Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Mautz Seeks Delay On Tenures

i
' T&tiL
Ail Awifum

Vol. 61, No. 157

iniiaii
ETj
mmm
%jp* II
': r jSEISsmS. £ %f* % v
j -sft-f feS* 4^'"* &-JfS v V > *> 'V^ v /".
L >. ?j \ ts *** 1 sSlS£*'
ggpi| JeSSt J| |^h|k|
m^r 1 S%v; 'fefey t
- 1 % * - dKTBL m M f&*?j*Jr BjfPL&j lrcy a J I
I, aKjgPp|Pl|jjgpp|lj|SM^^^^p^BH!S|l|gt*
mk i w ~J%T Wmm*** ~.
JWMKit'- %rw wi fflM^MppHHMpMaggj^y bm, jR* .M|j^||jjgy : \ *^^^awaHli^WHHp^Wffi^TO
- > £ -: ,*k Wriin' 'V wf \ *A2yr % ;^^Sl^Sf^i
H a *4/ s *?£:' */
wWrsJMinHHn i% w^HETP?w
FORTIFYING THE CASTLE 0006 CASE

No, it isn't a moat to protect Tigert Hall. Eventually the
construction work is going to produce some additional parking spaces
for the 13th Street side of UF's administration building. Officials plan

$725,000 Diverted To Gym
For Fire Exit Improvements

By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Exaeutiva Editor
Following an architects
investigation of Florida Gym
and his conclusion that the gym

USFs Liberal Education
Getting Ahead Os UF
By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Is the University of South Florida becoming the states
center of liberal education and leaving UF in its wake?
Perhaps only time will tell.
But during the course of the next year, UF may be forced to
measure up to the academic progressivism of USF if it is to
remain the dandy of state iiiStitutions.
The USF University Senate capped months of research
demands, and sometimes heated discussions last week by
approving Afro-American studies as an academic major leading
to a Bachelor of Arts degree.
UF has begun plans to offer certificates of completion of
Afro-American studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. The
Certificate will provide a proposed 36 hours of Afro-American
studies but the student will still have to complete a university
(SEE 'UF' PAGE 2)

i The
Florida Alligator
L THE SOUTHEAST S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

is replete with violations of
the state fire code, UF officials
have decided to pour $725,000
into the old structure to bring it
up to standards.
The money for the

University of Florida, Gainesville

to permit diagonal parking when the new spaces twice as wide as
before are finished.

work which will include
additional fire exits, widening of
current exits and air
conditioning of the main
arena is being diverted from
its original intent of improving
University Auditorium.
The improvements will allow
the gyms seating capacity to
return to its original maximum
of 7200. Last year, because of
the lack of proper fire exits, UF
officials were ordered to reduce
the maximum number of people
allowed in the gym to about
5400.
Director of Planning Walter J.
Matherly Thursday announced
the decision to divert the funds
for the gym. But the decision
itself was a long time in coming.
For the past several weeks,
intensive study of at least three
different proposals has been
underway by high university
officials.
Explaining the final decision,
Matherly said, Since we
received no capital outlay funds
from the legislature this year and
since an emergency exists with
the gymnasium, the university
has attempted to reorganize its

Friday, July 11, 1969

priority needs to make the best
possible use of existing
construction money.
The plans, which also include
renovation of two classroom
buildings, must be submitted to
the Board of Regents building
committee for approval.
Matherly said the decision to
divert the funds from the
auditorium improvements was
partially based on the fact that
both the auditorium and the
gym are used for similar
purposes.
The auditorium was
designed for academic functions,
but the gym is used for academic
functions involving large
audiences, such as
convocations, Matherly noted.
With a constantly growing
student body, and because of
the emergency situation at the
gym, we decided the money
could be better spent on the
gym at this time. We have to
have some place which will
accommodate large crowds.
The gyms failure to meet
current standards was caused by
changes in the state fire codes
(SEE'GYM'PAGE 2)

Moratorium
On Regents'
Agenda Today
See Editorial Page 8
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Stiff Writer
A moratorium on tenure
granting has been recommended
to the Board of Regents by State
University Chancellor Robert B.
Mautz.
The regents will act cm this
and other recommendations
concerning tenure at their
meeting today in Jacksonville.
Mautz has requested the
approval of 280 pending
requests for tenure from the
state universities.
The desired one-year delay on
tenures is to allow a review of
the whole tenure process, said
Dr. Nicholas Sileo, appointed by
Mautz to review tenure policy.
Sileo said Janurary was a
probable date for the new tenure
policy to be announced.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer,
chairman of the UF political
science department, said the
proposed decision postponement
on tenure was not so ominous as
it first sounds. He said tenure is
only granted once a year and
Mautz has already recommended
tenure for this year's candidates.
Dauer said the universities
have different tenuring
procedures. At UF, for example,
tenure can be awarded an
assistant professor after three
years and before five years at the
university. At Florida State
University tenure takes at least
a year longer.
The difference in tenuring
procedures is reflected in
percentages of tenured faculty at
the different ranks.
At UF, for professors,
associate professors, assistant
professors and instructors, the
respective per cent tenured are
88, 72, 36, and 21. Faculty
tenured at all levels is 58 per
cent.
FSU's faculty tenured at the
same ranks is 79, 57, nine and
two per cent. Faculty tenured at
all levels for FSU is 32 percent,
some 25 per cent lower than UF.
Dauer said the moratorium is
justified if new and just tenure
(SEE 'MORATORIUM' PAGE 2)
.* Jr s' '} W 1 ; 1
Ilf M j
jJ
mk <
MAUTZ
.. .'delay tenure'



Page 2

!, Th* Florida Alligator, Friday. July 11.1969

Stuart Wesbury Resigns
As UF Hospital Director

Stuart A. Wesbury Jr., director of Shands Teaching Hospital and
Ginies, announced his resignation Thursday, effective Sept. 17.
Wesbury said he was relinquishing his role as hospital director to
complete his academic work for his doctorate.
Coming to the hospital as associate director in March, 1966,
Wesbury became director in October, 1967.
A key element which precipitated this decision has been my
involvement in health care services and in the planning for an
expanded health center. The past several years have given me the
opportunity to work with exceptional health care leaders. These
activities have identified a personal desire for additional education,
Wesbury said.
Wesbury received his masters in hospital administration from the
University of Michigan in 1960. He was advanced to fellowship status
in the American College of Hospital Administrators last summer.
Health Center Provost Edmund F. Ackell said, Wesburys decision
to pursue his doctorate at this state of his professional career is a
credit to this institution and to his long-range goals. He has served the
hospital in an impressive manner.

Moratorium On Tenure
Suggested To Regents

f FROM PA6E OMt jj
policies are forthcoming.
However, he said there would be
a serious problem if the regents
Tied to introduce political
grounds forjudging faculty.
The purpose of tenure,
Dauer said, is not to let anyone
keep his job but, in the interests
of society, to have a mans
colleagues judge his professional
qualifications.
American Association of
University Professors (AAUP)
President Ray Fahien said the
AAUP had been aware of
Mautzs recommendation.
Fahien said he had written
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell requesting that before
any changes are made in
tenuring procedure, faculty
committes be formed and
consulted. OConnell agreed,
Fahien said.
Mautz has said he will submit
suggested revisions to faculty
committees, AAUP chapters and
councils of deans before any
changes are made. Final
recommendations will be
reviewed by the boards Council
for Academic Affairs and the
Council of Presidents.
I believe such review will
provide an adequate safeguard in
protecting the interests of the
faculty while meeting wishes of
the board, Mautz said.
Dr. J.J. Zeman, American
Federation of Teachers
president, said the whole idea of
regents approving tenure under
any circumstances is curious. He
said the board is too far removed
from campus to judge any final
commitment of faculty.
Tenure has to be determined

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any r
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (l) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several ,times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

,' 'Wm
DAUER
... not so ominous'
by ones colleagues, Zeman
said. Whatever the
recommendation is at the college
level has to be accepted.
Whenever the issue of tenure
is spoken of at UF, the case of
Marshall Jones, denied tenure in
1967, is brought to mind.
Zeman siad the wishes of
Jones college, the College of
Medicine, were ignored. Jones
college not only recommended
tenure but an advancement in
rank. Zeman said this was
ignored by UF Personnel Board
and by former UF President J.
Wayne Reitz.
Zeman felt it was possible the
moratorium may be a reaction
to recent legislative pressure.
It may be to show the
legislators that the regents are
keeping their house in order,
Zeman said. The regents arent
anxious to have their power
eroded.
Philosophy Prof. Kenneth A.
Me gill, whose firing for his
political views was demanded by
a state senator last winter, said
Jones was clearly denied tenure

| 1 S|MIP
-MM
m mm
WESBURY
... resigns post

because of his political activity.
Megill said this was not the
first time political activism was a
reason for denying tenure.
Former Humanities Prof. Ed
Ritcher was denied tenure
exactly the same as Jones,
Megill said.
The issue of tenure is not
important, Megill said.
It removes more people than
it protects. It is important for
faculty to unionize.
Fahien said the AAUP sees
professors as professionals who
are integral parts and officers of
the university.
This is at variance with the
AFT, which views professors as
university employees and
condones the use of strikes and
walkouts to promote interests of
the faculty. The AFT sees itself
as a collective bargaining unit for
the faculty.
Eat Light
Fatty luncheon and variety
meats should be avoided as a
daily diet. The Miami Heart
Association advises only that
you cut down on these and
substitute nutritional salads.

|P*; 4 §l p Jyy| ffIJKA
aw"'* a V \ asmMs .Mj
Mm |*? Wmm %
gH JHKjjjfc 'lff 9I&
jpapfe. aHBHf JH|H| Hfe, fS -JV Jjj
j|| l[- t ||j|^
ORCHESIS MODERN DANCE GROUP

8:00 P.M.
WEDNESDAY
JULY 12

UF Falling Behind?
Pitt o*^l
approved major and minor for his degree.
Dean H.H. Sisler said the plans have been in the making and
now await approval from the arts and sciences curriculum
committee and then the office of academic affairs.
We are trying hard to complete the plans as soon as possible
but at the expense of being premature I can say little more than
this, Sisler said.
Im hopeful we can have some appropriate action on this
proposal in the very near future, Sisler said.
Bob Pratt, Under-secretary of Minority Student Affairs, said
this year there is no pressing need for a degree program in
Afro-American studies.
But by end of this y ear UP should have 5,000 black
students, and there will be a definite need in 1971, Pratt said.
I dont know how the USF does it. This school has the
largest Upward Bound program in the state. I really dont
understand how they do it, said Pratt.
A main problem hindering the eventual move of an
Afro-American degree program would be the hiring of adequate
professors to teach the courses, when and if such a program is
approved, Pratt said.
Dr. Charles Amade, professor of American Idea, who voted
for the USF proposal, said, This whole program should have
been diffused into our curriculum long ago.
The USF program calls for 24 quarter hours credit in core
courses with an additional 24 hours credit required in existing
courses in political science, sociology, humanities, American
studies, and psychology.
As proposed by the Liberal Arts College, the new program
will be taught by both black and white professors representing
the best persons available from the standpoints of ability and
experience.
A chairman for the program will be appointed soon and
sources say this person could be a black educator of high
academic competence.
The UFs tentative chairman of the Afro-American credit
programs is history professor Selden Henry.
Also approved by the USF University Senate was a physical
education authorization approving required basic PE credit
hours beginning in the fall of 1970.
This hikes the graduation requirements to 184 quarter hours
giving USF the highest requirement for graduation in the state
university system.

Gym Gets Funds

HOM PAM out
since the building was open in
1948, Matherly pointed out.
Some improvements have
already been effected on the
21-year-old building during the
past year. Director of Physical
Plants Calvin C. Greene said the
emergency lights and a smoke
control system have been
installed.
These have improved the
Greene said,

, UNIVERSITY
auditorium

But they have not brought the
gym any closer to complying
with the fire codes and other
regulatory mandates. They have
merely made the gym safer for a
limited capacity crowd.
Matherly noted that even
with the improvements, the gym
will still hold only about
one-third of the student body,
making UF the only
state-supported institution
which does not have facilities to
accommodate at least a majority
of the student body.

ADMISSION;
FREE I



Alcoholics Fight Daily Sobriety Battle

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
A home for alcoholics, Alcothon House, Inc., has
recently moved to its new location, 306 NE 7th St.,
in Gainesville.
We bring a drunk in and help him get off the
stuff, said Frazier F., house manager of Alcothon.
With only a few contributions to support the
halfway house, a group of interested citizens and
alcoholics opened the first house last December at a
location near the new city hall.
The first house soon proved too small, said
Byron Bristol, vice president of the corporation
which supports the house. The current house, able
to hold 25 people, was found and S2OOO, raised
from contributions, was paid as a down payment.
The house is deisgned to help those alcoholics

A 24 HOUR A DAY BATTLE
... the life of an alcoholic

Two Coeds Hit Books With New Habits

By DIANA LATHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
What makes students go to school
during the summer quarter?
For some its a chance to make up
bad grades, others use the time to get
ahead.
But for two UF coeds, summer gives
them a chance for contact with reality.
Sisters Susan and Nancy are the first
undergraduate nuns ever admitted to
the UF. School teachers during the rest
of the year, they are living at St.
Patricks Convent while attending school
this summer.
Both like being at UF this summer.
The students are great. The
professors are neat after they get over
the initial shock of having a nun in their
class, Sister Susan said.
Even nuns have trouble with
computers. It seems that Sister has
become their -last name in several of
their courses, thanks to the mechanical
wizard that has touched every students
life.
Both have definite opinions about
the new religion that has evolved in the
last 10 years. To Sister Susan the trend
has been toward universal Christianity,
which she feels is great.
No matter what we are, Catholic,
Jewish, Buddhist, we are working for a
gou, no matter what his name is to the
individual, she said.

AT ALCOTHON HALFWAY HOUSE

To Sister Nancy, it is quite another
thing. She feels that all religions are
different, but there is more tolerance
and respect now for each others.
They both said they believe many
changes have been felt in the Catholic
SISTER SUSAN
... Universal Christianity
Church in recent years. When they
became nuns, the program took three
years. During that time, they were
working for their associate of arts
degree as well as taking religious
courses. Now the program takes 15

who need the environment of a home, Bristol said.
Many alcoholics have lost their families because of
their disease and Alcothon seeks to provide a
substitute until the alcoholic is able to fully return
to society.
Alcothon is recommended by Alcoholics
Anonymous (AA) but the two are not directly
associated, Bristol said.
An alcoholic who wants to dry up must stay
three days if he comes to the house. When he does
leave, he is accompanied by a member of the
Alcothon board of directors, comprised of both
alcoholics and non-alcoholics.
Alcoholics can stay at the house up to three
months. They are encouraged to work and asked to
donate $3 per day, not as rent or board but to help
another alcoholic, Frazier said.
Alcothon is largely self supporting from
members contributions and from selling doormats
the members manufacture.
In addition to the board of directors, there is an
advisory board whose members include Florida
Supreme Court Justice J.C. Adkins, Gainesville
Police Chief W.D. Joiner and Rev. C.D. Weaver of
Grace Presbyterian Church.
Frazier, 47, provides a good example of an
Alcothon member.
The first step in fighting the disesase is the
personal battle, recognizing he is an alcoholic,
Frazier said.
I tried doctors, the church and hospitals to find
a cure for my illness, he said. None of them did
any good.
I went sober twenty-two months ago and have
been working to keep sober every day since. Its a
twenty-four hour a day job.
Frazier first sobered up with AA and began
working with Alcothon at its inception.
He reported that alcoholism is the third largest
disease in America, following heart disease and
cancer. Alcoholics are never cured, he said, their
disease is only arrested.
Most of the residents of the house work, Frazier
said. Some are enrolled in school such as George C.,
a student nurse at Santa Fe Junior College. He
receives aid from the Florida Department of
Vocational Rehabilitation to continue his studies.
Photos By Doug Case

months, but an associates degree is
required for admission.
Sister Nancy is taking a course in
evolution that 10 years ago a nun wasnt
allowed to take.
Describing themselves as like
I I I -l,
|9
I I <

*
SISTER NANCY
... religions are different
married people, the sisters lead pretty
normal lives. They go to Mass and pray
every day, but at their own chosen
times.
Although the sisters dont date, they
do socialize.

