want to be? How do our moralities
differ from societys standards and what problems does this
cause in our sexual lives? What are the differences in the
sexual psychologies of men and women? We assume that free
and friendly discussion of sexual feelings and values will
provide new insights into our own feelingsand give us
perspective on how others cope with their sexuality.
Coordinator: NANCY GRABENSTEIN. 378-0310. THURS.
7:30 PM, starting July 17th.
SEMINAR IN WOMEN'S LIBERATION
Exploring the role of the female in society its roots,
significance, consequences, and the possibilities for
meaningful changes. Despite the American "sexual equality
myth, womens efforts toward equality are only symbolic
agitation. The first step toward womens liberation is
realizing that they have gained only what men have granted
them. For women only. Coordinator: JUDYE McCALMAN,
392-0243 & 372-0556. Or, call 378-3131, or 372-6653.
AMERICAN JAZZ: AN OVERVIEW
From blues to rock n roll to soul: styles and trends in
contemporary jazz. Coordinator: ANN GOOCH. 376-8322.
THE MALE-FEMALE RELATIONSHIP
Considering the changing roles of the sexes, redefinitions of
masculinity & femininity, and their effects on male-female
re ationships, including, but not restricted to, sexual
relationships. Recent trends and research findings considered
n light of the participants own experiences. We will seek
new bases for male-female relationships based on past
teachings, current realities and attitudes, plus a greater
nonesty and fulfillment for both sexes than have previously
Coordinator: MARY H. McCAULLEY. 392-2914.
THURS. 12:00 to 2:00 PM.
CHRISTIANITY AS PROBLEM SOLVER
Attempts to integrate Christianity with personal and social
problems surrounding contemporary man. Open discussion.
Boo PM a 372-5?8 T 3 HER ARK COSGROVE - S B WED
FOR REGISTRATION CALL
THE COORDINATOR LISTED
COURSES OPEN TO
ANYBODY INTERESTED
**** ----XXXX!! wX XvX*X*X X*X*X vX*Xvv!*X # X # XvV*X*-
#%*#*#*



(rfahhd if-*
FREE ART MASTERPIECES FROM PUBUX
O FOR 4 MORE WEEKS!
All the pictures for the next a
ifilw j I subjects youll find some works
- *"- |||i: p by Florida artists! Theyre n l |rt| ; .p-::... jL if jlgSfe
^7Z^^~ 1 ... l :j ll I i all reproduced in full color j [
j i and mounted on sturdy, J
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m SAVE UP TO 50% ON FRAMES!I [flgJjr/; Wll
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Friday, July 18,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18,1968

Bi platters of tempting
r slices. Onion and
ins, pumpernickel, rye.
iise, mustard, ketchup.
1 be easier for you?

Sunshine Tasty
Sugar Wafers .... 49*
Suniwwt Healthful
Prune Juice IT 49*
10c-olf table. Mild
Liquid Ivory UT 49*
3*-eff label. Personal
Ivory Soap IT 30*
7c-oH label, Sta-Flo
Spray Starch HT 49*
Greenwood Delicious
Whole Beets \T 29*
Stekely's Cream Style
Golden Corn 4 ?" 89*
Green Giant Tender
Sweet Peas 4 #> South Shore Stuffed
Olives LV 49*
Per Hearty Eating, Swift's
Corned Beef "49*
Swanson's toned
Chicken 39*
Swansea's Tasty Soned
Turkey .39*
Swift's Oalicieus
Vienna Sausage ... 5 4 .V. 1
Mrs. Ball's Plaverful
Grape Jam , 39*

rj
Red, Pineapple, Grape or Diet
Hawaiian Punch ... 3** ;; $ 1
Halved or Sliced
F&PPeaches ... 3:B9*
FOP Bartlett
Pear Halves 39
Sweet Treat Sliced
Pineapple 4 :.\*i
Swift's Pard
Dog Food 6 '£ 9B*
lOc-off label.
New Biz ... O # O O O Biont 69*
Kleenex Strong Absorbent
Dinner Napkins ... .;;"25*
Hot Weather Relief, Nestea
Instant Tea r.r 99 c

Ilk
Akw (fflircduce Sflane
Sweet Golden
Bananas , 10
Crisp Michigan
Pascal Celery 229*
U.S. No. 1 All
Potatoes .. 'b.', b 59* C 89*



THE LAST DROP,
all grinds
11 Maxwell I
H House ml
lb can
P, AO* m
Swa* m a
. Ml 1 :l .'SI A'lH ' Hi H
* < < H-

Breakfast Club Olaa
Margarine Xl5 c
Parkay Regular
Margarine X 29 c
Pillsbury Tasty
Cinnamon Rolls I 33 c
Pillsbury Caramel
Danish Rolls ,2 c 0, 43 c
Wisconsin Cheesa Bar
Longhorn Cheese .. ... ,. 89 c
Armour's Miss Wisconsin Cheese, Round
Burger Slices X 41 c
Kraft's Individually Wrapped Cheese,
American & Salami 'X?. 69 c
(Our ood Sf)ept.
Snow Crap' frozen Cenc. Florida
Orange Juice W" 49 c
Minute Maid frozen
Lemonade 3 ,X69 C
Southland Poly-Bag Froxen
Whole Corn £*' 37 c
Pictswoet Fro ton Poly-Bag
Green Peas X b 49 c
Green Giant Froxen
Rice Verdi 'XV' 39 c
Green Giant
Rice Medley ........ 'XV 39 c
Booth's frozen
Perch Fillets X 39 c
Shrimp Cakes X* 59 c
Banquet Assorted Froxen
Dinners X 39
(Corn Beef Hash, Haddock, Meat Loaf, Chicken, Beef, Turkey,
Salisbury Steak, Macaroni A Cheese)
Treasure Isle Froxen
Breaded Shrimp VC 79 c

111 | if
| &)ept.
MmM&ceaulyCjflih I SlicedolOMO B** y mhm-iw
A W W * Seafood Treat, Tatty largo
Got Set Reg. or Extra-Hold Zety Flavored Fresh-Made r C II sl39
Hair Spray W/ 49' f Cole Slaw .39* f Scallops 1
" / Seafood Treat, Fresh Ocean
Arrid Extra-Dry A Tasty Kitchan-Fresh r | I r-*|l i QOc
Deodorant *.," 69* ) Potato Salad 39* Flounder Fillets
PUBLIX-

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street
*

T SWIFT S PRfMIUM PROTEN GOVERNMENT TO
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BE E E SALE
Sirloin, T-Bone,
BH Key Club or H
|lm Boneless Top Round m||!
m per pound
s|29^B

