Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Shepherd Defends UF Membership In NS A
SEE PAGE TWO

RSI
Alt A MAum

Vol. 61; No. IS6

Student Senate Joins Militant NSA

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Ktf&< 4jPr Jr
THE FLORIDA GATOR! DOUGCASE

The cool look! James Bond never looked more
intriguing than does Albert as he spies a UF coed
passing his cage. However Albert is quite content to

Streamlined,Reduced Budget
Goes Before Student Senate

By DAVE REDDICK
Editor-In-Chief
A streamlined student body budget, fresh from a
reducing salon, will be presented to the Student
Senate in a special meeting Thursday night and
could provide more fireworks than the recent
Fourth of July weekend.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd has
requested much of the money previously used to
pay traveling costs for members of special interest
groups be used instead for entire university
community.
This means many groups, which Shepherd calls
self-promoting, will have their requests for funds
cut or even denied.
Jim Reinman, chairman of the senate's budget
and finance committee, agrees with Shepherd, and
his committee will recommend Thursday the
continuation of a policy not to fund groups which

Henderson Named To Recruit Black Students

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Don Henderson, a black UF
medical school student who
failed to meet the entrance
requirements to UF in 1963, was
named last week to serve as
special assistant to Vice
President for Student Affairs
Lester Hale.
Henderson will be assigned to
recruit black students and
economically disadvantaged
white students from the states
junior colleges.
He will also be responsible for
counseling services to help black
student here adjust to the UF.
The 23-year old UF student

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

ADOPTS BY-LAWS, CONSTITUTION

will carry on the activities
formerly assumed by Dr. Corbin
Camell, UF professor of English.
Camells resignation from the
position of Coordinator for
Minority Group Affairs became
effective July 1. Camell had
been named as temporary
Coordinator when the office was
created May 15.
Henderson will serve only
until Sept. 1. At that time,
according to Hale, a coordinator
will be appointed to fulfill the
office on a permanent basis. UF
is presently negotiating with
several persons who have
expressed an interest in the
position.
A product of the Jacksonville

leave the action to his handsome rivals as he rests
from the summer heat.
--- -v

he says were formed merely to collect funds from
Student Government.
Unofficially at this time, Reinman said, we
are turning down requests of nine organizations. We
feel they should get no money.
In addition, several other requests for funds are
being reviewed.
Marc Glick, senate majority leader, said
Reinmans committee had gone much further in
cutting the budget than Shepherds
recommendations, and the senate would probably
cut more than Reinmans committee recommended.
For too long a disproportionate amount of the
student activities fee has gone to a small minority of
students, he said. Last year less than 500 students
garnered $42,000 (one sixth of the budget) from SG
for activities from which the campus received no
benefits.
The $42,000 went for tours made by the glee
(SEE 'BUDGET' PAGE 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

inner-city slum areas, Henderson
applied to the UF in 1963 for
admission to the fall term. He
was denied admission because
his score on his high school
senior placement test did not
meet the minimum requirement
here.
Henderson was admitted to
Howard University in
Washington, D.C., and received
his B.S. degree there in 1967. He
has completed one year in the
UF medical school and will
begin his second year of study
there this fall.
Carnell approached
Henderson, at the request of
Hale, over two weeks ago about
the possibility of Henderson

See Editorial, Page 8
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The preamble, constitution
and by-laws of the U.S. National
Student Association (NSA) were
adopted by the Student Senate
late Tuesday, ushering the UF
into the ranks of an organization
which formerly was affiliated
with the CIA and SDS.
In 1967, action was taken to
disassociate the NSA from the
extreme right and left, following
the exposure of both
organizations interest in the
NSA.
Marvin Sylvest, Focus Party
minority floor leader, led the
fight in the senate against UF
joining the NSA.
He said the senate needed
more time to study how UF
might be affected by joinmg the
NSA.
A few minutes before the
start of Tuesdays meeting
senators were given a 37-page
packet containing SGs NSA
Study Committee reports and
copies of NSA governing papers.
Some senators complained
they didnt have time to read the
entire packet. A motion to
postpone the vote until tonight
was defeated 30-10, after which,
the bill went on to pass by a
voice vote.
Speaking in favor of passage
of the bill was Student Body
Vice President Charles Harris.
The NSA has amazing
programs, Harris said. We
would be foolish to turn them
down.
He referred to studies which
are available to member schools
on problems confronting student
governments, plus savings for
students who travel abroad and
in this country if they attend a
NSA school.
The senate also passed a bill
calling for a special election

acting as special assistant for the
summer.
Henderson was later one of
several persons interviewed by
Hale. On June 27, he was
offered the position for the
summer, and he accepted.
Henderson had attracted the
attention of administrators by
his efforts to recruit black
students to the UF medical
school during 1968-1969. He
and several other black medical
students here were involved in
the effort.
Contacted in Washington,
where he was visiting with
friends last week, Henderson
said that he would be occupied
(SEE 'HENDERSON' PAGE 2)

Tuesday, July 8, 1969

age $£ £&
CHARLES HARRIS
... spoke for NSA
set for July 30 to choose five
delegates who will attend the
NSA National Student Congress
to be held at El Paso, Texas, on
August 19.
The senate also acted to limit
the Reitz Union from using the
Florida Gym, Florida Field, and
other major facilities, according
to the senates Union resolution.
This means the Union
Program Council loses control
over the following events,
provided the senate bill is
approved by UF President
Stephen C. OConnell: four
lectures presented each year by
the council; the Gator Gras
festivities; and one major
function held in Florida Gym.
All of the above functions
lost by the council will be
picked up by the senate by
special legislation in the future,
according to Marc Click, who
was unanimously elected First
Party majority floor leader
earlier in the meeting.
Cabinet position approvals
included: Ernie Litz, director of
communications; Kathy
Spellman, secretary of student
affairs; Larry Jordan, secretary
of minority affairs; and Kevin
Davey, secretary of interior.

JlHl
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4jS
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- jir j
fr
DON HENDERSON
... Hale's assistant



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8, 4969

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd is convinced
that UFs student body joining
the U.S. National Student
Association (NSA) is a great leap
forward in SG at UF.
Unfortunately, there are
members of the student senate
who disagree with Shepherd,
who would have had the SG
study the NSA closer, and would
have offered to the students a
chance to make the choice in a
referendum vote a tactic used
unsuccessfully in the past.
The question arises, as it was
raised by Marvin Sylvest, senate
minority floor leader, as to why
the senators were not given time
to read the 37 page packet on
the NSA.
Senators were presented the
NSA packet a few minutes
before the senate meeting was
called to order Tuesday.
Some senators at Tuesdays
meeting said that it was unfair to
the student body to pass a bill
which was not given proper
consideration and study.
Shepherd disagrees with this
point. Wednesday he said, No,
they didnt need time to read
the bill. They took our
recommendations and
committee reports as being
reliable. They have some
confidence in our judgement on
the matter.
Sylvest charged at the senate
meeting the bill was presented
in a method that would have us
pass it in one night without
really looking at it.
It is an insult to give you a
bill which was worked over
yesterday.
Sylvest charged we are being
told how to operate.
He recommended that the
students be given" the
opportunity to decide whether
they want to be members of the
NSA or not.
The minority floor leader said
he would like to know how
many other colleges have been
contacted to find out what
they think of it.
He said the report submitted
to SG by the NSA study
committee is one sided.

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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

OPPOSITION IN SENATE

Shepherd Backs NSA

Information in the committee
report is from publications of
one group the NSA.
Sylvest moved that the bill be
sent back to committee for
further investigation, which was
Hr Jam
JM
% ;
CHARLES SHEPHERD
.. defends NSA membership
denied by a senate vote which
was practically unanimous.
The preface to the NSA study
report says that, It is
unfortunate that only a very
short period of time was
available in which to study the
NSA.
It goes on to say that, Not
only was it difficult to obtain
individual testimony, in that the
study was conducted during
finals week and over the quarter
break, but the only published
material available to us was
primarily from USNSA offices.
Shepherd added to the above
statement Wednesday when he
said, All of the materials which
were utilized in the report were
brought back from past
conferences. We had information
from conservative caucuses and
the southeast regional
meetings.
No, the information in the
report was not all one sided, he
said.
The student body president
said he would have favored a
referendum on the issue if our
joining was for longer than one
year.
He said that it was important
to join now because of some
important questions which will
be coming up before the next
congress in August.

It would be a great mistake
if we did not go as voting
members.
The student body would
vote in favor of joining NSA if it
were presented to them. The
reason they did not vote for it in
the past was because the
organization was anti-fraternity,
a position which it no longer
maintains, Shepherd said.
He admitted though, that the
election might be close.
Shepherd believes that we can
separate fact from fiction only
by participating in the
organization.
To hide our heads in the
sand and not participate would
be a shame and a disservice to
the UF student body. By not
participating we allow the NSA
to present a false picture of the
student, Shepherd said.
He said there was no
advantage or disadvantage in
passing the bill in one night.
This is commonly done.
The policies of the NSA and
those of the First Party were
said to be similar on many
issues by Shepherd.
On student rights, academic
reform, student power and black
students rights, he said that
First Party and NSA have about
the same viewpoint.
However, on the subject of
what difference in policy exists
between First Party and NSA
concerning the Vietnam issue, he
said, This would be difficult
because First Party has no policy
in this area.
The advantages offered by
NSA, according to Shepherd,
include:
SG obtains the advantage
of receiving NSAs publications
and ideas.
We have nothing to lose
by joining. By a vote, we can
disassociate from any resolution
they pass.
If we can influence the
larger schools votes, we have a
chance to change the image of
the college student in this
country.
Shepherd said that he does
not agree with all of the
legislation passed by the NSA,
and added that we have the same
opportunity as everyone else to
introduce legislations.
We will participate
thoroughly in the NSA this
coming year, Shepherd said.