Friday, July 11,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

",%*} flj
H&b. .jaH
IT'S NOT ALL IN THE BOOK
... as alcoholics learn at Alcothon
A CUP OF COFFEE, CIGARETTES
... an alcoholics tools of war

We do spend less time on
extracurricular activities than the
average student, but it isnt because we
cant participate, Sister Susan said.
The sisters could be described as
typical young girls in their early 20s
but for the fact that they were dressed
differently.
They are members of St. Josephs
order which serves only Florida and
Puerto Rico.
Each order decides the habit that its
members will wear. The nuns of St.
Josephs wear the knee length habit.
The sisters may wear anything they wish
as long as they wear their habit when
they leave the convent grounds.
On the subject of drugs and pre premarital
marital premarital sex, both sisters said they feel
young people today question life rather
than merely accept it.
The sisters agree that young people
make their own decisions about their
personal lives.
Sister Susan said she thinks only a
minority uses drugs. She implied that
she sees a difference between people
who have tried drugs and those who are
regular users.
During the summer most of the nuns
go to Berry College, but Sister Susan
and Nancy feel it has a nunny
atmosphere, so they came here instead.
They say they are glad to be in
Gainesville because it gives them
contact with reality.

Page 3



, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1968

Page 4

Profs Want
Dubious FSU
Quiz Change
By LYNN PARSONS
Alligator Staff Writer
A faculty group from Florida
State University recently
demanded a change in an
incoming student questionnaire
for fear answers might be used
later against the students.
The group wrote the
American Council on Education,
which prepares the
questionnaire, demanding
students not be required to sign
their names or that some of the
questions be dropped.
Dr. Christine Cassin of the
FSU philosophy department said
the Faculty Action Caucus,
which is comprised of more than
200 professors, made the
decision to write the council
after the questionnaire was given
out to incoming students.
The controversial questions
delt with student's religious and
racial backgrounds and beliefs,
social and protest activities.
We have an atmosphere of
distrust, she said. Nobody
trusts the administration.
Specifically, we feel the
questionnaires could be used
against the students.
Chancellor Robert Mautz said
he understood students were
required to take the test, but not
to fill in all the answers if they
didnt want to.
He said he will ask the
Council of State University
Presidents to look into the
problem of invading a students
privacy.
He said the tests are given at
400 to 500 other coDeges in the
nation and other schools want to
participate in the program.
I feel the tests must be good
or it wouldnt be so much in
demand, Mautz said.
The chancellor said, to the
best of his knowledge, FSU
officials have never compiled a
blacklist of students who believe
in taking part in protests.
When asked if the
information from the
questionnaires couldnt be used
for such lists, Mautz said, I
guess at some point you just
have to have some confidence in
the persons administering the
test.
SHARE THE
ARMY ADVENTURE
as an OFFICER in the
WOMENS ARMY CORPS
-^*^^3(l^*******
Warn
piP -v
ft mere nfon witkevt kkgotio* AH owf and moil rh.t coupon to >
ATTN. UIARCS-I r~] I
NO U.l AIMY THUD RECRUITING DISTRICT P*| j
(Alt VIROINIA AVI. COUEGi PARK. GA JOJJ7
J .. __ l
M*
r
Hw


SDS Split Takes Light Criticism

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
The recent internal split of Students for a Democratic Society will
have far reaching effects for the national radical movement as well as
the local SDS chapter.
An explanation of the split, which saw the expulsion of Progressive
Labor Party (PL), was given at a recent SDS meeting by three
members who attended the convention, Steve Fahrer, Ed Freeman
and Norman Reynolds and by Womens Liberationist Martha

Freeman.
The question of whether
black people form an
intra-colonized nation, and
therefore have the right of
national self-determination
including the right of secession,
was the issue that led to the
split.
Opening skirmishes at the
convention, as reported by
Reynolds and Liberation News
Service, occurred over whether
to exclude the commercial press
and whether to hold more
workshops. PL won these votes
as well as a strong showing (586
to 577) against hearing Chris
Melton, an American who
belongs to Chinas Red Guard
and who PL condemned as a
sell-out.

The split was precipitated by
a speech by Black Panther Party (BPP) representatives calling for SDS
to expel PL for its anti-nationalist line or for PL to change its line,
Reynolds said.
Youll be judged by the company you keep, the BPP spokesman
said.
At this time two dozen PL men stormed the rostrum and PL
spokesman Jeff Gordon took the microphone to respond. He charged
SDS with opportunism for bringing the Panthers to the convention.
Reynolds said SDS Interorganizational Secretary Bemadine Dohm
called for consideration of whether a split with PL was necessary.
SDS Secretary Mike Klonsky then called for a walkout to an
adjacent hall.
The rest of the convention was spent by SDS discussing the reasons
they broke with PL. The main topics were the reasons why PL was
counter-revolutionary Reynolds said, and PLs action throughout
the country.
An SDS press release stated, While SDS tried to go to the people
to win support for the Vietnamese, the Black Panther Party, the
movement of workers in the factories and shops ... the struggle of
the Gls and young people around the world, PLs practice ran
completely counter to these principles ... PL printed lies and slander
(about BPP) ... PL was leading an attack on the NLF ... Ho Chi
Minh ... was called traitor in the pages of PL Magazine.
At the local SDS meeting last week, Fahrer gave an analysis of the
convention after Reynolds report.
The groups expelling PL primarily consisted of a coalition headed
by the SDS national office called Revolutionary Youth Movement
(RYM). Principal leaders of RYM are the new National Secretary
Mark Rudd, past secretary Mike Klonsky and past Interrorganizational
secretary, Dohm.
Fahrer began explaining the division that still remains in SDS. One
group, called the Weathermen from a statement they made that
You dont have to be a weatherman to know which way the wind
blows, formed the majority of the anti-PL group. They were led by
Columbia activist, Rudd.
The other group, RYM 11, theoretically differs from the
Weathermen over several issues. The Weathermen see the only
LEARN JUST *5
Introductory Flight Lesson
Discover why the swing's to wings
Cl Yf Try our introductory flight lesson in a modern
I Piper Cherokee. Come see us today.
VETERANS!! Your G.l. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot
Training. For full details, call Gainesville's only approved
school
378-2646 J
ISL CASSELS IN THE AIR. NC

i pcM RADICALS SIDE WITH SPLINTER

STEVE FAHRER
. .. SDS no longer "catch-all"

principle for unity in SDS is the national question, raiirer said.
They further believe the forces of revolution are already in motion
and that SDS should fight directly for socialism without intervening
stages. RYM II states the Weathermen lack attention to white
workers and calls for a united front against imperialism.
Fahrer said the SDS is no longer a catch-all organization and is
forming a definite direction. He said he and the rest of the local
delegates favored the RYM II group.
Freeman presented several criticisms of the convention to the local
chapter. He specifically criticized the manner of the walkout and SDS

The recent internal
split of Students for a
Democratic Society will
have far reaching effects
for the national radical
movement as well as the
local SDS chapter.
The question of
whether black people
form an intra-colonized
nationand therefore
have the right of national
self-determination
including the right of
secession was the issue
that led to the split.

oo
Towards the end of the convention, SDS adopted positions
supporting the struggles of Black and Latin colonies within the US.
for national liberation, as well as Vietnams National Liberation
Front and Provisional Revolutionary Government.
It also called for mass demonstrations in Chicago against American
imperialism and in support of the Conspiracy 8, indicted for the
Democratic Convention demonstration.
WELCOME ALL U of F PERSONNEL
CTsHwrSa
i cityw lawifSJ
Mm " BANK H^jpf
1116 W. UNIVERSITY AVE
THE CLOSEST FULL SERVICE
BANK TO CAMPUS
Campus Twig Mall Twig
1131 W. Univ. Ave. 2552 N.W. 13th St.
DON'T MISS OUT ON THE GREAT
SAVINGS ON ALL MERCHANDISE,
INCLUDING SWIMWEAR AT 1/3
OFF, DRESSES UP TO !4 OFF
SLACKS, SKIRTS, AND BLOUSES
UP TO 1/3 OFF. SAVE AT TWIG TO TODAY
DAY TODAY

handling of Womens Liberation.
He said the walkout was
handled in an unprincipled
manner. Rumors were
circulated and fought with
counter-rumors. Many people
who had little knowledge of the
national question were forced
into positions and the reason for
the walkout became negative
rather than positive, he said.
Freeman condemned
opportunism on the part of
certain groups like Independent
Socialist Caucus to take
advantage of the split.
It was Freemans opinion that
the handling of Womens
Liberation was a total disaster
in that SDS is male dominated
and only gives lip service to the
womens struggles.



lllllifcf 1.. ux
B
N M ip&
BIMJI* r.<& B| aSat %
1 .^W^^^HKi^Bi
Sfel fc 'BBSSI^
Ups
fiHI |j|
Ilf s
'llblismE
felP
KiiM v: fetog,-' 1 ..
CRASH, AT LAST!
Those "temporary" buildings have finally been demolished across
from Florida Field. Pictures like this one have been multiplying
rapidly in the last few weeks since the old World War II barracks,
converted for use as dorms and classrooms to ease-in the huge influx
of returning Gls in the late 19405, began falling. It is only a beginning,
however. Flavets and other "temps" still mar the pinetree landscape
beauty of the campus.
AT MEETING TODAY
New School Prexys
On Regents Agenda
The State Board of Regents is expected to name presidents of the
two new state universities in Jacksonville and Miami at its meeting in
Jacksonville Friday.
A moratorium on the granting of tenure to the professors of the
new schools may be recommended by Chancellor Robert B. Mautz.
Gatorade litigation is also scheduled cm the boards Friday agenda.
Latest development in the beverage controversy is that the U.S.
Department of Health, Education and Welfare is prepared to
relinquish its claim to Gatorade royalties to the UF. Gatorade was
invented by UF Prof. Robert Cade..
HEW provided the grants for Cades research in renal medicine,
during which time he invented Gatorade and sold the marketing rights
to Stokely-Van Camp Co.
The regents will also divide $514,000 from state racing funds
among the universities to be used as athletic scholarships. UF and FSU
will get shares of $157,000 each.
The cooperative plan of Florida A&M and FSU to exchange
students for credit is also scheduled for approval at the Friday
meeting.
Under the plan, slated for a two year trial basis, library facilities of
the two universities will be available to both student bodies.

Miss UF Vies
For Top Title
Pretty Miss UF, Jo Lynn
Pijot, began competition
Wednesday in the first of five
judging sessions for the Miss
Florida contest.
One of 41 contestants will be
selected winner Saturday night
in the Orlando Municipal
Auditorium. Another UF
student, Carol Still, representing
Panama City, is also entered.

I FREE BEER I
I EVERY MONDAY I
1 NIGHT 9-10 PM I

11 ;
. m dm
JO LYNN PIJOT
... Atlantic City next?

Senate Rules Change
Sent To Committee

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Tuesday
attempted to break the back of a
system which has kept many
senators from reading pending
bills before senate meetings. The
attempt failed when the remedy
legislation was sent back to
committee for further study.
Motivation for passage of this
type of legislation was sparked
last week by the last minute
distribution of the UJS. National
Student Association (NSA)
membership bill to senators.
Senators complained they
were not given enough time to
read the 37-page packet
prepared by the NSA Study
Commission. Despite the
complaints, though, the senate
approved the commissions
recommendation that UF join
the organization.
Im getting sick and tired of
this system of late distribution
of senate bills, said Ben
Murphy.
We have had a lot of stuff
handed to us the night of the
meeting. We should see it before
it comes up.
To speed up the senates bill
consideration process and to give
senators time before meetings to
read bills, Murphy introduced an
amendment to the rules and
procedures of the senate.
He recommended the bill go
to the senate president who
would then determine which
committee the bill will be sent
to.
Murphys bill would also
require the bill, following proper
subject area committee

IK|l(tiid(y fried
I if CticVvn I
214 N.W. 13th . 114 N.W. 34th St.l
| 376-6472 372-3649 |
I EVERYDAY SPECIALS I

FISH SNACK
BOX
4 OZ. BONELESS FISH
FRENCH FRIES
jk WITH TARTAR JL
SAUCE AND U TT £
HOT ROLL T

I WEDNESDAY SPECIAL I
I (EVERY WEDNESDAY)
I REG ti o* KENTUCKY FRED U
m K 4> .zo CHICKEN DINNER M
3 PIECES KENTUCKY I
FRIED CHICKEN A A K
SERVED WITH 111 I | i H
CRACKLING GRAVY tM | |
I HOTROLLSAND ||||A
coleslaw wwY wEBlm!-M3

consideration, to pass through
the senates Rules and Calendar
Committee before being placed
on the agenda.
Another item which is
developing into an SG
controversy the funding of
delegate expenses to the NSA
convention-received its first
setback Tuesday when a bill for
$1,850 was sent back to
committee.
Minority Floor Leader Marvin
Sylvest, said the senate was told
that joining the NSA would be
inexpensive.
We were also told to get our
financial house in order by
Student Body President Charles
Shepherd. Now we are being
asked to pay out over SI,BOO to
send delegates to an NSA
convention.
A bill stating the NSA
coordinator be appointed by the
student body president subject
to a vote of approval by the
senate, was also passed.
The senate also sent back to
committee a bill which will
determine the method of
selection of delegates to the
NSA convention in August. A
dispute arose as to whether

I FBBPfIIPLE WHO VALL'f MMU I
-BECKUM OPTICIANS
22 West University Ave., GainesviHe, Fla. Phone 376-3516

Friday, July 11,1969, The Florida Alligator,

NEW LUNCHEON SPEC/All
KENTUCKY FRIED
CHICKEN SNACK BOX
2 PIECES OF mm mm I
CHICKEN, MASHED O C M
POTATOES, AND O I
CRACKLING GRAVY,
ROLL

alternate delegates should be
sent to the convention at the
expense of SG.
The student senate meeting
formerly scheduled for Thursday
was cancelled Tuesday because
of a holdup in preparation of the
budget.
Student Body Treasurer Jim
Roll said Tuesday the budget
should be ready for senate
consideration by July 22.
mmsmsmm wmmmmmmsmmm mm
Vfl-' V\ V -"
Mk
lyiA '* -r** j
§££+ sSsfi X
JIM ROLL
... Student Body Treasurer

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1969

Page 6

B>-. K H^"^wHrclS|r:
A CRUISE FOR YOUR THOUGHTS

Looking pensive and trying to extract some ideas
from Homecoming leaflets and the Seminole is
Susan Wynne, 3AS, working on her slogan for
Homecoming 69. Apparently she figures that if she
wins, she'll need a tan for that cruise to Nassau.