T
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVT. <
f INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE
i Swift's Premium Boneless
j Imperial Roast ......99*
I Swift's Premium Boneless English Cut
Beef Roast s l o9
f Swift's Premium Tasty
j Chuck Steaks ......... 89*
Swift's Premium English Cut
I Short Ribs .. 79*
| Swift's Premium Brown Sugar Cured
) Sliced Bacon 79*
Swift's Premium Tru-Tender Sliced
I Beef Liver 69*
A Swift's Premium Tasty Sliced
j Kosher Salami Pk- 53*
I Swiff's Premium Zesty Flavored
I Smokies Sausage .r69
A Swift's Premium Asserted Sliced
1 Cold Cuts J£49*

A (Pickle A Pimento, Olive A Pimento
I Armour's Star Plump Juicy
* Armour's Franks Pk 69*
I Copeland's Chunk Style
j Braunschweiger ... 59*
V Always A Family Favorite,
j Tarnow Wieners VC 49*
f Cook-Quik Tasty Cenvaniant
j Cubed Steaks .. X 89*
T Delicious Dairi-Fresh
| Cottage Cheese X 33*
" Herman's Orange Band Sliced Variety or
| Cooked Salami pkg.
(Plus SO Extra SAH Green Stamps With Coupon)

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

RATH S HICKORY HICKORYSMOKED
SMOKED HICKORYSMOKED BONELESS
fiM Canned M
PM Hams J
$299 1
np A J
;- plus 100 f.l.a S A H C rn

* Si

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Stores hours; 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.

# ir T r< *a*%

cUPand^
L 'OCOUPOIIS
PRICES EFFECTIVE
THRU WEDNESDAY
NOON JULY 23,1969

Friday, July 18,1969, Th Florida Alligator, I

EXTRA P p!B^l
11. Rath's Black Hawk Boneless !j
Canned Hams '!
(needs no refrigeration) !|
3 lb. can $2.99 !j
(Expires Wed. July 23, 1969) |
CAAAeeeeAAeeeeftftAAit EXTRA |F B^|
< :
; 2. Brilliant Cooked Shrimp
6 ox. pkg.
(Expires Wed. July 23, 1969)
CAaeaeeeAAaeaAftAAA^MMMHMMUMtAAAAAAAAX
EXTRA pr-^1
S 3. Gleem Tooth Paste
6 3 /4 oz. size (Expires Wed. July 23,1969) |
eoooe^^AAAAAaAAAAIieAAAAAAAeAeAAefteftX
G reenSta mps fpjj]
4. Head Shoulders Shampoo
5 oz. jar, 4.3 oz. tube
; or 6 oz. size |
I (Expires Wed. July 23, 1969) |
XftftaftftftAAftftAAAAAAA^ftAAAftftAftAftAAAftftAAX
EXTRA
l |
!5. Polident Denture Powder |
6.65 or 10 oz. size > |
| (Expires Wed. July 23, 1969) J [
WITH THIS COUPON AND PU9CHASI Os
1<
6. Assorted Flavors
Kool Aid
1 2 reg. pkgs. 58c
(Expires Wed. July 23, 1969)
YTtlfteftnftftftftP'AAftAAA^AAftAAAAftftftftAAAAAX
M. EXTRA IF s *!
17. Herman's Orange Band
Sliced Variety or
Cooked Salami
reg. pkg.
(Expires Wed. July 23, 1969)
Vflflftnaan nnnnnnnaeeuftAAAeftaftftftftaftaaeflte
pm
R K E
Where shopping
is a pleasure

o

Page 13



* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

| FOR SALE jj
1961 Plymouth radio heater air cond.
Call 376-8615 between 4:00 and
8:00 week-days anytime weekends.
$375 or best offer. (A-3t-157-p)
STEREO Must seH, need bread! Top
quality, like new. Garrard, Electro
Voice Utah. S2OO. Call Dave at
372-1272. (A-st-157-p)
Windmill Class Sailboat complete
with new Gator trailer $650.
372-3333. (A-4t-157-p)
AFRICAN basenji barkless (dog),
male AKC, planned breeding for
show, loving temperament, whelped
1/19/69, SSO below cost. Call
376-4103. (A-st-157-p)
TR 3 1962 going on the block (block
is busted). Good tires, body, top.
S2OO or best offer. 376-1850.
(A-2t-158-P)
Lambretta motorscooter 125 cc only
2400 miles. Excellent condition.
$135 including helmet. Call
378-4661. (A-3t-159-p)
Two Bedroom 1965 Statler mobile
home 10x50. Air conditioned
$3,000. Archer Rd. Village lot B-16.
Call 378-4449. (A-3t-159-p)
Cute persian tortoiseshell kittens $lO
females 8 weeks old. Harvey 1918
N.W. Ist Ave. Call 372-0110. Now.
Have to get rid of them today.
(A-159-lt-p)
1962 Chevy. Completely overhauled
motor. Moving, must sell; best offer
accepted. Also English bike sls. Call
378-1710. (A-3t-159-p)
FROM wall to wall, no soil at all, on
carpets cleaned with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-159-c)
GET AWAY CAR Get away from the
heat in an air conditioned cheap car. \
$325 It runs fine. Godding & Clark
Motors 2nd & 2nd S.E. Ph.
378-2311. (A-ts-159-c)
nil now!
I JOHN WAYNE
GLEN CAMPBELL
KIM DABBY
Bail
HURRY!
I I'i ,'HI r )
I LAST DAY
"FINIANS
RAINBOW

r*opEN i wwjms\ ii i iu y
I rap I
I sts m CARLOAD 1
t
cotom I
F^Sfl
y o 7 I

| FOR RENT I
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)
UniversityApts.justnorthofesearch
Lib.2sizeseff.,2styleslbdrm.and2bdr
m .a lla.c.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
.LeaseQuarterlyratesyearlyaverage7s
- 120/m 0.3 76-8 9901536NW3rdave.
(B-12T-158-P)
Air conditioned room quiet Golfview
subdivision bordering campus.
Limited kitchen priviledges. 521 S.W.
2 7th St. Phone 376-5849.
(B-6M56-P)
A few units of privacy remain at LA
MANCHA for the fall. See
Gainesville's newest apartment idea
nearing completion at the corner of
SW Bth Ave & 9th St. Rental trailer
open on the site 3-5 p.m. Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Fridays. Phone
372-2662 for info. (B-3t-157-P)
Spacious 2 Bedroom Furnished apt.
Married Couple Only Poolside Porch.
$126 Month. 1405 SW 10th Ter.
Apt. 36. 378-8019 After 5 P.M.
(B-st-159-p)
Sublet 1 br upstairs apt. at Frederick
Gardens normally $l2O only S6O for
August. Call Ray at 392-0581 or
376-8182 after 5:00 p.m. (B-2t-159-p)
One co-ed to share poolside 2br.
Village Park Apt. for fall. Call
372-9904 or 392-9049. Please reply
before Aug. 1. (B-3t-159-p)
IB 8 8 8 8 WWOftM iillM'WW;
1 WANTED |
Living in Tampa starting in Sept. I
need female roommates. Call
378-3273 before 9pm. Ask for
Jennifer. If not home leave
message. (C-2t-159-p)
HELP WANTED f
I >v*srK*x*x*x-xx*!*svM x x x x*x*w*x<>s*
Listeners wanted will pay $2.25
for IV2 session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Univ. ext. 2-2049
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. (E-st-157-p)
WANTED COCKTAIL
WAITRESSES! Must be 21 yrs of
age. No experience necessary. Full or
part time. Apply Dubs 4560 NW
13th. St. Ask for Mr. Thomas.
(E-159-7t-p)
4 year old & 8 year old subjects with
normal vision needed in visual
research. $3.00 per hour. Call
392-3031 Visual Sciences Lab.
(E-4t-c-15 )
; :^w%x%XX-:-x*x>:xc-x^w : > xx<-x*x*X4^:
AUTOS I
SX*X*X-X*XtX?X*X*X*XX*SVXW<44C&
1962 Rambler station wagon AC,
radio 40,000 miles. Needs minor
repair. Best offer accepted. 378-6843
1 anytime except July 4 & 5.
(G-st-156-p)
1962 Buick Special excellent shape
clutch, tires, paint, seats, brakes, and
radio. $475. 278-0844. (G-2t-159-p)