< LESSONS
FOR INFORMATION: 392-1655
" ion

Henderson Picked
As VP Assistant
FROM PA6f ONE

this summer with the
recruitment of black students
from state junior colleges.
The deadline for freshman
students 'applications to the
university for the fall term has
passed, Henderson said.
However, there are still
vacancies in September for
junior college transfer students.
Henderson will be traveling
personally to the campuses of
junior colleges in the state.
Because the number of
vacancies at UF is limited, and

Wauburg 'Playday
Set For Saturday

Two ski shows, games for
adults and children, and speed
boat rides, are the main features
of the annual Wauburg Playday,
which will be held Saturday
from noon until 6 p.m.
Wauburg Playday is open to
all students, faculty, staff and
their families. It is sponsored by
the Reitz Union Programs
Office.
Free transportation will be
provided. Buses will leave from
the west entrance of the Reitz
Union at 9:30 and 12 a.m. to
Wauburg, and return at 5 and 6

Budget Goes To Senate
BOH PAM OMt J
clubs, and choir, the debate society, military groups,
the moot court and a number of other organizations, Click said.
In a memorandum to Treasurer Jim Roll, Shepherd said he felt no
money should be given to groups for meals on trips, awards,
entertainment, registration and toll fees, trip insurance, salaries for
secretaries, club publications and in-city transportation.
Also scheduled for a cut is the Seminole, the UF yearbook.
Shepherd asked that no money be given for groups planning to pay
for pages in the yearbook.
Glick said about $3,000 was budgeted to clubs last year for this.
This indirect subsidy would not be continued if the senate agrees
with Shepherds recommendation.
Funds for SG come from the student activity fee which is included
in tuition. Glick said last year a total of about $6.75 was received
from each full-time students fees for each term.
In addition, Shepherd asked, and the budget and finance
committee agreed, that all requests for funds should include an
itemized budget showing all outside revenue.
So the scene is being set for what may be the most fierce battle on
the senate floor, as Glick expects representatives of all of the clubs to
come crying in defense of their special interest.

because he believes that only a
small number of students can be
recruited in the short time
available to him, Henderson will
have other objectives in addition
to recruitment.
Basically, I hope to establish
a rapport with guidance
counselors at the junior colleges,
and to let black students and
economically disadvantaged
white students there know the
UF is interested in having them
come to Gainesville, Henderson
said.

p.m.
Hot dogs will be on sale at
Wauburg for 15 cents and soft
drinks for 10 cents.
Twenty-five cents will buy a
trip around the lake in a
speedboat. Games include canoe
jousting, a canoe race, raw egg
toss, sack race, a three-legged
race, volleyball games, horseshoe
toss, baby race, tug of war and a
footrace.
Playday will offer something
for every age group and a good
time for all.



t
/ 3 |k'-
jb
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: ' bH|k||:
DOUG CASE
AN OUNCE OF PREVENTION
Pat Schwieter is among UF coeds receiving blood tests for German
measles susceptibility from med student Steve Bloomfield under J.
Hillis Miller Health Center program. Tests continue in room C-4, Reitz
Union, Wednesday.
SG Election To Pick
NSA Representatives
UF students will vote in a Student Government special election
July 30 to elect Five delegates to the National Student Association
Student Congress in August.
When the UF recently joined the NSA, it acquired the
responsibility of sending seven voting delegates to the Student
Congress, Five of whom must be elected by popular vote of the
student body.
Candidates for the post of delegate may qualify either as individuals
or members of a slate.
Any full-time student with a 2.0 academic average may run. The
qualification fee is $5 per candidate and the deadline for qualification
is 5 p.m., July 21.
Registration forms are available from the SG office through the
Department of Interior. s
All full-time students are entitled to vote upon presentation of the
proper identification at one of two polling places, the mam entrance
to the Research Library and inside the Reitz Union.
A voter may vote for up to five of the individuals named on the
ballot.
REITZ UNION
SUMMER LESSONS
Beginning Bridge
MONDAYS
SH JULY 7-AUG. 18
7:30-9:00P.M.
ROOM 118
J.W.R. UNION
$7.50 PR PERSON
FOR INFORMATION:
Call 392-1655
or come by
K Room 310, Union

MAY PURCHASE PLASTIC HANDCUFFS

UPD Views New Devices

, University Police Department
Chief A.I. Shuler took a look at
new riot control devices ranging
from throw-away plastic
handcuffs to a supersound
generator at the annual
University Security Directors
Conference last week.
Manufacturers displayed their
gimmicks at the International
Association of College and
University Security Directors
conference at the University of
Georgia.
Shuler said the devices were
really nothing new. He said he
was most impressed by the
display of an electronics building
security system.
Such a system would involve
wiring of campus buildings to
detect fire or burglary with an
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alarm board at police
headquarters.
Shuler estimated the cost of
this electronic security system at
$200,000.
The UPD chief said he might
purchase some plastic handcuffs
since they cost only 50 cents.
The theme of the conference
was student disorders and drug

THIRSTY GATOR THIRSTY GATOR THIRSTY GATOR THIRSTY GATOR -I
| IF YOU
j MISSED
| "POONTANG TRILOGY" j
SHAME ON US! I
i/> 0
a x
I IF YOU MISS f
l "LEGEND AT BIG SUR l
in O
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I REMEMBER ITS ALSO l
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HTHIRSTY GATOR THIRSTY GATOR THIRSTY GATOR THIRSTY GATOR

Tuesday, July 8,1969, The Florida Alligator,

abuse. Shuler, said the
conference proved most
beneficial in meeting security
directors from other universities
and learning how they handle
their problems.
He said there is a definite
trend to increasing the forces of
all campus police departments.

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8,1969

Volunteer Lack
Hurts SAMSON
By ANGELA RACKLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
SAMSON, the UF Operation Student Concern program that
inspired similar anti-poverty programs across the state, is in danger of
losing its strength.
In an interview last week, Executive Chairman John OShea and
Program Director Bert Simon, both 4AS, disclosed that lack of
student volunteers during the summer quarter is causing a critical
problem.
Last quarter we had 500 volunteers, Simon noted. Now there
are only 50.
Theres a limited number of people and so much for them to
do, he added.
OShea said that most of the problem resulted when students who
had volunteered to do summer work left school or moved to a
different address.
We still need these people, he said, but have not been able to
reach them.
Project SAMSON was originated by OShea in April, 1968.
At the Same time, Gov. Claude Kirk launched his Operation
Stude;.* Concern program, using UF as a model center.
We were independent in the beginning, OShea recalled, but
were working toward the same objectives. It was kind of natural for us
to get together.
The two programs are now merged.
OShea said the purpose of SAMSON is to channel \the efforts of
interested students who want to devote time and energy to
community involvement programs.
Its obvious that college students have certain advantages, he
explained. SAMSON provides away to share these advantages with
the underprivileged.
SAMSON has had a one-year history of successful clean-up,
recreation, and tutorial programs.
Simon and OShea agree that the tutorial program has been the
most rewarding. They feel that if there is one way to get out of
poverty, it is to be educated.
If the children can read better, they dont get frustrated, and do
better in school, OShea said. And if they do better in school, they
are more likely to stay there.
This summer SAMSON is offering a recreation program for indigent
children ages 8-14.
The children are chosen from the Gainesville welfare rolls.
The program consists of three, 2-week sessions from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. daily at Camp Wauburg, and sessions in the afternoon at the
Cultural Enrichment Center at the old Post Office, SE Ist Street,
downtown Gainesville.
Volunteers teach swimming, coach team sports and instruct in arts
rd crafts.
Transportation and lunches are provided free for the children and
volunteers who work at the camp.
Volunteers may participate in any of the activities, and are
encouraged to share special interests such as singing, dramatics, or
judo.
From the experiences Ive had, theres no one else doing anything
like this, Simon commented. The program will work right if we
have enough people.
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| plavdav Features Ski Club

The Gator Ski Club will hold
its annual ski show in
conjunction with International
PI ay day at Camp Wauburg
Saturday.
Bob Pillmore, president, said
two shows are planned for the
afternoon, with boat rides for
the children during the break
between shows.
The first performance starts
at 1:30 p.m., and the second at
4 p.m.
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE jTf.
NORTH OF KUj
THE MALL
376-4552 AU * ED
Open til 7 p.m. nightly

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Pillmore said both shows will
consist of 10 acts, featuring
airborne water skiers, barefoot
skiing, a five-man pyramid, and a
clown routine, just to name a
few.

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The Gator ski team has been
named one of the top teams in
the nation by Water Skier
magazine. Among its victories
are the Southern Intercollegiate
and Tampa Invitational meets



a *ji^fl fijdljl
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DOUG CASE
EAGLES EYEFUL OF MANS GEOMETRY
Bird's eye view of the foundation of the new completion will be the largest natural history
home of the Florida State Museum, which upon museum south of the Smithsonian.
Plan Before OConnell
To Change Union Board

By CRAIG GOLDWYN
Alligator Correspondent
A resolution that would put a
student in charge of the
policy-making committee of the
Reitz Union has been sent by
the Student Senate to UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
for his approval.
The bill proposes the
restructuring of the Union Board
of Managers, with a student as
its chairman.
The members of the board
would be appointed by
OConnell, with the chairman
chosen from prior board
members in a campus-wide
election next fall.
The board is presently made
up of eight students and six
faculty members who represent
groups directly involved with the
Union, such as the Board of
Student Publications, Student
Government, and Alumni
Services.
In addition to providing for a
student as chairman of the

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Union Board and president of
the Union, the recommendation
asks for the disbanding of the
present program committee,
with all matters pertaining to
the operation of the Union or its
program ... under the direct
purview of this Board.
The resolution was drawn up
by the present Board of

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Managers, headed by Chairman
Dr. Michael Gannon, with
cooperation from Student Body
President Charles Shepherd and
Vice President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale.
If the plan is approved, this
will be the first presidential
committee with a student its
head.

