Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
i Schedule Os Events
; WEDNESDAY
i
I 9:32 a.m. Launch from Cape
Kennedy
12:16 p.m. Craft fired into
lunar trajectory
1:41 p.m. LM and command
module hook-up
[ SATURDAY
1:26 a.m. Engine fired behind
moon to place craft in
lunar orbit
| SUNDAY
1:47 p.m. LM and command
module separate
4:19 p.m. LM lands on moon

! MONDAY
2:17 a.m. Armstrong steps
: onto moon's surface
4:42 a.m. Astronauts re-enter
LM
j: 1:55 p.m. LM engine
: launches module from
: moon
5:32 p.m. LM and command
; module re-unite
I

Sk

nMaJI...
V
V

MOON LAUNCH IS GO

Apollo Astronauts Ready

By DAVE REDDICK
Editor-In-Chief
CAPE KENNEDY The three crew members of the
Apollo 11 reported they were in Go condition Monday,
ready for their history-making flight to the moon.
Neil Armstrong, Edwin E. Buzz Aldrin and Michael
Collins will be launched from here atop the Saturn 5 rocket
Wednesday morning at 9:32 EDT if the countdown, which
began more than a week ago, goes without problems.
If the launch is on time, the men and their command

The
7
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

Vol. 61, No. 158

University of Florida, Gainesville

#
module will be put into orbit more than 100 miles above
the surface of the earth. After checking out hundreds of
circuits, the ship and its crew will be ready to break out of
orbit toward the moon.
Barring any problems, the third stage of the Saturn 5 will
blast the men into a translunar trajectory, speeding them
toward the moon at 24,200 m.p.h. That bum will take place
at 12:16 EDT.
An hour and a half later, the astronauts will separate their
craft from the adaptor section, which had been attached
directly behind the Apollo craft. Using small rocket engines,
the command module will be turned 180 degrees, so the astronauts
will face the adaptor section.
At that point, the four walls of the section will open to expose the
Lunar Module (LM), and the astronauts will link the nose of their
craft with the LM.
The rest of Wednesday and all of Thursday and Friday will be spent
coasting toward the moon, while making needed mid-course
corrections.
Saturday, at 1:26 p.m. EDT, the Apollo craft, still linked to the
LM, will slip behind the moon, and communications will be lost.
A few moments later, the astronauts will fire their main rocket
engine to place them in lunar orbit, with the low point being 69 and
the high point 196 miles from the moons surface. After two orbits,
taking four hours, the engine will again be fired to adjust the orbit to
62 by 76 miles.
At 7:22 p.m. EDT, Aldrin will crawl through a tunnel in the nose
of the command module into the LM. He will Spend two hours
checking the systems.
Sunday, at 9:32 a.m. EDT, Aldrin and Armstrong will enter the LM
through the tunnel and begin preparing to free the LM from the
command module.
The separation is scheduled to take place at 1:47 pjn. EDT, when
the descent to the lunar surface will begin. Command Pilot Collins will
remain in a parked orbit in the command module.
In addition to keeping tab on the progress of the LM, he will beam
(SEE 'APOLLO' PAGE 2)
Regents Postpone
Tenure Requests

See Editorial Page 6
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
The Board of Regents Friday
denied the recommendations of
the state universities, Chancellor
Robert B. Mautz and Regents
Chairman D. Burke Kibler to
tenure 262 faculty members.
The final decision was made
by Kibler who refused to call for
a vote, thereby tabling the issue
until the regents next meeting
in two months.
A majority of the regents said
they would have voted against
tenuring the recommended
faculty.
The regents apparently
thought present tenuring policies
allow incompetent professors
undeserved job security.
I am not going to rubber
stamp all these names without
knowing something about each
one, said Regent Henry
Kramer, chairman of the boards
personnel committee.
Board members agreed with
Kramer, saying they were not
provided with any background
information, only a list of
names.
The opposition to tenure was
led by Dr. Clarence Menser who

Tuesday, July 15, 1969


said, Tenure is only a crutch
for incompetence. Two years is
not enough. We are in an era
where a lot of shabby teachers
are available.
They dont stand behind
what the universities stand for,"
he continued. We ought to get
rid of teachers who aren't even
good Americans," Menser said.
Menser further said he was
opposed to anyone being
tenured below the rank of
associate professor and then
only with three years experience
at that rank. ?
Mautz said that although he
did not like existing policies, the
list of professors should be
approved.
He said all the professors
recommended had been put on
the list by their presidents after
careful screening, including the
political judgement that they
adhered to American
principles.
Kibler described the action as
injudicious" and said it broke
faith with people who had met
the tenure policy at the time
they were hired.
UF President Stephen C.
(SEE *262' PAGE 2)



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 15,1969

Upper Division Entrance
Begins New Grade Point

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Many upper division students who had low
University College grade point averages will find
their overall averages greatly increased as a result of
recent changes in student regulations.
The new Undergraduate Catalog states when a
student is admitted to the upper division, his grade
point average shall begin anew and his academic
average will be based on his work in that division.
Registration Director Louis Voyles said that as
far as university records are concerned, a students
grade point average starts afresh when his
classification changes from 2UC to 3-. This gives
the very important opportunity to determine what
direction a student is going in at the UF, Voyles
said.
This change was brought about by a
recommendation of the Student Regulations
Committee (composed of students and faculty) to
the University Senate. The senate then unanimously
approved the recommendation.
Regulations concerning probation because of
unsatisfactory academic achievement have been
changed to a grade point deficit. A student will be
placed on university scholarship warning if he has a
grade point deficit of nine points or less.
Scholarship probation will be given if a student has
a grade point deficit of 10 points or more.
An example of computing grade point deficit is if
a student had completed 50 quarter hours and
earned 90 grade points he would have a grade point
deficit of 10. He would be placed on probation
because he should have at least 100 grade points.
In addition to university probation, a student
may be placed on probation by his college as

262 Tenure Bids Tabled

OConnell said it was important
to remember the decision was
only deferred and there is no
reason for faculty to take action
at this point.
There is no reason for this
decision to affect morale,
OConnell said. Any qualified
professor who deserves tenure
Will receive it.
He said the problem was
confusion among the regents
about tenuring assistant
professors.
Lester L. Hale, UF vice
president for student affairs and
a tenured professor of speech
since 1944, said the board has
the prerogative and
responsibility to give system to
the system.
However, Hale said, for
the board to pass on individual
decisions is open to debate. The

Senate Meeting Off
There will be no meeting of the Student Senate tonight. The
meeting has been changed to Thursday at 7:30 p.m. Caucuses will be
at 7:15. The meeting will be held in room 349 of the Reitz Union.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion. /

O'CONNELL
.. only deferred'
question in point is how much
power the board should delegate
to the presidents of state
universities.
American Federation of
Teachers President J.J. Zeman,
an untenured philosophy
professor, agreed. In presuming
to sit in judgement on tenure,
the board acts in an area where,

an| C Bhk
fl M
MM
. C wKjpr.
VOYLES
.. starts afresh'
determined by that college.
The new student regulations also include an
explanation of the pass-fail grading system.
Students may take electives outside their majors
and receive a grade of satisfactory or unsatisfactory.
These grades do not count in the grade point
average.
To be eligible to enroll under the S-U grade
option, a student must be in good standing,
classified as an undergraduate student and receive
proper approval.
The number of hours a student may take under
the new grading system will be determined by his
upper division college.

although it has power, it lacks
competence, he said.
A professors academic
colleagues alone have the
competence to judge whether he
should be tenured or
promoted, Zeman continued.
The action is grossly unfair to
the 262 whose tenure has been
held up, especially to those who
must be granted tenure now or
be dismissed.
Would a regent care to
submit to the strains and
uncertainties imposed upon such
a professor by this action?
Zeman said the AFT will meet
today and possibilities for action
will be discussed then.

Semi-Annual Sale
from the
University Shop
Continues
/Mens and Womens Depts.
Savings of 20, 40 and 60 %
nibersit ? &f, o p HfjH
16M WEST UNIVERSITY AVENUE UNIVERSITY PLAZA

[Apollo Ready]
page on^
live television pictures of the separation and descent.
At 4:19 pm. EDT the LM will land on the surface of the Sea of
Tranquility, a relatively smooth portion of the moon. The intended
landing spot is near the crater of Moltke
After landing, Aldrin and Armstrong will spend 10 hours preparing
for immediate takeoff, in case trouble develops.
The two will also attempt to rest before donning life -supporting
back packs. At 2:12 ajn. EDT, Armstrong will open the hatch, and
begin his descent of a ladder on one of the four legs on the bottom
half of the LM.
Just before stepping onto the moon s surface, he will open a small
hatch which contains a television camera aimed at the portion of the
moon where he will first step.
At 2:17 a.m. H)T Monday, Armstrong will step onto the moons
surface, becoming the first human to stand on another planet.
Almost a half hour later, at 2:41 a.m. EDT, he will be joined by
Aldrin, and the two will spend about two hours exploring the nearby
area, planting American flags, taking pictures and gathering rock
samples. In addition, another small hatch on the bottom half of the
LM will be opened and will display a plaque signed by the three
astronauts and president Richard Nixon.
We came in peace for all mankind, the plaque says.
pf jfl ..
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1 i I;
DOUG CASE
AN ARABIAN NIGHT
Sundra, the Goddess of the Sun, performs her
specialty belly-dancing -for guests at the Arab Club's annual
dinner Saturday night at the Gainesville Women's Club.