Drug Garden Helps Research

By LESSLITER
All igator C orrespondent
Not far from the Lambda Chi Alpha house on
Radio Road an insignificant tract of land is enclosed
by a rusty old fence. The 9-acre plot is overrun with
weeds and tall grass, but only because the caretaker
has been sick for two months.
The propertys appearance doesnt bother Dr.
Carl H. Johnson, though.
Johnson, a UF professor of pharmacognoscy
since 1939, is director of the Medicinal Plant Gardens
on Radio Road. He explains that the garden is a
very useful learning device for pharmacy students,
in spite of its run-down condition.
We maintain the garden to have a supply of
living drug plants to show the students, he said.
Johnson added that the garden also provides raw
material for research, although he admits that no
earth-shaking discoveries of new drugs have ever
been made from it.
Most of the plants Johnson grows are used for
flavoring bad-tasting medicines. Lemon gras* and
various mints thrive in his garden.
Johnson does cultivate a drug plant that was used
as one of the first tranquilizers on the commercial
market. Called rauwolfia, it is grown primarily in
India.
Johnson grows other plants in the garden oesides
those used for medicines. A small plot of land he

More Police,
But Two Quit
The strength of the
University Police Department
has been increased by the hiring
of nine new officers.
The additions follow in the

wake of last Aprils Carnigras
racial incidents and UF President
Stephen C. OConnells
subsequent request for more
campus police.
Since the hiring of the nine
officers in May two of these
have M?ft and have now been
replaced.
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
NORTH OF AXA
THE MALL
376-4552 AU aTeT D
Open til 7 p.m. nightly

Wishbone
There s a new Wishbone Fried Chicken Take-Out Store at
704 S. W 2nd Avenue or 16th Ave at S. Main Street.

Susan is an ADPhi from Quincy. Besides the cm ise,
the other grand prizes are an expense-paid trip to
Ft. Lauderdale and a football weekend during the
Orange Bowl festival.

reserves for herbs.
I have herb beds because theyre easy to grow
and add interest to the garden, Johnson explained.
Dill and marjoram dominate the beds. Johnson
said he has even given some dill to a person who was
making dill pickles.
The garden also has three dilapidated wooden
sheds, one of which was used as a mule bam 10
years ago. Johnson got rid of the temperamental
beast because he refused to do any work.
It took two men to harness him, Johnson said.
When wed hitch him to the wagon, hed run wild
and wreck it.
One shed was used to dry plants, Johnson said,
but it was abandoned with the advent of
air-conditioning at the pharmacy college. Now it
stores garden tools.
The third shed was a dog house for keeping
research dogs, but the medical center supplies the
pharmacy college with dogs now, Johnson pointed
out.
Johnson says the garden has been at its present
site, adjacent to Lake Alice, for about 34 years. But
only two of its nine acres are usable because the
lake is two feet higher than the garden, and floods
it.
He mentioned another threat to the garden. He
says students with romantic inclinations use it at
night, and unwittingly trample upon the plants.

Museum Goals
Change In Move

If you peer into the bushes
on the north side of Flint Hall
youll find two large ships
anchors. They belonged once to
the old Battleship Florida.
During the years that the
Florida State Museum was
housed in Flint Hall the anchors
were on exhibit there.
That was until 1942 when
the museum moved to its
present home in Gainesville s
only skyscraper the Seagle
Building.
Next summer the museum
moves once again. Back to
campus.
New facilities are presently
under construction due west of
the campus police station. Said
the museums Director, Dr. J.C.
Dickinson, the new structure,
with 107 thousand square feet
of space, will have twice the area
currently provided by the Seagle
Building.
Not often, said Dickinson,
can a museum move or expand
with as much freedom as we will
be allowed.
Although still in planning, he
described the museums new
goals as visionary and
experimental.

COMPLETE VOLKSWAGIN "!
REPAIRS
Factory trained mechanics
I Complete parts department j
Bring This Ad With You 1
Service Maintenance Only $ 7.95 I
BUSH GAMGE_ _]
HENRY FONDA JACK LEMMON
JAMES CAGNEY WILLIAM POWELL
"MR. ROBERTS
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, JULY 11 AND 12
7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
REITZ UNION THEATRE

The museum is currently
employing odor as an
environmental component in
one of its three traveling
museums. These mobile units
housed in large trailers and
designed primarily for children,
aim at presenting a total
exper ice.
Ratbur than offering facts
and en ised objects, the total
environment is simulated.
Thus, a real side of bacon
adds atmosphere to the interior
of a Florida pioneer cabin, while
stereo tapes depict dawn in the
Florida wilderness.
The interior of a 17th
century ships cabin is complete
with creaking of rigging in
stereo. The beams have been
packed with seaweed to enhance
the aura of the high seas.
The newest of these mobile
museums, scheduled for
completion sometime in July,
will present an earthward view
from the interior of a lunar
crater.
The Florida State Museum is
actually a department of UF. It
was established in 1917 by a
special act of the State
Legislature.



ACADEMICS
news and views
By BETH WECKERLE
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. William C. Childers, associate professor of English and logic in
University College, is the fifth recipient of UFs Thomas Jefferson

Award for teaching excellence.
The SSOO award is designated
for the teacher who best
exemplifies the educational
ideals of Thomas Jefferson.
Dean Franklin Doty of
University College said, Dr.
Childers represents that breed of
teachers who combine versatility
with a full devotion of talent to
his students...
* *
A register of incoming
freshman students will go on sale
as part of the Gator Loan Fund
drive early in the fall quarter.
The Freshman Record
contains names, home towns,
university addresses and
telephone numbers along with
pictures of the students. It will
sell for about sl.

The register also contains important information for all students
such as a campus map, university calendar and a short history of UF
* *
Sigma Lambda Chi, national honorary scholastic fraternity of
construction, elected the officers for next year at their May 29
meeting: Gary Wagner, president; Dale Helling, vice-president; Art
Stackpole, secretary; Bill Fischer, treasurer; Bob Muson,
parliamentarian; and Byron Barton, pledge master.
* *
Floridas largest periodical, the UF Magazine, was bom at the
annual Alumni Association convention in Fort Lauderdale. It will
offer timely feature coverage of the entire university to approximately
60,000 readers, making it the states largest periodical in circulation.
The first 32-page publication will appear in September.
Phillip W. Dann of St. Petersburg has been awarded the Martha B.
Culpepper Law Review Scholarship for the second time at UF. The
senior law student was selected to receive the S2OO award on the basis
of his outstanding performance in the College of Law.
* *
The North Central chapter of the Florida Engineering Society
recently installed Phil Parrish as president; Buddy Clark as
vice-president for FES affairs; Dick Motta as vice-president for
political affairs; Kail Skadowski as secretary and Ted Yeats as
treasurer. Out going officers Ed McGinnis and Jim Hollis were the first
students ever to receive the FES Certificate for Service.
* *
A National Science Foundation grant of $32,500 will make it
possible for Dr. William R. Maples, assistant professor of
anthropology, and William F. Greenhood, doctoral student in
anthropology, to spend one year in Kenya, Africa. The two will be
studying the effects of Expanding agriculture on primate animal
societies.
*
A fourth consecutive federal grant of $50,000 to train
rehabilitation facility administrators has been awarded to the graduate
program in health and hospital administration in UFs College of
Health Related Professions.
The funds were provided by the Rehabilitation Services
Administration of the Social and Rehabilitation Services in the
Department of Health, Education and Welfare.
Richard W. Bowles, director of the Gator Band has been awarded a
grant from UF to compose music for brass trios. Associate Director
Robert E. Foster will act as director for the Gator Band.
Their next concert is scheduled Wednesday at 6:45 p.m. on the
lawn of University Auditorium.
"Thirsty Tims"
EVERY AFTERNOON
4:30 7:00
ALL COCKTAILS Vt PRICE
ALL DRAFT BEER sl/PITCHER
REMEMBER W.C. FIELDS EVERY MONDAY!

:;
s:**'
* ** a V V ?
WILLIAM CHILDERS
.. wins Jefferson Award

GAINESVILLE MALL l
2546 street
I SUMMER SALE! I
FRI. SAT.-JULY 11-12 I
Reg. $6.99 to $14.99 Linens Voiles Piques Cottons
SUMMER DRESSES I
$4 .$5. $6 I
Huge Selections Misses Jrs. Petites Womens I
Reg. $2.99 to $4.99 Reg. $3.99 to $7.99 H
Jamaica Shorts BLOUSES B
$2 -$3 $2 -$3 I
SIZES 6 TO 18 SIZES 32 38
Reg. $2.99 to $5.99 H
KNIT TOPS I
$2 $3 I
Stripes Solids Tank Tops S
SIZES 32 TO 40 H
Reg. $2.99 to $4.99 Reg. $3.99 to $5.99 H
HANDBAGS LOUNGEWEAR
Straws Vinyls Patents Shifts Tents Dusters
SHOP NOW FOR SPECIALS fl
IN ALL DEPARTMENTS B
YOUR FASHION HEADQUARTERS B

Friday, July 11.1968. Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday. July 11.1989

/gSfck The Florida Alligator
i The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility
Spy Dave Reddick Dave Osier
Editor-in-Chief Managing Editor
Harold Aldrich
kW Ass Ammm Executive Editor
Well, Chief, youre probably wondering how the old
Warm Hand of Friendship tour went, eh?
Wauburg Needs Funds

MR. EDITOR:
The report in the Alligator
that money from the Lake
Wauburg Development Fund is
intended to be used for the
construction of an amphitheater
angered me enough to finally sit
down and write this overdue
letter.
I have been out at the Lake
quite a few times lately and
every time I look across the
nicely kept, beautifully green

w wmmmwmwmmmwwwwwmwwwmmmww
These
Days

The small towns, worried about youthful gangs
that have taken to gathering in the parking lots of
shopping centers, have been drawing up
anti-loitering ordinances. If the ordinances become
effective and there are mass arrests of the young, we
will be treated to the usual recriminations on both
sides of the generation gap. The old will complain
about the terrible increase of juvenile delinquency;
the kids will say they have no place to go.
As is usually the case, the real culprits will not be
mentioned. But it is easy to see what is going to
happen this summer. Businesses wont be hiring
teenagers, and for a variety of quite understandable
reasons.
First, the Students for a Democratic Society, in
issuing instructions to their cadres to take jobs in
industry with revolutionary agitation in mind, will
frighten many a personnel department into turning
down anyone with scraggy sideburns and a callow
lode. Not that the Maoists and the super-Maoists
who have been contending for control in the SDS
will care when the young fail to get summer
employment; the infantile leftists in the SDS
welcome anything that causes disillusionment with
the system. But the businessmen will be blamed
for withholding job opportunities; the SDS itself
will go free.
Secondly, the minimum wage law will continue
to close off avenues of employment to teenagers.
The National Federation of Independent Business,
which is apparently the only organization that
makes an effort to collect statistics bearing on the
matter, is absolutely devastating in the evidence it

Why The Young Are Forced To Loiter

turf and beyond the slender
palm trees I shake my head in
wonder about the incredible
ugliness of the three rotten
buildings. They certainly ought
to be forbidden to stand in such
surroundings, if oniy for esthetic
reasons! Look at the bathhouse:
doors nailed and the back slowly
breaking to pieces. Or go to the
restroom: broken toilets, broken
washbasin, no water. And the.
house with the coke-machines
seems only to serve

.<
amateur-demolishers as an object
for exercise.
So lets for the students sake
put some money (it neednt be
half a million),into a prqjeet to
improve these facilities, even
though the Lake may drain ini
some* distant geological future!
If it lasts another five to ten
years, the effort and investment
will have paid off with interest!
PETER U. ROOS 7AG

John
Chamberlain


presents. Using the standard polling techniques of
its continuous field survey of small business, the
National Federation comes up with the accusation
that more than a half-million jobs formerly given to
teenagers have been closed because of the wage-hour
law passed during the Johnson Administration.
The American system, as amended by the liberal
ideologues, now makes absolutely no provision for
apprenticeship. Take the trade of glassblowing, for
example. If you have already mastered the art, you
can get $6.22 an hour, which adds up to some
$13,000 a year plus fringe benefits. But glass
manufacturers are now turning down teenage
glassblowing apprentices because they arent worth
the $1.60 an hour that is the legal minimum. It
takes five years to train a good glassblower.
The construction trades generally should be
making provision for thousands of apprentices, but
are stopped, from doing so by the unions own
practices as well as by the minimum wage law.
Within the last decade there has been an increase in
the 20-24 age category from 11,000,000 to
17,000,000, which is a fifty per cent growth. These
young people are now living in apartments, or they
represent split families, with the breadwinner like as
not in the armed services.
But in a very few years, these young people will
want homes of their own. They wont find enough
skilled building trades union members to supply
what they demand. Prefabricated housing could be
an answer, provided that restritive union practices
could be outlawed. But even here the minimum
wage law might keep the prefabricated housing

EDITORIAL
Two Faces
A nnarentlv legislative influence has again permeated the
walls of the university system.
This time, however, the penetration may be for the
systems' own good. For a change.
Near the end pf the recent legislative session, Sen.
Richard Deeb, R-St. Petersburg, said he would introduce a
bill erasing tenure in the university system. His
announcement was met with a burst of outcries from
educational leaders throughout the state.
Leading the dissent was Robert Mautz, chancellor of the
university system, who said the elimination of tenure would
be disastrous. Joining Mautz was UF President Stephen
C, OConnell, who said he thought the bill was not very
well thought out, and would have tragic consequences.
Mautz and OConnell were joined by almost every other
university president in the state, including- J* Stanley
Marshall, whose conservative attitudes are currently causing
an almok mass walkout by more progressive professors at
UFs sister school, Florida State University.
Deeb did go ahead with his plans but later withdrew his
bill from immediate consideration.. Its still on the books,
ready to be brought up next session.
But, now those cries of anguish have turned to chirps of
optimism.
Mautz, this week. recommended a plan which would
place a moratorium on tenure granting for a year, pending a
hopefully thorough study into the traditional system, of job
insurance and security of academic freedom.
We applaud Mautz openmindedness,, but question his
inconsistencies. Nevertheless, we feel' that tenure should be
investigated. We see no reason; why a professor, whose
academic feebleness has led him through an undistinguished
career, should be granted any more job security than a
young, outstanding and bright, award-winning professor
who is held back by only the brevity of his stay here.
.. Yet, this is one face of the tenure system. The system
does have another facet. :
Without some sort of tenure system, the university will
not be accredited. The absence of job insurance would make
recruiting almost impossible and legislative meddling a daily
occurrence. > 1:-'-. ;
Although the legislature did not act on tenure, Mautz
has, but prudently. His directive appears to be a good piece
of old educational oneupmanship. The target date Cor
compiling, reports and formulating a plan is Jan. 1,
plenty of time before the legislature meets in April, when
Deebs bill will probably be unearthed.
This time, the Board of Regents wijl .have bargaining
power, however. '//;. '
Despite Mautz apparent readiness to appease legislators
by calling for a tenure study, his recommendation is good
politics.
It is too bad politics is still playing an active role in the
non-political university system.