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Campus Pools Coming
Swimming pools on the UF campus are at least eight more months
away from completion according to Assistant Director of Housing
Wiliam Neylans.
Neylans said he had hoped to see the pools completed by
September but bids and other preparations will not be completed
until that time. Completion of the pools will then come six to eight
months after bids are received.
The total cost for both pools is expected to be $150,000 with
these funds coming from the Division of Housing rather than students
fees.
One will be located in the western portion of campus, northeast of
Trusler Hall. The other, in the eastern part of UF, will be between
Broward and Mallory Halls.
Board of Regents Planning Consultant for UF, R.W. Munson
reported each unit will be lighted and fenced with as much deck area
as funds allow.
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Tuesday, July 8,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8, 1969

Page 6

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the conclusion of a two-part
series concerning the Office of
Coordinator for Minority Group
Affairs.)
By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
With Dr. Corbin Camell, UF
professor of English, acting as
Coordinator of Minority Group
Affairs, the UF began its first
real efforts toward the active
recruitment of black high school
students.
Camell served as coordinator
from the time the position was
created, on May 15, until July 1.
Camell described the effort as
a three-week crash recruitment
program. Since the deadline for
applications to the freshman
class for the fall quarter had
passed, black and economically
disadvantaged white students
were recruited for the freshman
class this summer.
They were admitted under a
waivered summer deadline
requested by the Presidents
Committee for Disadvantaged
Students.
Working with Camell were
Dr. Ted Landsman, UF
professor of education and
chairman of the Committee for
Disadvantaged Students, and UF
black student Larry Jordan,
secretary for minority group
Senate /Meets
I Tonight, Thursday |
:j: The Student Senate meets
:j: tonight at the Reitz Union, :*
:j: Rm. 349, at 7:30 p.m., and :>
>: Thursday in special session at
> 7 p.m., concerning the SG :<
: budget. ij:
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! BACKGROUND REPORT j
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affairs in the cabinet of Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd.
High school guidance
counselors who were known
personally to Landsman were
contacted by letter. They were
asked to advise students of the
UF recruitment effort and to
recommend qualified students to
the university.
The students had to meet
several requirements.
First, they had to have the
recommendation of their high
school counselors. They were to
be persons who by reason of

BSP Tables Firing Call

In its monthly meeting
Thursday, the Board of Student
Publications voted to put aside
until July 25 a request by the
chairman of Accent 69 to have
an Alligator staff member
removed from office.
Larry Benin petitioned the
Board on June 2, to have Carol
Sanger, then executive editor
removed from her job because
she failed to maintain
appropriate standards of
accuracy, truthfulness and
fairness, and maliciously
inpugned the character and
motives of the Accent staff in

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race or economic background
might not have thought of
applying to the UF.
Finally, placement test scores
could not deviate greatly from
the minimum requirement for
acceptance here. But placement
scores were not considered as
the main predictor for success at
the UF for these students.
Under these guidelines 13
students were accepted to the
UF for the summer quarter.
Lack of time was a factor
preventing the recruitment of
more students.
Camell has recommended for

general and Berrin in particular.
Miss Sanger authored a
four-part series on the financial
problems the symposium was
facing.
The board passed a resolution
asking Berrin to appear with
sufficient factual information
in support of his petition at
one of its next two
meetings, July 25 and Aug.
15-if he wished to justify a
board investigation.
Berrin, who is in Miami for
the summer, will be notified of
the decision, as will Miss Sanger,
now working in Fort
Lauderdale.

the future that recruitment of
black students and of
economically disadvantaged
white students be made separate
programs under separate
directors.
But Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hale
expressed doubt about this
approach.
We are not likely to solve
desegregation by a segregated
approach in our recruitment and
counseling programs for

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disadvantaged students,". Hale
said.
Camell gave several reasons
for his resignation, which had
been set'for July 1, at the time
he agreed to become
coordinator.
I had made an agreement
prior to May 15 to undertake a
research study this summer,
Camell said.
The coordinator must be
someone who can devote his full
attention to the job. Also, I feel
that ideally the coordinator
should be a black person.



Commuter Parking To Begin In September

By DIANA LATHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
The new commuter parking
plan will go into effect in
September, according to W. Ellis
Jones, director of the UF
Division of Planning.
The parking plan is divided
into three parts. Phase One was
the restriction of access to the
central academic area by the use
of control points. This phase was
implemented in the fall of 1968.
Phase Two was the increase in
the number of parking places.
There were to be 912 spaces
constructed behind Hume Hall,
227 added in the central
academic area, 126 at the new
Law Center, 124 at the
Fraternity Row, and 44 at the
east side of Norman Hall.
So far only the lot behind
Hume has been completed.
Phase Three is the
establishment of the shuttle bus
system, which will begin in the
fall.
The shuttle buses will run
from 7:30 a.m. until 5:30 p.m.
There will be six buses traveling
three different routes.
Maximum capacity of each
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PHASE THREE CALLS FOR SHUTTLE BUS SERVICE

bus is 70 people with no fee to
the riders.
The first route will carry
commuters from the lot to the
central academic area.
The second route will
connect the lot with the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center and then to
the central academic area.
The third route will connect
Corry Village, Fraternity Row


Parking Pamphlet
Available Soon

A pamphlet explaining the
details of UFs new parking
regulation is being compiled and
should be available to the public
by the end of July, UF Business
Manager Tom Wells said
Wednesday.
Wells said a t raffic
coordinator to implement the
new parking plan is still lacking,
but the position will hopefully
be Filled this month.
He expressed hope that
registration of vehicles will start
sometime in August for those
now working or studying at UF.
This would help reduce the
flood of registrants in the fall,
Wells said.
Wells stated the new parking
plan has now been approved and
goes into effect Sept. 1.
He added it will remain
unchanged from the original
form, which requires students to
pay a yearly $lO fee and park in
perimeter lots away from the
main campus.
Fees for faculty and
YSA Meets
Young Socialist Alliance
(YSA) sponsored by Student
Peace Union will hold a meeting
Thursday, July 10, in the Reitz
Union at 8 p.m. Michael
Crawford will talk and lead a
discussion on the anti-war
mobilization and YSAs activity
among Gls.

and the Flavets to the central
academic area.
are only tentative
plans. Jones said the bus
schedules will have to be used on
a trial and error basis initially,
but will be refined later.
A n increase in auto
registration to $lO for students
and an additional charge of sls
for faculty and staff reserved

university employes will be
somewhat higher, depending on
salary.
Also included in the plan is a
shuttle bus system to transport
commuters from the parking lots
to the campus.

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parking lots will Finance the bus
system.
This fee will enable
commuters to park in any
commuter lot on campus, on a
first come, first served basis.
Some of the commuter lots
now on campus will be phased
out.

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Tuesday, July 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

For example the site of the
new music building will preempt
the commuter lot from the
orange grove, across from
Broward Hall.
But the commuter spaces on
the side of Radio Road will
remain as will some of the other
lots now in use.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8,1969

EDITORIALS

Choo, chooo-o. V-roooom
The Student Government train, which for
some time waited inconspicuously on a
siding, idly stroking its fire, roared down the
track, demolishing everything in its path, last
Tuesday night.
Without a whistle-stops delay, the
Student Senate, with only six dissenting
votes, railroaded an authorization for SG to
join the controversial and militant-leftist
National Student Association.
Swept aside by the trains charging
on-rush were some pretty important
concepts. Like intelligent inquiry. And
active, honest debate. And plain common
courtesy.
Under the able direction of engineer Marc
Glick, recently elected leader of the First
party majority, the train tired of debate
after about 20 minutes and proceeded to
plow through that particular obstacle by
calling the question, which cuts off debate
and brings the motion before the senate to
immediate vote.
Several senators and an Alligator editor
who had requested floor privileges to discuss
the motion were smothered. Such is the way
of representative, democratic railroads.
The First party-dominated senate refused
even to consider additional study of the
proposal. Despite the fact that most of the
senators did not receive any information
about the plan until just before the meeting.
The senate also adamantly refused to
consider placing the controversial issue on a
referendum ballot, allowing the student
body to decide if it wants its good name and
reputation linked to the organization. The
NSA was once involved in a national scandal
for accepting money from the CIA and is
said to have very close ties to the radical
Students for a Democratic Society.
Could it be the senate remembered that
the last time the question of joining NSA
was placed before the student body, it was
defeated by a more than 2-to-l margin?
This railroads management, namely

Information, Please

Reports that UFs College of Agriculture
was playing an active role in chemical and
biological warfare (CBW) were two weeks
ago denied by Provost E. T. York Jr. But,
now the billowing number of news stories on
CBW has given us new information. It
appears that UF may be indeed engaged in
research on chemical weapons which could
be used in a war zone by the Air Force.
Perhaps herbicides, weed and brush killers
tested by the Air Forde and then researched
by UF professors and technicians at Eglin
AFB will not lead directly to development
of CBW weapons. Nevertheless, though
herbicidal techniques ma y no t be
designed to destroy populations or kill off
livestock, they are used to defoliate whole
areas of dense jungle where an enemy
might hide. In this sense the College of
Agriculture and UF may be, perhaps
unknowingly, aiding a brand of warfare that
is not entirely scrupulous.
Moreover, defoliation cannot be entirely
safe, despite Air Force assurances to the
contrary. Weed killers sprayed by low-flying
aircraft over a wide area may be caught by
strong winds and dropped on nearby
population centers, polluting drinking water
and damaging crops. UF researchers on the
Air Force project at Eglin in West Florida, in
fact, admit that spray damage may have
been acting at some distance, perhaps even
outside the huge reservation.
Air Force and Pentagon officials further
cannot deny that herbicides will ever be used
for destroying crops and livestock of an
enemy nationNorth Vietnam, for
example.
What worries us most, though, is not that

Stop The Train!