* ! v HH|Ui
NICK ARROYO
GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator charmer is Susan Merret, a sophomore from
Jacksonville who likes football and ballet dancing. Susan is majoring
in psychology. Anyone for analysis?
Extra TVs In Union
For Apollo 11 Launch
IFs moon-minded eartnungs will have an opportunity to watch
the progress of the Apollo 11 moon shot, including the landing of the
lunar module on the moon, in the Reitz Union.
Bill Cross, assistant director of the union, said extra TV sets will be
set up in the union in time for the 9:32 a.m. takeoff Wednesday.
The union will stay open all night Sunday so the 2:17 a.m. Monday
landing on the moon can be viewed. Sandwiches and other food will
be available in the snack bar, and free coffee will be served.
Murphree Area will continue the holiday atmosphere Monday at
noon by sponsoring a luncheon celebration of the hopefully
successful moon landing. Free Cokes and cake will be served on the
union colonnade.
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Petition Demands Student
Vote On NSA Membership

A petition to bring the
question of UF membership in
the National Student
Association (NSA) to a
vote is being
calculated on campus.
Jimmey Bailey, who is
heading up the campaign, said he
wants the students to vote on
NSA Election
Set July 30
Student Government is
accepting applications for the
U.S. National Student
Association (NSA) delegate
elections to be held July 30.
To qualify as a representative
from UF to the NSA
convention, which will be held
in El Paso, Texas, Aug. 19-29, a
student must be a full time
student not on academic or
social probation.
Application and $5 fee must
be submitted to the secretary of
interior by Monday at 5 p.m.
From the total field of
candidates for the special
election, only five delegates will
be chosen to attend the
convention.
In addition, five alternate
delegates will be chosen to back
up the regular delegates in case a
delegate is disqualified.
However, alternates will not
attend the convention unless
authorized by SG.
The student body president
and the NSA coordinator will
accompany the elected
delegation to the convention as
voting members.

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the matter, rather than just the
Student Senate.
If the students vote on it,
Bailey said, they will vote it
down,
Two weeks ago the senate
authorized Student Body
President Charles Shepherd to
join the national organization
for a one-year trial basis. Bailey
says he feels the important
matter should be left up to the
students.
If Bailey can get signatures of
25 per cent of the student body,

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Tuesday, July 15,1969, The Florida Alligatoi',

about 2,000, the question will
go before the senate, which will
decide whether to place it before
the students.
Bailey said he hoped to have
the vote before die end of the
term, but Senate Majority
Leader Marc Glick said it would
take too much time to verify the
signatures.
Bailey said he planned to have
three tables set up, one at Little
Hall, another at the Reitz Union,
and a third at the College
Library.

Page 3



Page 4

\ n Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 15,1969

r '"- > t.' > s
;' t J|^Hk
HE GLIDES THROUGH THE AIR
... on the flying ski kite

i aft,
IT WAS A ROUGH DAY FOR THE EGG TOSS
... contestants often found the yolk on them

Astronomers May Be Next On Moon

Space flights have altered the image
of the moon for the worlds
astronomers. No longer is it simply an
object to view from afar. Astronomers
now see it as a potential home.
If no one else wants it, well take
it, says Dr. Alex G. Smith, chairman of
the UF astronomy department.
Smith explains that astronomers are
attracted to the moon because they
soon may have nowhere else to go. Like
some forms of wildlife, they are being
driven from the earth by modem
civilization.
On the moon, astronomers would

Wauburg
Plav-

Day
PHOTOS BY
DOUG CASE
...-.

* *iflS BPljf
/y V -olPq, ijjigfr-_
' y-; ; 1 mk s >
j% *;S /vy-\ y_ r ; -, : ;
COUPLES RACE IN THREE LEGGED EVENT
... another playday feature

TO ESCAPE CIVILIZATION

escape the three greatest threats to their
precise measurements light, electrical
noise and the blurring and filtering
effect of the earths atmosphere.
Smith concedes that problems
connected with placing an observatory
on the moon are formidable, but they
somehow seem small when compared
with the alternative problems of
overcoming light, noise and atmospheric
interference here on earth.
Common experience demonstrates
the benefits of total darkness in star
gazing. Standing in the city you can see
a dozen or so of the brightest stare

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ft m 1 W|p,
" la : '^S' dMlSiiiiK *jfjfeyt
* *3m Jj&gf BB
&rj
:: jr wp^vf~r % ,<< %-?3K* gy ~~1 %/s^'\ % -.'' " ';'
PLAYDAY FEATURED WATERMELON FOR ALL
... this youngster got his fill

~- .v|iS--'K I W
YOU RE CHUNKIN'
.. canoe joust one of events

visible to earth, but in a darkened
countryside you can see thousand
Radio astronomers derive similar benefit
from absolute quiet.
nhl! F has gone through a succession of
observatories as its astronomers have
fled civilization. In the process its
astronomical research and teaching have
moved form the middle of campus to its
outer fringe and are now in ew
quarters more than 30 miles west of
The university has an ootical
c r tory n 0,1 a mra) tra m LevJ
County and a radio observatory on a

similar tract in Dixie County. It also has
two Southern Hemisphere observatories
in Chile.
Chile is our last refuge, Smith
sighs, and no one knows how much
longer it will last with the South
American population expanding at the
rate it is.
While an observatory on the moon
still may be in the dreaming stage,
Smith says astronomers are attempting
to overcome some of their earthbound
problems through the use of balloons,
rockets, planetary fly-bys with guided
missiles and an orbiting laboratory.



-- r -
' '' #y
' iHsml
I Bw v
I Mir
WELLS
* will help some'
New Contract
r
Provides For
Fall Buses
By JIM CONGLETON
Alligator Staff Writer
The final phase of UFs new
parking plan is now a reality. A
contract was signed last week
with City Transit. Inc., providing
UF with six buses to shuttle
students from perimeter parking
areas to the main campus.
UF Business Manager Tom
Wells said last week that each of
three routes, designated the
Orange, Blue and Green
routes, will have two buses
serving them. Hours of operation
will be 7:30 ajn. to 5:30 pjn.
Wells said the cost of running
and maintaining the six buses
will be $6.50 an hour, including
the driyers salaries.
Possibly one or two buses will
begin trial runs Sept. 1 for any
students or employes wishing to
use them.
This will help some of the
people get used to the system
before the fall term begins,
Wells said.
Revenue from the sale of
vehicle registration decals this
fall will help pay for the buses,
shelters along the routes and at
the new parking lot behind
Hume Hall, and for construction
of that lot. Wells said.
There are no immediate plans
for constructing other parking
lots similar to the one behind
Hume Hall, he said.
Frosh List Sale
A register of incoming
freshman students will go on sale
as part of the Gator Loan Fund
drive early in the fall quarter.
It will contain names, home
towns, university addresses and
telephone numbers, along with
pictures of all freshmen. It will
sell for about sl.
The Freshman Record will
have some important
information for all students such
as a campus map. university
calendar and a short history of
UF.
Open To Commuters
The parking areas for Broward
Hall and Rawlings Hall are open
to students with commuter
parking decals during the
summer quarter. University
Police Chief A.I. Shuler has
announced.

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Tuesday, July IS, 1969, The Florida AWgetor,

Page 5



Page 6

'.The Florida Alligator, Tuesday. July 15.1969

The Florida Alligator
SThe price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick
*
.j Dave Osier
(vCb&L Managing Editor
All
s' Harold Aldrich
A l /Mm. Executive Editor
#
, oopsr Ik

In suggesting that we withdraw militarily from
South Vietnam and, at the same time, abandon the
only government the South Vietnamese have,
Senator George McGovern has prescribed a formula
for absolute defeat. We could have peace with the
Viet Cong and North Vietnam on such terms, yes.
But as soon as the disintegration set in in South
Vietnam for everybody to see, it would be the end
of our influence in the world. There wouldnt be a
single small country whose government would trust
us, or a single big country whose citizens would
respect us.
The Senatorial doves, among whom McGovern is
the most extreme, have a perfect right to criticize
our conduct of the war, but they should know that
words have consequences. A policy of graduated
U.S. troop withdrawal from South Vietnam is
perfectly feasible. But to accomplish it without
losing the war to the Communists it will have to be
accompanied by a program of training and arming
Asian replacements for our men. Such training
could not possibly be carried out if there were no
continuity in local government, which means
cooperating with Thieu and Ky until such time as
orderly elections provide for a successor
government. Talk of abandoning the present
Saigon administration will not produce an orderly
election; it will only insure chaos.
The Sbnate doves are too emotional to give us
useful criticism of our Vietnam policies. For a
model of critical discussion they should read a
report of a British seminar held at the Royal United
Service Institution in London last winter, the tape
recordings of which have just become available.
The British panel included Sir Robert Thompson,
head of the British advisory mission to Vietnam in
the Malaysian police in 1963-66; Lieutenant General
Sir Walter Walker, who directed operations in North
Borneo and played the guerrilla at his own game;
PJ. Honey, a lecturer of oriental studies, and other