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18,1969

Page 14

I AUTOS |
X B'9WeiWlfl.i.99aMflo 888 P 8 IWWMWaiSW
1965 Rambler American automatic
transmission radio heater 4-door
white walls excellent condition. Very
clean. Must sell. Make offer. Call
372-2317. (G-st-157-p)
67 Valiant Signet, 4dr, R, H,
automatic, powersteering, white,
$1650 or best offer. Call Ananth
376-0770, 376-1545, 5 to 8 pm or
before 8:30 am. (G-4t-157-p)

I directed by
B| m r 1 josef von sternberg
EMU El Jj with Oscar-winning
emiljannings
W thmlihiM 50'
m. f? Cl 1 1 U vA Uidut O'ktum
REITZ UNION PRESENTS
\ IWM \
> \
IM Mi/ \ \
Whks'mmwm* \
WBWRWBHft \
j A MAX t YOuTgSThT StCNi Y liwPvZT
DAN O HERUHY WALTER MATTHAU FRANK OVERTON
EDWARD BINNS LARRY HAGMAN
FRITZ WEAVER
Aho tuning
*>; Biseioii Ifeeksl selling noyei feftWE HiiSICK! Rffi'Pf WHIJIiI Pfodiceil&fMMllljlltSlflN OifeclwlliSlOlltTlllMfl
,£ t If?
C^c&uhXtcuj Qu£y g:O0 1 aovusson
Ot

rwx* PERSONAL J
Free black and white kittens, short
hair, one male, one female, 6 wks
old. Sandbox trained, guaranteed.
Call 376-0137 after 5 P.M.
(J-lt-159-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear an electronic
factorial. Any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-Bt-158-P)

I LOST A FOUND j
W 6 iiTOfff! 0 9 6 8008 MoWSffWnOTAnMr.n.n.n.l? ID*
Found: Weimeraner puppy with
chain collar. NW section. Call
378-0036. (L-3M57-NC)
Lost at pool. Mans gold Signet ring.
Reward open. 378-5626 after 10
p.m. Great sentimental value.
(L-4t-l 58-P)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

tsssa
H |
horseback riding
HAVRIDES PARTIES!!! SE 15th
St. 372-8460. (M-st-159-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-c)
DATA PROCESSING SERVICES
PROGRAMMING. SYSTEMS
ANALYSIS AND CONSULTING
Scientific or Commercial.
CONTACT: Jack Stephens
COMPUTER MANAGEMENT
CORPORATION 378-1615.
(M-st-157-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
5191/2 SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-155-2t-p)

KEEP YOUR EYES ON GATOR ADS
FOR DOGGONE GREAT VALUES!!
BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:15
SHOWTIME 8:45
Ist RUN FEATURE
..THE NEXT DAY..the Love
"Don 'Knotts -TheJoVe God?
CO-STABO.nG I I
b Anns Francis Edmond OBrien James Gregory ilYn
PLUS A GREAT CO-FEATURE ...
"THE WAR WAGON"
JOHN WAYNE KIRK DOUGLAS
If Vu \ SPECIAL II
iCLJ FRIDAY 1
|^ r SPECIAL ~§
1 SAUTEED FISH I
I ALMONDINE |
I 1
1 MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS §
||L G AIN ES VI

SERVICES |
Experienced drummer wants work in
local rock band. Knowledge of all
types rock. Call 378-3191 after 5 pm.
(M-4t-157-p)
TYPING ALL SUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. IBM ELECT. TYPEWRITER
TYPE IN MY HOME. CALL
3/6-7809. (M-st-156-p)
RAYS Styie and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)

Friday, July 18,1969, The Florida Alligator,

- v
. Quinn Oskar Werner
feftiawt" David Janssen Vittorio De Sica
' Leo McKern Sir John Gielgud
Barbara Jefford Rosemarie Dexter
ill Laurence Olivier
? l
Rocking Choir f jk
ksMia i 11 1
I 1015 N. W. 13th St. \ /_] f
Can Herbie, a clean-living, hard-working
STARRING -K
DEAN MICHELE DAVID BUDDY ~
JONES LEE TOMLINSON HACKETT FLYNN FONG GRANATEUI j
From the author of The Guns of Navarone
and Where Eagles Dare!
American nucleai- ***>
attack sub... a sky full
of Russian paratroopers...
a raw for the secret
Rock Hudson Ernest Borgnine
p a tn C kMeGoohan Jim Brown
* i 4 J r f ; <*i n m """ ""* **"*