, ............ vrr.iV.v.
industry from expanding its own rate of hiring.
Nobody will think of the real reason this summer
for those loitering gangs on the street comers and in
the shopping centers. The judges, in meting out
penalties sot those who defy the police, wont be
fining the authors of those incendiary SDS
pamphlets or the Congressmen who failed to make
teenage exceptions to minimum* wage requirements.
The old medieval quatrain comes to mind as
something that is very roughly applicable:
We put in jail the man or woman
Who steals the goose-from off the common,
But let the larger felon loose
Who steals the common from the goose.
Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey Marcia Baker
Editorial Assistant Copy Editor
Darcy Meeker
Campus Living Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union,, Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683
Opinions expressed in the I lorida Alligator are those
e editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.



Who Was The Whore?

MR. EDITOR:
/...* r . t t
To the Florida .Male :
You called me a whore, because you discovered
there were others, but I asked no payments or
obligations. You are the one asking for a price to be
paid' Pleading with your eyes for me to say you
were all I knew; and I obliged. But now I find your
price was much too high and our lies (Yes, you were
a part of them, too, for wanting to believe them)
have sordidly become a calamity.
With much effrontery you stared at my
body-and I let you; but now that youve had a
glimpse of my mind you cannot handle me. Forgive
my harshness, but.l cannot-bear deceit another day.
1 listened when you drew the line
between our sexes; promulgating: There is a
"difference. Hah! But then there is your kind!
You have a propensity to seduce, using even arms
and legs as phallics, undressing with such
impertinence. Abstruse-fervid words meant to
divert. Crashing tempestuously through cautious
pleas, begging for fulfillment. Then a savage lying in
the bed naked and brown. A face artless in its
beauty but your sleeping face betrayed you your
search was only for adventure. %
And 1 knew what you were doing on those nights
that life seemed so remote (for yon were my .% ..).
Didnt your body fear what it might touch? Qh, yes,

Chamberlain Is Naive
MR. EDITOR:
The pattern of events John Chamberlain described in his column
on July 1 detailing the machinations of the Stalin regime in regard to y
the Polish Provisional Government, apparently is a fact of life of big
power politics. Mr. Chamberlain is either quite naive or is attempting
to push straight ideological hogwash by his implication that the USSR
can do no right, while the USA-can do no wrong. History indicates no
such dichotomy. .
Similar manipulations by the U.S. government come.in to mind
include support for the secession of Texas from Mexico and the
annexation by the UJSL shortly thereafter; the creation of the
Panamanian nation at Colombias expense in order to obtain more
favorable terms in regard to the Panama canal; and the recent
intervention in the Dominican Republic to sustain a friendly
government, etc.
Stalin didnt invent this type of political intrigue nor did his
death stop the use of it. Research, I suspect, would reveal that it is as
old as civilization. Such practices are likely to continue so long as the
world is divided into competing, national states.
R.S. POWER
WON PAYS DEBT IfS
/ TO AMA, REJECTS 1
m 2S m
Wow There's A Real Wheeler-Dealer

I remember. It was your freedom that was priceless.
Well, is giving up yoiir freedom worse than giving up
your soul? For it seems to me a. soul must have
compassion and yours has none.
My needs which had once been opaque promised
to become transparent if I would only look. .1
pressed my face close and held my breath to clear
the glass and I saw But now what? The truth
mustnt bum my heart out while I sit still.
I relinquished pride, youre right;but Ill cling to
respect, only this time it will be my own, not yours..
For yours does not matter. Like the-blacks, we ? ve
been down to long. Now when we go down it is
only to he laid. Dont cringe! Perhaps, remorse, that
you have done this to me. Why guilt? I am no more
immoral than you.
I must look for something better now. Its love I
want. I say its better, you say its a womans toy,
her vital excuse for the bed. Yet, what name did I
heat you call a woman who went to bed and never
. loved? We are the same flesh and you insist a man
has time only for summerwine and winter nights.
But isnt the wine sweeter when its tendered and
aged, and isnt' the nighttime more fruitful when the
body beside him is warm?-
Go now, but dont think that I will indulge my
sorrows in your judgements (A whore you called
me You are the whore). Perhaps its time you
looked through the glass instead of at the mirror.
V V A COED

The World
Out Os Perspective

Recent disclosures that the Students for a
Democratic Society has allied itself with other
militant groups to achieve the extermination of high
government officials have made many people take a
second look at it.
T this new information I visited the headquarters of
the Flodunky U. chapter of the SDS.
The organization recently moved to an
abandoned, partially buried bunker located just off
campus. The bunker was originally built to house
the college president in times of turmoil but was
abandoned as unnecessary. A larger bunker has been
built to replace it.
As I approached the entrance a rifle barrel found
its way out of an opening in the concrete wall.
Halt where you are! a serious voice
commanded.
I quickly considered the possibilities open to
me run as fast as I could back to the car and get
the out of there or stand my ground and get
my story no matter what.
My legs wouldnt move.
Hey man! Are you a governor? the voice
queried.
No, I replied intrepidly, suddenly sweating
profusely as I felt my knees begin to buckle.
A congressman? Senator? Pig?
No. No. No.
Well you dont look like Spiro Agnew and
Tricky Dick wouldnt send anyone who wasnt
expendable. Put down your guns cats.
What a relief. I suddenly felt as strong and
impregnable as the press had been at Chicago.
The door opened and I was told to enter. Briefly
I explained my position and how I was impartially
searching for the truth (not in these exact words, of
course, but getting this basic idea or something like
it across).
Having reworked my way into their good graces
after mentioning this interview was for the Alligator,
I tactfully, subtly slipped the big question into my
first question. v
Do you really plan to assassinate high level
government officials?
Got to man. Dont you see, its the only way to
achieve our goals?
Specifically what are your goals?
Peace, brotherhood, free speech, free love, free
beer, Fremont, no work, utopia, a cure for the
common cold, restriction of use of the atom to
building molecules, pot kitchens on every street
comer, happiness, good weather, old reruns of the
Smothers Brothers on all four channels that
includes educational TV ...

Friday, July 11,1960, The Florida Alligitor,

Gee, I exclaimed, you dont want anything
unreasonable. Whoever would try to deny you these
things?
Everybody man! Capitalists, the over thirty
faction, pigs, the weatherman. Man, thats why
weve go to kill. KILL! KILL! KILL!
Boy that felt good.
Suddenly feeling uneasy again I decided to
change the subject slightly.
What would the SDS do if the capitalist
governments capitulated to your people?
Wed throw them into prisons, man. Exile them
to Siberia. Put them to work in the salt mines. Then
we could set up a true Marxist society where there
would be freedom for everyone.
Well, youve certainly convinced me that it is
possible to build a better society. Can I join the
cause?
Sure, man. Ill help you fill out the form.
First question, Are you now or have you ever
participated in any destructive extracurricular
activities, or do you have any significant destructive
talents you never applied?
LETTERS POLICY
}

In order to appear in the Alligator, letters must be
typed signed and double-spaced and should not exceed
300 words in length. A writer's name may be withheld
from publication only if he shows just cause. No letters
signed with a pseudonym will be accepted for
publication. The editor reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of space. Addresses and telephone
numbers must accompany all letters.

Les Gardieff

Page 9



Page 10

I. The Florida AHiptor, Frktoy,Juy 11,1969

W town- fl^l
yy r'** M/A n \ 1 sealfest's Ice Cream
t ,;, jv Sandwiches ;J,\ 45 c
| Breakfast Club Grade A Florida Medium A,.or.a
HWpiHn' / Eaas no Snack Crackers.. 347
j IK V\ \ Welchade Low-Cal or Regular Carnation Enriched
\ \ Gra P e 'ink .... 3 $| Evaporated Milk6.r. 98'
\\ W FA P Halved Greenwood Sliced or With Onions
[(/}> u Bartlett Pears . 4 t 3 3 $1 Pickled Beets I9 C
W NA V F& P Fruit B Ls P Golden Cream Style
<# Cocktail 5 T*!S" Cor 6 -''
Wi,a Lemon Garden Peas 6 tSf S 1
Joy Liquid e e O e e 3^XEc
Flavors ' Tomatoes 5 t 3 s 3 $ l
S? Ge,atin ** $ l Italian Dressing t 39'
m. acl a Shortening VJi 49 Green Beans .... BT.M
W'ch'shireSauce b ;' 49'
Shore Stuffed
reserve (3\?\ BUket OllVeS .... 'm 39'
PttmflhSb 4luL
i 0 |Ht Suave Normal, D& T, Extra-Hold
Sta>Puff Rinse ... 9 :" 79' jj Hair Spray jQQTM]
Tomato Juice ... r 29 c -49'
Colors | II d L. jti
TOWeIS .......... 29* M3L S'n.nless Steel Double Edged
Regv'.,., Gillette Bladec
Modess... pV's9 c ,.,* S
pi xr All lOc-off label I (
y Reg. All Cold Water Dishwasher 10c-off deal "* pj ii 1 mJL n
.* e r9e / 1 Detergent Li quid All All Detergent Lux Liquid Liquid D 20c-off deal
9 ' n pk9 Gio/pitg. 20 o, Detergent For Drshe? L r.ile, Whk Uqrfd
C
52 c 3 reg. size* 35c half gal.
1 I 20c



Don't forget, lF^\mi
H redeem your'l3%jfw
m 7?,z/ v/> bf 'iiHf f fU f f
tin
iil Don 1 m ' 4 thince to collect your FR£f Sr |f:fv
ji&'.'Jv ceproducliony of iamouy paintings! Y fe: : : : >
| PUBLISH j

JJairy
Publijc Corn Oil
Maigarine ;'. b 39 c
6<~off label. Chiffon Regular
Margarine ..-. : t ;' b 43 c
Pillibury Snowflokc
Dinner Rolls ~
Pillsbury Orosft
Danish Rolls * 39 c
Kraft's Cracker Berral Mallow
Cheddar Cheese '%£; 69 c
Kraft's Cracker Barrel Ckedder
Extra Sharp '.!£ 85 c
Armour s Miss Wiscenstn Medium Aped
Longhorn Cheese.... .. .*T69 C
Wisconsin CbeoM Bar ftaverful
Muenster Cheese 97 c
Delicious Dairi-Fresk
Cottage Cheese 59 c
Buko Assarted
Cheese Spreads 29
(Mushroom, Salmon, Shrimp,
lohstor. Ham)
(^fmen(^fc^ < Q^ctai
Stauffers Frasea
Macaroni & Beef .... 9 c
Morton's Chicken, loaf, nr Turkey
Pot Pies 5 Sa $ 1
Marten's Delicious fracen
Macaroni & Cheese .. 5
With (Boat Sauce, Merten's
Spaghetti 5 5£ $ 1
Rich's Non-Dairy
Coffee Rich 2 HZ. 49 c
Fictsweet frasea Cut
Green Beans 43 c
Birds lye Bahy or
Fordhook Limas .X 1 33 c
Booth's Skinless Fresen
Sole Fillets ',Z 79<
Barton's Tasty fracen
Fish Puffs 49 s
Mrs. Paul's frasea
Fish Sticks 49 c

Prices are effective
Through Wednesday noon,
July 16,1969
Taraew'i Tatty S o. 10 *. 16 o.
Sliced Bologna 29' 49* 69*
Cook-Quik 1 leaded
Voal Steaks VST 99*
Copoland'i Daliciouf Sliced
Cooked Ham........X $ 1 39
Famous Oscar Mayor
All-Meat Wieners .. 79*

PUBLIX

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street

Chun King Chun King Chun King Chun King Chun King Chun King New Drive Lifebuoy
Chicken Chow Mein Beef Cho P Sue Chinese Vegetables \ Bean Sprouts Chinese Noodles Soya Sauce Detergent White soap
dt3o3ean #303 can #303 can #303 can #303 can 5 oz. bot. giant pkg. bath 2 size
# 63c 63c 35c 19c 21c 23c 89c 49c

SWIFT S PREMIUM PROTEN GOV T.
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE^j
Swift's Premium Bone-In
Pot Roast 85 c
Swift's Premium English Cut Boneless
Beef Roast ly*
Swift's Proten Boneless Roast,
Denver Oven *1
Swift's Premium Steak,
London Broil *i 19
Swift's Premium Tasty
Chuck Steaks 89*
Swift's Premium Beef
Short Ribs 59*
Roth's Honey-Cure
Boneless Ham s l s
(Plus 100 ixtre SAM Green Stamps with Coupon)
Swift's Premium Boneless Canned
Hostess Hams s 4* 9
(Plus 100 Extra SAN Green Stomps with Coupon)
2 lb. pkg. Swift's Premium Butterball light A all light
dark moat meat
Turkey Roast... *2 s 3 4
(Plus SO Extra SAH Grean Stamps with Coupon)
Swift's Promium Boneless
Smoked Daisies ....... 89*
Swift's Promium Flavorful Pork
Bag Sausage...... JiJ: 69*
Swift's Promium Stick-Stylo
Braunschweiger ... 59*
Swift's Promium Tasty Frosh
Sliced Belogaa X'49*
Armour Star Natritiaas Slicod
Beef Liver 89*
Famous Orango Sand labol
Herman's Wieners. 7.T89*

FLAVORFUL. PALM
RIVER BRAND
Sliced
Bacon
l-lt>. pkg.
69*

j£S StSsmsifa- ; Jgf 1

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

i?^*~
mgmm^§m§mm^' \ I L'i
Tasty Kitckaa-Frask
Potato Salad 39 c
flavorful OM fashion
Baked Beans . 39 c
Slicasl Cookosl Salami or
Chopped Ham T 59 c
>-asso
inlood Troat, Tasty Florida
Small Shrimp Ifc .79 c
ireload Troat, Daliciovs Froth Rod
Grouper Fillets 89 c
Lr ji /sj j 7- T~B
,
Sliem S£>ane

North Caroiiaa Kilo Driod
Sweet Potatoes.. 12*
Tangy, Rofroshing Florida
Limes 39*
Salad Favorito, Farm Frosh
Tomatoes V,l:'39*
Salad-Fort act Crisp Florida <=*
Cucumbers.... 3 " 19*

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Stores hours: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.

Friday. July 11,1969, The Florida AI lip tor.