The Loss Os Our Will To Win

EDITORIAL

Regents Blow It Again

Unproportionate low pay, small fringe
benefits, retarded advancement and fear of
outside interference all have sullied the
attractiveness of being a professor in
Floridas university system.
And now we come to this.
Friday, 262 teachers at five of the state s
seven universities were put on the spot
their jobs placed in doubt by a hesitant,
thoughtless and blundering Board of
Regents.
Racked by internal squabbles over the
question of granting tenure automatically
of being a rubber stamp for each university
personnel committee the regents refused
to vote on Chancellor Robert Mautz
recommendation for granting tenure to this
years applicants, a move that smacked of
something less than unity.
Mautz had planned to call for a year-long
moratorium on tenure okays, afterwards, in
hopes of studying the inequities in the
system of job and academic freedom
security.
He never got the chance.
Instead, the regents took the opportunity
to publicly blast the tenure system, thus
rebuking not only Mautz, but betraying the
confidence each university had placed in
them by every new professor when they
were hired.
In short, the regents action undermined
one of the main recruiting attractions of
every state university. Job security and
academic freedom.
"* v
< .1
Certain regents settled back on the excuse
that they had not reviewed the list of tenure

knowledgeable lecturers, writers, and military
experts.
The British consensus was rather ably expressed
by Sir Robert Thompson, who attributed the
American discomfiture in Vietnam (he avoided
the word defeat) to an obscurity of aim, a
failure of strategy and a lack of control and
organization.
We began, says Sir Robert, by preparing for a
John Chamberlain
Korean type of war, and ignored the necessity of
building both a local police force and a unified
intelligence organization. The worst mistake was to
let American domestic politics govern the strategy.
Philip Goodhart, a member of Parliament who
has made frequent visits to Vietnam, told of writing
to the U.S. ambassador in Saigon that the Viet
Cong cannot beat you, but I think the Columbia
Broadcasting System and The New York Times
can. Along with a number of British panelists,
Goodhart said the Americans will to win in
Vietnam was broken by what they saw on the
television screen.
Brigadier WP.K. Thompson observed that this
has been inherent in the way television is compelled
to report.
You cannot start a television news broadcast or
a news story, he said, by saying that in 95 per

applicants. What they failed to mention was
that every university thoroughly screens
each professor before his name is placed on
the list submitted to the board.
It is right that the university should do so.
Every institution must have a fair amount of
autonomy in hiring and tenure granting
without such procedures the situation would
be similar to the Atlanta plant of General
Motors asking Detroit headquarters
permission every time personnel wanted to
hire someone.
It is obvious the regents no longer have
any trust in the competence of each state
university administration.
All of the problems a personnel
administrator has in getting qualified
professors to come to Florida, since the
states educational reputation has been
tarnished from Massachusetts to California
by past botches of both the regents and
university officials, have been compounded
now by the boards actions Friday.
Floridas state university system has been
suspected for some time by many top
educators of being an intellectual desert. The
boards refusal to grant tenure must be
confirming their doubts.
For a bright, young, dedicated professor
teaching in this state, the atmosphere under
which he labors is a bitter disappointment in
terms of the gleaming reports he was given in
a glossy, slick, PR-produced recruiting
brochure.
Here at home, we would not blame each
of the 119 UF professors affected by the
regents action if they, either collectively or
individually, walked out today.

cent of Vietnam today nothing happened, although
that is what in point of fact happens most of the
time. To which Goodhart added, there are the
pictures of the 852 s dropping enormous loads of
bombs. There are pictures of Marines entering
villages, where the population is clearly terrified.
But the American news machine is not geared to
taking pictures of the headman of the village
who has had his arms cut off and has been
disembowelled by the Viet Cong. They are not
geared for that because the cameramen are not there
when it happens.
The conclusion: an open society, dependent on
the TV screen, cannot sustain its will to fight an
undeclared war in a strange land far from home.
Said Brigadier Thompson, in a proper and
declared war... you would have had censorship.
But this would be bad, too, for censorship
enables the military to cover its mistakes. Second
conclusion: there is really no solution in Vietnam
unless the South Vietnamese, who dont depend on
television, develop their own will to win.
This, of course, is not what Senator McGovern
has been talking about. He doesnt seem to care who
wins in South Vietnam.
Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey Marcia Baker
Editorial Assistant Copy Editor
Darcy Meeker
Campus Living Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications. i
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in. Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683
Opinions expressed in the Honda Alligator are those
o e editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida." ;



Staff Writings

On May 16 of this year black students here
gathered on the steps of Tigert Hall to voice their
complaints about the UF's relationship to black
people of this state. Specifically, they complained 1
of a lack of black students and black faculty here.
Statistics released through a booklet published by
the Southern Education Reporting Service show the
truth of the complaints made then. For the fall
term, 1968, of 19 state universities and land grant
colleges in the southeastern states, the UF ranked
ahead of only two in the percentage of black
student enrollment in the undergraduate student
body. Black students at the UF constituted less than
.05 per cent of the student body.
Ranking ahead of the IF were Alabama,
Louisiana State, Mississippi State, Mississippi, and
Florida State, among others.
What is the reason for the low black student
enrollment here, as compared to other southern
universities?
It cannot be said, at any rate, that there are fewer
black students here because the UF is more
discriminatory against black students than other
southern states. The policy of this university is the
same as that of most other southern
universities complete non-discrimination on the
basis of race, that is, equal opportunity for all
students, black or white, who meet the
requirements for admission.
The term equal opportunity has a fine ring to
it. It is a common phrase tossed out proudly by
almost all Americans. Equality of opportunity is a
concept deeply imbedded in the history of this
nation. v
The question is however, just how equal is the
equal opportunity offered to black students
seeking admission to universities which truly do not
discriminate on the basis of race?
The fact is, of course, that by the time that most
black persons in this nation, and in this state, have
graduated from high school assuming that they do
graduate they have already witnessed 18 years of
unequal opportunity. An inferior education is one
of the measures of this inequality of opportunity.
This fact has not been entirely lost on some
university administrators in the South. The report
of the Southern Education Reporting Service, cited
earlier, named three southern institutions Florida
State, Virginia Tech, and the University of South
Carolina which had already adopted a moderate
policy of what the report termed positive
discrimination.

A Witch-Hunt On Research?

MR. EDITOR:

It was with regret that I noted
in Tuesdays Alligator that you
have taken a position against one
of the prized freedoms of the
individual on a university
campus. You have called the
University administrators to
deny the right of an individual
to conduct research on whatever
he chooses. Your reasons are
political. Because you object to

The Myth Os Campus Beauty

MR. EDITOR:
Last week we witnessed the quiet transition of
the Plant Pathology woods from a convenient,
roomy, and shady commuter parking lot to an ugly
HANDS OFF* array of vertical rails and horizontal
poles.
This is obviobsly another attempt to harass
students by forcing usage of Butts Botch, the
paved pasture from which we are told efficient
bussing will be available, and making payment of
the 1000% parking fee increase just as distasteful as
possible.
When the new plan was presented on WRUF-TV
last winter, the administration enumerated two
reasons for the increase. The first was to pay for
several studies which I believe were said to have cost
in excess of $46,000! They revealed that traffic and
parking congestion exists on and around the UF
campus.
The second reason: maintain a grassy and open
campus by eliminating ugly student and

Recruit Black Students To UF

the use of herbicides and other
chemicals in warfare, you seek
to impose your beliefs on others
by having the University deny
the right of members of its
community to conduct research
on chemical warfare.
If you succeed in your
objective, what is to prevent a
Christian Scientist from
terminating medical research?
I cannot help but fear that