Page 15



Page 16

l Th# Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18,1960

GELATIN 5/95* fjM CH SA Z& fl A
PEANUT BUTTER99* ffl fJtwM f| U
TOM. CATSUP... 10* W LOT* K HJ
BATH TISSUE 4/$l §l| a TL t
TOWELS i/ti fei Astor Coffee 39
| ## ##### MB m I Limit I of Your Choice With $5.00 or More Purchose Excluding Cigarettes
LYKES BEEF 4 1 2oi BEECHNUT ALL STRAINS BABY
BB _ Mi A i MM i Giant WHITE, BLUE or COLD WATER ARROW . Limit 1 with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes
Stew 49* F00d... 9* nETEDfENT 90,
f c Q < i i 0< HE I ElftiEN I AT
I %Pwl |bQ I jm 28-oz. No Return Bottles "Twist Off Caps"
#uEif nmuiic c/si
VVIEn VRIIIIIJ J/ I
2 E **S* CRISCO OIL 39'
I Prices Good All Week Thursday mmM|BBBIIB|WWW^9W9B?!!^^^^^^^^J
mb GRANADA
Swich 3/sl. Ring 49* PES S>^f'
Bread... 2/39' Vitalis 78* I 9Qy
. J ,with each
I Lb DIXIE DARLING VlO Lo-gp LIQUID j, pjrcnase
Bread... 2/49* Shampoo 68* .-i.:.- r -' : "-.- ,-;/ Each week a piece of distinctive Granada dinnerware
" Will be featured for just 29. For each $3 in grocery
8-Pl dixie darling wiener OR hamburger Med.um TOOTHPASTE regular or mint .&',, /.l.fe* purchases, you are entitled to one piece at this low
Rime 4/901 tv Act 481 n SU;" i,h as 6 >" ha ^ ca
0 o### jMI J
DETERGENT
P i miflt'l Pears...3/$l apple...3/$l
ll\aUll HID Punch 3/$l Ssage 5/$l
N - 303 Con STOKELY CS OR WK GOLD 4 oi. GLEN FARMS STEM S PIECES MUSH-
MM C0rn....5/$l rooms 4/$1
|if£VV' J FLAVORS canned Can INSTANT POTATO
\TmfjtJd ; r : Drinks 15/$ 1 Flakes 10/$1
R W lj mmZyjmft | astor thrifty maid pork &
e.lr 1 Salt 10* Beans 3/Sl
- .......... .......... ------ ....
STAMPS j S wEIJ j j
i l^^S^^^S^Bm yCTTnHrTTW^Tnrr?? i B i~*~a,i rT^ys l r 1
Pint 47c Half Gallon 3-Lb. ALL DISHWASHER . 20-oi. 45c . Giant Size
i-Lb. Con henny penny WisK Cleaner .... 1 Fluffy Detergent 91* All Detergent .... 77?
Dog Food Large 43c Giont Size Giant Size COLD WATER "\ 24-oz. GLAMORENE FOAM
Breeze Detergent . 95? All Detergent. < 91? Rug Shampoo *] w
3/29? Giant Size COLD WATER ADVANCED . 3-Lb. 79c .. 10-Lbs. 12-oz AEROSOL BOMB
I 1 Surf Detergent . .91? All Detergent .... $ 2 43 Gulf Insecticide ... 98?
...
1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS
Ilia jn(9)&*iniiuiMmmvr:i)



-100'*50" ~ ...
|g| gfrr SUNNYLAND TENDER
Hauif
\ |*|! REGULAR #ft
x to G nHs~£ 3iicfid Karon ov^
\. *. | vl B HI 9 9 9 9
12-01. COPELAND 2ibs jtNNIE O GRADE A QUICK FROZEN BONELESS
ALL MEAT FRANKS... 4 9( TURKEY ROAST.... $1.99 W £. BRAND FRESH LEAN '£- s
BAKED HAM 69* CAN BISCUITS 4/43* LdAIIHiI knnl S
BEEF FRANKS 89* COTTAGE CHEESE 2a 65* Ml VUIIII VWI A
TALMADGE FARMS HALF OR WHOLE COUNTRY 12-oz. KRAFTS SINGLY WRAPPED AMERICAN USDA CHOIOE W-D BRAND CORN FED CHUCK 2-lb. Plq W D BRAND QUICK FROZEN BEEF
CURED HAMS 99* CHEESE FOOD 69* CTEAIf TQ< Cfronl/ottoc s l B9
Mb. PLUMROSE WD BRAND MILD DAISY STYLE | hMll***** LB # M vTvUIIvTV O
CANNED HAMS $1.39 CHEDDAR CHEESE... >B9* USDA CHOICE W D BRAND CORN FED SHOULDER OR CALIFORNIA FRESH BOSTON BUTT PORK
FISH STICKS 99* PORK SAUSAGE 65* ROAST 89* ROAST 59'
FISH CAKES 3/sl. SLICED BOLOGNA... 69*
FROZEN FOOD SPECIALS
4-oz. ASTOR FROZEN - SWEET, JUICY GA. RED
ORANGE JUICE 6/sl. A PEACHES
DINNERS 39* w % m
TOPPING 2/sl. BPI 0-1
18-oi. ASTOR FRENCH FRY m jm > Jm/p BBC*
POTATOES.... .. 4/S1 HARVEST FRESH
12-or. MINUTE MAID (6-oz. cans 7/SI.) 1402. WHOLE FROZEN STRAW- FANCY COIOtN BAN-! AV LARGE FRESH
Lernonade4/sl. berries 2/89* Corn 10 59* Cabbage 2 39*
B*lir*r o/ti isX A/ti Grapes 29* Tomatoes 29*
rlllCTS****** A/ aI nlUld* / I WNE RIPE WESTERN -JUMBO- .. JUICY PERSIAN m* I M At*
12-Pock ESKIMO --OR GREEN PEAS OR BABY Cdntdlopes 3/>l. LimCS il/ W
Donuts 2/>l. umas 5/5l Crape Drink 2/79* Potatoes 10 69*
, 2 Lb THUNDERBOLT BRAND CHUNKEES w w / m m
10-oz. BIRDSEYE LEAF F a a MIX OR MATCH FRESH GREEN U S N, I MILD SWEET WHITE
Spinach ...4/sl. Shrimp.... $2.19 Bell Peppers^..s/39* Onions 3 49*
SUPERBRAND SOFT ; \ j \ [ijlf TOPVaLuTsTAMPS j TOP fTTHT W VALuTsSmM |
Margarine ONE MS. or sWD I | 7J- WHOLE OR CUT. UP I 1 WD GRAND ] SUNNYLAND T[NO[. H
o $1 HuvonL Beef Steakettes I IK&sfi' Ground Beef PRfrijM' Fresh Fryers I BBlKiiSf Ground Beef BPftlifig Smoked Ham
J HjS | ffjjj #7 COOD RU JULr 23 GOOD THRU jULt 23 MjgSV # GOOD THRU JULY 23 | IRjM GOOD THRU JULY 23 | 0> GOOO THRU JULY 23
*' i7www 'r-j ,| i I' \ I i 171m.... Trm #
I(h NUCOA(Otrs) 15-oi. Con SWITCH ASSORTED Reg. Sixe 3/37c Both Sue
Margarine . Cat Food . . 10* Lux Soap . 2/35*
S'. HIAZ-lfflllN MADE PINK Rc<3 Si2e 2/39c B h SU Syrup .... 63* Phase 111 Soap . 2/49* Liquid Detergent . 85*
Spagheth w/Meatballs 75* Lifebuoy Soap .. 2/43* Liquid Detergent . 85*1 CZ 1
1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N,W- 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

Friday, Juty 18, IHi. Tfc* Florida AW***.