EXTRA PF*^
o
1 Rath's Honey-Cure |
Boneless Ham |
lb. $1.59 1
' (Expires Wed., July 16, 1969) |
xg*aaaaaooaaaaa^WagdfcHiftftaaaftftftftfl
EXTRA
WGreenStampsgPj
>
Swift's Premium Boneless ;
Canned Hostess Hams ;
4 lb. can $4.99 ;
> 2 (Expires Wsd., July 16, 1969)
xeeeefteeeeeeafuuuukbeftaflftaflftftaaaaaaaa
EXTRA IF* s *!
n Sta mps Q
Right Guard
Spray Deodorant
4 oz. can
3 (Expires Wsd., July 16, 1969)
EXTRA IF^l
> ;
Colgate Dental Cream
5 oz. Tube
-
* (Expires Wed., July 16, 1969)
xaeeeeeaaaaaaaaaaaknaeaaaaaaaaaooae*
|i|
11 Anacin Tablets i
: ioo ct. I
I 5 (Expires Wad., July 16, 1969) 1
n^,^^^.>>ririnnnnnnft EXTRA |FMJ
*WGreenStampsPj
WITH THIS COWrOH AMD POICMASt Os
I Gulf Spray Bombs
12 oz. can S
6 (Expires Wed., July 16,1969) I
E X T R A* * P * "jp- jJfi
dWGreen Sta mps g|
Lipton's Family Tea Bags 1
24 ct. Pkg. I
I 7 (Expires Wed.. July 16. 1969) |
EXTRA
iJWGreenStampsP!
Your Choice, Swift's Bid
Premium Butterball
Turkey Roast, 2 lb. pkg.
Light & Dark Meat $2.79
All Light Meat $3.49 ]
' r B. (Expires Wed.. July 16, 1969)
Eij3
Hk&dl Wit** 16H CODPOM AND PDBCMAtI
I Ole South Fruit
Cobblers 1
(Blackberry, Strawberry, Appla) 1
2 lb. Pkg.
9 (Expires Wed., July 16, 1969) 1
xaaaaanananaaaftaQQnaaaar-nnnnnnaaa
lif ll^GreenStamps
HkvwJH WITH THIS COUPON AND 9BRCMASI OF ABbI
IKikkomon Soy Suace 1
S oz. size 1
I * (Expires Wed., July 16, 1969)
cUPand^
UQE-Jr 1 -'.
sy7 -these

KM
PBUXI
R K E

Page 11



Page 12

!. Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1969

,T* ,'*v-/Y V, T*.
:y* > ?* <*ss%%*'?
;;<, ', i < -sVr' T>y>v<
;i
IM| ,
Sffifc .1
i^^MMUSUEr^^^UUsUMm
2T
V S; V Vfl
fl Vfl V ft
A/yL4S£/?6>77/£/?,s
Junior House brings
traditional plaid in two new
lights... by giving it that
daring look for fall 69. Add
a ban-ion shirt and have
new dimension for the on
the go girl. Found in
better sportswear at Maas
Brothers.

/ \ s>:%%v>>>x : >::X:X:X:X>:svX>:s:*^
i 1 j>;xxx : x : x : : : :^^
/ \ . .V*VVVVVt'VV%
/ v , *% , # .% # # l #%\%** # *** # "***\** # # *% # *%***%** # # ****** # *** !
I X **.*****"*****"****** ****^*^*l*^ X*l*X***%**************** * X
, X*X l*l*t # X /I l*!vX I # v****v. X l * # "******** *** **X l # **X # X # I # !*. , .* * # ****v**v#v****" !v! !** *%***!vl **l l # *%*l*l *************/
r : :;:;:;:;:v:v:;:vj
W*"* x *£P!L*L

HOW
DOES
IT
FEEL
TO BE
FASHIONABLE?

i&m
B
/ j'
>
S7L VERMANS
Andrea keeps her cool in
this cooler than cool tunic
top and shorts sun and fun
outfit in a grey patchwork
cotton print. The tunic top
is accented by red calico
printed shorts and sash tie.
Be cool in this outfit from
Silvermans.

FIGURE FAIR
Like to look pretty while
you lounge? Then you nee
a lounge set of silver nylon
and metallic. Long sleeve
top of nylon with covere
buttons tops the pants of
metallic tricot. Sizes: pet petsm.,
sm., petsm., med. . about $25.



I
v > "'
H
in a wide-open
nd three button
the nod at the
STzop. when
/ extra-daring
r wmofa 6y adding
scarf on your head
test wild, "pirate
odeled by Karen.
\
w%\ %? IMEBiWB^^^
Wwi %|P x,
iSSfc&i* Im|Bi|lk 1 r
MHIBMmi g |?Ri'' ImHL
. %£ w-l*^|' : ,v

*6** :
MM
tf&Mtxk. .'- % ' A i(SMp/ >
£MW' ' V*l S;
A ( S lA& *, |f^-
/ ; £
gmbm* Bftl
i
/W
, |g\
. / ~ hHHh
t bHHP <; l
fps ifr*it7£3KA
rfeJii: ; Jf
, s§iif r~
f'- >!!{!!* r<
I > \
K|
IMfr/ WgSegj&ffZ
ySt %
it
STAG AND DRAG
Striking is the word for this
black and white outfit from
Stag and Drag. The skirt
features a black and white
check pattern made of
100% cotton, and accented
with a black patent leather
belt. The black voile, sheer
blouse is quite feminine
with ruffles running up the
front, and also on the
sleeves. Modeled by Charla.

% 4 v In^B
s
| 'r r:
I IbH f^m
~: A>\v: VwV wM?
'jgfe | ^fflr

j_l__ jjv.^
vt| S'J
:*
shs/Wscott-
Charisma has the perfect
dress for summer. The deep
neckline and printed sash
are just enough to give it
real class. 100% acetate,
available in sizes 3-13.
Modeled by Judy.
v r A
5
0 <
fashion layout by. . joyce gehrke
photography by .. aaron law
figure fair photo by .. eric littlejohn

Friday, July 11,1969, The Florida Alligator,

SEARS
The latest in the fashion
world is the jumper dress
with its own contrasting
blouse. The off-white
jumper with a navy blue
blouse can be worn dressy
or casual. Sizes 5-13.
Modeled by Gail.

Page 13



*G A TOR CLASSIFIEDS*

1 FOR SALE i
Zeiss binocular microscope, excellent
specifications, brand new, good for
med school, a real bargain, $795. Call
376-9551. (A-st-155-p)
Honda S-90 1966 Excellent
condition $l5O. Call John Fortner
372-9289 includes helmet.
(A-2t-156-p)
2 ROYAL standard typewriters. 1
elite, 1 pica like new. Cost $260 each
new. Just cleaned will sell for $125
each. Phone 378-6403 evenings after
six. (A-st-155-c)
Unused, Costom-made Flexsteel
hide-a-bed Early American sofa,
quilted cotton print. S4OO retail. Our
price: $275 or best offer. 378-6022.
(A-2t-156-p)
1967 Honda 305 cc Scrambler, in
unused condition, dark green, low
mileage and many extras, call
3 76-0516 after 2:00 P.M.
(A-2M56-P)
Canoe l7 ft. fiberglass Seminole.
New s2oo; now $125. Sailing rig
for above $75 (new, $150). Call
372-7942 after 6:00. WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS! 40%
OFF TO STUDENTS. 2-Drawer
suspension files, list for $49.50, you
pay $29.70. JR Office Furniture Co.
620 S. Main St. Phone 376-1146.
(A-5M55-C)
1961 Plymouth radio heater air cond.
Call 376-8615 between 4:00 and
8:00 week-days anytime weekends.
$375 or best offer. (A-3t-157-p)
STEREO Must sell, need bread! Top
quality, like new. Garrard, Electro
Voice Utah. S2OO. Call Dave at
372-1272. (A-st-157-p)
1967 YAMAHA YR l-350cc touring.
Many extras. New SIOOO. S3OO cash
and assume payments. Call Jeff at
378-5311 ext. 25. (A-2t-157-p)
Windmill Class Sailboat complete
with new Gator trailer $650.
372-3333. Metal bunk beds w/mattresses $35.
Mayfair monaural tape recorder
$75. Phone 372-7795. (A-lt-157-p)
AFRICAN basenji barkless (dog),
male AKC, planned breeding for
show, loving temperament, whelped
1/19/69, SSO below cost. Call
376-4103. (A-st-157-p)
Garage sale household items
including furniture and some
antiques. 244-A Flavet 111 U. of F.
Campus. July 12 & 13. (A-lt-157-p)
Sale: Farfisa combo compact
transistorized organ and all new solid
body dual pickup electric autoharp.
378-0313 after 3 p.m. (A-lt-157-p)
YOU saved and slaved for wall to
wall carpet. Keep it new with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-157-c)
Sub-let Ruby D. Apt. AC pool 70
mo. Call 378-6203 after 6:00 P.M.
Available now. (B-2t-156-p)

|f \ W \ SPECIAL m
ITjU FRIDAY 1
SPECIAL I
B LUNCH & DINNER if
1 SAUTEED FISHi
I ALMONDINE 1
if WITH TARTAR SAUCE ¥ S
680
I MORRISON'S 1
I CAFETERIAS I
||L GAINESVILLE MALL Wl

FOR RENT

A few units of privacy remain at LA
MANCHA for the fall. See
Gainesvilles newest apartment idea
nearing completion at the corner of
SE Bth Ave & 9th St. Rental trailer
open on the site 3-5 pm, Tuesdays,
Thursdays and Fridays. Phone
,372-2662 for info. (B-3t-157-p)
Air conditioned room quiet Golfview
subdivision bordering campus.
Limited kitchen priviledges. 521 S.W.
27th St. Phone 376-5859.
(B-6t-156-p)
RANCH STYLE LIVING two br.
apt. large closets & tile bath. Fully
panelled & AC, use of pool & BBQ
house Walking distance of new golf
course to be opened this summer.
Sorry no children no pets. $l5O per
mo. Call 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-st-155-p)
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)
Apt for rent available July and Aug.
Call 376-5043, 1241 S.W. 4th Ave.
Convin. to Norman Hall and Art
Building. (B-3t-156-c)
Sleeping room l h block Anderson
Phone installed for male $7 wkly
summer $lO other times Skinner
Apt. 2 105 NW 15 St Ground floor
see in p.m. (B-2t-156-p)
98 SOB B 8 800'Mi IMIWWW;
I WANTED ]|
Need a small or sports car. Would like
MG midget-type. Must be in good
mech. cond. & good tires. Will pay
300-400. Call Dan at 378-8787 after
1 pm. (C-lt-157-p)
SEX! CLO has gone coed for the
summmer. If you are looking for an
inexpensive place to stay near
campus we're it! Room & 3 meals
a day for S6O a month. Space also
available for fall. Stop by 117 N.W.
15 st. or call Kim or Paul at
378-9420. (C-st-155-p)
One male roommate wanted for
University Gardens one bedroom or
sublet whole apt. Air conditioned
pool carpeting. Call 372-5921 or
378-4565. (C-3t-156-p)
HELP WANTED f
Listeners wanted will pay $2.25
for lVz session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Univ. ext. 2-2049
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. (E-st-157-p)
| AUTOS |
67 VW excellent condition transistor
radio new tires $1295 or best offer.
Call 372-0939. (G-2t-157-p)

~ The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1969

Page 14

| AUTOS |
1966 MGB excellent condition new
exhaust system and rings. Good tires.
Luggage rack, racing mirror, tonneau
top and boot. 26 mpg. Only $1550.
Call 376-4962. (G-2t-156-p)
1962 Rambler station wagon AC,
radio 40,000 miles. Needs minor
repair. Best offer accepted. 378-6843
anytime except July 4 & 5.
(G-st-156-p)
67 Fiat 850 Fastback very clean
needs minor body repair $llOO Call
376-7434 or see at 1829 NW 2 Ave.
Apt. 5. 27000 miles good
mechanically. (G-lt-1 57-p)
1965 Rambler American automatic
transmission radio heater 4-door
white walls excellent condition. Very
clean. Must sell. Make offer. Call
372-2317. (G-st-157-p)
67 Valiant Signet, 4dr, R, H,
automatic, powersteering, white,
$1650 or best offer. Call Ananth
376-0770, 376-1545, 5 to 8 pm or
before 8:30 am. (G-4t-157-p)
PERSONAL |
V y
"Tonight we are man and wife. . &
pant. So what if she was no good?'
Thanks for a wonderful and happiest
weekend. Dummy-Shump. The Sexy
Chick. (J-lt-157-p)
Am selling untouched new $56 long
med. dk. brown human hair fall for
$39. Price includes professional cut
and style to your choice. Call after 9
p.m. 2-9014. (J-lt-157-p)
World's largest Paper Mill has
positions available now for Chemical,
Mechanical and Industrial Engineers.
Career Representative of Union
Camp Corporation will be
interviewing at the Placement Office
Wednesday, July 9. (J-3t-156-p)
Two affectionate kittens to good
home. 1 all black male. Grey/white
fern. Housebroken, adorable.
378-4455 even. (J-2t-156-p)
Want to buy used textbooks for the
speedwriting home course. Call
376-4801 after 6. (J-3t-156-p)
FOUND W |
Lost German shepherds Vicinity of
towers, Wednesday night. Reward.
Call 378-2289. (L-3t-156-p)

HD
BROADCAST
H /J|
WT£ - - .JZaSf&ibKiL"^
MBS

vy.y.SV.v^.*.**v.
LOST & FOUND |
Found: Weimeraner puppy with
chain collar. NW section. Call
378-0036. (L-3M57-NC)

PART I the W blttli ENDS SAT- ALL SEATS
7:00 \(^^l $200
THE TWO PART PRODUCTION Os
LEO TOLSTOYS Jf?f Afl SSir
w 3&peaceSc
PACT II SUN MON-TUB
I 808 JACKIE 1
HOPE GLEASON I
SHOW YOU HOW
TO COMMIT MARRIAGE.
JANE WYMAN
I "HOWTO COMMIT I
MARRIAGE I
TECHNICOiOR
(Ml Supirt* For MATIHH Audiwicts |||'
jSHgg || MMMAL OUCMTIQW AOVISIO WSm
I A MINUTE TO PRAY, ftjnnl I
A s to die JfL*
InEXTWEEJ^JORRORJ
|

if' j
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)


1H
s&Ca/VUr
W.C FIELDS
808 HOPE
'7*kcvtf&'
AND,
Oo^-ow^
U- Ojtcj£>kjJ\~*
gfund/vj,
7:00 eJvil :
SIA/Vib&yL, &AA*ch4rO**AAArf* l>
AOMI SSI ON



CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICES |
Experienced drummer wants work in
mral rock band. Knowledge of all
types rock. Call 378-3191 after 5 pm.
(M-4t-157-p)
Tuning done ioc to 15c a
p, E CE CALL 372-1688. N.W.
SECTION. (M-2t-157-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
- Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2nd
st 378-7330. (M-ts-157-C)
oata PROCESSING SERVICES
programming, systems
ANALYSIS AND CONSULTING
Scientific or Commercial.
CONTACT: Jack Stephens
COMPUTER MANAGEMENT
CORPORATION 378-1615.
(M-st-157-p)
TYPING ALL SUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. IBM ELECT. TYPEWRITER
TYPE, IN MY HOME. CALL
376-7809. (M-st-156-p)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
My office os small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-giasses at University Opticians
519 l /2 SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-155-2t-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376 0710. (M-14M55-P)

IpuUuHnpj jhf/foi//
|VW|V 3
| JOHN GLEN KIM
WAYNE CAMPBELL DARBY
*
Blil THE YEAR S BEST SELLER
HP f ABOUT THE TRUE WEST!
Jeremysute Robertouvall strothermartin HENRY HATHAWAY MAR6UERITE ROBERTS
CHARLESPORTIS apaSTSure.^S E EPMKjITINIANS
PMKjITINIANS EPMKjITINIANS RAINBOW*
\ !!_'*" 171 1414 A I
| NOW AT- 2:00 4:30 7:00 9:30