Student Body President Charles Shepherd, is
no dummy.
Some illustrative points:
§ The committee which studied the
proposal and recommended UFs
membership was hand-picked by Shepherd.
Its entire reference basis was material
supplied by NSA.
The proposal calls for a one-year trial
membership, after which time the move
can be evaluated and a decision made about
permanent membership. Shepherd will be
out of office by then, but he will have taken
advantage of NSAs education reform center,
thus fulfilling a campaign promise with only
a minimum of effort on his part.
9 The proposal was placed before the
senate as an authorization, which requires
only one reading for approval, rather than as
a bill, which is the normal legislative vehicle
and requires two readings.
The major argument in favor of the
proposal was that SG would better
understand NSA if it were a member than if
it merely thoroughly and completely
analyzed the question and its many different
points of view.
(You know the argument. You have to
freeze before you know ice is cold.)
Indeed, the management was good. And
the train roared down the tracks, its engines
spewing flames.
Unfortunately, though, the student body
got burned. And now its time for the
railroad to back up its train, treat the
wounded and try again to do what it should
have done the first time.
To put it more bluntly:
On behalf of the student body, we
demand that the senate reconsider tonight
its vote on the NSA authorization and
decide instead, because of the nature of the
proposal, to place the question before the
student body on the regular fall ballot.
Afterall, the student body is paying the
fare. Shouldnt it be allowed to determine
the destination?

UF is doing CBW-connected research, but
that the College of Agriculture apparently
did not learn beforehand what purpose Air
Force officials had in mind for the $46,000
project.
York says he doesnt know. The head UF
researcher claims he doesnt know, either.
Even Air Force project personnel say they
have only scant knowledge of what is
going on. They would have us believe that
they are only tools of a higher authority.
We have reason to believe otherwise.
Someone must have reviewed the programs
goals before committing the UF to it three
years ago. Someone must know what the Air
Force plans to do with the material gathered
from the research.
Have agriculture officials ever asked why
the Eglin project is Air Force-sponsored? If
the project is really public welfare-oriented,
for example, doing studies on selecting the
best weed killer for crop dusting, why isnt
the Department of Agriculture sponsoring
the research?
These remain unanswered questions. The
growing anxiety over CBW only points out
the public distrust of the military
establishment entrenched in
secretiveness.
Someone now mast begin to give some
very detailed answers to these questions. The
UF administration must screen all so-called
defense projects it commits itself to. If
officials already do, and we have no
documented information this is true, they
should make known their findings in a
handbook.
Somewhere, someone must have a
conscience. Do they have a soul, also?

The Florida Alligator
#The price of freedom
h is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick
Editor-in-Chief
Dave Osier
Managing Editor
All
v Margo Cox Al Jensen
[/i Assignments Editor News Editor
M1 % Mrwm I
* J /rx / n. J \
f /J Jy7 Air// /
/ M, Wv t \
y / 5 Q/VIU ||M t
1 ,; 4lyjr
Superb Reflexes
Editors Notebook
American Dissent
Dave Reddick

Whenever a governing body
begins to overstep its bounds,
and surpasses the rights which
have been granted it by the
people it rules, those people
have a right, a duty, to change or
even do away with the system of
government.
Sounds pretty subversive
doesnt it? Some might even say
it sounds Marxist. Perish the
thought.
Many people will realize it is
really not too original. I simply
paraphrased one of the most
subversive documents in the
history of the world the
Declaration of Independence.
The problem with many
Americans is that they forget the
document which gave birth to
this country was originate
written and signed by a group of
radicals seeking to overthrow the
government not by peaceful, but
by violent methods.
The fathers of our country,
these first patriots, were
hippies who wanted change, and
wanted it now. They were not
willing to wait for the
government to change for the
better on its own accord, but
insisted on the immediate
forming of a new government.
This is often forgotten by
Americans who feel dissent, even
the most responsible dissent is
un-American. Recent history is
full of such cases, but probably
the worst is Joseph McCarthy in
the early 19505.
McCarthy, the most famous
red-baiter, spent the last years of
his life fighting the threat of
communism from the colleges
and universities to the churches
of the country, calling anyone

who opposed him a Communist
sympathizer. In the frightened
climate of a Red-scared United
States, that charge was near
fatal.
Its easy to talk about the
McCarthy era as a black page in
American history, and its just as
easy to say weve learned our
lesson and it will never happen
again, but I wonder. This
country is going through a time
probably more trying than any
since the Civil War, and yet it
seems freedom of speech and
dissent is undergoing one of the
greatest periods of repression
ever.
At a time when free
discussion is most important, the
country is full of McCarthies,
who, using the same tactics as
ole Joe, seek to destroy the very
essence of the ideal they say
they stand for. By degrading
protest, they undermine
ddftiocracy.
It is often said history repeats
itself. It doesnt have to. This
country doesn't have to go
through another time of fear and
repression but its heading
that way.
The only way America may
remain free is to not only allow,
but welcome, disagreement. This
is no time for my country right
or wrongers. This is no time
for the house internal security
committee to be investigating
campus disorders, doing
everything it can to link radicals
with communism. Its no time to
be equating sex education with
pinkoism.
It must be a time for
understanding a time for
working together by working
against one another.



JOMO Leader Leaves 'Repressive City

'I would rather die
without shame,
a bullet channeled
into my brain.
ialpra
f
If I do not
struggle to reach
our peoples goal,
let a
bleeding cancer
torment my soul.

Mayor John Lindsay of New York, who couldnt
quite win the Republican primary, can still make a
fight of it next November to succeed himself in City
Hall. Running on the local Liberal Party ticket, he
could luck through if the small-c conservatives of
the city split their votes between Mario A.
Procaccino, the Democratic Party nominee, and
John J. Marchi, who will appear on both the
Republican Party and Conservative Party lines.
But if Lindsay has a chance to redeem himself in
his home town, the Marchi victory in the
Republican primary is a mortal blow to the cause of
liberal Republicanism in the Northeast. Even with
the vocal support of two New York Republican
Senators, Jacob Javits and Charles Goodell, to say
nothing of heavy financial contributions from
left-wing Republican angels, Lindsay couldnt
succeed in his own primary.
The New York Conservative Party, which was
started just a little over seven years ago by
disgruntled regular Republicans who were tired of
candidates that were invariably on leftward side of
the definitely proved to the world that
it now holds both the New York City and the New
York State balance of power. Together, the regular
Republicans and the Conservatives demonstrated
that they have what it takes to nominate their
candidates in four out of the five New York City
boroughs, leaving non-typical Manhattan to the
liberals.
What the New York City Republican primary
showed was that just as metropolitan New York is
not America, so Manhattan Island is not the voice of
greater New York. The two liberal New York
metropolitan newspapers, the Times and the Post,
proved powerless to nominate their preferred
candidates in both the Democratic and Republican
Party primaries.
The rightward sweep of the country is now
nationwide, reaching from Mayor Sam Yortys Los
Angeles through Minneapolis and Buffalo to

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
The destruction of my activism, by the
pressures of white racism, the capitalist
media, police persecution and judicial
repression will never stop the revolution. I
may leave Gainesville now, but when the
power is united, I will be back to help rally
the people.
With this statement, in an exclusive
interview with the Alligator, Junta of Militant
Organizations (JOMO) Minister of
Information Charles Fulwood announced he
was leaving Gainesville to work for the Black
Panther Party at a confidential location in
New England.
Fulwood said the joint official and
unofficial repression of the racist
establishment had been instrumental in
crushing his organizing efforts. For some
time, he has reportedly been in bad health.
To destroy a revolutionary is not to
destroy the revolutionary movement, he
said. There is a point in any revolutionary
movement, when the destruction of
individuals and organizations is not of
importance as far as the success of the
peoples movement is concerned.
Fulwood said JOMO had been crippled by
the white power structure.
Cultural nationalism car. be used by "the
man to repress the people. As long as it lacks
a political program, socialism, it is
counter-revolutionary. It poses no threat to
the white power structure.
They (government and the media) found
out right away the way to destroy JOMO was
to denounce it in the papers, arrest members
on jive charges that the papers would then
justify and back up.
JOMO was made out, in the press, to be
an enemy of the people. Hell, its not the
black man, who has had no power, who
causes everything wrong in society. Its the
goddam system. Its the system that makes
revolution necessary.
The government had JOMOs leader
(Fulwood) arrested out of town so that there
wouldnt be any uprising in Gainesville and
their troubles would be gone forever.
The establishment operated beautifully in

New York Wants Law And Order

Atlantic Ocean tidewater. Richard M. Nixon now
knows where his mandate lies; it is to restore a sense
of order in America. But the mandate, despite the
liberal cries that fear and racism have
triumphed, does not say that justice is unimportant.
After suffering his primary defeat, Mayor Lindsay
burst out with an intemperate statement that the
ultra-right had seized control of the New York
Republican machinery. The complaint makes no
sense. John Marchi, as the Republican nominee, is a
pragmatic Staten Island State Senator with thirteen
years experience in fighting for Republican
proposals that can only be termed moderate. He is
far closer to President Nixons positions than to
John Chamberlain
anything championed by right-wing ideologues.
As a matter of record, the New York
Conservative Party itself is far from being
ultra-right. Its founders, Dan Mahoney and
Kieran ODoherty, have always been careful to repel
the kooks. Last autumn the Conservatives
deliberately snubbed the Wallaceites, supporting
Nixon for President and running the attractive Jim
Buckley for Senator simply because the incumbent
Senator Javits had served notice to the world that
he intended for the most part to support liberal
Democratic measures in Washington. Nixon himself
called the New York Conservatives a responsible
party.