Page 17



Page 18

I. The Florida Friday, July 18,1980

Gatorland Midsummer Festival

WTW
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WILLARD BRASK
chairman of the UF Piano Department. Performing Wednesday.
P $29 VALUE J|!|£t ;: :: .'Sg,' : |
1 CASCADES ,#§ W I
I SICBO fc' I
8 I W RANGE pi jggi :- fjfcx I
8 CHOOSE FROM THE STATES LARGEST f-\ l %i>'-- ,f ]M
QUAUTY HAJRGOODS DtALtR | **f "
1 $l5O VALUE A> \ A I
1 100% TEXTURED HUMAN HAIR I
1 FULLY HAND MADE I
WIGS $ 39 80
1 100% SSSS HUMAN HAIR P
( WIGLETS S 4 BO
V WBaki * 80 ELEGANT COLORS A
S TRANS-WORLD |
I HAIRGOODS IMPORTERS M N AT 1
| CORNER UNIVERSITY & 13th ST styl L. 1
1 GAINESVILLE
|j§ I OTHER SHOWROOMS IN JACKSONVILLE, DAYTONA BEACH
M t| COCOA BEACH & ORLANDO |fi
S9UBI v-r? ** -r*

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J mi ifiirfTi i,l
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* :^;>^|.^7 li l '? ~ll t IMJ!^* 1 > j %
R*.
V 'A # l'^ > I 7 . V,
AMERICAN BRASS QUINTET
here to perform, aid Gatorfand Clinic.
<
- Join the Swing to Wings
.EARN just $c
kL.MRII for our Special
T/\ Introductory Flight Lesson
* Discover why the swings to wings.
|T|_Y V Tr Y our introductory flight lesson in a modern
Piper Cherokee. Come see us today.
VETERANS!! Your G.l. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot
Training. For full details, call Gainesville's only approved
school
378-2646
KEL CASSELS IN THE AIR. ,mr



Opens Today
The 10th Annual Gatorland Music Clinic, which opens today, is
designed to provide high school musicians with in depth musical
experience, stated Bob Foster, director of the clinic.
We want to give these students the opportunity t.; hear
professional performers that many of them lack in their own home
towns, Foster said. Several public concerts are part of the program.
In carrying out this aim the UF music department has gone to great
lengths and enlisted the efforts of performing musicians and high
school instructors from all over the country.
The music department will provide most of the staff for the clinic.
Faculty members teaching in the clinic are: flutist, Sarah Baird Fouse
and William Faust; bassoonist John S. Knitts and oboeist Earl Grothe.
Clinic director, Robert Foster instructs and plays the trumpet and
is assistant director of the bands.
Percussionist, James Hale, has performed with the Dutton
Percussion Ensemble and recently performed with the London
Symphony Orchestra. He directs the UF Percussion Ensemble.
Reid Poole, chairman of the department of music, will instruct the
French horn.

| IV/llvli iiv/i ii*
Also on the staff are celloist
Marie Henderson; concert pianist
Willard Brask and Director of
Bands, Richard W. Bowles.
Among the selected high
school instructors being featured
are: trombonist Charles Caudill,
director of Leesburg High School
Band, James Senn, director of
instrumental music, Parker High
School, Greenville, S.C., and
Andrew Wright, director of the
Sarasota High School Stage Band;
from Nathan B. Forrest High
School in Jacksonville, comes
oboeist Charles Ball. Performing
on the clarinet and saxophone,
Fred Turner, of Miami-Norland
Senior High School. Robert
Cowan, Director of Bands,
Winchester High School,
Winchester, Ky., plays the tuba.

Other clinicians on the staff
are outstanding instructors from colleges around the nation.
Saul Feldstein, professor of Music at State University College,
Potsdam, N.Y., is a clinician for the Rogers Drum Company. He has
performed professionally in the New York Metropolitan area and has
appeared as guest soloist with music organizations throughout the
country; some of which included performing with his jazz trio.
From Brevard Junior College is Nathaniel Baggariy, teaching the
clarinet and woodwinds. Pianist Sue Moore, from the faculty of
Louisiana Tech, Rustin, Louisiana will isntruct as well as Kenneth
Jones, French homist and Tom Stidham, trombonist, both from
Georgia Southern College.
Northern Illinois University representative is Mark Zumbro.
Zumbro has performed throughout the United States and Europe as a
soloist and with such artists as Marie Powers, Vladimir Bakaleinikoff,
Michel LeGrand and Doc Severensen.
The American Brass Quintet are also on the teaching staff.
Two hours college credit will be given to those Junior college
students who are participating in the clinic.
All concerts given by the faculty will be open to the publjc.
*7 Ue. (loHcU&i, 9nc.
"The South's Largest Western Store"
.. with Gainesville's largest supply of
|y Blue xx Denim &
See the new Look in Levi's for
Ivt ii W th MatC^'n 9 Denim Jackets Jackets-1
-1 Jackets-1 / jftjk 1 li t J White, Sky Blue, & Denim
JPpf I|A flflj Blue. Also Levi's Nuvo Flares
*7lte. (Ighcli&i, 9*tc.
4821 N.W. 6th St.
% C>
ABC men y:
The Most Student-Minded Businessmen
ADVERTISE IN THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR

.'-if- SaS:|.r jM H j
IL g|j
MARK ZUMBRO
... clinician, concertist

ft J
IH. 'ixx
3BLy
FLORIDA BAROQUE ENSEMBLE
.. .performing tonight and during clinic, Vivaldi and Telemann.
:
; c\ :
o
1968 WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS.
Our car the movie star.
Incredible as it sounds, you are look- Once signed up, the bug wont sud suding
ing suding at the romantic lead of a big new denly start making crazy demands. (A
Hollywood picture. gallon of gas for every 27 miles or so is
Please, no autographs. all.)
The picture is Walt Disney Studio's No studio could ask for a less temper temper"
" temper" The Love Bug." And our VW appears amental star. (It'll work any time, any any(in
(in any(in all its real life splendor) as Herbie, where and in any weather.)
the main character. Or one with fewer bad habits. (It
Why would a big film studio want to doesn't even drink water.)
make a movie star out of the bug? Or one that ages so gracefully.
Why not? And of course, there isn't a performer
Signing one up for a lifetime costs around that's better known to the public,
only $1 799*. That's less than they have Who else makes three million personal
to pay other movie stars in a single day. appearances on the road every day?
Our car can be seen In Walt Disney's Production of The Love Bug."
Your "Love Bug" button and sticker are waiting for you.
MILLER-BROWN W
authorizes
4222 N.W. 13th St.
"SUGGESTED RETAIL PRICE, (EAST COAST) P.0.E., LOCAL TAXES,
AND OTHER DEALER DELIVERY CHARGES, IF ANY, ADDITIONAL."

Frtd w> M yie,.lLTl FM**WWT.J

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18, 1969

mp
'***&..
808 FOSTER
Director of the Midsummer
Gatorland Music Festival and
summer director of the band
demonstrates a Vietnam
flute. Foster studied trumpet
with Dr. Frank Elsass and
Armando Ghitalla. He is
soloist, clinician and
adjudicator in the South and
Southwest, in addition to his
duties in the UF music
department. The flute is one
of many curious pieces of
musicalia in his office.