FORUM:
{ A&na mi tJtAAWit J
no hnp* fnr tUa
Positive discrimination can be defined as an
attempt to balance the adverse discrimination which
a person may suffer in his formal education due to
conditions of life into which he was bom. This
concept applies not only to blacks but also to
whites who must accept an inferior system of
schooling in an economically backward area.
The UF, due to its recent efforts to recruit black
and economically disadvantaged white students who
do not completely meet all the technical
requirements for admission, has in effect, become
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiii
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, /
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The UF can, if it will, benefit both itself
and the state by the active recruitment of
black students.
llNlHitlMHilllMlllllilinHllflllllllUllllllllllllllllllflllllllllllllfllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllUll
the fourth state-supported university in the South
to adopt a moderate program of positive
discrimination.
Such a policy, in this state, is bound to come
under criticism even though the amount of
positive discrimination grant to these students is
very slight.
Opponents of positive discrimination might point
out, first, that such a policy will lower the quality
of the university. This is highly unlikely. In the first
place, a substantial number of students is not likely
to be admitted under the program, secondly, those

employee-driven automobiles.
It seems to me that if the Architecture
Department Chairman really is concerned with
campus beauty, he would try to correct at least the
most recent of the contradictions of this
openness concept: sentries and sentry shacks; a
wealth of restrictive hardware and signs; the
friendship walk-hole; big green unused
electioneering billboards; crude Florida sports
signs that have never promoted anything but clutter;
failure to remove a dozen or so vacated wood
building? on campus, inattendance to the dune
surrounding Towers Residence Halls; and that
battleground east of the Hub and extending to
Newell Drive that has seen no activity since the
wreckers left over a month ago.
Why should employees and students of this
university have to put up with such nonsensical
reasoning and Diesel bus fumes as well?
DONALD G. GUTTINGER, 6AG

your voice, added to that of
others at other universities that
have succeeded in your
objective, will engender a
witch-hunt like that in the days
of Joe McCarthy. Your
witch-hunt however, would be
directed toward weakening the
United States militarily.
* ARTHUR A. BROYLES
PROFESSOR OF PHYSICS AND
PHYSICAL SCIENCES

students who are admitted can deviate only slightly
from the normal minimum score mi the high school
placement which is required for admission here.
Thirdly, there is evidence that such placement
scores are irrelevant to the actual aptitude of
persons schooled in an inferior education system
and brought up outside the mainstream of American
culture.
Don Henderson, recently appointed to serve as
special assistant to Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale here for the summer, is an
illustration of this last point. A graduate of what he
has called one of the finest educational systems in
the nation he referred to a black Jacksonville
high school Henderson was not admitted to the
IF in 1963 because his placement test scores were
too low. He graduated from another university and
is now a second-year medical school student here.
Opponents of positive discrimination might also
point out that an influx of black students might
lead to such troubles here as have occurred at
Cornell, Columbia, and other universities. In fact,
some IF administrators are fearful of just that.
But these fears are probably unfounded. The
essentially conservative nature of this state and of
this campus would prevent such disturbances.
Second, the black students at this university, and
particularly the black leadership, has shown no
indination toward violence. The demands made by
black students on the steps of Tigert Hall last May
were reasonable, they were peacefully made, and
there was no threat of violence.
By positive discrimination, the UF would also be
realizing its responsibility to the lower economic
dasses of the state. Because the state legislature is
unwilling to touch industry and business for taxes,
the bulk of funds for education in Florida come
from consumer taxes those taxes which rest most
heavily on the lower economic classes, both black
and white. In other words, the lower classes are
paying the most for education, on all levels, and
getting the least benefits.
Finally, as some faculty members have said, black
students should be recruited to this campus as a
cultural resource. Since blacks form a fairly distinct
subculture in American society, black students can
be a cultural resource here just as international
students now are. White students can learn from
both black Americans and international students.
The UF can, if it will, benefit both itself and the
state by the active recruitment of black students.

- < J-
iH 11 agZjg&c
PMIw / Pi ]
"//ey, Man, Hes One Os Us!"

Tuaacfay, July 15.1969, Tin Florida A Wgter,

By Lee Hinnant

Page 7



I. Ttat Florfch AMptor, Tawhy, July 16,1969

Page 8

i Jill JTf- Ij||| I If
i II \ il ll llui |mu Hf I f ifMtf Ul'^'

Suz of California blends sugar E SI
and spice, and everything nice to wT M
make a doll of a dress with little v i
I girl charm and big girl -t \v
M sophistication. It's navy crepe
ffl with a generous sprinkling of % _/'
VI white polka dots, and a white
I sissy lace.
I your books and promise not to I '.* , .*'
S puli your In sizes 3-13, I
| modeled by Lynn.

jBQHN| SEARS 1
3" np>V,3 Simplicity is the key word for
BBHHB this cool, and casual skirt and I
£ .'r/fi *ir-i. f V' /- front pleats. Find this outfit in S
' I mix and match colors at Sears. W
Modeled by Gail.
il itijll I I

make the k
\ n sensationa

I THE UNIVERSITY SHOP N
I Bring back the glamorous mood r. |
i of the '3o's in this simple, but UM
sophisticated brown crepe dress l,yi
with fuller than full beige inset l J
ffl sleeves. To complete your image j *j|
add an accenting scarf to your *rj|
head, and you're in courtesy of -1
I The University Shop. Modeled l



mm mm m:

styles!

I B "' || j
j
$H wj ' *&.
JM| 4 r ajBKSy 3g|MHB s| y Wtfy yyp
w. ?>M

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\ Jfl \ : i|!: : -::: hi'hi ' I
\U& m-Miil 1 I
,B Pfr i 1
' f|M .MAASBROTHERS I
/ Don't get stopped short in the I
I\ jM \j | rain! Debutogs make I
j |pk fejgl puddle-jumping fun when you're I
\ \ mpm ?*3k mm wearing an ice blue all-weather 11
. m . m M- : i coat, trimmed with tortoise shell
A| J&dH bottons and buckle plus afc
zip-out lining for cooler days. W)
B Found in Junior Terrace.... If
\<] f $32 * Maas Brothers. Modeled I
by Brenda.
il, i I
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jaokuw,Muf&4ub by..
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;Tuwdiy, July 15,1969, The Florida AMptor,

I p |
Pi
,*-> I
FIGURE FAIR |
| Mad as Mod and very Tres Gay!
If fashion's your passion, then
obviously this is meant for you. I
Miss Elaine lounge wear in Mod
Colors. Pet, Sm., Med. price
$9.00. Modeled by Charlotte.
li illlMt I
1! j i iii; I
|t 1 V I 1 wrfi ui I Lj 1 i 11
hi

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE I
Sttu&mMamMttc&ezeww MftflftftwasssK
2 ROYAL standard typewriters. 1
elite, 1 pica like new. Cost $260 each
new. Just cleaned will sell for $125
each. Phone 378-6403 evenings after
six. (A-5M55-C)
808 JACKIE
HOPE GLEASON
SHOW YOU HOW
TO COMMIT MAMUSE.
janewiman
HOW TO COMMIT
MARRIAGE
ucHHicotw 'f:
f : Iwl 4& f
I A MINUTE TO PRAY, Mjn
J A SECOND TO DIE MW 1 ft
umtaeaum
Inextweek^jorrorl
OmiMviiik J
.* \
t entertainment!
Dick :
Van me j
*
I w w W W UfIAV I
to presciu
r"Su33 v 2
L Mil XW. Ilf* S. \*W/I
n last desparua effort to pr*vrt* World War 111 a secret
meeting I* arranged One man Is caled upon to succeod
tahera all the worid loaders ham tatted That man was once
a prisoner in a Russian labor camp. He la now the Pope
Anthony Quinn
Laurence Olivier n
Oskar Werner \!£zm I**]
David Janssen
and Metrocolor |

Pjtaalnii
Now you can enjoy America's
favorite pizza, Pizza Inn
Pizza prepared from a secrete VM \ v'
recipe, flavor baked to
perfection served fresh, hot and fnT~ \
delicious! Your choice of
cheese, olives, mushrooms, TctM|
peperoni, sausage, hamburger or
anchovies. Jt y ,f
Special
r f Good July 15 July 18
Utter nowonlyQQ^
Reg. $1.65
, . . Limit 2 Per Customer
Bnng mis ad
Open 7 days a week Dine
in or take out. Phone Orders
Ready in 10 minutes.
PJteaima
316 S.W. 16th Ave. 376-4521

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 15,1969

;v;v:-xvXvXvx-v-v.vx vx .-:-;-:*;;;
FOR SALE
* X
Zeiss binocular microscope, excellent
specifications, brand new, good for
med school, a real bargain, $795. Call
376-9551. (A-st-T55-p)
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESSI 40%
OFF TO STUDENTS. 2-Drawer
suspension files, list for $49.50, you
pay $29.70. JR Office Furniture Co.
620 S. Main St. Phone 376-1146.
(A-5M55-C)
1961 Plymouth radio heater aircond.
Call 376-8615 between 4:00 and
8:00 week-days anytime weekends.
$375 or best offer. (A-3t-157-r)
STEREO Must sell, need bread! Top
quality, like new. Garrard, Electro
Voice Utah. S2OO. Call Dave at
372-1272. (A-st-157-p)
1967 YAMAHA YR l-350cc touring.
Many extras. New SIOOO. S3OO cash
and assume payments. Call Jeff at
378-5311 ext. 25. (A-2t-157-p)
Windmill Class Sailboat complete
with new Gator trailer $650.
372-3333. (A-4t-157-p)
AFRICAN basenji barkless (dog),
male AKC, planned breeding for
show, loving temperament, whelped
1/19/69, SSO below cost. Call
376-4103. (A-st-157-p)
Garage sale household items
including furniture and some
antiques. 244-A Flavet 111 U. of F.
Campus. July 12 & 13. (A-lt-157-p)
stereo, gerrard, 110 w amp, 2 months
old, am-fm stereo tuner, new $425,
will sell $275, need money. Call
392-7532 after 7 p.m. or 808 Tower
B. (A-2M58-P)
TR 3 1962 going on the block (block
is busted). Good tires, body, top.
S2OO or best offer. 376-1850.
(A-2t-158-P)
!PP*2J NOW!
I JOHN WAYNE
GLEN CAMPBELL
KIM DABBY
lIH
HURRY!
LAST 3 DAYS
"FINIANS
RAINBOW