destroying JOMO in general and me in
particular. The pig power structure used every
means to destroy the political agitators. The
Gainesville Sun used its influence with the
white community and middle class black
community in order to justify the
harassment and judicial repression of JOMO.
In fact, the Sun initiated arrests sometimes
and attempted to have more made.
Fulwood went on to express his opinion of
UF.
The liberal university proved that it was
a very vicious and racist institution with its
prune-faced president who has done his best
to keep his niggers quiet.
(UF President Stephen C.) OConnell and
(Lester) Hale used the media (during the
Southern Student Organizing Committee
recognition issue) to expose JOMO as an
organization with the slogan ln guns we
trust.
The educational and political
accomplishments of JOMO in the black
colony were never mentioned by OConnell or
Hale.
Racists in the university used the
capitalist media to make false accusation to
frighten people. For instance, Charles
Shepherd made it his business to charge JOMO
with the slashings on campus. This was
wild-eyed opinion on his part and was done
for political reasons to win an election for a
stooge government.
The liberal white community, Fulwood
said, never did want to accept an
organization that was revolutionary in its
attacks on white racism, capitalism and
money-hungry, Uncle Tom cultural
nationalists that liberal whites thought was
the ultimate nigger.
Many liberals spoke of black racism and
classified JOMD as racist whenever it attacked
white racism. like Alligator Reporter Carol
Sanger. And capitalistic Uncle Toms attacked
JOMO to satisfy their masters, the white
establishment. This shows the racism of
middle class black Toms although it is usually
known as class prejudice.
Fulwood first came to Gainesville last fall
to establish a coalition with SSOC to protest
the 10-year imprisonment of a JOMO officer
for allegedly stealing $lO worth of groceries.
Returning to Gainesville later, Fulwood and

Tuesday, July 8,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I 1^
,- BL
w Hrli
WL, ~ ~ -lfag?U I i ip
CHARLES FULWOOD
... his struggle is elsewhere.
several other St. Petersburg JOMO members
began organizing a local chapter.
Among the accomplishments of JOMO,
Fulwood reported, was the establishment of a
blood bank for blacks, opening a Freedom
House, organizing black self-defense groups
and conducting black history classes.
Fulwood was arrested April 4 by the
Hernando County Sheriffs Department on
charges of transporting obscene literature, a
Black Panthei film recently shown at UF. He
states that several sheriffs cars and 14
policemen armed with shotguns made the
arrest without a warrant and with no specified
charges at the time of the arrest. Fulwoods
afro hair was shaved by deputies before bail
was granted.
Fulwood said he doesnt expect to be
brought to trial.
Fulwoods case is one of several recent
cases to be used by William Kuntsler, attorney
for the Panthers, H. Rap Brown and others, in
a suit he is bringing on behalf of 100 plaintiffs
against the city, county and state and various
officials, charging them with using the law to
deny political activists their civil rights. The
suit is for SIOO,OOO.
A slave that dies of natural causes,
without struggle, could not even balance out
two dead flies on a scale. I would rather die
without shame, a bullet channeled into my
brain, Fulwood said.
If 1 do not struggle to reach our peoples
goal, let a bleeding cancer torment my soul.

For next autumn, it is practically certain that
New York will vote two-to-one for a
law-and-order that will protect both the white
middle-class citizen of Queens and the proprietor of
a Negro pa and ma store in a Manhattan or
Brooklyn ghetto. Mario Procaccino, the conservative
Democrat, and John Marchi, the moderate
Republican, will surely share more than sixty per
cent of the vote between them. But with the ethnic
Italian vote and the conservative vote dividing
evenly, John Lindsay could still win with a
thirty-five per cent total.
Marchi, however, must be accorded the edge at
this point, for he will be the only nominee running
on two separate party lines. The Conservative Party
bigwigs are trusting that Bill Buckley, their nominee
for Mayor in 1965, can persuade conservative
Democrats to vote for Marchi on the Conservative
line if they cant stomach pulling a specifically
Republican lever. Some liberal Democrats will
assuredly desert Procaccino for Lindsay, but the
Democratic vote itself will be fragmented between
three parties, giving Republicanism and
Conservatism the opportunity to put Marchi over.
Alligator Staff
Mary Toomey Marcia Baker
Editorial Assistant Copy Editor
Darcy Meeker
Campus Living Editor
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reit/ Union. Phone 392-1681, or 392-1683
Opinions expressed in the 1 lorida Alligator are those
of the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of l-lorida.'

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

I FOR SALE j:
67 VW Excellent condition transistor
radio. New tires. $1375 or best offer.
Call 372-0939.(A-2t-155-p)
Zeiss binocular microscope, excellent
specifications, brand new, good for
med school, a real bargain, $795. Call
376-9551. (A-st-155-p)
1 table 2 chairs, sls, Zenith TV $75,
chest of drawers S2O, Night stand
$lO, 4 drawer file cabinet $25, 2
posturepedic twin beds & covers and
bolsters S4O each, bookcase sls, 4
butterfly chairs $7 each. After 5 PM,
378-9148. (A-3t-155-p)
67 Valiant Signet, 4 dr, r, h,
automatic powersteering, white,
$1650 Call Ananth 376-0770,
376-1545, 5 to 7:30 p.m., or before
8:30 a.m. (A-45-156-p)
Honda S-90 1966 Excellent
condition $l5O. Call John Fortner
372-9289 includes helmet.
(A-2t-156-p)
2 ROYAL standard typewriters. 1
elite, 1 pica like new. Cost $260 each
new. Just cleaned will sell for $125
each. Phone 378-6403 evenings after
six. (A-5M55-C)
Richard Burton ]
dint Eastwood
MaryUre @
MCTWOCOIO* I

COMING: VV.C. FIELDS
LA I I ] BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:30
SHOW TIME 9:00
Ist GAINESVILLE SHOWING
A GIANT OF A IyiOVIE
BREBORY
jrWMifmmm pbcr
/WBomir
W JmwH SHflnir
! MfICKEWWrSBOLD ]
"rKSYSfliaLas
~.w
Ji Lit \mit-rmilu sp\rv kiemn hinn-ted nssntv
and THE GENTLEMEN from HADLEYBURG PL 1 I |'|j|)[) U\\ MOM) \l KWV
in alphabetical order jL Li J. lI'DD IWMHmI' u li'i'l. I
Mm MEREDITH ANTIIONV DID II EDWARD 11. ROBINSON
FI I Hi I liril D,rected bv J LEE THOMPSON Screenplay by CARL FOREMAN
LIjI 11/iljlj/tIII Based on the novel by WILL HENRY Music by QUINCY JONES
Produced by CARL FOREMAN and DIMITRI TIOMKIN C?£j
SUPER PANAVISION -TECHNICOLOR STEREOPHONIC SOUND
I Hear Jost feltcuno sing thf MACKEN*US GOLD theme I ~~~~
rOe Turkey toward'on the RCA soundtrack album and single r L | Suggested for MATURE audiences
PLUS CO-FEATURE AT 11:30 (parental discretion advised)
'THE PINK JUNGLE"
JAMES GARNER & GEORGE KENNEDY

PLUS

FOR SALE
>:
:->;-:x:x:-:-:-:-:-:-x-x-x.-.-.x.-.-:x:-:-:-:-x-x.x.x:x:-x
CLEANINGEST carpet cleaner you
ever used, so easy too. Get Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-c-156)
Siamese kittens. 8 weeks. sls
evenings and weekends 309 N.W.
15th Ave. (A-lt-156-p)
Unused, Costom-made Flexsteel
hide-a-bed Early American sofa,
quilted cotton print. S4OO retail. Our
price: $275 or best offer. 378-6022.
(A-2t-156-p)
1967 Honda 305 cc Scrambler, in
unused condition, dark green, low
mileage and many extras, call
376-0516 after 2:00 P.M.
(A-2t-156-p)
Canoe l7 ft. fiberglass Seminole.
New s2oo; now $125. Sailing rig
for above $75 (new, $150). Call
372-7942 after 6:00. (A-2t-156-p)
67 VW Excellent condition transistor
radio. New tires. $1375 or best offer.
Call 372-0939.(A-2t-155-p)
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS! 40%
OFF TO STUDENTS. 2-Drawer
suspension files, list for $49.50, you
pay $29.70. JR Office Furniture Co.
620 S. Main St. Phone 376-1146.
(A-st-155-c)
xft*x*x*x<*x*:*x;sx;x:xx*>K*x*x*x*MssNMS
FOR RENT 1
£:x;xx-:%x-x*x-x-xxxxxx-x*x.x.xxxxs
Air conditioned room quiet Golfview
subdivision bordering campus.
Limited kitchen priviledges. 521 S.W.
27th St. Phone 376-5859.
(B-6t-156-p)
Furnished 2 bedroom house $125 per
month Ist & last in advance SIOO
damage deposit refundable. Large
yard. Kids & pets OK. 376-9025
anytime. (B-2t-156-c)