J. WAYNE REITZ UNION PRESENTS
FOR EARLYBIRDS
I MOON-LANDING
COVERAGE
1:00A.M. TO 5:00A.M.
Ample T.V. Viewing
in Union T.V. Lounge
And Rooms 121,122, 123
FREE COFFEE
(Compliments Os
Murphree Area)
SNACK BAR WILL BE OPEN
ALL SUNDAY NIGHT

DOUGHNUTS, MILK,
JUICE, SANDWICHES
WILL BE AVAILABLE
FOR PURCHASE
< s \
k DONT MISS
THE EVENT
OF THE CENTURY!

American Brass Quintet To Perform

The Brass are coming!
The American Brass Quintet
that is. They are being brought
to campus by the music
department and Student
Government Productions to
participate in the Tenth Annual
Gatorland Music Clinic, July
18-26.
Since their debut in New
York in 1960, these five
diversified and highly trained
musicians have won world-wide
acclaim. Participating in
international music festivals in
Italy, Wales and Yugoslavia,
they have created a renaissance
in brass music.
Os their reception by
Europeans, Arnold Fromme,
tenor trombone, wrote in the
January 1, 1968 edition of
Music Journal: There is,
apparently one area of American
musical life, aside from jazz, that
seems to elicit not only
international praise, but actual
acknowledgement of superiority.
That area revolves about our
brass instruments, embracing not
only our performers, but their
schooling and the manufacture
of their instmments as well.
A student of Simone Mantia,
world famous teacher at the
Juilliard School of Music, Robert
H. Biddlecome plays the brass
trombone. Presently he is with
the New York City Ballet.
Edward Bird well, french
horn, is a member of the New
York City Ballet Orchestra.
Bachelor John W. Eckert
plays trumpet for the Quintet.
Far from a square, Mr. Eckert

plays first trumpet with name
jazz bands out of New York
such as Buddy Murrow and Sal
Salvador.
One of the founders of the
American Brass Quintet is
Arnold Fromme. Besides playing
the tenor trombone, Mr.
Fromme is adept at such ancient
instruments as the Sackbut,
tenor Cornett and Serpent.
The final member of the
Quintet is Gerard R. Schwarz. A
master of the Baroque trumpet
Mr. Schwarz does extensive
experimenting with the trumpet
and mouthpiece. Currently he is
the conductor for the Erie
Hawkins Dance company.
The American Brass Quintet
performs works of the Pre-Bach
era as well as modem works of
composers Hindesmith, Varese
and Villa Lobos. They are
commissioning pieces from
current composers to keep their

MAN THE M##N
Florida Alligator
r f!l§llfll& m fill

\ ill,
~ 'xllm iflHB
x-x ..::: .^SsWflpKiWr-^Jrsv.-.- .6 HR
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repertoire varied and up to date.
Alvin Etlers Concert for Brass
Quintet and Orchestra is the
most recent piece.
High school band leaders have
become very interested in the

ROBBIE'S
"xw. For The Best In Steaks.
Meals & JoJ^ ndwiches
TV <& BILLIARD^^
1718 W University Ave.
On The Gold Coast

artist-clinicians.
A reception for the Quintet
will be held in the Reitz Union
Ballroom Tuesday at 8:15 pan.,
sponsored by student
government productions.



Â¥: TODAY
|
$ 4 p.m. Lecture-Recital by the Faculty Brass Trio (Richard
g W. Bowles, trombonist; Robert E. Foster, trumpet; Reid Poole,
g French horn) and the Florida Woodwind Quintet (Sarah Baird
:j Fouse, flute, Earl Grothe, oboe, Terence Small, clarinet, John S.
Kitts, bassoon, Reid Poole, French horn).
*

§ SATURDAY

1.30 p.m. Lecture-Recital by the Florida Baroque
Ensemble (Sarah Baird Fouse, flute; Earl Groth, oboe; Willis
>: Bodine, harpsichord; Marie Henderson, cello).

j;j SUNDAY

'
:§ 4 p.m. Faculty Concert. Chamber Music Program
Slogans Still Wanted
There are only 13 days left to get that slogan in for 1969
Homecoming. Three grandeur prizes are in store for the three best
entries.
The three winning slogans will be selected from those sent in by
both UF students and the general public.
A cruise for two to Nassau on the S. S. Bahama Star is one the
grand prizes. A Thanksgiving weekend for two in Fort Lauderdale is
planned for another contest winner.
An Orange Bowl extravaganza for two, with tickets on the
50-yard-line for the Orange Bowl Game, is offered as a third grand
prize.
The winner of the slogan contest will have first choice of the three
grand prizes.
Last year three slogans were selected from the more than 3,000
entries. The winning Homecoming Slogan 1967 was Happiness is

Being a Gator, taking secom
Society Film
The threat of nuclear war
looms over the human race when
the Cinema Society brings Fail
Safe to the Reitz Union
Auditorium this weekend.
With showings at 7 and 9
p.m., Fail Safe will run on both
Friday and Saturday nights.
The story points up the
dangers of a mechanical failure
when machines are run by
machines and not by men. What
is the duty of the President, the
leader, the ultimate authority in
American government. In Fail
Safe, he gives an order which he
cannot correct. American
bombers are sent past the point
of fail-safe.
Deadline Moved
The deadline for qualifying
for the election later this month
of delegates to the August
convention of the National
Student Association has been
extended because of the
cancellation of classes Monday.
Student Government
Secretary of Interior Linda
Roberts announced that the new
deadline will be Tuesday at 5
p.m.
Any full-time student
interested in being a delegate to
the convention may qualify by
paying a $5 registration fee
before the deadline in the SG
offices on the third floor of the
Dance Tonight
The Opposite Sexes, a
rock group from Tampa, will
play for a dance tonight from
9 to 1 on the Reitz Union
_ terrace.

I place was A Charlie Brown
Homecoming, and placing third
was Gators A-Whirl in a Mod
Mod World.
The deadline for entries to
this years slogan contest is
midnight July 31.
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
Cvraxro)
~
Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E Univ. Ave. 372*4373

ROAST BEEF
SANDWICH
THE BEST
O|| JL SANDWICH
HU Sr IN TOWN
AVAILABLE ONLY
at fflr iggimsi "v
715 N.Wa 13TH ST. / f

CONCERT
SCHEDULE
Events scheduled for later
in the week will be
announced in. Tuesday's
Alligator. Unless otherwise
indicated, all events listed
here are held in Reitz Union.
*
--
Movie Times
Center I Lovebug,
Disney fantastic.
Center II Shoes of the
Fisherman, with Anthony
Quinn. A documentary of the
Catholic Churchs rituals. A
weak, incredible story is
supposed to turn into a
movie. 2:30, 5:30, 8:30.
Florida Ice Station
Zebra, with Hudson,
McGoohan, Brown. Dont let
the stars and advertising fool
you this one is not an
adventure movie to give you a
pleasant evening. 2, 5,8.
Gainesville Nightmare in
Wax, with Cameron Mitchell
and Ann Helm. 8:52, 12:16.
Blood of Draculas Castle,
with John Carradine and
Paula Raymond, 10:47.
Things that go bump in the
night.
Plaza I True Grit, with
John Wayne and Kim Darby.
If youre a once-a-year
moviegoer, this is the one.
Kim Darbys portrayal is a
winner in depth, and John
Waynes performance reminds
you why hes one of the
greats. 2,4:33, 7:05,9:37.
Plaza II 2001 Space
Odyssey. Those who like it,
and those who dont all say
its incomprehensible. 2:23,
5:59,8:35.
Suburbia The Love God,
with Don Knotts, Ann
Francis, Edmond OBrien,
James Gregory. 8:50, 12:40.
The War Wagon, with John
Wayne and Kirk Douglas.
Lacks plot, drama, interest.
10:54.