: iwaniwaK
FOR RENT j
#x->x-x*x-jxsvxx^x*:.x.nnnsWS
Uni vers ityAptsjustnorthof Research
L i b .2 sizeseff.,2styleslbdrm.and2bdr
m .a lla.c.,swimmingpool,cablet.v.3qtr
. Lea seQuarterlyratesyearlyaverage7s
-12 0/mo. 37 6
(B-12T-158-P)
Air conditioned room quiet Golfview
subdivision bordering campus.
Limited kitchen priviledges. 521 S.W.
2 7th St. Phone 376-5849.
(B-6M56-P)
A few units of privacy remain at LA
MANCHA for the fall. See
Gainesvilles newest apartment idea
nearing completion at the corner of
SW Bth Ave & 9th St. Rental trailer
open on the site 3-5 p.m. T uesdays,
Thursdays and Fridays. Phone
372-2662 for info. (B-3t-157-P)
RANCH STYLE LIVING two br.
apt. large closets & tile bath. Fully
panelled & AC, use of pool & BBQ
house Walking distance of new golf
course to be opened this summer.
Sorry no children no pets. $l5O per
mo. Call 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-st-155-p)
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)
| wanted" H
SEX! CLO has gone coed for the
summmer. If you are looking for an
inexpensive place to stay near
campus were it! Room & 3 meals
a day for S6O a month. Space also
available for fall. Stop by 117 N.W.
15 st. or call Kim or Paul at
378-9420. (C-st-155-p)
One male roommate wanted for
University Gardens one bedroom or
sublet whole apt. Air conditioned
pool carpeting. Call 372-5921 or
378-4565. (C-3t-156-p)
HELP WANTED |
jv.wxx'x'x-x-xo.xxrxvx^-x^x-jww*:*::^
Listeners wanted will pay $2.25
for lVz session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Univ. ext. 2-2049
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. (E-st-157-p)
AUTOS 1
67 VW excellent condition transistor
radio new tires $1295 or best offer.
Call 372-0939. (G-2t-157-p)
1966 MGB excellent condition new
exhaust system and rings. Good tires.
Luggage rack, racing mirror, tonneau
top and boot. 26 mpg. Only $1550.
Call 376-4962. (G-2t-156-p)
1962 Rambler station wagon AC,
radio 40,000 miles. Needs minor
repair. Best offer accepted. 378-6843
anytime except July 4 & 5.
(G-st-156-p)
1965 Rambler American automatic
transmission radio heater 4-door
white walls excellent condition. Very
clean. Must sell. Make offer. Call
372-2317. (G-st-157-p)
6 7 Valiant Signet, 4dr, R, H,
automatic, powersteering, white,
$1650 or best offer. Call Ananth
376-0770, 376-1545, 5 to 8 pm or
before 8:30 am. (G-4t-157-p)
| PERSONAL |
.s.:.nnsyx > xw*:.>sns*x*x*x*n;xyx*x?
Worlds largest Paper Mill has
positions available now for Chemical,
Mechanical and Industrial Engineers.
Career Representative of Union
Camp Corporation. will be
interviewing at the Placement Office
Wednesday, July 9. (J-3t-156-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear an electronic
factorial. Any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING 16 NW 7th
Avenue. (J-Bt-158-P)
SMITE
LAST
TIMES
THE TWO PART
PRODUCTION OF 117AÂ¥1
LEO TOLSTOY S VTlll\r
7:00 fflul
ONLY! PEACE
* COIOH aiaoio Co>i|aiM f

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11\_ TUESDAY SPECIAL |i
FRIED I
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||| CARE TO EAT X X y |M
H WEDNESDAY SPECIAL |||
||| LUNCH AND DINNER ||||
1 JUMBO CHOPPED 1
I STEAK 0i 1
H WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY OuC HI
M AND YELLOW RICE |||
I MORRISON'S I
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j||
FINAL TWO DAYS
"RUN, ANGEL, RUN"
and "PLAVGIRL KILLER"
STARTS THURSDAY'
Youve got to see ft ...to believe it!!!
jWfIPvSBMIE9L
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tefancis Edmond flEmn . lames Greoori i
PLUS CO-FEATURE CLASSIC
'THE WAR WAGON
JOHN WAYNEKIRK DOUGLAS



Orange and

address all campus calendar
notices to public functions
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Administrative Notices

GOLF LESSONS: Beginning
July 1, B.E. "Buster" Bishop,
new Golf Club pro, will be
available for private and group
lessons at the University Golf
Club. Appointments can be
made by calling 392-0689.
Individual, 30 minute lessons,
including shag boy, are $5.50. A
series of five individual lessons,
30 minutes each, including shag
boy, costs $22.50. Group
lessons, eight lessons with six per
group, including shag boy, are
S2O.
GRADUATE STUDY
ABROAD: L 970-71 competition
for scholarships for graduate
study abroad is now open to
seniors and graduate students
below doctoral level.
Opportunities have been reduced
in number but information
brochures and application forms
are available from the Fulbright
Program Advisor, Internation
Center, south of Walker
Auditorium. The last date for
applying is October 25.

CLASSIFIEDS

I PERSONAL
s
Seeking coed interested in different
kind of summer, john 378-0313 after
7 p.m. (J-lt-158-P)
| LOST A FOUND |
w^WWWWiWCWCSSS!S!iSS?i*W W*W*W X/
Found: Weimeraner puppy with
chain collar. NW section. Call
378-0036. (L-3M57-NC)
Lost at pool. Mans gold Signet ring.
Reward open. 378-5626 after 10
p.m. Great sentimental value.
(L-4M58-P)
SERVICES |
TYPING ALL SUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. IBM ELECT. TYPEWRITER
TYPE IN MY HOME. CALL
376-7809. (M-st-156-p)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 w. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)

On All Loans...
Low Interest Rates Still Available

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Q A
sth Avenue at the comer of 12th Street Hours : 800 am.- 3:30 Pw^MondayjhroughFndgy W__WJ

PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, July 22,
at 7 p.m. in Little 101 and 109.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST
for Sections 134, 135, 136 and
T 37 will be given Wednesday,
July 23, at 7 p.m. in Little 101
and 109.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST
AND FINAL for sections 140,
143 and 146 will be given
Wednesday, July 23, at 7 p.m. in
Little 207, 233 and 235.
CPS 121 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, July 24,
at 7 p.m. in Little 101 and 109.
CPS 122 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, July 24,
at 7 p.m. in Little 203 and 205.
CPS 123 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, July 24,
at 7 p.m. in Little 235, 237 and
239.

SERVICES
My office's small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
519V2 SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-155-2t-p)
Experienced drummer wants work in
local rock band. Knowledge of all
types rock. Call 378-3191 after 5 pm.
(M-4t-157-p)
IRONING DONE 10c TO 15c A
PIECE CALL 372-1688. N.W.
SECTION. (M-2t-157-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-157-c)
DATA PROCESSING SERVICES
PROGRAMMING, SYSTEMS
ANALYSIS AND CONSULTING
Scientific or Commercial.
CONTACT: Jack Stephens
COMPUTER MANAGEMENT
CORPORATION 378-1615.
(M-st-157-p)
MILLIONS of rugs have been
cleaned with Blue Lustre. Its
America's finest. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(M-lt-158-P)
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)

BLUE BULLETIN

Monday Friday Saturday Sunday
College Library* Bam ll pm Bam ll pm 2pm ll pm
Research Library Bam ll pm Bam ll pm 2pm ll pm
PKY Lib. of Florida History B:3oamspm Closed Closed
Special Collections B:3oaml2N
lpm spm Closed Closed
Architecture & Fine Arts Library Bam spm
Arch. & Fine Arts Building 7pm lO pm Bam l2 N lO pm
Chemistry Library Bam spm Bam l2 N spm
216 Leigh Hall 7 pm 10 pm ** Ipm 4ppi 7pm 10 pm
- - i
Education Library Bam lo:3opm ** Bam spm 2pmlo:3opm
341 Norman Hall
Engineering & Physics Library Bam spm 9am l2 N spm
410 Engineering Building 7pm lO pm Ipm 4ppfi 7pm lO pm
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R. 8 am 5 pm
305 Florida Gymnasium 6 pm- 10 pm*** Bam l2 N
Health Center Library
Med. Sci. Bldg. LlO2 Bam -12 M 8:30 pm-spm 2pm -12 M
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall 8 am-11 pm Bam spm 7pm -11 pm
Journalism & Communication R. R. Bam spm
Stadium 337 7pm -10 pm *** Bam l2 N
Law Library Bam -11 pm Bam ll pm B:3oam llpm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School
Library) Yonge Bldg. F Bam l2 N Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Office at Bam spm Closed Closed
Record Room Bam l2 N, 1-5 pm, spm
The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nights from 11pm-12M
* The Chemistry and Education Libraries close at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
** The Reading Rooms close at 5:00 p.m. onFriday nights.
Campus Calendar

Tuesday, July 15
Phi Chi Theta: Self-defense
demonstration, 346 Union, 7
p.m. 9 p.m.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Wednesday, July 16
Music Dept: Outdoor Twilight
Concert, University Aud.
Lawn, 6:45 p.m.
Philosophy Lecture: Mr. Joseph
Waller will speak on Black
Liberation," at the Union
Aud. at 8 p.m.
Ruth High Excursion Group
Dance Presentations,
University Aud., 8 p.m.

;| |||JjjK Jl M HS Hf' -4; I j wj

Tuesday, July 15, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
Schedule
Summer, 1969

Friday, July 18
Music Dept: Florida Woodwind
Quintet & The Faculty Brass
Trio, Union Aud., 4 p.m.
Union Dance: 'The Opposite
Sexes" will play on the Union
Terrace starting at 9 p.m.

Page 11



Page 12

!, Th Florida Alligator, Tuasday, July 15,1969

Profs Express Uneasiness
Over Teacher Evaluation

By JIM CONGLETON
Alligator Staff Writer
A general feeling of uneasiness
seems to be the main roadblock
for Omicron Delta Kappas
teaching evaluation program,
says Fred Breeze, the programs
chairman.
Breeze said many teachers are
uncomfortable about the
evaluation because they believe
the questionnaire is inadequate
and unreliable that it doesnt
help the course or teaching
techniques.
He also said some teachers
feel once the results are
computed, they will be
published and could hurt the
teachers professional
reputation.
Breeze refutes the contention,
saying the evaluation results are
kept strictly confidential.
The only results published
are those relating to the course
itself, he said.
Breeze emphasized course
results do not reflect on the
teachers personal or
professional qualities.
Dr. William Purkey, associate
professor of education and a
member of the Presidents
Committee on Teaching
Evaluation, agrees that some
teachers see the evaluation
program as a threat.
I believe that we must
emphasize the positive aspects of
teaching evaluation, he said.
We must tell what it can do to

Classroom Behavior
Lecture Slated Today
Dr. Robert S. Soar, UF professor of education, will speak today at
1:30 p.m. in Norman Hall Auditorium on Systematic Observation of
Classroom Behavior.
Systematic observation is an observation schedule which helps to
identify certain kinds of behavior and their repetition, Soar explains.
Usually more than one observer is sent to a classroom.
Presently involved in research work on classroom behavior; Soar
noted the uses of systematic observation.
By a comparison of what classrooms are like versus a measure of
pupil growth, the effects of teaching behavior can be more clearly
seen, Soar has said. Also; the information taken through systematic
observation can give the teacher feedback on the effect of his own
teaching.

W a
|BHHHk P§||||'lN >l l* : Vv!T*sJHf /m& m
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ORCHESIS MODERN DANCE GROUP
ADMISSION: FREE
Wed., July 16, 8:00 p.m. University Auditorium

improve teaching.
Purkey said the evaluation
program puts teaching in a new
light.
It helps all teachers to be
aware of the process of
teaching, he said.
Purkey believes the evaluation
program will take hold at UF
and become a very useful tool in
the future. The College of
Education has had it for years,
he said.
There has been a large effort
in the past either to request all
teachers to participate in the
evaluation program once a year
or to have each college develop
its own teaching evaluation
program.
The Action Conference
recommended in 1968 that all
teaching faculty participate once
a year in a teaching evaluation
program.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell later appointed a
nine-member faculty committee
on teaching evaluation to make
recommendations for
implementing the Action
Conference proposal.
The committee has made its
recommendations and submitted
them to Vice President for
Academic Affairs Fred Conner,
but no action has been taken on
those recommendations.
It has been suggested that
each college make its own
teaching evaluation program.
Some members of the
Presidents Committee on

Jjjy
*'
* BREEZE
.. results confidential'
Teaching Evaluation believe that
pressure is building for the
faculty to do more
self-evaluation.
Although there has been
much controversy over the
matter, the evaluation
completed so far has proven very
successful, according to Fred
Breeze.
Breeze explained that a
follow-up questionnaire is sent
to each teacher who participates
in the program.
This questionnaire asks such
questions as what the teacher
thought of the evaluation, how
the evaluation questionnaire
itself can be improved, and how
the results have helped the
teacher.
Breeze said most teachers find
the results very helpful,
especially those who take it for
the first time.
As a result, many teachers
have changed text books, course
outlines and topics, and course
goals.
Breeze said two major
projects for the future are an
evaluation of all C-courses,
including 100- and 200-level
courses, and a booklet giving
complete course descriptions
and requirements.

Miss Florida Is UM Coed

ORLANDO A 20-year-old.
hazel-eyed brunette ended her
own personal two-year quest for
the Miss Florida title here
Saturday night.
Lynne Topping, a University
of Miami drama student, last
years Miss Florida first runner
up. was chosen over a field of 41
at final ceremonies in the

SG Helps In Baby Sitter Hunt
Student Governments office of student services is organizing a
baby-sitter referral service.
Anyone interested in babysitting may register by supplying
necessary information in the SG offices on the third floor of the Reitz
Union.
Wishbone
There s a new Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Store at
704 S. W. 2nd Avenue or 16th Ave. at S. Main Street.
mmmm ^
Half-priee to
roll eye sludenls and
family:
Ihe neu'spaper that
netrspaper people
read, .
s
At last-count, we had more than 3,800 news newspaper
paper newspaper editors on our list of subscribers to The
Christian Science Monitor. Editors from all
over the world.
There is a good reason why these pros read
the Monitor : the Monitor is the worlds only
daily international newspaper. Unlike local
papers, the Monitor focuses exclusively on
world news the important news.
The Monitor selects the news it considers
most significant and reports it, interprets it,
analyzes it in depth. It takes you further into
the news than any local paper can.
If this is the kind of paper you would like to
be reading, we will send it to you right away at
half the regular price of $26.00 a year.
Clip the coupon. Find out why newspaper newspapermen
men newspapermen themselves read the Monitor and why
they invariably name it as one of the live best
papers in the wo*\d.
The Christian Science Monuou
h t)(,. 11 S i,v nti.r.- 4*4 JC
I The Christian Science Monitor i
;Circulation, P.O. Box 96, Gainesville, Fla. 32601 :
: Please enter a Monitor subscription for the name below I
jl am enclosing $ (U.S. funds) for the period 1 j
| checked. 1 year sl3 9 mos. $9.75 6 mos. s6.soNj
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Orlando Municipal Auditorium.
The 5-foot-5.110-pound Miss
Dade County edged out first
runner up Karen Peterson. Miss
Florida State University. Miss
Topping impressed the board of
judges with a toe and ballet
dance. Former Miss America
Vonda Van Dyke emceed the
final ceremonies.



Dome Folds, Divided Up

B y ANGELA RACKLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
The geodesic dome endures
no more.
The 35 wooden structure
which towered over the
Architecture and Fine Arts
building was torn down recently,
after withstanding a rather
lengthy temporary test of
time.
The S3OO dome was
fabricated as a structures project
by five UF graduating seniors in
September of 1968.
The former students, Robin
Bosco, Bill Pauley, Charles
Sieger, Dick Barrett and Jim
Lloyd, worked on it four days,
around the clock.
They built it to see if it
would stand. Lucky for them it
Students At Work

BECKY WARDEN
.. .receives a lesson in molecular model construction
THE CENTER
of MAN
Lecture on Man Series
Thursday, July 17, Self-Disclosure, Considered and Re-considered
Sidney Jourard
Center of Modem Art, Micanopy
Weekend Encounter Group
July 26-27, Communications Laboratory for Teachers
Dr. Wayne Richard
Write CENTER of MAN
P.O. Box 106
Micanopy, Florida
Center For Modern Art

Micanopy

did, and they passed their
structures course. Lucky for
people walking around and
under it, and well, anyhow.
So why did it come down?
Marvin Collins, 6AS, lent a
hand in building the dome.
Some of the structural
members broke, and money
could not be obtained to put it
back in stable condition,
Collins said.
Architecture Chairman
Arnold F. Butt said the dome
was getting quite dangerous as
it was not only heavy, but also
deteriorating.
I had visions of the thing
collapsing, he said.
Collins asked for and got half
the dome. He is using his share
of the wood' and bolts to help

build* a Vista playground in
High Springs.
UF got the other half,
because it helped pay for the
dome to begin with. Butt said
UF had hoped someone would
be interested in buying its half
of the wood, but so far no one
has.
Now UF is stuck with it.
Collins predicted the wood
will probably sit and rot.
Butt would like to see one
nice tree go up in place of the
dome. What will actually go up,
probably sometime this fall, is
anybodys guess.
Undergrads
Do Research
Twelve weeks of summer
research in chemistry for college
undergraduates is underway
currently in the UF Department
of Chemistry.
Seventeen seniors from
Florida, New Jersey, North
Carolina and Wisconsin
universities are engaged in
individual research projects in
analytical, inorganic, nuclear,
organic, physical or quantum
chemistry under the direction
of one of 25 research directors.
Each student is allotted $720
by the National Science
Foundation and by Proctor &
Gamble.
The prir/iaiy goal to
introduce students to techniques
of research and strengthen the
UF undergraduate research
program. In addition to original
research, and reports by the
students on their work, the
schedule includes
Monday-evening seminar sessions
with University researchers and
two representatives of Proctor &

TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
11AM TO 9PM
LONDON BROIL STEAK
FRENCH FRIES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
HOT ROLLS BUTTER Q gy
1225 W. UNIV. AVE I
/}& 1/2 BLOCK from CAMPUS
WE HAVE SPECIALS EVERY DAT
11AM TO 9PM
MONDAY 14 SHRIMP IN BASKET F.F, Cole Slaw I
WEDNESDAY- CLAM DINNER F.F., Cole Slaw I
T HURSDAY- LONDON BROIL -F.F, Chopped Salad I
FRIDAY- ROAST BE? F.F.,Cble Slaw
9 1225 W. UNIV. AVE. M
'/j BLOCK from CAMPUS f f

~ **""' <'%'&'' ? :>* iirtiMna,
M Jlfc :.
[ M**y "yi|WU^MMMMi^P|^ l A, 1
DOUG CASE
THE DOME ENDURES NO MORE
... Wood goes to UF and students
The Florida Alligator

Gamble and Tennessee Eastman,
subsidary of Eastman Kodak.
Participants form UF are
Thomas P. Skordas from
Clearwater, Jack T. McCown
Jr., and Rebecca L. Warden from

Tuesday, July 16,1968, The Florid* Affigetor,

Gainesville, Judith E. Durham
from lighthouse Point, James T.
Pfleuger from Maitland, James P.
Bennett from St. Petersburg, and
Claude A. Harmon from West
Palm Beach.

Page 13



Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 15,1969

Hardin Sentimental Over Family

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
It is not at all difficult to give
up any hope of developing a
sense of community within the
structure of contemporary
American society.
Tim Hardin has given up
hope, and reverted back to a
more primitive, easily manage manageable
able manageable social unit the family.
In his first Columbia release,
Suite for Susan Moore and
Da mi on We Are One, One,
All in One, he traces the
history of his family from his
initial involvement with Susan to
the birth of their son Damion.
The songs on the album are
broken down into
implications one, two and
three.
Implication I leads off with
First Love Song, the only love
song Hardin ever sang, according
to the lyrics. The hard white
blues emphasizes the pain and
Co-op Grocery
In Planning
By LYNN PARSONS
Alligator Staff Writer
UF students may soon have
an alternative to going
off-campus for groceries
sometime in the future.
Student Government has
plans for a campus co-op that
will provide food and clothing
for UF students at lower prices
than most stores off-campus. SG
is currently investigating the
success of co-ops on other
campuses across the country.
At present, there is a grocery
co-op located in Flavets Married
Housing, but, according to
Undersecretary of Student
Services Ralph Glatfelter, the
planned co-op will be much
larger.
In essence, it will be a
7-11, Glatfelter said, only we
will be trying to sell a greater
divergency of products at lower
prices. The idea behind the
co-op is convenience for the
students.
SG will not try to make a
profit from the store, he said.
The co-op will simply attempt to
break even.
We need help, though,
Glatfelter stated. We need
volunteers who are majoring in
architecture, engineering and
business administration, but
anyone who wishes to help will
be welcome.
A site for the co-op has not
yet been designated.
Hava
Your Generator
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strain of his initial courtship
with Susan, and provides
impetus for a good deal of finger
popping in the process.
Next comes, Everything
Good Becomes More True, in
which Hardin tastefully relates
his first love-making with Susan.
It is a good cut for two reasons:
Hardins poetry excels, and the
romantic electronic piano
merges with and becomes an
impressionistic liturgical grand
organ line which suggests church
time in small town America.
Implication II begins with a
talking liturgical blues, in which
Hardin raises all of the pertinent
parental problems and
misgivings, i.e. how to raise the
child in an absurd world in
which parents themselves are
still growing. The iron-lyrical
lecture above the muted
keyboard is at once too didactic
and too sentimental.
Once Touched by Flame is

Center I The Maltese Bippy, with Martin and Rowan. The
preview promises silly disconnectedness. 1:06, 2:48,4:30,6:12,
7:58,9:46.
Center II Shoes of the Fisherman, with Anthony Quinn
made tight-lipped, and a lot of footage for educational tv. 2:30,
5:30,8:30.
Florida Chitty, Chitty, Bang Bang, with Dick Van Dyke,
Sally Ann Howes and Lionel Jeffries. Lots of travel. Light. 2,5,
8 p.m.
Gainesville How to Commit Marriage, with Bob Hope and
Jackie Gleason. Very funny in spots, unmerciful to all parties in
the generation gap. A little thick with the slapstick at times, but
fun evening. 8:57. A Minute to Pray, a Second to Die, with
Robert Ryan. 10:52. Opening Wednesday, Nightmare in Wax
with Cameron Mitchel and Ann Helm. 8:52. Blood of Dracula
Castle, with John Carradine and Paula Raymond, 10:47.
Plaza I True Grit, with John Wayne, Glenn Campbell. Kim
Darby does a great job. A movie about heroism, and very nice
indeed. 2,4:33, 7:05,9:37.
Plaza II Finians Rainbow, with Fred Astaire, Petula Clark.*
Musical. 1:55,4:24,6:58,9:30.
State War and Peace, Part Two, 7 pjn.
Suburbia Drive-In Run Angel, Run. 9:05. Playgirl Killer,
10:55.
Union To Cash Checks
>
Students may now cash personal checks over the weekend at the
Reitz Union.
As a service to students and visitors, the guest desk on the ground
floor will cash checks for amounts in increments of $5, sls, or $25.
This special function is not extended to two party or payroll
checks.
Due to the limited amount of money, Union officials hope
students will cash no more than one check a day. Checks may be
cashed during regular Union hours.
Student Senate Meeting Changed:
Lawmakers To Take Up Budget
The Student Senate will not meet tonight as previously planned.
Postponed until Thursday evening, the meeting is to concern itself
with the budget. Copies of the proposed budget will be available at
room 349 in Reitz Union. Caucuses begin at 7 p.m. Thursday night in
room 349 of the Union.
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

a good mixture of romantic
piano and church organ in which
Hardin drives home the point
that he doesnt need the world
because his family satisfies him.
The second sid£* opens with
the Magician, the only
negative cut in the album.
Hardin tells the story of the
Emperor whose cup is
overflowing still his old lady
must dream of sex he only
knows whos next.
Hardins familial isolation is

reemphasized in The Country
Im Living In. It begins with
anti-war, discontented,
America is down and out with
no help for recovery which is
part and parcel of todays
protest music, but then breaks
and goes into Hardins
description of the metaphysical
country he is living in with his
family, somewhere closer to the
sun.
The final cut on the album,
One, One, the Perfect Sum
Susan, is about ten minutes
long. The same line is sung over
and over again, although it is
broken every two minutes or so
for a new musical structure.
378-57241
DIC HdNli
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necessary. But the ratings can't all be wrong.
GODDING & CLARK
"Home of the New Leader"
2nd Ave. & 2nd St., S.E. 378-2311 I

The album is refreshing and
disappointing. Some of the
instrumental blending between
the electric piano and organ is
very well handled, and it is a
nice switch to hear someone
who grew up in the
contemporary folk idiom to get
off the overworked death and
destruction soapbox. Yet the
album is gushy. Some of
Hardins lyrics, especially in
some of the telling cuts are just
too sentimental. But that may
be the logical fate of anyone
who is trying to be optimistic in
America.
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
NORTH OF Kl/j
THE MALL
T 76-4852 A UTHORIZED
3/ dealer
Open til 7 p.m. nightly



ff)PS WESTERN OPEN

Melnyk: All American

By TOM EASON
Alligator Sports Editor
UF golf star Steve Melnyk
rounded out his college career
with his second consecutive
first-team All-American
selection. Melnyk and Wake
Forests Jack Lewis were the
only two repeaters from last
years team.
The team was selected
Saturday by a panel of NCAA
golf coaches.
Steve was chosen on what he
accomplished this season, said
UF golf coach, Buster Bishop:
He won five major tournaments
this year as well as his
outstanding play at the NCAA
tournament at Colorado Springs.
He well deserves the honor and
Im very proud of him.
Others chosen to the first
team were Bob Clark, California
State at Los Angeles; Joe Inman
Jr., Wake Forest; Drue Johnson,
Arizona; John Mahaffey,
Houston; Wayne McDonald,
Indiana; and Gary Sanders,
Southern California.
The team will be honored at a
banquet at the Waldorf Astoria
Hotel July 29 in New York.
Melnyk will take a break from
the AAU golf tour to attend the
affair.
Saturday also produced a
Melnyk victory at the Western
Amateur Golf championship
being held in Rockford, ID.
Melnyk downed a strong
Howard Twitty, Phoenix, Ariz.