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8,1968

:-;xcxx*Xc-ssxX*xxX%\ -wx*>w3sv.x.K
FOR RENT
v >:
:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:-:->:-:-x.v-vx-:-:-x*x-:-:-:-:.:-v.*v.wxt*
Air conditioned 2 bedroom furnished
apt. Avail. 7/1/ Call 376-5828.
(B-4t-155-P)
RANCH STYLE LIVING two br.
apt. large closets & tile bath. Fully
panelled & AC, use of pool & BBQ
house Walking distance of new golf
course to be opened this summer.
Sorry no children no pets. $l5O per
mo. Call 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-st-155-p)
COLLEGE TERRACE 1225 SW 1
Ave., adjacent to Univ. Studio Apts
with balcony entrance. Elevator,
Pool, AC, ample parking. Lease now
for Fall, nine mo. min. $187.50 per
qtr. double or $345.00 per qtr. single
occupant. Phone 378-2221.
(B-ts-156-c)
Sub-let Ruby D. Apt. AC pool 70
mo. Call 378-6203 after 6:00 P.M.
Available now. (B-2t-156-p)
Apt for rent available July and Aug.
Call 376-5043, 1241 S.W. 4th Ave.
Convin. to Norman Hall and Art
Building. (B-3M56-C)
Sleeping room >/z block Anderson
Phone installed for male $7 wkly
summer $lO other times Skinner
Apt. 2 105 NW 15 St Ground floor
see in p.m. (B-2t-156-p)
| WANTED
One female roommate summer
quarter Landmark lmmediate
occupancy, S9O whole summer air
cond, dishwasher, disposal, pool
Call 378-3518. (C-3t-155-p)
1 or more female roommates to share
2 bdrm VIII. Park apt. sllO for
summer. Come by apt. 48 after 4.
(C-3t-155-p)
SEX! CLO has gone coed for the
summmer. If you are looking for an
inexpensive place to stay near
campus were it! Room & 3 meals
a day for S6O a month. Space also
available for fall. Stop by 117 N.W.
15 st. or call Kim or Paul at
378-9420. (C-st-155-p)
Responsible coed needs job. Willing
to be student assistant, iron shirts,
babysit, anything legal. Call Carolyn,
392-7625, 1003 Tower A.
(C-2t-156-p)
One male roommate wanted for
University Gardens one bedroom or
sublet whole apt. Air conditioned
pool carpeting. Call 372-5921 or
378-4565. (C-3t-156-p)
:*X-x.x.v;xx*X*X*x*X*X*:x..-.*x.x.x.nx.^
HELP WANTED |
Part time help male over 21. Apply
Pizza Inn 316 SW 16th Ave.
(E-156-p)
I need several students to help me in
my business. Average usually around
$2 to $3 per hour 378-8496.
(E-lt-156-p)
;^rWrx*x-x-x*X:x*:iSsr:rX<*X'X*X4-:
I autos I
WX-x-x-x-vx-:-x-x-x-x-.v:.:-v:-w:'Xi;fr
1948 CHEVY Unique, ugly, but
passed inspection. Mucho miles, but
runs well. Will negotiate price. Call
378-2294 evenings. (G-3t-155-p)
1963 V.W. Kombi bus, inspected,
1970 liscense. Call 372-0033 after
5:30. (G-st-156-c)
1966 MGB excellent condition new
exhaust system and rings. Good tires.
Luggage rack, racing mirror, tonneau
top and boot. 26 mpg. Only $1550.
Call 376-4962. (G-2t-156-p)
1962 Rambler station wagon AC,
radio 40,000 miles. Needs minor
repair. Best offer accepted. 378-6843
anytime except July 4 & 5.
(G-st-156-p)
x.ss-;xxxxxxxx*:-.-:-.^x>:-x-x-x-x.:.x.x;{;
PERSONAL |
j^.;.;.SS*XX:XX*XX*XSX:-XXX"X-X*XW*XXXX
Wanted 1 attractive coed to cook
dinner for two hungry males. Should
have own transportation. Call
378-4913. (J-lt-156-p)
last
vIRTvC TIMES
"KING
KONG
3-S-7-9

Wk \ SPECIALS II
frL jcit tuesday special ||
FRIED 1
I CHICKEN I
HI ALL YOU OOA m
||| CARE TO EAT X M V |||
|| WEDNESDAY SPECIAL ||
LUNCH AND DINNER |||
1 JUMBO CHOPPED 1
I STEAK A /j 1
Hf WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY OOC HI
||| AND YELLOW RICE |||
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS I
||L GAINESVILLE MALL
I ENDS JACK 'THE APRIL I
SUNDAY LEMMON IN FOOLS" I
U R^7t3lhS?23r^^*
W LjLll2Sll2llL22L£2l--2S-J
"JOHN GLEN KIM
WAYNE CAMPBELL DARBY
HAIWALLIS'
The strangest trio M l
ever to track a killer.
U.S. marshal who never knew
still wet behind the ears I
who didn't care what they were if
or who they were as long as J
thy j wmBKL
A BRAND NEW BRAND AMERICAN FRONTIER STORV
* "! j
BOBtRT OIiVALI STROTHER MARTIN HENRY HATHAWAY MARGUERITE ROBERTS CHARLES PORTS
ln Su( S 91| GitN ClVPSfll
w.c y Hs, net* etees't n T CHRICOLOR IMMMOUHT PCTURE 1 BuSc isoe tNt'saw *mm\ ow c*wm~icain j Q||flS^
NOTE
EXPERIMENTAL PRICE
, POLICY NOW PREVAILING
FOR PERSONS UNDER 17.
MATINEE TIL 6 . EVENINGS &
I I MON. THRU FRI. ||| ALL DAY SAT.
II 50 4 I &SUN. 75
iljf| JiHiaiijg
[b"ainboW



CLASSIFIEDS

Tuesday, July 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

"ODD T*
I PERSONAL
Please adopt gold and white kittens.
Healthy and playful. Adorable. Call
Lefty 372-6474, 1007 SW 13 St.
(J-3t-l 55-P)
Want to buy used textbooks for the
speedwriting home course. Call
376-4801 after 6. (J-3t-156-p)
Worlds largest Paper Mill has
positions available now for Chemical,
Mechanical and Industrial Engineers.
Career Representative of Union
Camp Corporation will be
interviewing at the Placement Office
Wednesday, July 9. (J-3t-156-p)
Two affectionate kittens to good
home. 1 all black male. Grey/white
tern. Housebroken, adorable.
378 4455 even. (J-2t-156-p)
Wanted the slides taken from my car
behind towers during finals. Since
they are of no use to you please
return them to Towers Area office
or 1701 N. Military TL, W. Palm
Beach, Fla. or Union Lost and
Found. (J-3t-155-p)

IFC Operates Rush Booth

Interfraternity Council is
busy this summer operating a
hospitality rush booth during
freshmen orientations.
IFCs goal is to talk to as
many of the freshmens parents
as they can to introduce the
favorable aspects of fraternity
life.
Mil cs Wilkin, director of
summer activities of IFC, said
the major cause of fraternity
dc-pledging is parental pressure.

... >
r 1 i
lIV M lACf*T|A
Florida Alligator
r '* r' A =
[ SUMMER

[LOST A FOUND I
Lost German shepherd. Vicinity of
towers, Wednesday night. Reward.
Call 378-2289. (L-3t-156-p)
SERVICES |
TYPING ALL SUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. IBM ELECT/ TYPEWRITER
TYPE IN MY HOME. CALL
376-7809. (M-51-156-p)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
{M-15t-156-p)
Tennis Racket restringmg free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
My office s small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
519*/2 SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-l 55-2 t-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)

He said IFC wants to talk
directly with the parents before
they hear negative views about
fraternities.
The booth is located at the
Teaching Resources Center
where incoming freshmen get
their identification cards.
IFC also conducts a guided
tour of the campus and a tour
through one fraternity house
during the orientations.

Page 11

PART I
TMC TWO PART PRODUCTION OF
leo tolsto ys fNr.iTf 1 £551
WAR,
and PEACE starts
jUn I
JTOTE" 7:00 ONLY
THE CENTER
of MAN
Lecture on Man Series
Thursday, July 10, Seeing It Like It Could Be
Jerry Uelsmann
Center of Modern Art, Micanopy
Weekend Encounter Group
July 19-20, Teenagers: Cop-out or Join-in?
Drs. Stanley Lynch and Charles Merrill
July 26-27, Communications Laboratory for Teachers
Dr. Wayne Richard
Write CENTER of MAN
P.O. Box 106
Micanopy, Florida
Center For Modern Art
Micanopy

f Pswfewe Geieesvide I
fcj
.* fantasma&orica! #
t entertainment!
Dicfc :
Van me [
/EXPLOSIVE £ A A.X
m
!\
I RUCCED
1 WEST!
wii.uam iioi,im:v g
Ti:hm:st iioiiiiMM:/
RESTRICTED-PERSONS UNDER * NOT ADRMTTEO.
UNLESS ACCOMPANKD BY PARENT OR ADULT GUARDIAN
fM 4w A k !10 miirjit s
i ton w. w.)s
In a last desperate effort to prevent World War 111. a secret
meeting Is arranged. One man Is caled upon to succeed
where all the world leaders have (ailed That man was once
a prisoner in a Russian labor camp. He Is now tha Pope.
Anthony Quinn
Laurence Olivier i i
Oskar Werner l£i
David
Step with
GATOR ADS



:, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8, 1960

Page 12

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Administrative Notices Campus Calendar

GRADUATE STUDY
ABROAD: L 970-71 competition
for scholarships for graduate
study abroad is now open to
seniors and graduate students
below doctoral level.
Opportunities have been reduced
in number but information
brochures and application forms
are available from the Fulbright
Program Advisor, Internation
Center, south of Walker
Auditorium. The last date for
applying is October 25.

College Library*
Research Library
PKY Lib. of Florida History
Special Collections
Architecture & Fine Arts Library
Arch. & Fine Arts Building
Chemistry Library
216 Leigh Hall
Education Library
341 Norman Hall
Engineering & Physics Library
410 Engineering Building
Health & Phys. Ed. R. R.
305 Florida Gymnasium
Health Center Library
Med. Sci. Bldg. LlO2
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall
Journalism & Communication R. R.
Stadium 337
Law Library
%
Mead Library (PKY Lab School
Library) Yonge Bldg. F
Teaching Resources Center
Office
Record Room

The Literature Room is open as a study hall on Sunday through Friday nights from 11pm-12M
* The Chemistry and Education Libraries close at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
** The Reading Rooms close at 5:00 p.m. on Friday nights.
Low Interest Rates Still Available
_ 1
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours : 800 ojh. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday |
i^

BLUB BULLETIN

PRE-MEDICAL AND
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS:
Must r egister with
pre-professional counseling
office room 105 Anderson Hall
starting Tuesday, July 1 through
Friday, July 11. Be sure to bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors in the course
and section numbers.

GOLF LESSONS: Beginning
July 1, 3.E. "Buster Bishop,
new Golf Club pro, will be
available for private and group
lessons at the University Golf
Club. Appointments can be
made by calling 392-0689.
Individual, 30 minute lessons,
including shag boy, are $5.50. A
series of five individual lessons,
30 minutes each, including shag
boy, costs $22.50. Group
lessons, eight lessons with six per
group, including shag boy, are
S2O.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
Schedule
Summer, 1969

Monday Friday
Bam ll pm
Bam ll pm
4
B:3oamspm
B:3oam I2N
Ipm spm
8 am 5 pm
7pm lO pm
Bam spm
7pm lO pm **
Bam 10:30pm **
Bam spm
7pm lO pm
Bam spm
6 pm 10 pm ***
Bam 12M
(
8 am- 11pm
Bani spm
7pm -10 pm ***
Bam ll pm
Bam l2 N
*
Bam spm
Bam l2 N, 1-5 pm,
6pm lO pm

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Wednesday, July 9
Speleological Society: meeting,
346 Union, 7 p.m.
Mensa: discussion led by Dr.
Mary McCaulley on "Sex
Differences in Personality,"
118 Union, 8:30 p.m.