Friday, July 11, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

UgeGaTtvG&n..
Wt KNOW now YoiiGoT'T YoiiGoT'T
Uoh 6ofA FuWYOI'&R!"
S H£Cfi sH§?SHeHteTo.
> uouGfTAFHi£HPAHO£L,
WILLIAM. VALERIC fiT 4"
SMITH STARRETT l=J
l ! .
piut rus>c>npm
FMHCIRL M
| mnM*
Stowing COIOK
/l; JT Produced bjr l %-v. IT
MAXWEU SENOEL Productions
kmSi U S FILMS. Inc. -

Page 15

__Pyfw *TifaiL)it }
HELD OVER
i oncI ast I'
EVERY CH| E LD SHOULD d JRV performances I
j FLY|A MAGie CAR, A Tm
| CII^MCTOBY,
ms N. W. nth Si. \ttt/
*IE SHOES OF THE FISHERMAN
RESTORES FAITH IN FILMS!
MGM f.enls 3 Gro.g, Enghina edition
v. f Anthony Quinn-Oskar Wemer
David Janssen Vittorio De Sica
Leo McKemJohn Gielgud
Barbara Jefford Rosemarie Dexter
[J 2r f******** M Laurence Olivier
HLDIOVK is JIU about 1 the gems. ERNIE and I
bursts in, followed by I
,8 also looking for the diamonds. B
(And thats just the I
j* If first reel!) Ji
BMi
ihii MmA
- I< s W li,ft BfwiwM
kvA 1 1 \k b S
'9r' #. m n 4 j;
lul* f, 11 jf i HR I
I I r T I ] -V >]| .
. .1 i .M .. M ... i '; MB
Carol Lynley 'Julie Newmar* Panaviuon*and Metrocolor 16 | .' > "'



Page 16

Ip The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1969

rAKJKIcn ai I d A\/Anc Quantity Rights Reserved Prices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon, Julv 10 -16
12-oz. CANNED ALL FLAVORS w ,nn.d,xi .to*.., .nc. c0fy...ht......
CHEK DRINKS 15/M lawn mower
A 3 H P 4 CYCLE BR,GGS & STRATTON ENGINE
Wf Rf vv IjR I V lei I 0 non
L Lis LI W 8 M. m m a
mK VIH V 1. v H j#****** vacuum lift designtempered steelbalanced & tested
No. 1 Toll Con THRIFTY MAID . Limit 6 With $5.00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes % \ tubular steel heavy chrome plated 2 pc.\handli
mh mm mm mam mmm mmamm mm amm m mm /mm mm Vs | 3 POSITION SLIDE TYPE THROTTLE CONTROL
Fll A DAI) A TEI\ AM 11 I# ifi ,\
EVArUIfAICI/ ffllLlY lU'\
PAPER TOWELS. 4/l. | \39
1-Lb. Pkg. LAND 0' SUNSHINE GOLD MEDAL Plain or Self-Rising | \ jtKtm
Limit 1 With $5.00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes Limit 1 With $5.00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes Ij
BUnER 69' FLOURS 49 I fy"t jffs
Y.C. PEACHES 4/sl. FRUIT JUICE 3/sl. TV^SPIS^PP
BATH T155UE.....5/sl. VIEHHA SAUSAGES/SI. IF
No. % Can BLUE BAY No 303 Con THR | FT y MAID 3-Sv. OR Large _ 26-oz. CRACKIN' GOOD BIG 40 FAMILY CREMES
TUHA FISH 4/sl. SWEET PEAS 6/sl. COOKIES 39*
No. 303 Can THRIFTY MAID No. 300 Can THRIFTY MAID . ?n nmF nARi irur PBFFTIGF
TOMATOES 8/sl. PORK & BEANS 8/sl. BREAD 29*
M& M CANDY...3/sl. POTATO STICKSIO/SI. DINNER ROLLS2/2S*
MAXWELL house all grinds 4 Pk. MM^DARLING
all grinds 68
Astor Coffee 39^Mhm T TOOTHPASTE 25*
Limit 1 of Your Choice With $5.00 or More Purchose Excluding Cigarettes ABBBB
MORE DEEP CUT SPECIALS
CLOROX BLEACH 69* tUfil np 14 vlt n)l
CHEK DRINKS 5/sl. Bft dinner plate
THRIFTY MAID EXTRA FANCY LONG GRAIN 100 G DIXIE HOME :
Rice 3 39* Tea Bags 89* Wmmlm .1
P reserves 69 < Meat 39*
a I w W %0 4# If M I iF magljfc^ v ~ Each week a piece of distinctive Granada dinnerware
BEECHNUT STRAINED BABY JUSBmNOHjJ, WHO! C.NO < Sm 2
Fnntfl Q ( fnirlfon 0Q K'p I Js' s .:i3'L" ~haWp eh, c,n
I Vlll I %lm WII Jm M Excluding tobKco, liquor and liquid dsiry products.
* ..,, 'ayrii ______
11 [lllf W VALtS STAMM I [ill J TOP VALUE STAMM >ITITIWTOP VALUE STAMM 11 [lll¥ W YALufsTAMM 1 EpYVALIS STAMPS I TITIT
* W M COUPON ANO hr(*M 0 WITH HfVUII COUPON -Utce.ll 04 w< .OUPOH AND PUOCNASI O* WITH NIWIPAPO COUPON ANO PU.CH.iI Os 1 I V/F VALUE J I AfWrj fl 111 I TOD VAI HE CT A AIM I
HPSFWB Dxrc 1 fBB u ____ f i coupon .no pucH.ii o B LIA B _Y r ,_ T aAuwK Aivird
1 TWO PKCS a W BCCF TWO PKG S RIROSEYI HALF GAL. onr __ I
white Acre Peo. ; steokettea Corn-On-Ccb u r TH^ | V M I Dow Handi Wrap WfflS -o.c. zae ato,
mcmullin t OfeOKeTTeS good thru JULY 10 EppEav Ollls D THRO JULY 16 ; InStOflt CoffCQ l
1 AT TOU LOCAL WINN Oil 4t lOM iKM UMMIM 1 AT roue LOCAL W.NN D...E >1 AT SOliA LOCAL .. MM M... I 1 #6 1
*i~^^^^^^^TT*T*s*T*sT*?TyT gT?TTT*s"r7MiffS^^Trnrn'iTfTrrsTTASTsyiJ la£3si___ attmikm. n M
- LTsTSTrsnrra 1 .All IlfmTpMH.
Giant Size 91c . Large Size FAULTLESS . 15-oz. 49c . 20-oz No. 1 Can PARD "*
Cold Power Detergent 41? Spray Starch .... 59? Dog Food .... 2/35?
A A Giant Size LAUNDRY 20-oz. FAULTLESS 14-oz. JACK'S CHOCOLATE
M a n3? rine Ajax Detergent . 91? Fabric Finish .... 59? Chip Cookies .... 39?
MIRACLE WHITE 16-oz. 49c . Quorts 79c . Half Gal. Large Size 41c . Giant Size 12-oz. NABISCO FAMOUS
Cleaner . . 91? Fab Detergent.... 91? Cookie Asst. . 45$
1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS



^lftfto7 ES 100 7 NNERS
mlww ,N CASH
W-D BRAND FED USDA CHOICE
Oolmomcos 1 j
FLA. GRADE 'A' FRESH FRYER THIGHS OR
< .. A '.-, MAi 12-oz. BORDENS PROCESSED AMERICAN TASTE O'SEA BONELESS PERCH
Ariiintliws u 69* sliced cheese ....73* fish fillets 39<
w,# * STICK CHEESE 57* ALL MEAT FRANKS...49*
Pork C110D5.... /T CHEESE 2 65* SLICED BOLOGNA.... 69*
. : r PIMENTO CHEESE..... 59* TURKEY 3/sl.
SIICOO BOCOII #7 CAN BISCUITS 2/39* BEEF LIVER 69*
.. ... *'*-.- T;~ . - 2%-Lb. FRENCH FRIED HORMEL
. $ a 59 FISH STICKS 99* CAN HAMS 3 $2.99
Gr* 800 T.... 0 s A PRODUCE & FROZEN FOOD
W-D BRAND IAN...Mw 200 SWmptW/Cpupon \
MM. MM '.V W % A $ J|99 GA. RED FRESH SWEET
Or. 8ee1...10 4 PEACHES 5- $ 1
. MORE FROZEN FOODS
LEMONADE 9/99' MEAT P1E5....6 -*1
# Quarts DIXIE WHIP DESERT
FRIED CHICKEN.. .$1.89 TOPPING 2 $ 1
mb. Poly Bog SHOESTRING FRENCH IH 188 PE HI BE O
FRY POTATOES....3/$ 1 harvest fresh produce
6-PIl ESKIMO
Hi MMI HI AH% EH /r I WESTERN VINE-RIPE JUMBO WESTERN VINE-RIPE JUMBO
CREAM 8AR...2/sl. Cantaloupes...3/sl. Honeydews 69*
mjkm m hji dM /A California seedless vine-ripe
WAFFLES. 3/51 white GRAPES 29* Tomatoes .. 29*
PIZZA PIE. 79* Fancy Corn... 10/59* Nectarines... 3'* sl.
GREEN GIANT BABY LIMAS. WHITE or NIBLETS DIXIANA Poly Bag Mustard or Collardsor Torres w/rooH HARVEST FRESH MIX 'EM UP CUCUMBERS OR
Corn 2/69* Greens3/SI. Bell Peppers 5/39*
Peas 6/f I. Rich...4/sl. Bing Cherries- 49'MRggfHS
." i it* (if ?wy*wTi imj j§3[p imj
Tile Brite Cleaner j Knit* BpHF Roost Ground Beef I Ground Beef
GOOD THRU JULY 16 KtWHhD MRU JULY 16 GOOD THRU J ULV 16 # GOOD THRU JULY 16 I
moz LAWRys " "12-oz""GEORGIA MAID "sWEET 12-oz. SWIFT W/GRAVY
Seasoned Pepper . 49? India Relish .... 37? Roast Beef .... 65? '£ "*
12-oz No. 2 BUSH GREAT e a #
Elbow Macaroni. 2/33? Swift Prem .... 59? Northern Beans . 2/31? Margarine
.. a. oz SWIFTS No. 303 Can BUSH 4/1
Sea Shells .... 2/31? Vienna Sausage . 27? Gold Hominy . 2/25? "...
1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

Friday, July 11,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1969

s'
Mm Campus; Crier
C M Sponsored by Student Government. J
INTERESTED IN SERVING
AS AN NSA DELEGATE?
Student Government is looking for candidates for the
Special Election on July 30, 1969, which will select
delegates to the National Student Congress (annual
convention to the U.S. National Student Association) to
be held at El Paso, Texas, August 19-29, 1969. If you
are interested, please contact Lou Tally, Ombudsman,
Room 232 of the Union, 8:30 am to noon weekdays or
by telephone, 392-1650 24 hours a day. NOTE:
FINALS ARE AUGUST 23-29. THEREFORE,
CANDIDATES SHOULD BE EITHER, 1) Attending
classes but not taking finals, 2) Taking finals only the
last two or three days of the convention (and would
therefore leave the convention early), or 3) Be able to
rearrange exam schedule so as to permit attendance at
the Congress, at least until August 26, 1969.
a**************************************************************************
Announcing
Homecoming 69
SLOGAN CONTEST
WIN RULES
V*
* Cruise for two to Nassau on the U.S. Bahama 1. Slogan should have a general Homecoming
Star courtesy of Eastern Steampship Co. and theme and have a max of seven words.
House of Travel
2. Contest runs July 1, to midnight July 31,
* Thanksgiving weekend for two courtesy of 1969.
Ocean Manor Resort, Fort Lauderdale
3. All entries must be mailed or delivered to
* Orange Bowl Extravaganza for two, tickets on Homecoming slogan contest, Florida Blue
the fifty yard line, tickets by reviewing stand Key Office, Reitz Student Union, University
for parade, accommodations,entertainment at of Florida, 32601. i
several Miami nightclubs
Winner of the Slogan Contest will have first 4. All entries become the property of Florida
choice of prizes! Blue Key. I
Anyone interested in working for Homecoming apply at the Activities Desk, Third Floor,
Reitz Union. It's your thing, do what you want to do ..
* .. ~..a I



A
U isfft
'Sr'- '" l|f|l|lf 6
g B ; If 9f9HH|YI If* I
}lvH fm Bj
"B |r m|H r> MSO
' \ fe V o'..': B j" :
M^MSBm K: v k.;
-- - JjjTJaaMgfe^|jdi&fe- jto^ v
* >*B
b I ** HP HI &&&&
PPPUWMU 0 fl 1J BM
B ft fl BUfl
IB
fl 'in Aiirf
DOUG CASE
WAS / GOING TOO FAST ?
It's not all watching Chevys, Fords and motorscooters for campus
policeman James Bishop, standing guard at the Florida Field
checkpoint on Stadium Road. Keeping unauthorized cars out of Area
One is a hot job, even with the shade from the new metal
guardhouses. But at least there's a friendly coed who stops to ask
directions on her way to class to make a trying day a little less
nervewracking.
AT FORT CLINCH
No Cannons There,
But Balls Explode

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
A museum storeroom has
turned into an explosive
situation for the Fort Clinch
State Park Museum at
Fernandina Beach.
For 30 years, museum
officials there have been
collecting Civil War cannon balls
for a future exhibit. Now they
have 150 relics but the
exhibit is dead.
The cannon balls are live.
Dr. J.C. Dickinson Jr.,
director of the Florida State
Museum, a UF department,
became suspicious of the
10-pound antiques when his
staff was preparing to clean
them for a pyramid exhibit.
He pointed to a small cap on
one of the large spheres. That
could be live.
As the Jacksonville team was
trying to melt the 100-year-old
wax seal, the black powder
inside the antique exploded. The
team at Jacksonville Naval Air
Station was protected by a
shield.
The second week in July, the
demolition team will visit a
dusty storeroom at Fort Clinch.
Quarterly Meets
For Staff Confab
A staff-organizational meeting
of the Florida Quarterly will be
held Sunday afternoon at 3. The
purpose of the meeting is to
discuss reorganization of the
present staff and editorial plans
for the upcoming issue.
Attendance of the current staff
is mandatory. Florida Quarterly
office, 336 Reitz Union.

Mission: destroy 149 lethal relics
which are too-well-made to be
disarmed.
_____
TURN
OFF
SUMMER
9
ZA'R
auto air conditioning
FIRST... nd tUII Bwt
cotta lata than factory air
GODDING A CLARK
MOTORS
2nd AVE. & 2nd St. S.E.
378-2311
OPEN 8 P.M. MON.-SAT.

Mans Sea Invasion Studied

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
Mans invasion of the sea will
depend largely on his ability to
cope with the elements of
underwater environment,
according to Dr. Omar Shemdin,
specialist in coastal and
oceanographic engineering at
UF.
Regardless of what man is
going to do, whether building
cities underwater or just mining
the ocean floor, it always
involves the problems of
air-water, air-land and water-land
interactions and we are
involved in all of these areas of
research, Shemdin said.
Research in the Department
of Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering has brought the sea
and its problems to a hangar-like
building on campus, where
models of coastal problems are
built to scale for development
and study.
The scene is not unlike a
movie set where mechanically
produced waves beat against the
shoreline, propelled by the
power of winds.
The largest project in the
building is a scaled down version
of Jupiter Inlet, on Floridas
East Coast, measuring 60 by 100
feet on a scale of one to 60
horizontally and one to 20
vertically.
Nearby is a study of a jetty
for the outer harbor of Aruba,
and in a special wind tunnel
Arubas petroleum docking
facilities expansion is undergoing
investigation.