;w.v.v.%v.x.x.x.x*>x*x*x $
MONDAY A
t
1:30 p.m. Music for Brass, with the Faculty Brass Trio.
Music by Nelhbel, Reid, Troupin, Reiche, Des Pres.
2:30 p.m. Percussion Demonstration by Sandy Feldstein,
clinician. &
V
TUESDAY :jjj
11 a.m. Trumpet Recital, Gerard Schwarz, clinician, with
Kim Pofahl Tuttle at piano. Music by Fischer, Honegger,
Fontana, Whittenberg, Stevens, Jolivet.
1:30 p.m. Florida Woodwind Quintet. Music by Haydn,
Milhaud, Carter, Stravinsky. Barrows.
2:30 p.m. Flute Clinic by Paul Stromgren, clinician.
8:15 p.m. The American Brass Quintet (Gerard Schwarz
and John Eckert, trumpets: Edward Birdwell, horn; Arnold
Fromme and Robert Biddlecome, trombones), a Student ::

Government' Production. Music by Gabrieli, Simon, Bach,
Wittenberg, Susato, Dahl.

THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMo'
h a
S NOW AT DUBS I
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| PLAYING 6 NIGHTS A WEEK p
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Race side by side at 200 mph
THIS SAT NITE
Gates open 2 PM, Qualify 3-8 PM
Races 8:30 PM
FULL GIGANTIC Racing Prog.
3% Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225

Friday, July 18, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

\ The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18,1969

Ice Station Zilch: Vandalism

By R.E. OSTEEN
Alligator Reviewer
Ice Station Zebra, starring Rock Hudson,
Patrick McGoohan, Ernest Borgnine, and Jim
Brown, opens at the Florida Theater today. The
situation is basically the following: A nuclear
submarine undertakes a special mission to the North
Polar ice-cap to capture a piece of microfilm
deposited there by a spy-in-the-sky type satellite.
The sub crew is augmented by two special agents
and a small body of U.S. Marines.
There are many reasons why you might expect to
enjoy this film: First, the movie is based on a novel
by Alistair McLean, the greatest adventure novelist
in sight. So if you are a McLean reader and movie moviegoer,
goer, moviegoer, you would naturally want to see a filming of a
McLean novel. Or if you saw and enjoyed the Guns
of Navarone and/or more recently Where Eagles
Dare both exceptional movies and both based on
McLean novels you might reasonably expect to
enjoy Ice Station Zebra. Perhaps you admired the
character projected by McGoohan in his old
television series, Secret Agent: cool and witty,
competent and courageous, and always in control.
Or maybe your hero-lust has been sharpened by
your having recently seen that gigantic tribute to
courage: True Grit.
If these are your reasons, then you may be

certain that you will be outraged
by the film, Ice Staion Zebra.
You will leave the threater
feeling that you have been
cheated; and you will have been.
This film is an instance of
vandalism in art. The novel is

exciting and suspenseful, it has an ingenious plot,
and it is populated with exceptional men, heroes.
The makers of this movie lure you in on this basis,
keeping the title of the novel and prominently
displaying the authors name. Then once you are
separated from your money, you are insulted with
the systematic and complete destruction of all the
values of the novel.
First, the plot is adapted for the screen beyond
simplicity to simple-mindedness. The individual
responsible for this improvement on McLean is
Harry Julian Fink (no kidding), who did the
screenstory. Fink is in the wrong industry: he
should be writing for comic books. The screenplay
by Douglas Heyes isnt much better. There is an
astonishing minute or so of dialogue between a
junior officer preparing a torpedo tube to be loaded
(a rather complex procedure) and his superior who
is reading through the checklist for the procedure.
This serious business is unbelievably interspersed
with personal trivia relating to the junior officers
request for leave to get married. The junior officer is
then instantly annihilated by the inrushing water
when he opens the tube hatch.
At this point the childish purpose of the
incomprehensible dialogue becomes apparent: it is
standard third-rate procedure to personalize a

minor character just before
bumping him off, in order to
sharpen the sense of his
loss but you will never see it
done less subtly, more blatantly
obviously, than here.
Jones, played by McGoohan,
is represented as the antithesis of
the hero of the novel.
Specifically, he is a fumbling,
incompetent, panic-stricken
souse. Jones directs the mission,
under orders personally signed
by the UJS. Chief of Naval
Operations; but it is quite
literally incredible that a frantic
bum of his degree of ineptitude
be so entrusted with a mission of
such importance. Aside from the
boozing, Jones indulges in
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exchanges of sarcasms with the Captain (Rock
Hudson), cynical, degrading confessions about his
career and character, and occasional demonstrations
of impotent rage complete with table-pounding
and glass-breaking.
Jim Brown plays the USMC Captain,
commanding the body of Marines attached to the
sub for the mission. This character is strictly
cardboard, but it is not the actors fault: nobody
could have made a character of this hackneyed
stereotype of the tough Marine. To make the role
even more hopeless, this battle-hardened
professional Marine with an automatic rifle in his
hands submits to the villain armed only with a
hand-gun. But the Marine knows that the villain
must kill him, now that the villains identity is
known to him.
The best characterization is that of Vasilov by
Borgnine. Vasilow is Jones assistant, a Russian
defector to the West with some fifteen years of
loyal service as an agent for the West. Jones and the
audience know that Vasilov is loyal by his long and
impressive record; moreover, his loyalty, as he
points out, is based on conscious convictions and
choices rather than merely an accident of
birthplace.
Although Borgnines acting is credible, Vasilovs
actions are not. Herein lies one of the messages of
the film and this is openly expressed in the
dialogue a mans ultimate loyalties are determined

by his blood and genes, not by his mind.
Only the subs captain (Rock Hudson) retains any
vestige of ability and heroism. In fact, he half-saves
the mission after Jones has repeatedly and
disastrously blown it. But even this is half-accidental
and completely gimicked up: the Captain has
stumbled onto a Handy Dandy Magic Marvel
Remote Detonator, which he slyly hides up his
sleeve until a propitious moment, namely when the
Russians have recaptured the microfilm (thanks to
Jones, of course) and are transferring it to an
aircraft via balloon. Then, ZAP! A stationary ball of
burning fuel, but no airplane or parts thereof even
the special effects of the movie are inferior.
To add further insult to injury, the film closes
with a peaceful coexistance propaganda speech by
the Russian Colonel commanding the opposition.
Producer Martin Ransohoffs Ice Station Zebra
deserves to lose as much on this film as Where
Eagles Dare makes.
The Florida Theater has been having lots of
childrens movies lately, e.g., My Side of the
Mountain and Chitty-Chitty Bang-Bang. One easily
sees how the management may have mistakenly
concluded that Ice Station Zebra couldnt have been
intended for an adult audicence.
Caveat emptor.

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Deadline for reservations, Friday, July 25,1969
Program Office, room 310 J.W. Reitz Union



A FEW GET INVOLVED
Students Do It All

By TOM EASON
Alligator Sports Editor
Golf, tennis, handball, surfing... Well, whats
your thing this summer? UF students are doing it all
plus a few others that are helping them stay lean
and consent in their hazy, crazy days of summer.
Golf seems to be biting the dust as the most
popular summer sport on campus. Dick Kip, club

pro at the university course,
estimates only 75 students use
the links daily. And many of
them are daily visitors. The
weekends usually attract a large
contingent of faculty and staff
while students become more
involved with such relaxing
adventures as exploring wilds of
the Ichnatucknee.
But then I hear the campus
police dont allow such evil
beverages as (may I be so bold as
to print the word) beer on their

course. Maybe if they would permit the uninhibited
linksmen on their premises, they would attract a
few more relaxing students.
A more popular sport with the male students
seem to be that ol* grit and sweat sport handball.
What a sport for keeping in shape, or should I say
keeping from getting in worst shape. It is quite a
skilled sport with the hardest part being hitting a
little black ball against a three-walled court.
Whoever created that game probably never realized
how taxing the ball could make it. Maybe P.A. Lee
will be out there soon doing his thing ..... At least, L
pray hell be. You just cant keep a good man down.

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The
Florida
Alligator

Then theres that game of tennis. You know the
one your mother wanted you to learn when you
were a kid but you always liked baseball or
swimming. Well, some of the students have finally
picked it up because the courts are usually filled. Or
at least the handballers become aware of the
learners when they have to run tlfem off the
handball courts.
Surfing ... Its only 70 miles to that beautiful

into a beautiful scene.
And then there is that American sport of
swimming, or as students see it, sun bathing while
tubing. I must say, the majority of the students do
participate in this type of physical exercise. Some
even add a little weight-lifting in the form of arm
curls with that old familiar 12 to 16 ounce can.
(Not too much exercise but a lot of fun.)
But some of the unfortunate people dont do a
damn thing. Well, the Presidents Council on
Physical Fitness wont like you, but then you all
might make a little better grades or something like
that.

beach at Crescent. Or 85 miles
to Jax Beach. Or if you really
want to get involved in some
fair East Coast waves, Cocoa
Beach is but a mere 180 miles.
And as surprised as some of you
dirt farmers might be, surfing is
part of quite a few UF students
who really know how it feels to
really get involved with a little
bit of nature that propels a small
7-foot board up and down and
inside and out of some beautiful
blue curls. So much for a delve

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Passanger compartment designed as a safety zone. Doors
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Friday, July 18,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 23



Page 24

The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 18, 1969

Defendina Champs Down Aeros, 8-4

By Alligator Services
The second week of softball
began with the defending
champion P.E. Petes bruising the
Aeros 84 behind Richard
Turners three hits. Independent
League Champion Tallywhackers
crushed the Guidance Institute
15-
Paul Smiths two homeruns
paced the Neutralizers to a
16- win over Miller Memorial.
The Unbeatablcs proved to be
just that as they beat the Mighty
Burners 7-5. The Burners outhit
the Unbeatablcs 1 1-9, but made
live errors. Georgia Scaglc scored
seven runs in the first three
innings and held on to edge
I.F.E.K. 8-6.
Tom Buschs three base hits
paced the S.C. & B.A. to a 26-3
demolition of the Pedagogs. Jim
Ashes three hits helped the Old
Timers chop up the Meats 16-6.
The next days action

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Tun-Car* Rally Set
By DEAN WAITE
Alligator Sports Writer
The Hart Rallyc Club is sponsoring a patriotic fun car rally July
26 to build public interest in rallyeing and to promote automobile
safety in the Gaincsvillcarca.
Appropriate to July, the theme is Rally Round the Flag. But
emphasizing the safety aspect, rallyc master Vinson Bailey said,
anyone collecting a traffic ticket along the way would automatically
be disqualified from competition.
Fun car rallycs are not as highly competitive as a standard
time-speed-distance rallyc (tsd). In tsd rallyes, there are checkpoints
that drivers have to pass at a specific time to give them a specific
average speed. At the end of the rallyc theyll have a precise distance
reading. Any deviations from the specifications cost points and the
closest combination of time, speed, and distance wins the rallye.
The Hart fun-car rallye will incorporate the excitement of a tsd
rallye with the added safety factor of a fully paved itinerary. Most tsd
rallyes have their rough spots.
The registration will be held at 5:30 p.m. in front of the
Commercial Bank at 1717 N.W. 13th St. The course instructions for
the 75-mile rallyc will be given at registration. At 11 p.m. the rallyc
will terminate at 316 S.W. 16th Avenue.
e
After proper route verification, the car with the closest odometer
reading to the actual mileage wins. Second and third places will also
be awarded trophies and a special guest trophy will be given to the
best time by a non-club member.
The registration fee is $1.50 per person for non-club members and
$1.25 per person for club members.
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produced a stunning upset as the
Busadmen nipped the P.E. Petes
7-6 for their first victory after
two straight losses. A strong
Silver Streak team kept their
record unblemished with a 14-1
romp over the Reds as Juan
Montes contributed three hits to
the winners cause. Frank
Ebrights four hits helped the
Old Timers stay unbeaten with
19-0 whitewash of the
Marauders.
The Mighty Burners grinded
the Meats 12-0. Stern pitched
the shutout and Terry Goldman
had three doubles. The Wasps
stung the Neutralizers 12-5 as
Guenther homcrcd and singled
for the winners.
Mario Ariets four hits led the
Latin Club to a 19-8 romp Qver
S.C. & B.A. ENE buried the
Subterraneans 8-3 as Tom Helms
laced three hits. Injury and
Disease had a 2-run seventh and

inflicted the first loss on the
Braves 10-9 as Dennis Daniiano
banged three hits.
Tim Talers two homers kept
the Fla vet Tigers perfect record
with a 15-8 rout over the Towers
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Powers. MBA came up with two
runs in the seventh to trim Spur
and Sickle 3-2. Reid Hall scored
six times in the last inning to
gain their first win, 13-12 over
Gresham Drugs. Millard Nixons

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four hits led the Tuttlingers to a
20-10 romp over Georgia Seagle.
Jim Broadbury and John
Polsteen both homered and
singled as the Unbeatables edged
the College Kids 8-6.