Saturday
Bam ll pm
Bam ll pm
Closed
Closed
Bam l2 N
9am l2 N
Ipm 4ppn
9am spm
9am -12 N
Inm 4pm
Bam l2 N
8:30 pm spm
Bam spm
Bam l2 N
Bam ll pm
Closed
Closed
Closed

Friday, July 11
Films Committee presents
"Night of the Hunter," 7 & 9
p.m., Union Auditorium
Psychedelic Elephant Sale,
G-41 Union, 9a.m.5 p.m.

Sunday
2pm ll pm
2pm ll pm
Closed
*
Closed
6pm lO pm
2pm spm
7pm lO pm
2pm-10:30pm
2pm spm
7pm -10 pm
7pm -10 pm
2pm l2 M
7pm ll pm
Closed
B:3oamllpm
Closed
Closed
2pm spm
6pm lO pm

Thursday, July 10
Children's Tap dancing lessons,
C-4 Union, 11 a.m.
Christian Scientists: meeting,
357 Union; 6:30 p.m.
General Dames Bridge, 150 C
Union, 7:30 p.m. closing.



Lisca-Fiction, Poetry

By LINDA MILKOWITZ
Alligator Correspondent
Peter lisca, associate professor of English, is a man who lives in
today.
His specialty is the modern novel, and he says he has no
antiquated interest in literature whatsoever. He has published
studies of other periods, but prefers the modem one, calling it
immediately relevant. lisca explains modem literature is easiest to
understand because one can dispense with such things as a study of
manuscripts and historical background.
A list of his numerous published critiques reveals his interests:
Faulkner, Steinbeck, Fitzgerald, and Hemingway. His 329-page book
on John Steinbeck has been translated into Arabic. In progress is a
study guide of A Farwell to Arms and a book on Hemingways
novels.
He writes some poetry for himself which he hasnt tried to publish.
My novels have left me too humble to try, the professor smiles.
His interest in today creates his enthusiasm for films.
The films of the last 15 years have been more vital than the novels
of the same period. He particularly admires the works of Bergman,
Antonioni, and Fellini. Few Hollywood films have equaled them in
quality because American directors have to please too many people.
Lisca, 44, keeps active by boating, fishing, and skin diving, which
make the Florida Keys a favorite vacation spot for him and his family.
He lives in a modem house on
Gainesville, where there is plenty
of room for his two daughters to
between the students and me is
clearly defined. A large class becomes an audience, he explains.
Lisca has been teaching the same modem novel courses in the
English department for some time,i but does not mind because pre preparing
paring preparing for class does not take so much time. And he adds that he
teaches the books better with practice.
He is listed with a biography in the following volumes: Dictionary
of American Scholars, Whos Who in American Education, Dictionary
of International Biography (1969-70), and Personalities of the South,
1969. He was awarded a humanities research grant last year.
Lisca says he does not teach for any idealistic reasons. Dont
make it sound like Im teaching to mold young minds. There is no
messianic fervor or moral reason behind it. I teach to stay close to my
field. Its very exciting to come into contact with people in a subject
you like.
A frequent visitor to the Plaza of the Americas, the professor sat in
the colonnade by the college library on a summer afternoon,
thoughtfully sipping a coke. S.D.S. was holding a rally on the other
side of the walkway.
He is sympathetic with many student goals, but feels students

should respect more the
opinions of older, more
experienced educators, he says.
I think all the new freedoms
are fine, but students will have
to develop a new sense of moral
responsibilities to go with
them.
Oklahoma Honors
Flying Flycatcher
The State Bird of Oklahoma
is the Scissortailed Flycatcher.

THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMO
f NOW AT DUBS |
j TOPLESS I
I -GO-BO I
1 o
| EVERY TUESDAY & \
| WEDNESDAY NIGHT \
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i ALSO REMEMBER EVERY |
| THURSDAY MINI-SKIRT CONTEST |
O r
RRAH OF GAINESVILLE THE SODOM AND GOMORRAH OF GAINESVm

Exotic Evening
Sundra the belly dancer,
Shi sc Kabab, stuffed grape
leaves, tabbula, hommoss, Syrian
dessert, An Exquisite Arabian
Night will be presented the
Arab Women on Campus this
Saturday, 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. at
the Gainesville Womans Club
House, 2809 W. University Ave.
Tickets are on sale at Reitz
Union through Wednesday for
$3.00.

$#!&? y/ y' | |
I
'
ifpifr wt mg im? jr
Bbu.
DOUG CASE
PROFESSOR LISCA
. . the usual cigar... the
frequent visit to the Plaza to
keep contact with
students ... the ready smile

TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
11AM TO 9PM
LONDON BROIL STEAK
FRENCH FRIES
TOSSED GREEN SALAD
HOT ROLLS & BUTTER Q
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WE HAVE SPEOIALS EVERY PAY
11AM TO 9PM
14 SHRIMP IN BASKET F.F, Cole Slow
WEDNESDAY- CLAM DINNER F.F., Cole Slaw
T HURSDAY- LONDON BROIL -F.F, Chopped Salad I
FRIDAY- ROAST BEff F.FCole Slaw
1225 W. UNIV. AVE. BMb
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WE RE NOT A GIANT CHAIN OPERATION SO WE TRY HARDER

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"Home of the New Leader"
2nd Ave. & 2nd St., S.E. 3/8-231

Tuesday, July 8,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8,1969

Kong: Beauty
Os The Beast
By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Tonight may be the last
chance you ever have to see the
original King Kong on a
screen big enough to hold him.
This movie is a work of
art in dialogue, scene
progression, not in acting except
iifRQK
litClm
by the beasts.
The movie opens with fog
swirling, night watchman
hobbling up out of the gloom,
lantern swinging. A harsh voice
booms down from the ships rail,
above. Tough face leans out
behind the voice to suspiciously
eye the stranger.
But Kong himself is the
greatest thing about the movie.
Hes so powerful and so
surprised by his strength. The
girl who is never so lovely as
when large-eyed, fragile and light
hued in his dark clutches he
only seeks to protect. His
man-like, fist-swinging approach
to killing the slimy monsters
who threaten her inspires the
first sympathy. Time and time
again, he sets her down gently
then goes about defending her.
Often, he nearly loses.
His fine, shiny coat ruffling in
the wind, his gentleness for the
girl, his ultimate helplessness in
the hands of c aging,
fear-instilling man whatever
the movie may lack in
sophistication, that questionable
value, it makes up for in
exposition of a force, pure and
elemental. Dont miss it at the
State.

REITZ UNION
SUMMER LESSONS
Painting for Fun
| t 1 fjy/m^^inJi/H^^ttr'TJ I
: yTi 4 iJ/A
4 9 w m -- l\ 1\ r*^
TUESDAYS-7:30-9:30p.m.
JULY 18
ROOM C-4, UNION
$6.00 PER PERSON iB
FOR INFORMATION: MH|
CALL 392-1655
OR COME BY ===^Q£fo- t
ROOM 310 UNION

Movie Times
Center I The Wild Bunch, a western with William Holden,
Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, and Edmund OBrien. 1, 3:39,
6:22, 9:05. Pretty weak save your money, unless slaughter is
your bag. <
Center D The Shoes of the Fisherman, with an all-star cast.
2:30, 5:30, 8:30. Gripping tale of the first Russian Pope, facing
nuclear war. Very realistic and believable see it!
Florida Chitty, Chitty, Bang, Bang, with Dick Van Dyke,
Sally Ann Howes and Lionel Jeffries. 2, 5,8. Light-hearted, well
produced, well acted, a bit too much at times, but worthwhile.
Gainesville Where Eagles Dare, with Richard Burton and
Clint Eastwood, 8:57. Thrilling war picture based on Allistair
McLeans novel. The Glass Bottomed Boat, with Doris Day,
11:30. Normal Day picture-when youve seen one, youve
seen them all.
Plaza I The April Fools, starring Jack Lemmon and
Catherine Deneuve. 1:55, 3:55, 5:53, 7:52, 9:50. Starts
Wednesday, True Grit with John Wayne.
Plaza II Finians Rainbow, with Petula Clarke. 1:55,4:24,
6:58,9:31. Fred Astaire co-stars in this delightful musical.
State the original King Kong, starring the giant ham
himself. 3,5, 7, 9. Starts Wednesday, War and Peace, Part 17
p.m. only. War and Peace, Part II begins Sunday. Reserved
seating.
Suburbia Mackennas Gold, 9:05; Exciting, enjoyable
Gregory Peck movie, marred only by Omar Sharifs miserable
portrayal of a Mexican bandit; great earthquake scene. Pink
Jungle, 11:30. An unacceptable love and adventure story in the
wilds of South American rain jungles, with disintegrated plot
and weak action. Expect to leave at 11:35.

Sex Lecture Topic
Dr. Mary McCaulley will
discuss Sex Differences in
Personality Wednesday night at
8:30, in Room 118 of Reitz
Union. Dr. McCaulley is assistant
professor of clinical psychology
at UF. Mensa, sponsoring the
lecture, invites all interested
persons.
Membership in the national
organization of Mensa requires
an intelligence test, but
membership in the local chapter
is open to any one intersted in
Mensas activities.
Homecoming Slogan
Contest Continues
Slogans for the 69
homecoming may be submitted
by mail or in person at the
Florida Blue Key Office, Reitz
Union, until July 31. Prizes are
Bahama and Florida excursions.

mi
IKi ffjflf
VOLKSWAGEN OF AMERICA, INC*
Volkswagen brings you an exciting old idea.