UF-Tech In 7B

UF and Georgia Tech will
resume their football rivalry
with a four-game series
beginning in 1978, Gator
Athletic Director Ray Graves
announced Saturday.
The two teams have not met
in a regularly scheduled game
since Tech shut out the Gators
in 1963, 9-0. The Gators did
play Tech in the Orange Bowl in
1967, grinding out a 27-12
victory in the nationally
televised encounter. This was the
last game super-stars Steve
Spurrier and Larry Smith played
together. Smith had one of the
best performances of his career
that evering.
The home-and-home series
will begin on Oct. 28, 1978, in
V f Help run the
, & JnitedSu,,esArn, > t
I lie Womens Arm> Corps
Jr
0r "* information without obhgotion Mil out and mail this coupon to:
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'MI VUGINIA AVI., COUiGf IAII, GA 30117
Hi*.
City
Zip
~ !' 11 ~

m? lip
wmmmm
STEVE MELNYK
... repeat All-American
and the University of Arizona, 3
and 1 for the championship.
Melnyk never trailed in
Saturdays match even though
Twitty evened the match with a
birdie on the seventh hole.
Melnyk regained the lead on the
par five eight hole by sinking a
four foot putt for his birdie.
Twitty never evened the match.
Melnyk will play AAU golf all
summer before returning to the
UF for his final graduating
quarter. He is expected to follow
other past UF golf greats onto
the pro tour.

Atlanta and will return to
Gainesville in 79.
The Gators and the Rambling
Wreck havei met 34 times with
the Gators trailing seven wins
against 22 losses and five ties.
It is a pleasure to get
together with Coach Bobby
Dodd on this series being
resumed, said Graves. I think
this should be a natural because
of the proximity of fans of both
teams to both Atlanta and
Gainesville.

V Climb aboard W
nlhe S.S. Winnjammer* j*
i Meals served from 11:00 AM to /i
L Midnight
'i Bernie Sher //
r at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday 11
l Oysters 8t clams on the half shell f 1 )
Michelob on draft 0
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty A
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager 1/
520 S.W. 2nd Ave. .fl
Reservations Accepted l\\


Graduation
Dips Deep
Into UF Golf
UFs golf coach Buster Bishop
will find himself in a lean
position next season as he loses
the services of four starters.
All-Americans John Darr and
Steve Melnyk and two other
regulars. Hal Hutchinson and
John Sales will be gone.
However Bishop has already
started a rebuilding program. He
has recruited two outstanding
golfers in Mike Killian, a transfer
from the University of Houston
and Jerry Curtis, a prep star
from the state of Washington.
Killian, who will be eligible in
March, has three years of elig eligibility
ibility eligibility remaining. Curtis will be
entering as a freshman.
Returning lettermen are
Robert Baggs. Wendell Coffee.
Mike Estridge. Jay Horton. Tony
Kindred. Mark Landrum. Ron
Mahood and Andy North.
The Gators will be out to
avenge its second place finish in
the SEC tournament at the
hands of the Georgia Bulldogs.
I-M Deadlines
The deadline for entering
intramural tennis, handball, or
three-man basketball is Friday at
5 p.m. If you desire to
participate in any of these
activities call 392-0581 or drop
by R oom 229 Florida Gym.
Mixed bowling deadline will
be the following Tuesday.
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS SALES-SERVICEREPAIRS j
M TRIUMPH
Good Service Starts
At
CRANE IMPORTS
506 East Univeisity 372-4373

^

n
I Maryland
FBIED CHICKEN]

I TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
baldwij^^A
1 STARKE, FLORIDA l^Sj|]
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER \lf
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
AINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
MAN L
ON THE nm
miinJ
jv'v
wot ''-- asvw. v/ ..... *rr -y |il| . iioyr'?r W

Tuesday, July 15,1969, The Florida Alligator,

H l I 'MlwiX'l
g WITH THIS COUPON ONE §
| COMPLETE $1.15 CHICKEN 2
g DINNER 1
1 COUPON GOOD l UES. 24th & §
§ WED. 25th FOR IN §
i STORE PURCHASE 11
zmmvmrnM
516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET

Page 15



i. The Florida Algator, Tuesday, July 15,1969

Page 16

Summer Softball Smashing

By Alligator Services
Simmer League softball got
off to a smashing start this week
with most teams scoring in the
double figures.
Last Monday, a
perennially-tough Flavet Tiger
team withstood an 11-nin MBA
third inning to defeat the
business masters 19-14. Bob
Harry led the way with five hits.
Spur and Sickle slashed their
way by Physics 16-6 as Gary
Copps two home runs paved the
way.
The 13th St. Gang mobbed
the Civil Engineers 24-6 as Rick
Kirby paced a 28-hit thumping
with five hits. Murphree F, in
the biggest scoring game of the

WSiSiS^r
WHIimII i
Wr% __ jmhjm hm|||h t-
I ImM I
FOOTBALLER TOM WHITEHURST
hammers 3-run homer
All Stars Play Aug. 2

The final touches are being
added to the 21st annual Florida
Athletic Coaches Association
Clinic and all-star football and
basketball games scheculed in
Gainesville, July 31 through
Aug. 2.
The coaching clinic will begin
July 31 with Vanderbilts Coach
Bill Pace, heading the football
portion of the program.
Abe Lemons, basketball coach
at Oklahoma City University,
will conduct the basketball
clinic.
The three-day clinic will be
held at the Reitz Union. It will
end Aug. 2 with the playing of
the 21st annual aQ-star games.
The North-South basketball
squads will meet Aug. 2 at 4
p.m. in Florida Gym, while the
football teams start their action
on Florida Field at 7:45 pjn.
Cary McDonald, Executive
Secretary for the Coaches
Association, announced several
changes in the North and South
rosters.
The South football changes:
Mike Rosinski, 6-1,225-pounder
from Hollywood has
replaced defensive tackle Brad
Bisson of Clearwater. Gordon
Ready, 6-1, 220-pounder has
replaced linebacker Gary Mills of
South Dade. Ron Chadwick, a
6-0, 200-pounder from Fort
Lauderdale Nova has replaced
defensive back Pete Russert of
Hollywood Chaminade.
The North football changes:
Robert Miller, 5-8, 145-pounder
from Daytona Beach Mainland
has replaced flanker Mike Oven
of Tallahassee Leon and
quarterback Jack Standridge, a

year, trounced the Red 29-26.
The Braves scalped the Bulldogs
17-8.
The Silver Streaks raced past
the Aeros 8-2 behind Juan
Montes* three hits. Baseballer
Guy McThenys 3 base hits led
the Subterranean Circus to an
11-3 rout of Injury and Disease.
Howard Sanders engineered ENE
to a 15-7 victory over the
Busadmen with four base hits.
Delta Chi rushed by Reid Hall
28-12.
Gresham Drugs 19 hits put
the Pedagogs to sleep 21-6 as
Skip McDonald had two
homeruns. In the best display of
offense and defense, the
Tuttlingers crushed Guidance
Institute 12-0 behind Jim

6-3, 200-pounder from Williston
has replaced Kelly Belote of
Starke.
TURN
OFF
SUMMER
C A"R"A^
uto sir coftdftfcmlng
FIRST...and itill lift
cost* Mtt than factory afr
GODDING A CLARK
MOTORS
2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E.
378-2311
OPEN 8 P.M. MON.-SAT.

OConnors 2-hit pitching and
Millard Nxons two homeruns, a
double and a single.
On Wednesday, the Bulldogs
evened their record at 1-1 by
chewing Injury and Disease 7-3.
AU-campus pitcher Bill
Manderville now playing
shortstop had four hits. MBA
slipped by Pi Kappa Phi 9-8
behind Bob Bell's two hits. Jim
Andrews had three hits for the
losers who committed seven
errors. Tom Bell tripled and
scored the winning run in the
bottom of the seventh as the
Subterranean Circus made it two
in a row with a 5-4 squeaker
over 13th St. Gang. Tom
Whitehurst led the Circus with a
three-run homer. Microbiology
drove Murphree F buggy with a
13-0 trouncing.
In other action the Braves ran
their record to 2-0 with an 8-2
massacre over the D.T.s. James
McClaves three hits paced the
Silver Streaks to an 8-3 win over
Busadmen. ENE scored four
times in the sixth and held on
for a 9-7 win over the red-faced
R eds who committed four
errors. Phil Bierbaum had four
hits for the winners who are 2-0.
Marty Davis slugged three
homeruns to direct the Leftover
Lammies to a 12-5 romp over
I.EE.E

The $ L 25
Chicken dinner
that costs 99*
Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Stores everywhere will be
serving their usual crisp and juicy fried chicken at an unusual price. Only 1
99 golden brown potato pancakes. Not to mention the three plump pieces of K
delicious, tender Wishbone Fried Chicken. Check for the Wishbone store I
nearest you. 1
Special Price in Effect July 15 and 16 Only I
At These Wishbone Stores: I
704 S.W. Second Avonuo 16th Avenue at S. Main St.l
I

IT W liF's REPRESENTATIVES
~~ Jim Bartlett John Potocki
l^w.crcMa stc L George Corl Skip Lujack I
Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Unhr. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
I FBlTOlt 11 MtllilMUlil I
Trantyin-lIKKUM OPTICIANS
22 West University Ave., Gainesville, Fla. Phone 376-3516
WELCOME ALL U of F PERSONNEL
I A
| CITY W
z&jL <--*a a. ;;*-* wpf
1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
THE CLOSEST FULL SERVICE
BANK TO CAMPUS