Our cover:
r mmHBBBI
ppu
v JHHBiBHpHHHBHBa
j| n H
iggMiilH
Behind this cover you will find a magazine of the arts: stimulating poetry,
art from the UF, and two short stories. $1.25 will cover the cost.
Available at: Florida Bookstore, Campus Shop and Bookstore, Mike's
Bookstore, the Design Shops, and the Subterranean Circus.

The models are very
satisfactory for what we are
trying to do, Shemdin said.
We cannot build a model and
.expect to study everything in it.
If the problem is currents, we
can reproduce the currents
exactly. We might have to build
a slightly different model to
study sediment transport
(movement of underwater sand
and materials) for instance.
For every process going on
in the field, there are certain
equations that must be
considered in the design of the
model, Shemdin noted.
Jupiter Inlet was designed to
study currents and it has done
that particular job very
accurately.
Model studies arent a new
innovation at the College of
Engineering. The coastal and
oceanographic engineering
department is very likely the
only one in the nation with a
history of work in this field
dating back to 1954.
What is new, Shemdin said, is
basic research for engineering.
Scientists have been at it for
years, he said, but the
engineer has not. Weve had to

SALES-SER VICE-RENTALS
" AuthoriZed Smith Corona
Adler Dealer
Dealer
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
FORMERLY Hancock office Equipment
582 N. Main St. 376-5551

Friday, July 11,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

ta*.e whatever the scientists have
been doing and try to apply it
for oceanographic engineering.
In many cases there is scientific
information that is not
applicable to engineering
problems. In other areas there
just isnt any information. This
is the new frontier.
Pollution, of course, is new.
Man is getting closer to the
ocean. Hes on the coastline and
moving off shore v Wherever he
goes he has to throw his wastes
away someplace.
Shemdin has conducted
laboratory work at Stanford
University and continues here.
Hes enthusiastic about the UF
facility.
I would guess it is more
versatile than any other lab in
the country. Certainly, it is the
largest. We can generate
waves . complicated
waves ... and we can control
winds, he added.
Two studies are underway
that involve a novel 140-foot
water-wave tunnel one, with
National Science Foundation
support and a second sponsored
by the Coastal Engineering
Research Center.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1969

Curtains For The State

By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
For only four and a half years has Bill Henderson
been managing the State Theatre in downtown
Gainesville, but his policies have made the small old
theatre a tradition.
When I took the job, the theatre probably
would not have lasted another six months. It was
struggling through on kiddy shows and late, late
peek jobs. The sororities had blacklisted the theatre.
There were only two theatres in town at that
time, and no one was even thinking of the university
audience. But I was.
Regular features, shows that came every year to
the State, included The Trial, Black Orpheus,
Phaedra,* Wild Strawberries, and others appealing
to the intellectual community. Professors often
recommended a State offering, But I always told
them not to require students to go, insisted
Henderson, bridling at the term required movies.
Thats not fair to the students or the movies.
It has been very interesting to watch these
students as they learn. The nearest theatres
comparable to the State are in Atlanta and Miami,
so most of these kids come in here never having
heard of The Trial,* or any of them. Their first
year, theyre fighting it, leery; then, by their third
year, the ones who are going to come around are
caught up.

The Florida Alligator
FEC Begins Seminars

Florida Experimental College,
described as an experiment in
how-to4eam, is now offering
courses for the summer term.
The Experimental College
operates on the basis that the
student has as much control over
his learning environment as the
teacher. Classes are run
informally by a coordinator, and
usually meet in the coordinators
home.
Students register by
contacting the coordinator Ksted
for the course, and by paying a
SI.OO registration fee at the first
meeting.
The coordinator and students
will decide the length the course
will run.
The following courses are
now offered:
Encounter Group:
Interpersonal relating and
sharing. Coordinators Bruce
Schell, 376-1739 and Carol
Butler, 376-7670, Tues., 7:30
pjn.
Sex and Sexual Morality:
Exploring the various social and
personal implications of our
, Have 'H v
Your Generator
OVERHAULED Special
s£so
INC LABOR
*i.
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVIQE
508 NW Bth AVE. GAINESVILLE
Mon.Frl. Bam-7 pm Sat. til 5 pm
378-4011

learned attitudes toward
sexuality. Richard P. Haynes,
392-2081 and 378-8916. Thurs.,
7:30 pjn.
Tripping: Weekend
caravans to Crescent Beach,
tubing, crab and fish fry at
Cedar Key, etc. First trip
planned this Sunday. Nancy
Grabenstein, 378-0310.
An Investigation Into Sex
and Sexuality: Who are we
sexually? How do our moralities
differ from societys standards?
Differences between men and
women and their sexual
psychologies. Nancy
Grabenstein, 378-0310. Thurs.

t Climb aboard
e S.S. Winnjammer* /J
/ Meals served from 11:00 AM to /ft
Lfe Midnight )
'/ Bernie Sher //
i at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday II
j Oysters & clams on the half shell
Michelob on draft \{\
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager Ad
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. /I
Closed Sundays 1)'

People come to Gainesville from out of town.
West coast professors get the newsletter; some
newsletters go to Vietnam. There is one man who
comes over to Gainesville from St. Petersburg on
Saturday to see that feature, then stays overnight to
see Sundays feature, then goes back to St.
Petersburg on the bus.
When he got into the movie distributing business,
It was 15 men for every j6b. A job depended on
whom you knew ...
I didnt get into the business because of a
fascination with it. A lot of its pretty tawdry, and a
lot of its fake. I can just see some guy laughing
behind his hands at the earnest discussions over
what his movie meant. It didnt mean anything.
Why cant the theatre continue operation? We
used to have a few first run movies a year to bring in
the money to permit running the less profitable
movies. Now we have to bid for the first runs
against Wometco (The Plaza) and Florida chain
(Centers I and 11, Florida), even the drive-ins are
chain operations; we just cant compete. And since
we cant get in the first run movies, we cant
support the others. So were bowing out. We could
continue with different programming, but not the
kind that gives satisfaction. Sounds kind of like art
for arts sake, doesnt it?
The swan run at the State is War and Peace,
Part One through Saturday, Part Two starting
Sunday.

7:30 pjn., starting July 17.
Seminar In Womens
Liberation: Sexual Equality,
symbolic agitation. For Women
only. Judye McCalman,
392-0243 and 372-0556.
American Jazz: An
Overview; Styles and trends in
contemporary jazz. Ann Gooch,
376-8322.
Male and Female; Dr. Mary
McCaulley.
Christianity as a Problem
Solver; Father Maril Cosgrove.
For further information, call
Dan Beardsley before 4 pjn. at
376-7539 and after, at
376-8044.

I %,'. !^Bl^fcfclf
_,.:.. u *WL
HL W |Jp
.; s ;, : ' t - Isl
.. 5 : ''MP.: :
Bl LL HENDERSON
. . .phone calls, letters
bemoaning the passing of the
State. Offers of money came
from three sources, but
Henderson refused it, saying
it would not help in the long
run. How does the passing of
his theater (he owns half
interest) affect him? "It tears
me up." What will he do now?
He doesn't know, but "I'll
only work where I chose the
features."

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
I STARKI 1 FLORIDA *^Bss)
",SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VO RITE DEALER
- HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM-6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
r
WORLD RECORD HOLDING
STOCK CARS RETURN!
ROUND ROBIN STYLE 3 ROUNDS
- AA'
Bounty Hunter Smothers Bros.
Chevrolet Oldsmobile
Wagon Red
Dodge Pontiac
The Comer Box Car II
Camaro Chevy
OVER 50 EXPECTED
FULL RACING PROGRAM
TIME TRIALS SPMf BPM RACES AT 8:00
/ 3 'A Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225

Union Shows
'Mr. Roberts
Hailed in 1955 as one of the
best movies of the year, the
Academy Award winning Mr.
Roberts comes to the Reitz
Union Auditorium this weekend.
The film shows at 7 and 9
p.m. both Friday and Saturday
nights.
Henry Fonda, James Cagney
and Jack Lemmon star in a
Naval battle of nerves between a
ships captain and the men who
serve under him. Fonda portrays
Mr. Roberts. In an effort to help
the ships enlisted men, Mr.
Roberts constantly feuds with
the captain (Cagney). Lemmon
adds humor to the picture in his
role as Ensign Pulver.
William Powell, Betsy Palmer
and Ward Bond also star in the
film.
Excited Atoms
Study Continues
A National Science
Foundation grant of $64,500
permits Dr. Earle E. Muschlitz
Jr. of the UF chemistry
department and his colleagues to
continue their study of highly
excited atoms and molecules.
The study, Metastable Atoms
and Molecules, begins its fifth
year with the grant.



The Sights And Sounds Os

* '' *'"/ \Jfj^&!Bk
f £ i^yy^^Zv^H^R^^KATSQEPpgQl^^r'
II j| £jwm&;-' .' ii

i 4 fe
| \JL 'ttfw Is &> ! '4§lfe ?
A th| W J^PjSj
ifltf ~. lillpLS jjktf! 31
a '^ v ; 'ilm #* | M| l^^HHH@^Hln^nft
pw&gMMXn adfl ~
-
A jSgSHHBppr H tfitiT t ,

% mu
av >s v ~

W ;*> &£;>
x---. M g
w / ^^^v^' (

Photos
By
Doug
Case

: .-: ....-S'' 'l||| : .^ W JgP * m
B SB P
BBBBf| B H |||i W .
HHrff tST
mm y aW^WWMMM^MBB3OT'3yMPttgBgB6awB* <, A
vCF*'t *&"% v- % S"M
al% Wl# l v in
aMmmz^ y6r pin... _, J >
Tr f "fTro *# "nillMliii *** *£&.
- rit- <<
** O r*Hgr^ptv
-fm, gjMwpwn kJP
&. : rs 2 I rj&fllf
r^lT 3 #'; g Tjffl
%? *-- > fc. -: jjffgMMWgfPp * .a#

Friday, Jdly 11,1069, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 21



Page 22

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11, 1969

Shoes, Grit: The Issues

By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Some of the issues at stake in these movies are
esthetic questions: What is art? What is it for? A
motion picture should be a work of art. And it must
first and always entertain. That is what True Grit
seeks to do.
Shoes of the Fisherman does not. Much of its

Spectacular length is spent in
living color documentary of the
rituals of the Catholic church.
The candles flickering, the pope
lying in state, the chanting, the
candles, the precision marching
2x2, the sealing wax ceremony,
the fancy costumes, and the
candles, wafting, smoking,
distorting the images of
marching cardinals whose
picture had been taken through
the flame. The commentators
mixed up married life is also

shown on the screen on the theory the viewer will
therefore conclude the commentator and his
commentary part of the story.
Shoes of the Fisherman has other serious
problems, though. The story doesnt ring true. I can
believe the Catholic church (or any Christian
organization) working with Soviet Russia; they have
fundamentally the same aims. But two other plot
premises are entirely unacceptable.
Imagine the Catholic church giving up its pretty
dresses, its castles, its gambling houses, office
buildings and regular gold shipments for one massive
economic infusion to the poor of Red China (or any
poor). Fat chance. Even if a fit of charity or a
sudden desire of philosophic consistency
overwhelmed it, its leading figures would know that
when the loot of their massive infusion was gone,
thered be even more hungry mouths clamoring for
more. And no more loot.
Also unbelievable is the picture of young,
idealistic, brave Red China bullied into starting a
third world war because the dirty capitalists and
half-capitalists (Russia) no longer let her trade

Theoman2-Diamond Open

(EDITOR S NOTE: This
bi-monthly column will be
devoted to a look at some of the
.various conventions in use
today. It assumes a working
knowledge of Bridge.)
By IRA LEE RIDDLE
Certified ACBL Director
This bid is a highly
specialized distributional opener.
It announces that the opening
bidder has a hand distributed
either 5-44 or 444-1. The
opening point count will vary
depending on the system being
played. If Standard American is
being played, the Roman
2-Diamond will usually show
about 16-22 high card points.
This puts it just under a forcing
two bid, and more than a regular
opening hand. Playing Schenken,
there are two options: limit the
2-Diamond opening to under a
1-club opener, or 17 points, or
use the Standard American
opening limits. Kaplan/Shein Kaplan/Sheinwold
wold Kaplan/Sheinwold users would probably use
the S/A limits.
Now that partner has opened
a Roman 2-Diamonds, we look
at our hand. How can we tell
partner what we have, or how do
we find out what he has? A
response of 2 NT to his
I Dick Holmes
I Jewelers
clock, WATCH & JEWELRV
I REPAIRS
I TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1 1230 W. UNI VERSITY AVE.
Vz BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

MM

isHSIH
opening bid tells partner to
bid his singleton or void next.
That way, we know that he has
at least 4 cards in the other suits.
As an example, holding the
following, partner opened
2-Diamonds, playing Roman: C:
K,J,9,7,6,5; D: A,Q,7; H: 2; S:

ROBBIES
For The Best In Steaks.
Meal s & B Q HLSandwiches
I 1718 W University Ave.
I 'On The Gold Coast

in th*e rice basket of the world, and consequently,
her people are starving.
There are interesting aspects to this picture of
China. Russias leader and the pope are old men,
whose philosophical tiredness has driven them into a
kind of moral relativism. But the face of China's
leader is young and incredibly unwrinkled; he makes
the two old men feel ashamed of themselves yet
moral relativism is embraced by the movie.

What is the point of the film? If only rich people
would give all their money to the poor of the world,
all our problems would be solved.
And what is the point of True Grit? True grit
courage, resolve, tenacity, ingenuity, integrity. On
the screen for you to admire and be entertained by.
The spunky young girl who sets out after her
fathers murderer is great. Her strictly-business,
no-nonsense attitude is made even more delightful
by the elusive sense of young womanhood Kim
Darby gives the characterization.
Theres one annoying scene in the movie, when
John Wayne is so drunk he falls off his horse. It has
become fashionable to soften up the good-guy
image by making the heroes drunkards, a weak
device at best, and here, very out of character with
the competence and clear thinking usually shown by
the character.
This movie makes for an entertaining evening,
but dont go into the Plaza early waiting in the
tiny velvet-roped waiting area gives the sensation of
a population explosion exploding in on you.

10,8, 5. The bidding went as
follows:
North East South West
2D dbl 2NT 4H
4S dbl 5C Pass
pass pass
The opening 2-Diamond bid
showed a singleton or void,
Easts double was for takeout,
showing a balanced Jhand.
Souths 2 NT was Roman, asking
for a singleton or void. Wests
4-Hearts bid was obviously
pre-emptive, and Norths
4-Spade bid had to be
competitive, but with the
distribution of South, Clubs
looked more attractive. It was
simple addition to finesse East for
the Queen of Clubs, making six
on the hand. Four Spades would
go down at least three.
Use of the Roman 2-Diamond
opener would mean that only 2
Clubs will be the strong forcing,
assuming that weak twos in the
majors are also played.