We dont expect a standing ovation.
But we do think our belated auto automatic
matic automatic transmission* deserves at least a
smattering of applause.
After all, it does let you drive with without
out without shifting and still get up to 25 miles to
the gallon. (You know what ravenous
appetites other automatics have.)
It does have the fewest moving
of any 3-speed automatic. (You know
how depressing transmission repair bills
can be.)
Optional

MILLER-BROWN
4222 N.W. 13th St.

Pulse Needs Technical Assistance
Pulse, the Student Government project to poll student opinion,
needs technical assistance to write a generalized form of a stratified
public opinion poll. Assistance is needed to get the poll in and out of
the computer, to help with journalism, social science, and statistics.
The purpose is to establish better communication between SG
and students, said Kathy Spellman, secreatry of student affairs.
Once we know what the problems are, we can start working out
solutions.
LEARN JOS, *S or our Special
TO Introductory Flight Lesson
Discover why the swings to wings,
pi Try our introductory flight lesson in a modern
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VETERANS!! Your G.l. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot
Training. For full details, call Gainesville's only approved
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378-2646
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It does offer you the lightest, most
compact 3-speed automatic transmission
you can buy. (You know how an auto automatic
matic automatic can take the oomph out of a car.)
And where can you find our latest
triumph?
In the Volkswagen Squareback Sedan
and the Volkswagen Tastback Sedan.
Now do you feel like applauding?


AUTHORIZED
DEALER



The Florida Alligator
iiiiiisfliiic
. vCocV >' 'vVxVC < S^ySw ; VOO Vxx'Qyv^XxxYy-
M , y --- --* *- vy
'69 Frosh Team
Breaks Barrier
By LEON BLOODWORTH
Alligator Correspondent
The 1969 freshman football team will have the first Negroes ever to
sign a UF grant-in-aid finally breaking the gridiron color barrier.
They are Willie Jackson, a 19-year-old halfback from Sarasota and
Leonard George, an All-State running back and pass receiver from
Tampa Jesuit.
Jackson, who stands six feet two inches and weighs 200-pounds
played football in his home-town of Sarasota until his senior year. His
senior year was spent at Valley Forge Military Academy in
Philadelphia where he gained his fame.
Jackson played both offense and defense and was voted Most
Outstanding Back in Pennsylvanias Valley Forge Conference while at
the Academy.
George, spent his senior year taking Jesuit to the Class A State
Championship. The six feet, 175-pound running back is noted for his
tremendous speed and sure pass receiving.
While at Jesuit, George broke the school records in most yards
gained in a season by racking up 2,295, and the most touchdowns
scored by crossing the goal line 27 times last season.
Along with those credentials, George also earned All-State honors
as well as honorable mention prep-All-American. He was also picked
to participate in the annual State All-Star game slated foi August 2.
When asked how they felt about being the first Negroes to play
football for the UF, Jackson stated, Im only glad I got the
opportunity to play for the Gators.
George said that he felt it was a challenge and that it would help
him to prove himself and to become a better man.
Coach Gene Ellenson stated, The football staff was glad to have
these athletes. Their records will speak for them.
The UF had to compete with various major colleges such as FSU,
University of Miami, and Ohio State, before landing Jackson.
George was recruited by Clemson, University of Kansas, and
University of Colorado.
Both George and Jackson are attending summer term at the UF to
get an idea of what college life is about. Now the majority of their
time is spent studying. Both are a little skeptical of the famed UF
freshman droupout record.
§' REITZ
,Sl
LESSONS
Modern
Dance
MONDAYS
JULY 7-AUG.IB
7:30-9:15 P.M.
SIO.OO
PER PERSON
~ for information-
V* / Call 392-1655
or conic by
'Y, Room 310 Laiion.

All-Star Game Features G'Ville Coaches

When the North and
South High School All-Star
football and basketball teams
line up for their annual classic
on August 2, the Yankee
coaches will be trying for a
record.
This year the North football
and basketball squads will have
coaches from the same school.
Gainesville High Schools Jim
Niblack will coach the football
team and Ed Poore will handle
the basketball squad.
No two coaches from the
same school have ever been
double winners in the all-star
contests, in fact only two other
times in the 19 year history of
the classic have coaches from the
same school coached both
I DlC* UdMIJ
Jeweler?/ 1
IcLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
I REPAIRS I
[ TROPHIES ENGRAVING I
I 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
I 1 1_2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS 1

\Semi-4nnual Sale
from the
University Ghop
I MENS DEPT. I
Bells and Flares Vi off Reg. price I
Short Sleeve Shirts
I Regular $5 to $9.50 Values I
NOW $3.99 to $6.99
Walk Shorts nowwas 49
I Reg. $6.50 to $9.00 I
Fancy Pants & NOW $2.99/$6.99
I Luau Pants Reg $ 4 98 to $9.00 I
I Levi Jeans NOW $3.99/$5.99 I
I 1 GROUP of SHOES -V2 off 1
I TIES $3 to $5 NOW $1.99 I
I BELTS Values to $5 NOW 99< and $1.99 I
I Large Selection of Suits & Sports Coats I
I 20 to 40 per cent off I
I 1620 W. UNIV. AVE. f, UNIVERSITY PLAZA I
Ladies Sale Continued ... |

football and basketball.
In 1951 James Scoggins and
Raphel Snead of Pensacola
Senior coached the North teams.
Scoggins football team lost to
the South 14-13 and Sneads
basketball squad lost to the
Rebels 55-43.
In 1954, Miami Seniors
Charlie Tate and Vince Schaefer
worked together in the classic.

drive and I
SAVE! I
_ ..
v SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER \|/
[GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

Tuesday, July 8, 1969, The Florida Ah
Tates football team won 33-7,
but Schaefers basketball team
lost 92-78.
Niblack and Poore will try to
become the first coaches from
the same high school to win
both the football and basketball
games. Niblack led Gainesville
High to a 9-0-1 record while
Poores basketball team captured
the Class AA title.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 8,1969

' .Mk "' c-- ~.\' J 'fc^s
4m * J' Q&&
ir
~
INTRAMURALS DEPARTMENT
.. sponsors skiing club
Lee Roy Wins
Daytona 400
By TOM EASON
Alligator Sports Editor
UF students migrated from campus this Fourth of July to carry on
the traditions of the holiday and to do a little celebrating. Much of
the celebrating was done in Atlanta where 96,000 people watched the
Atlanta International Pop Festival.
The others went to see Lee Roy Yarbrough drive his white Ford to
his fourth major win of the season at the Daytona Firecracker 400.
Yarbrough battled second place finisher, Buddy Baker, right to the
checkered flag. This was Bakers second consecutive second-place
finish.
Often turning speeds as high as 188 mph, Yarbrough sped away
from Baker at the finish. The victory was worth $22,175 and placed
him second of the all-time money winners at the Daytona track. First
isCale Yarborough with $96,710.
Right after the race, Lee Roy and his crew began packing to travel
to Dover, Md., and the race slated for July 6.
The way to keep in shape in this business is to race, and thats
what Im going to do Sunday, said Yarbrough. Then its on to
Trenton, (N.J.) next week and I cant remember where after that.
Cale Yarborough, the pole winner this year with a track record of
190.706 mph, failed in his attempt to win his fourth Daytona 400 in
the last five years. Cale had predicted a victory after turning the
record-breaking time.
Were right as right can be, said Cale. Just listen. If my Mercury
is running right, there will be no contest.
One of the most stirring moments of the Day was the playing of
the Star Spangled Banner by the Parris Island Marine Band while 87
Congressional Medal of Honor winners stood at attention. The race
was held in their honor.

'Dont Feel
Too Badly, Earl
Frank Gifford, trying to
console Earl Morrall after the
Colts loss to Joe Namath and
the Jets in the Super Bowl, is
quoted in the current issue of
Sport Magazine as saying:
You shouldnt feel too
badly, Earl. Youre NFL Player
of the Year. Fran Tarkenton is
still trying to make all-city.

WAUBURG iC;\m
PLAY DAY- vl
Saturday
July 12 xfyfftdiX
NOON TO 6:00P.M. V\
* TWO GIGANTIC SKI SHOWS ( C \ [ \ \ \
* GAMES FOR CHILDREN J J \
* SPEED BOAT RIDES / % \
* BUS TRANSPORTATION / \
FROM REITZ UNION
* HOT DOGS -15 i, PEPSI -10 4 [T / \
*-> 1 J jng I

I FREE beer I
1 EVERY MONDAY I
I NIGHT 9-10 PM I
I <3s DUBS I

35 Teams
To Play
By MIKE FERGUSON
Alligator Correspondent
For those students who are
looking for a little more exercise
than lifting a 12-ounce beer can,
the Intramural Department has
set up an extensive summer
recreation program.
Softball is the biggest sport in
the summer. Already 35 teams
have signed up to play and more
are expected. The softball season
will officially start Monday. The
teams will play a round robin
tournament to determine the
winner, the one with the most
victories at the end of the
season.
Robert Allen, Mens Program
Director, said tournaments in
handball, volleyball, tennis, and
golf are being planned for later
in the quarter. He is also
planning on starting a three-man
half-court basketball league.
Anyone interested in these
activities should inquire in room
229 in the Florida Gym.
The womens intramural
program is being directed by
Miss Ruby Lee Pye. Miss Pye
currently is scheduling a
volleyball and tennis tournament
for the near future.
A sailing and skiing club is
being sponsored by the
Intramural Department at Lake
Wauburg. There is no charge for
these clubs. The only expense is
gas for the boat. This usually
runs about $3.00 for ten rides.
Anyone interested in these clubs
should contact Miss Gerry
Husky in room 227 at the
Florida Gym.
The Intramurals Department
maintains four check-out areas
for the students convenience.
These are at the Florida
Gymnasium, Broward Hall,
Graham Hall, and Norman
Gymnasium. Equipment in just
about every sport can be
checked out there. There is no
charge.

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. Factory trained mechanics *. I
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f Meals served from 11:00 AM to it
L* Midnight )
J Bernie Sher //
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Michelob on draft
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
V/
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM Harry Lawton, Manager \i
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. rl
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