Center I The Maltese Bippy, with Martin and Rowan. The
preview promises silly disconnectedness. 1:06,2:48,4:30, 6:12,
7:58,9:46.
Center II Shoes of the Fisherman, with Anthony Quinn
made tightlipped, and a lot of footage for educational TV.
Overextended documentary, unbelievable story. 2:30, 5:30,
8:30.
Florida Chitty, Chitty, Bang Bang, with Dick Van Dyke,
Sally Ann Howes and Lionel Jeffries. Lot of travel. Light. 2, 5
and 8 p.m.
Gainesville How to Commit Marriage, with Bob Hope and
Jackie Gleason. Very funny in spots, unmerciful to all parties in
the generation gap. A little thick with the slapstick at times, but
fun evening. 8:57 and 12:40. A Minute to Pray, a Second to
Die, with Robert Ryan. 10:52.
Plaza I True Grit, with John Wayne, Glen Campbell. Kim
Darby does a great job. A movie about heroism, and very nice
indeed. 2,4:33, 7:05,9:37.
Plaza II Finians Rainbow, with Fred Astaire, Petula Clark.
Musical. 1:55,4:24,6:58,9:30.
State War and Peace, Part One, 7 p.m. Opening Sunday,
War and Peace, Part Two, 7 pan.
Suburbia Drive-in Run Angel, Run. 9:05 and 12:20.
Playgirl Killer, 10:55.
Union Mr. Roberts, with Cagney, Fonda and Lemmon.
Very enjoyable. Friday and Saturday at 7 and 9 p.m. Big
Broadcast of 1938, with W.C. Fields, Martha Raye, Bob Hope
and Dorothy Lamour. Grand and Funny 30s musical with
racing ocean liners. Three ex-wives chasing back alimony.
Sunday at 7 and 9 p.m.
I umm UF 9 S REPRESENTATIVES |
1 | f |§|lr ~ | Jim Bartlett John Potocki
George Corl Skip Lujack 1
. Dan a PP Arlie Watkinson J|
' -** 'W Mel Ward
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave. I
I NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208 I
I^JEFERRE^REMIU^AYMEriT^^^^^^^I
q- £ 2 -d pyr' .Jrm W
O c "*Z
jz o o jS Tm
Oo ? in
X o r
i o
Hi g
>-

1
Taws m m I
E 5 DQ U.
HCOoI Bi C 3



Pilots Sign Ovca

if ** J <
k fySmmSSJrt.
.-,. yr
p jjTJp
Pi ~
MIKE OVCA
... now a pro
Gators Open
Against No. 1
Ranked Team
The UF football team will
open their 1969 season with the
University of Houston who have
been picked number one in the
nation by several polls.
This will be a real challenge
to one of the greenest, most
inexperienced football teams
weve had here in years, head
coach Ray Graves said.
The Gators have considerable
inexperience in both the
offensive line and backfield.
With the loss of All-Americans
Larry Smith and Guy Dennis it
will be hard to fill in the spots
which they have left vacant.
We will have to rely heavily
on our sophomore backs in
order to make the offense
effective, Graves said.
On the other hand, the
defensive unit has experience
but lacks the strength and size it
has had in the past. The
defensive unit only lost two
starters from last years team.
Coach Graves believes what
the defensive unit lacks in
strength and size they will make
up for in morale and desire.
UF will be going into what
Graves calls a question mark
season.
We had a real fine spring
practice with good senior
leadership, Graves said. I hope
We can surprise a few teams this
year like they surprised us last
year.
Joe Walked
Je DiMaggios. 56-game
hitting streak was actually
interrupted after just 11 games.
On May 26, 1941, 11 games
? to the streak, lefthander
fflimy Halperin of the Norfolk
JJ'J (Piedmont League) faced
a gio in an exhibition game
? w hat no major-league
P 1 c er could do in the next 45
Halperin walked Joe in
irst at-bat, then retired him
c in a row before the
ankee Clipper left the game,
ess a Uer seven innings.
VVam...

SjSKuKCIASSIFIEPS^ii

UF catcher Mike Ovca has
signed a professional baseball
contract to become the second
pro-catcher in Gator history.
Ovca signed with the Seattle
Pilots for a small bonus,
reportedly only three figures.
The Panama City youth flew
to Seattle last Thursday to sign
the contract and was slated to
start in either their New York or
Midwest class A farm-club
league.
Ovca was not chosen in the
June Baseball Draft, but was
contacted by a scout from the
north Florida area and signed as
a free agent.
The catcher stated that he
was glad to get an opportunity
to sign and feels that playing this
summer will give him a chance
to find out if he is pro material.
I also feel that playing this
summer will help me decide
whether I will wish to continue
to play pro ball or not, if I do
well enough, Ovca said.
Upon hearing of Ovcas
signing UF baseball coach Dave
Fuller said that he had expected
Ovca to be drafted.
Three different scouts were
interested in Mike, but for some
reason he was not drafted.
While in college Ovca was
praised by scouts for the way he
called a game and handled his
pitchers. Fuller ranks him as one
of the smartest catchers to play
ball for the Gators.
Ovca made All-Southeastern
Conference twice while playing
for the Gators. Not only was he
noted for his catching ability but
has been a clutch hitter for the
Gators for the past two years.
He was also selected team
captain for the 69 Gator
baseball team, which finished
second in the SEC for the
second straight year.
The class A League will
finish play during Labor Day
weekend. Ovca will begin
graduate school at UF in
statistics in September.
Favorites Win
Os the 41 runnings of
Hialeahs classic Flamingo horse
race, 24 have been won by
favorites. Arts and Letters was
the favorite in 1969 and he won.

"The (loHcheSi, One.
"The South's Largest Western Store"
with Gainesville's largest supply of
SBlue Levi's -xx Denim &
White Levi's for Men
See the new Look in Levi's for
with Matching Denim Jackets.
White, Sky Blue, & Denim
Blue. Also Levi's Nuvo Flares
(louche*' Otic.
4821 N.W. 6th St.

21 OF 27 SEVEN FOOT JUMPS
AAU Droos Jourdan

By TOM EASON
Alligator Sports Editor
UF high jumper Ron Jourdan
has been the most consistent
seven-foot jumper in the U.S.
this year, but he was not
included on the AAU team that
will compete in Europe this
summer.
Why was Jourdan left out of
the competition?
The AAU team was selected
two weeks ago from the top two
qualifiers at the Miami AAU
meet...
At the meet, Jourdan
finished fourth behind Dick
Fosbury, Otis Burrell (who
finished first with a jump of
7-feet-2V2) and Ranoldo Brown,
a member of the 6B UJS.
Olympic team as a high school
senior. Jourdan and the second
and third place finishers all
cleared the same height but
because of fewer misses,
Fosbury was selected over
Jourdan.
Ronnie has definitely been
the most consistent jumper in
the U.S. today, said Coach
Jimmy Cames, UF track coach.
I feel Ronnie should have been
given the opportunity to
compete in one of the six meets
this summer. But as they are
running it now, the same two
will jump every time. One
performance shouldnt have
determined the team.
Jourdan, who stands 6-1 and
weighs 150 pounds, has jumped
seven feet or better 21 out of 27
attempts this past season. His
best jump of the year was a 7-2
effort Feb. 14, against the
University of Tennessee at
a tri-meet in Knoxville.
He later went on to set a new
NCAA record in March with a
jump of 7-3/4 at their national
indoor championships in
Detroit.
The AAU has six different
European tours this summer. If
one of the jumpers cancels on a
tour, Jourdan might be able to
compete.
The tours should be divided
among the top boys, said
Coach Carnes. Since there are

six different tours, Ronnie might
still get to jump. Well be waiting
for an invitation.
The first meet will be the

*VmIHHPyfrW
UF HIGH JUMPER RON JOURDAN
... AAU dumps most consistent jumper in US.
ANOTHER
T.G.
CINEMAR
TOMORROW
NIGHT
"MAINSTREAM
"SENSUAL UNINHIBITED FILM
9 PM TIL
DON'T FORGET W.C. FIELDS ON MONDAYS
gU^PLUSONE

/ W w BO
pl^
zzmhi
11 W P^ait* p. --.~~~ p J""
$1957 plus only sales tax&tag
The New Leader
ONE BETTER THAN
ANY BUG BUILT!
Put our Datsun up against anybody's bug, if that's
necessary. But the ratings can't all be wrong.
GODDING & CLARK
"Home of the New Leader" 07 0 O Oil
2nd Ave. & 2ndSt.,S.E. */ 0 I

Friday, July 11,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Russian-U.S. meet. Jourdan will
definitely miss this one and the
U.S. AAU team will miss their
most consistent high jumper.

Page 23



Page 24

l, The Florida Alligator, Friday, July 11,1969

Gator Track Bolsters

By TOM EASON
Alligator Sports Editor
Coach Jimmy Carnes, UF
track coach, is out to close the
gap between the top track teams
in the nation and UF track. And
with this years recruitment
program he could very easily be
on his way.
I can never get all the boys I
want, but I think we got some
pretty good boys this year,
Carnes said. Our best recruit
should be an outstanding
two-miler from Indiana, Mark
Bir. He will run most of the
distances besides competing in
cross-country in the fall.
Bir has run the fastest
two-mile in the nation for a high
school runner last year.
One of the most all-around
athletes Carnes recruited is an
intermediate distance runner
from Columbus, Ga., Benny
Vaughn.
Vaughn has run a 1:53
half-mile and then has come
back the same day and run a
48.9 quarter, said Carnes. He
also ran a 47.9 leg of a relay all
in the same day. This was at the
Georgia high school state track
meet.
Vaughn will supplement the
already strong UF intermediate
runners. Returning lettermen
will be Bob Lang who holds the
Inframurals
Deadline
Approaches
The deadline is approaching
for entering several of the
Intramural Departments
Summer Tournaments.
Play will begin shortly in
singles and doubles tennis,
singles and doubles handball,
and three-man half-court
basketball.
Later in the summer, a mixed
doubles bowling tournament will
begin. People desiring to
participate in any or all of these
activities should inquire in room
229, Florida Gym now or call
392-0581. All faculty, staff,
students and their wives are
eligible.
All women interested in
summer intramurals should call
the Intramural Department
392-0581.
Leagues may be made up of
off-campus students, on-campus
students, sorority women, or
any combinations of these.
There are possibilities of
competition in sottball,
volleyball, tennis, or mixed
bowling, depending upon
interest.
CRANE
IMPORTS ViU/
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville

N *''"
EAMONN O'KEEFFEE
... Irish veteran
school record for the half-mile,
Eamonn OKeeffee, who just last
week ran a blistering 1:48 half
mile in Ireland to place him in
the ranks of one of the all time
greats in Irish track, and Jerry
Fannin, the UF record holder in
the quarter mile.
He has also signed two
pole-vaulters from Florida. Gary
McCall is from Orlando
Edgewater and Mike Cotton
from Ocala. These two will help

New Pool Hours Set

The Department of
Intramurals has announced the
following hours for recreational
swimming at the UF pool during
the summer quarter.
Monday thru Friday 1-9 pjn.
Saturday 10 a.m. 5 pjn.
Sunday noon 5 p.m.
All students, students wives,
and faculty are entitled to free
use of the pool with the
presentation of an I.D. card.

Gators Sign Versatile
Oklahoma Grid Star
UF has signed quarterback-safetyman John Silman of Norman,
Oklahoma to a football scholarship, Gator Director of Athletics Ray
Graves announced Monday.
Silman, 6-0 and 180 pounds, was a first team all-state defensive
back this past season for Norman High and intercepted 15 passes in
the past two seasons.
Playing quarterback during his senior season he completed 60 of
100 passes for 1040 yards and nine touchdowns. He carried the ball
96 times for 624 yards and 14 TDs.
Silman has good speed, running the 50-yard-dash in 5.6 and is
regarded by Graves as a good athlete who should be able to play for
us somewhere, either offensively or defensively.
Silman was also a varsity wrestler at Norman, winning nine of 13
matches in his division this past season.
JML < STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

JpJH /:
WBUmp % Jmmm
* f ;v
808 LANG
. UF record holder
Mike Flanagan and Joel Sarrett
who carried the vaulting for the
Gators in the past.
Carnes also dipped into LSU
Tiger country to sign a 9.7 dash
man from Baton Rouge, La. The
Gators in the past nave been
weak in this area.
Another Irishman will join
the track team which should
make Eamonn OKeeffee feel
more at home. He is a distance
runner from Dublin, Ire.

Student wives need a student
wifes I.D. card which can be
obtained from the student
activities desk, third floor Reitz
Union.
Faculty wives, staff and
dependents 15 years and older
may use the pool by purchasing
a pool card for $2 in room 227
Florida Gym. Everyone is
required to present an I.D. or
pool card before entering the
pool area.

1 UF Signs 7 Swimmers}
By DEAN WAITE
Alligator Sports Writer
UF has signed seven swimmers, five of them high school
All-American, Gator Director of Athletics Ray Graves announced
Monday.
Joining the Gators in the fall will be Gary Chelosky of Wilmington,
Del., Greg Hardee of Jacksonville, Kevin Kierstead of Philadelphia,
Pa., Steve McDonnell of Columbia, Mo., John Plemons of Winter
Haven, Rick Hallquist of North Miami and Pete Orschiedt of
Baltimore, Md.
Chelosky, who swims the 100-yard breastroke in 1:01 and the 200
in 2:16, has been a high school All-American for the past two years.
Hardee, a 1969 high school All-American, swims the 200-yard IM
and 400 freestyle.
Kierstead has done the 50-yard freestyle in 21.9 and the 100 in
48.5. He has been a high school All-American for the past two years.
McDonnell is a high school All-American and with a time of 53.4 in
the 100-yard butterfly is one of the nations top swimmers in his
event.
Orschiedt, a two time high school All-American, swims the 200 and
400-yard freestyle.
Plemons is the Florida Class AA 100-yard breastroke champion
with a time of 1:03.
Hallquist swims the 100 and 200-yard freestyle.
The incoming tankers will compensate for graduation weaknesses
and will help the Gators in their bid to regain Southeastern
Conference honors in 1970. The Tennessee Volunteers ended UFs
string of 13 consecutive SEC titles last March in Nashville.

Maryland
[FBIID CHICKEMI

Want action ? O
Weve got it! I^o
,'tHEML I
SIZZLES |
at a cool price
MG MIDGET
Powerful 1275 cc engine and four-speed gearbox.
Plus precise rack-and-pinion steering, tight road roadholding
holding roadholding suspension, and dual braking system with
disc brakes up front.
Standard equipment also includes an electric tach tachometer,
ometer, tachometer, wire wheels, an efficient heater/defroster,
and snug easy-folding top. Escape from the driving
doldrums now with the mighty MG Midget, See it
today at
CRANE IMPORTS JjU|[
506 E. UNIVERSITY AVE.

Jll jl'MifiW
(WITH THIS COUPON SI.OO §j
OFF ON THE PURCHASE OF g
g BUCKET OR BARREL 1
| COUPON GOOD THRU JULY g
1 31 FOR IN STORE §
| PURCHASE. 1
516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET