Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Carol Thomas
Contempt Case
Thrown Out

y\M Amt 'u/M

Vol. 61, No. 156

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DOUG CASE
HAVE A HAPPY 4TH
The Alligator and Teresa Long, a Santa Fe Junior College student,
wish you a safe and happy Fourth of July vacation.
Hanson Assumes Post
As Grad School Dean
See Editorial, Page 6
By EDCROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Harold P. Hanson, professor of physics from the University of
Texas, takes over today as dean of UFs Graduate School.
Dr. Hanson is the fourth dean in the history of UFs Graduate
School, replacing retiring Dean L.E. Grinter. The graduate school was
founded in 1930;
Assistant Dean Robert Bryan left UF Friday after 12 years here. He
has accepted a position as Dean of Advanced Studies at Florida
Atlantic University. No replacement for Bryan has yet been named.
Receiving degrees from Superior State College in Wisconsin and the
University of Wisconsin, Hanson taught j>hysics at UF from 1948-54.
In the early 1950s he was active in a Navy project being conducted at
UF to improve electronic weapons being used in the Korean War.
A proposal co-authored by Hanson led to the awarding of Ph.D.
degrees in physics at UF.

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
\ j>
Civil rights activist Carol W.
Thomas* conviction for
contempt of court was thrown
out Thursday by the U.S. sth
Circuit Court of Appeals.
The reason cited was
freedom of the press.
Mrs. Thomas and militant
leader Irvin Lee Jack Dawkins
were convicted Dec. 27,1967 of
contempt of court and
sentenced to six months in* jail
after they distributed Black
Voices, a two-page handbill
outside the grand jury room in
Gainesville.
The grand jury was meeting to

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTH FASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

consider allegations that blade
women imprisoned in the
Gainesville city jail were being
sexually molested by certain law
enforcement officials.
The grand jury, composed of
13 whites and five blacks, was
accused of manifesting white
power if they did not hand
down indictments.
Black Voices also alleged
that certain city officials and
policemen were affiliated or
sympathetic with the Ku Klux
Klan.
The conviction had previously
been upheld by Ist District
Court of Appeal of the State of
Florida, the Florida Supreme
Court and the U.S. District

AS TOP SG PROJECT

Stage Set For Amphitheatei

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer.
An outdoor amphitheater for the performing arts,
long considered a needed facility at UF, heads a list
of SG projects for the summer quarter.
Constans Theatre, serving as UFs major
performing arts facility, has a seating capacity of
460 considered by SG to be insufficient for
theatre spectators at UF.
One of the Action Conference proposals during
the winter quarter was the incorporation of a
theatre for the performing arts into the coliseum
plan being sponsored by the UF, and local and state
government.
Whether the coliseum could provide the necessary
facilities for the theatre is a question yet to be
answered.
SG Vice President Charles E. Harris, said the
location of the amphitheater the Graham Tolbert
area has to pass through the University Senates
Land Use Committee.
Provided all of the problems involved in the
project can be worked out this summer, Harris said
construction on the amphitheater could begin as
early as next quarter.
Funds for the construction of an amphitheater
would come from the Lake Wauburg development
fund.
We dont want to spend a quarter or half million
dollars developing an area scientists say will go dry
some day.
Harris referred to reports that the lake, because
of geological evidence, might drain someday.
In addition to the amphitheater proposal, SG is
going ahead with its attempt to eliminate language
requirements in the College of Arts and Sciences,
and the present University College testing system;
considered to be too difficult for the purpose it
serves.
The Student Commission on Reorganizing
Education (SCORE), for dealing with the language
and University College testing system, should be
operational within a couple of weeks for
information gathering and dissemination, Harris
said.
Also, a computer operated polling system, for
obtaining information on students interests
concerning issues will be ready for operation by the
end of the summer.
Harris said the only problem holding the polling
project up is the need for someone to program the
360 computer.
Other SG projects include:
Construction of handball courts near Broward
Field, two tennis courts near Hume, and shuffle
board courts at the Murphree, Broward and Hume
areas.
Construction on dorm swimming pools by fall
quarter.
The continuation of the Taylor
administrations plan to build on-campus stores for
selling food and eventually clothing.
Plans for the construction of three student
service booths for handing out student information

Court for the northern district
of Florida.
The U.S. Supreme Court had
refused to hear the case.
The circuit court ruled that
Black Voices presented no
clear and present danger to
the grand jury.
The court stated, In the
borderline instances where it is
difficult to say upon which side
the alleged offense falls, we
think the specific freedom of
public comment should weigh
heavily against a possible
tendency to influence pending
cases.
Contacted in Louisville, Ky.,
where Mrs. Thomas is now
(SEE 'COURT' PAGE 2)

Tuesday, July 1, 1969

and sales for student productions.
Orientation of incoming freshman giving them
the students picture rather than the deans
picture, of UF, according to Harris.
In addition to the above projects, SG is planning
the expansion of the job placement service by the
fall quarter.
Two systems are being considered, the
Achievement Pattern Analysis (APA) at a cost of
SIO,OOO and the National Computer Placement
service. Both placement services send the graduating
seniors name and resume to companies throughout
the United States.
A plan which will allow students with telephones
on campus to pay their telephone bills here, instead
of walking downtown, coordinated with the check
cashing service on campus should be completed
some time this summer.
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiinuiniii
BACHELER CLINCHES TITLE
UF Track Club Olympic runner Jack
Bacheler wins the six-mile run by
four-tenths of a second in the AAU
Championships at Miami.
SEE PAGE 15
SOVIET POLE VAULT
Columnist John Chamberlain draws a
comparison between the Russian takeover
of Poland and the current U.S. position in
South Vietnam. He feels the Soviets plan
a takeover of key South Vietnam
positions.
( . s\\
SEE PAGE 8

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A
CAROL THOMAS
... civil rights activist



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 1, 1969

Ackell Challenges Health Center Woes

See Editorial, Page 6
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Managing Editor
The J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, long a UF trouble spot,
today takes on new leadership.
Dr. Edmund F. Ackell
: -i. :
Hb m
o: -:yv H
DR. SAMUEL MARTIN
... leaves post today

UF Minority Groups Lack Coordinator

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first in a series about the
office of Co-ordinator of
Minority Group Affairs.)
By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Dr. Corbin S. Carnell,
Associate Prof, of English, leaves
today as Co-ordinator for

Court Reverses Conviction
FROM PA6t (Hit
employed, she told the Alligator she was unaware of the recent
development of her case. However, she said it was a wonderful and
just ruling.
Wc never wanted to intimidate anyone, she said.
Mrs. Thomas said she and Dawkins knew they would be convicted
of something, they would be police department scapegoats.
Victims of social circumstances are made to pay for being
victims, she said, and anyone who points this out is persecuted by
the power structure.
Although her conviction is overturned, Mrs. Thomas has already
served the term of her sentence, four months, and was released Dec.
31, 1968.
.Former Bth Judicial District of Florida Judge J.C. Adkins, now a
Florida Supreme Court justice, convicted Mrs. Thomas and Dawkins
because he said the publication constitutes a veiled threat to
members of the grant jury.
When contacted while on vacation in Cedar Key, Adkins declined
comment on the overturning of his decision.
Norma Munn, local head of the American Civil Liberties Union
(ACLU) which defended Mrs. Thomas, said, It is ironic the two
judges who ruled against the case, Adkins and (U.S. District Court for
the northern district of Florida) Judge G. Harrold Carswell, have both
been promoted within their field.
She said the circuit court's decision has been confirmed by many
other cases. For citizens of Gainesville, she said this will bring home
the point that they have the right to criticize the government, verbally
and in print.
Miss Munn said this is one of the most expensive cases the ACLU
has handled recently and is partially the reason why the state office
will be closed during the summer for lack of funds.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matte- at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

assumes the job of provost for
the huge medical complex from
Dr. Samuel P. Martin, who
resigned last November after
weathering a year-long
budgetary crisis.
Ackell, optimistic about the
Health Centers future* at the
time of his May 5 appointment,
is the former dean of the new
College of Dentistry, which is
due to open in September, 1971
with 60 students. His
replacement is yet to be
announced.
The new provost, whose job
at $38,800 a year is the highest
paid in the university system,
will be responsible for managing
the $23 million teaching and
training center, which includes
the 381,-bed Shands Teaching
* Hospital where schooling for
most of Floridas medical
personnel goes on.
The 43-year-old medical
administrator has been described
as a moving force in the Health
Centers $33 million expansion

Minority Group Affairs. The
question of who his successor
will be remained unknown as of
Sunday night.
The position was created May
15 only six weeks ago and
Carnell was the first appointee.
He accepted the position with
the understanding that he would
act as the coordinator only

AS MARTIN STEPS DOWN

LIMITED FUNDS BASIC PROBLEM

program. The project was put in
doubt recently by legislative
inaction over appropriating
$13.7 million in state matching
funds which would have meant
an additional $19.7 million
federal grant.
Since the legislature decided
to wait on a November bond
issue to fund its part of the
project, the federal funds were
sent to other states. The
program now depends on
Congressional reapproval of the
federal grant and on state voter
okay of the bond issue.
Besides contending with the
expansion plans funding, Ackell
may be faced with the same
budget problems that plagued
Martin for a good part of his
seven year tenure as provost.
Though Ackell has said that
he anticipates no operating
money problems and expects a
viable annual budget, Martin said
in a recent interview' that the
center still may have difficulties
with personnel hiring and firing

temporarily, until a person could
be found who could fulfill the
office on a regular basis, and
that Camells resignation would
be effective July 1.
It was also understood then
that by July 1, there would be
visible support and funds
available for the active
recruitment of black students
and of economically
disadvantaged students, who had
shown potential in high school.
The difficulty which now
arises is that of whether the
funds are available to hire a
completely qualified person who
can accept the position on a
full-time basis.
For the first time in my
memory and Ive been in this
state since 1956 the legislature
undercut the recommendation
of the State Budget Commission
for appropriations to state
universities, Carnell said.
The result has been that all
state universities will have less
funds than they had planned on.
A proposal that funds be
given for the establishment of a
Co-ordinator for Minority Group
Affairs office was made in the

NOW OPEN
And Accepting Appointments
RAYS STYLE and BARBER SHOP
1125 West University Ave
(Formerly Windy's Barber Shop)
OPEN DAILY 8:30 AM 6:00 PM
SATURDAYS 8:30 AM 5:00 PM
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until some iocal autonomy is
achieved.
Martin also noted that
although the center may be
better off than it was before,
budget-wise, the legislature had
not moved as far as it should
have in funding for the center s
1969-70 fiscal year.
But at least this time they
recognized the serious situation
over here, Martin said. During
his stint as provost Martin was
faced with several money crises
over operating funds for the
Shands Hospital, two within the
last year.
Martin both times was forced
to ask the State Budget
Commission for extra money to
bail out the teaching hospital
because of inadequate legislative
funding.
During his upcoming
18-month sabbatical leave,
Martin will be visiting professor
of preventive medicine at
Harvard Medical School and will
do research at Harvards John F.

legislature in April. This
proposal was one of many on a
single bill affecting the
university, according to
Vice-President for Student
Affairs Lester Hale. However,
this proposal died in committee,
while another proposal on the
same bill, providing for the
appropriation of $121,000 to
UF for the hiring of more
campus policemen, was passed.
We must find money. This is
high priority. As an institution
we are at least two years behind
other schools in the South in the
recruitment of minority
students, Carnell said. But he
added, Lester Hale is very
interested in this program and
wants to see it continued.
Hale, contacted Sunday, said,
We are not going to let this
thing drop. We have made
progress and have some qualified
people in mind. This office is
top in priorities in my requests
locally to persons who make
decisions on internal budgeting.
He has asked the Budget
Committee, which distributes
available funds within the UF,
for money to provide for salaries

Kennedy School of Government
He will also do health care f
research in England, Finland
Sweden and Yugoslavia
following his Harvard work.
Im looking forward with
great excitement to a new
career, he said.
DR. EDMOND F. ACKELL
takes over today

for a full-time co-ordinator and
for a secretary. The Budget
Committee Chairman is UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
If small funding is given, Hale
would appoint some one to a
vacant faculty position, who
would also become Co-ordinator
for Minority Affairs. This person
would be under the jurisdiction
of the Dean of his College, and
may or may not be required to
teach classes in addition to his
job as a co-ordinator.
A co-ordinator will be
appointed within the week. I
hope that he can be appointed
on a permanent basis, but if not,
there will be an interim
appointee until Sept. 1. By that
time there will be a person to
accept the job on a regular
basis, Hale said. I will know
what money is available within
the next few days.
Camell, speaking of his
successor, said, qualified
persons have been interviewed
and have expressed an intereslin
the job. But recruitment pf
qualified personnel has been
difficult when budgetary matters
have been in such an unsettled
condition.



UF Employes To Receive
Pay Raise In September

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
Salary raises for almost all of
UFs non-academic staff will
come in September, the result of
the Brown Report, a state
supported study of state
employe and salaries.
The Brown Report was made
last year by a Miami consulting
firm and was to put the state in
a more competitive position
with private industry and
personnel recruitment.
Adjustments in the report
increased the entire pay range
for each particular job

Health Center To Test
Coed Measle Chances

UF coeds wishing to be
vaccinated for German measles,
a disease linked with
abnormalities in birth, will soon
have their chance.
Dr. Richard J. Hildebrant,
from the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center, said Friday he will begin
today taking blood samples from
coeds to determine if they are
susceptible to the disease. If
they are, they will be vaccinated
on July 11 and 14.
Hildebrant said German
measles, also called rubella and
three-day measles, is a disease
with mild effects. However,
infection during the early
months of pregnancy could
cause deafness, mental
retardation and other problems
in the child.
Six weeks after the

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classification, according to
Robert A. Button, UF personnel
director.
He called this a significant
improvement over previous pay
increase plans.
The salary adjustments for
more than 5,500 employes will
in some cases reach as high as 20
per cent. The overall average of
salary increases will stand at
about 10 per cent. Button said.
However, almost 90 per cent
of the staff employes will
receive a raise in excess of five
per cent.

vaccination, a second blood
sample will be taken to
determine the effectiveness of
the vaccine. Hildebrant said the
drug is usually 95 per cent
effective.
The initial samples will be
taken today and Wednesday
from noon to 10 p.m. in room
235 of the Reitz Union.

OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS TIL J
9PM
Saturday 106 FM
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave.

Formerly, employes received
an annual pay increase once a
year on their job anniversary
date.
Because of the Brown Report,
employes will now receive
automatic pay increases Sept. 1
and their anniversary date
increases will be advanced six
months.
The new anniversary increase
date will then become their
regular anniversary date for
future yearly increases.
We were disappointed that
state financial conditions made
the changing of the anniversary
dates necessary, Button said.
No Classes
On Friday
Classes will be cancelled
Friday, in observance of
nationwide Independence
Day celebrations. The
Alligator will not publish
again until Tuesday. Classes
will resume Monday.

| t m mm UF's REPRESENTATIVES I
B- -'/jp I Jim Bartlett John Potoki
stC George Corl Skip Lujack S
\V~ -zr Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson I
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OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
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After a few years,
it starts to look beautiful.
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The hump.
Looks like an afterthought.
Good for laughs.
Stubby buggy.
El Pig-O.
New York Magazine recently had a few
choice words to say about it too: And
then there is the VW, which retains its
value better than anything else. A 1956
VW is worth more today than any American
sedan built the same year, with the pos possible
sible possible exception of a Cadillac.
Around 27 miles to the gallon.
Pints of oil instead of quarts.
No radiator.
Rear engine traction.
Low insurance.
$1,799 is the price.
Beautiful, isnt it? ''
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4222 N.W. 13th St. ~
Suggested retail price, (East Coast) P.0.E., local
taxes, and other dealer delivery charges, if any.
additional.

Tuesday, July 1, 1969, The Florida Alligitor,

Page 3



Page 4

I, Tin Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, July 1,1909

PRICES EFFECTIVE
THRU SATURDAY, JULY s
pBHgJ WBW Ewfe-fefflW Ewatfs
Canto
|n Shop early for the weekend,
\ PUBLIX will be CLOSED

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Charcoal
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Convenient White
Paper Plates ...69*
Scott's
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12-inch Aluminum Foil
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Heinz Tomato
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French's Pure Salad
Mustard 7 39*
Rod, Pineapple Crape or Diet
Hawaiian Punch 3 l L $ 1



Plain or Peanut Candies
M&M Candy
giant pkg.
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l *1 S Kosher
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little Brownie
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little Brownie Assorted
Boxed Cookies.. 4 *1
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Assorted
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Swift's All Purpose
Jewel Oil ....... S9
Lipton's Hot Weather Special
Tea Bags 99c
Lindsay Pitted or Unpitted Select
Ripe Olives 3 t a 3 n s $1
South Shore
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Libby's Delicious
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all day Friday, July 4!
OfiP
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ill Dont forget, redeem IS
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dc. sure co redeem your coupon for the Bth. week which
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Lettuce 2 h.d> 49*
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Spare Ribs I V. 79 c
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Kraft's Ind. Wrapped Slices, American, Swiss,
Pimento, Salami .... pkg. 69*
Publix Com Oil
Margarine 39*
Swift's Margarine
Allsweet ...X 29<
Pillsbury's Crescent
Dinner Rolls 'Z 39
Kraft's Philadelphia
Cream Cheese Ur 39*
Sboeauty Qjfod ( Q§tecut&
Reg. or ixtra Hold Hair Spray
Lustre-Creme '!.T 39*
Kffervoscont Alkalizar
Alka-Seltzer Ur 39*

ARMOURS STAR GOVERNMENT-INSPECTED SHIPPED* f]
QUICK-FROZEN* EVISCERATED (8 to 14-lb. average)
Turkeys 39 { |
SDept. j:

Sam Iw Praia. Danish f
Cinnamon Rolls a a a j Pkg. 69*
ird. tya Pmsaa with Almaads
French Beans an. pkg. 39*
oath's Tasty Krispy
Fish Sticks X 39*
Siaalataa's f roman Stuffed
Fillet of Flounder a a pkg. 49*

SWIFT S PREMIUM
HALF OR WHOLE
SMOKEO
Fully-Cooked
Homs
pound
59*
plus 100 Extra S&H Green Stamps with coupon

GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street
3;

ffiwm (Our Apt.
Freak mr Smoked |
Liverwurst P ,Z 99 e |
Delicieu, Kitchen-Fresh
Potato Salad T 39 c j
Tasty Party-Parfact #
Cole Slaw 739* |
Xi
Anneticing Bar-B-Q Beef or
Pork Ribs X % V 9 P
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11 l CII n 9^l
Swift's Premium Proten
Chuck Steaks it 89*
Swift's Premium Proten English Cut t
Beef Short Ribs ...... r 79*
Swift's Premium Proten Steak
London Broil k: *1

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Stores hours: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.

Minute Mu id Fregen Cent, Untuned* * S
Limeade ****** 4 49 c |
fictsweet fmien Helve* _.. jj
Strawberries nee 3 pkg*. M F
Chun King Fresen Chicken
Egg Rolls I
June's with Fegpereni A Cheese
Pizza Rolls kg. 69 e |

Tuesday, July 1. 1968, Ttw Florida Alligator,

iTfl^WGreenStamps
MM! THIS COUPOU AM* SO SC MASS Os ^l
1. Swift's Premium Either
Half or Whole Fully-Cooked
Smoked Hams
(Ispirtt Sat.# Jaly S# 1888) <
<
iTn^GreenStamps^
2. Rath's Black Hawk
Boneless Canned Hams
three pound can
(spiral Sat.# July 9, 1888)
iflAnomuuuuuuuumahAfMUumenoooee
pQ^GreenStamps^
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3. Treasure Isle PSD Frozen
Shrimp Meats
. I i/i-lb. pkg.
(I*#ir*s Set.. July * *> J
>eflh>eeeaAfteaaaaAAl!iUUM>juu>eenm>e r.Y.I EXTRA IF***
[!ly Stamps gy
4. Lipton's
Instant Tea
giant jar
(Expires Sot., July 9, 1888) 2
utAAfuuu>i>iu>efuu>eftlhnf>f>eAaAfteeneeeeeJc
rn EXTRA IF^i
[l}l]^WGreenStampsP]
5. Any Brand-Any Size |
Sun Tan Lotion I
(Expires Set., July S, 1888) 2
[iJi]^WGreenStamps^^
6. Normal or Dry |
Brack Liquid Shampoo j
8-oz. size f
(Expires Set., July 9, |
[jJij^GreenStamps
7. Reg. or Mint Flavor
Crest Tooth Paste
5-oz. Tube
(Expires Set., July 9, 1888) 1
GreenStamps pi
aiTH THU COUFOM AMO fWRCMAtt OF BSIShH
8. Herman's O. B. Spiced |
Luncheon or Sliced Bologna I
1-lb. pkg. I
(Ixyir.a Set.. July S. !*) |
mefteseeoeeeeAAeel'muuineenftAftftaneeeh;
EXTRA EF*^
dsWGreenStamps|s*J
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9. Assorted Varieties
Tarnow's Pizza
(Ixpiret in,.. July S. I***)
M>nuu>ftftAftfteaee*
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10. Stouffer's Pouch |
Cream Chipped Beef
11-oz. Pkg. |
(Expires Set., July 9. 1888) 2
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11. Swift's Cornish
Game Hens
1 A-lb. pkg.
(I#ire. Set.. July S. I vet) J
beeeeeeeeeeAeeefte
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/O'VtUese
fPOBIIXI
lal
Where shopping
is a pleasure

Page 5



Page 6

S, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 1, 1969

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
/
TmMZCL Managing Editor
All u r
. Margo Cox Al Jensen
y\ Mhim Assignments Editor News Editor
Grad Assts. Hurt
By Higher Tuition
(EDITORS NOTE: The following is a copy of a letter sent to Dean
L.E. Grinter of the UF Graduate School.)
DEAR DEAN GRINTER:
On June 19, a delegation from Local 1880 AFT/AFL-CIO met with
President OConnell to express our concern over the financial
situation of UF graduate student assistants for the next academic
year. We know that our concern is shared by many of the faculty who
are not members of our union.
You are well aware of the situation. Tuition for resident graduate
students has been raised SSO per term, but the stipends to be paid to
graduate student assistants were not concomitantly increased; this, in
effect, decreases the stipend to each such assistant $l5O for the
academic year. For a one-third time assistant this amounts to a salary
cut of almost seven per cent at a time when living costs are rising
sharply. And we all know that these people, even without the increase
in tuition and living costs, live hand-to-mouth; they subsist, indeed, on
a genuine poverty level.
That President OConnell and the Graduate School share our
concern in this matter is only appropriate, for it would be shameful if
the University were to disregard the plight of this group of students.
The task of finding extra funds to forestall the hardship threatened
to our brothers is, we know, difficult; we therefore urge you to
continue your efforts to find the necessary money, both at the
university level possibly in units such as the Division of Sponsored
Research and through petition of the Board of Regents and the
Legislature.
The interests of Florida demand that our university be competitive
in the attracting of real graduate student talent, but even more do the
common bonds of humanity demand that we treat these dedicated
and talented individuals fairly.
J. JAYZEMAN
Asst. Prof.
PRESIDENT,
LOCAL 1880 AFT/AFL-CIO

The 'Provisional Government Racket

The Foreign Minister of Ruritania was journeying
through his memories. Its supposed to be
ominous, he said, for your peace-with-honor
prospects in Vietnam that the Communist Viet
Cong, or the National Liberation Front, has
suddenly metamorphosed into something that calls
itself a Provisional Government. I know that some
of your Kremlinologists are thinking now that
Moscow has recognized this new Provisional
Government as the rightful authority in South
Vietnam. The Kremlinologists recall the history of
Stalin and the so-called Lublin Poles, and what
befell Poland when the Communists used the Lublin
Committee to get control in Warsaw.
Well, so the Foreign Minister continued, the
Polish business was bad enough. When your
Franklin Roosevelt and Britains Winston Churchill
agreed at Yalta to let the Lublin Poles, who were so
obviously Moscow stooges, combine with
non-Communist Polish govemment-in-exile
characters such as Stanislaw Mikolajczyk to form a
coalition regime, it meant the end of Polish
freedom. The Lublinites eventually swallowed up
everything, and Mikolajczyk had to flee for his life.
The Russians clearly hope to repeat the story of
the Polish takeover in South Vietnam. They expect
to wear you down at the peace negotiations in Paris.
After you have lost a few thousand more young
Americans during a protracted fight-talk period,
they are confident that you will agree to a merger of
the Viet Congs Provisional Government with the
Thieu government. They are sure that once they
have their men in the key South Vietnam positions
they will be able to grab everything. They let
Mikolajczyk remain in Poland for two years after
1945 as Minister of Agriculture and Deputy
Premier. But a phony election ruined Mikolajczyks

EDITORIAL I
Welcome To Worries

Will the day ever come when aUF
administrator will be able to step in o s
new office and not be worried with
financially-oriented problems which c
knows will burden him for the remainder ot
his tenure in office.
Today two men are taking over
administrative posts both are facing
similar money problems, both assume their
jobs with a knowledge of the situation here,
and both have a hard road ahead.
Dr. Edmund F. Ackell and Dr. Harold P.
Hanson begin on a long trek during which
they can expect enough frustrations and
headaches to drive the average man
screaming to his psychiatrist.
Ackell takes over as provost of the J.
Hillis Miller Health Center, and Hanson
begins as dean of the graduate school.
Both of these institutions have been hit
hard by a tightening of the governmental
pursestrings. The health center is in the
midst of an expansion program which will
make it one of the largest teaching and
medical research facilities in the nation.
That program received a critical blow this

NEWS ITEM: The Military Is Still Trying To Perfect A
Dependable Guidance System For Underground Missiles. .

political base. Mikolajczyk slipped out of the
country in 1947 just in time to escape arrest. I
remember what he said when he arrived in London:
I did not want to be shot and killed like sheep. If
things work out in Vietnam as the Communists
think they will work out, those words will be
repeated by Thieu when he runs for his life to
Manila or Honolulu.
The Foreign Minister of Ruritania pauses
John Chamberlain
reflectively. You know, he went on, the
Communist takeover in Poland doesnt actually
mean that the Soviet formula for getting control of
countries through the Provisional Government
gambit is infallible. My memory goes back even
further than Yalta, to the time of the
Finnish-Russian War of 1940. Your SDS young
people have certainly never heard of a Finnish
character named Otto Kuusinen. He was a member
of the Bolshevik Old Guard who had served as
international secretary of the Third International

year when almost minion in federal
funds were, if not lost, at least postponed
until next year. The money was there, but
because the state legislature failed to provide
matching funds, it was given to two other
states.
The graduate school is faced by many cuts
in funds which affect research, but possibly
the greatest problem is faced by the graduate
assistants, whose tuition just rose $l5O for
the academic year, but whose pay remained
dismally low. Because it is costing them this
much more to go to school and work, they
are in effect taking a cut in pay, a cut which
comes at a time when the cost of living is
rising.
Floating a giant education bond issue is
not the answer. Although a step in the right
direction, it is only a stopgap method which
will only postpone the day when taxes are
upped.
Not until the citizens of the Sunshine
State and their elected representatives realize
greater education requires greater taxation
will the state emerge from the shadows of
inferior schooling.

you know, the Comintern for almost twenty
years between the first and second World Wars.
His headquarters were in Moscow, and he had
practically forgotten he was a Finn, but his daughter
Hertta had gone back to Helsinki, the Finnish
capital, in the Thirties to work in the local
underground. This tenuous family connection was
enough to make Kuusinen a viable Finnish citizen in
Moscows eyes. So the Soviets, assuming that their
armies could roll over Finland in a matter of days,
named Kuusinen head of a Provisional Finnish
Government. They expected to install him in
Helsinki within a month.
The Finns, as some of us old folks remember,
crossed everybody up by fighting the Russians to a
standstill in the so-called Winter War. They werent
having anything of this Provisional Government
nonsense. Eventually they were compelled to yield
the Karelian Isthmus up close to Leningrad to the
Russians, but they kept their national integrity.
So what happened to the Kuusinen Workers
Government? It just faded away. Today you wont
find any mention of the Kuusinen business in
official Soviet history.
The moral is that the Soviets dont have any
magic formula in the Provisional Government
racket. If Roosevelt and Churchill had stood up to
Stalin at Yalta, and if General Patton had been
allowed to remain in Prague after beating the
Russians to it, even the episode of the Lublin Poles
might never have happened.
I m not running your government, and wont
presume to tell Nixon what to do about the Viet
Congs own Lublin Committee.* But in Ruritania
we know that the only way to deal with a
Communist is never to give him a break. If you do,
he 11 kill you the second time around.



FORUM:^^'
( Aiiiti mi ViiAuit j
hope for the compla^ mL-****^
The Law Is A Threat

MR. EDITOR:
After reading Palm Beach
County Judge Lewis Kapners
open letter to UF President
OConnell in the last Alligator, I
can see where the rock group
Moby Grape got the words to
their song, Ive Got Murder in
My Heart for the Judge.

The judge loudly protested the Student
Government showing of obscene, racist,
anti-intellectual, and communist-produced SDS
films. The words are quoted from his letter. Each is
supposed to mean something but when we get past
the judges emotional hysteria, we find the choice of
words confusing and essentially meaningless.
First the films are said to be obscene. As Phil
Sandford was saying at FSU just before he was
thrown out of the country by another Florida judge
in Tallahassee, What is obscenity? Are bare breasts
obscene? Are human sexual habits obscene? Or is
war obscene? Is the murdering of natural resources
obscene? Is the exploitation of hungry people
obscene? We are going to change the usage of the
word and apply it only to those things which really
are obscene. In other words does the judge think,
hell, damn, etc., are obscene while war, imperialism,
germ-warfare, hunger, disease, napalm, etc., are
decent? I think throwing a person out of the U.S.
for exposing American business interests is obscene.
Next the judge uses racist to describe the films.
Our society is racist. Any film accurately portraying
our society is bound to be a racist film. Racism
wasnt invented on campus by radical students.
Racism originally flourished in this country and is
still flourishing because it makes money for rich
people. Ending racism will cost money and rich
people (businessmen, politicians, judges, etc.)
usually have no interest in parting with dollars. For
this reason I dont trust the judge as an evaluator of
racism and racist content. Does the good judge
condemn white racism as enthusiastically as he
condemns black racism? I doubt it.
Next is anti-intellectual. There are crocodile
tears all over this word. Whoever heard of a judge
protecting a true intellectual? Judges are the people
who throw intellectuals in jail and make sure they
get the maximum. When they get a chance, they
throw them out of the country. Judges are anti antiintellectual
intellectual antiintellectual so it is hard to believe they disapprove
of anti-intellectual films.
Last is the old standby communist-produced.
The judge laid an egg there. Workers and students
dont go into frothy convulsions at the mention of
the word communist anymore. Like Satan it
has lost the ominous magic spell which right-wing
bigots and profiteers have relied on for so long.
What does the word mean? Is there one communism

Alachua Delegation Deserves Applause

MR. EDITOR:
In my judgment, a real injustice has been done to
our Legislative delegation in your Four Silent
Men editorial of June 24. After observing closely
the actions of the past Legislature and particularly
the performance of our local delegation, I come to a
decidedly different conclusion than that which you
expressed.
First, however, let me share your concern that
more was not done for higher education. The need
was great and many of these needs remained unmet
at the end of the session. However, no one was more
vocal in voicing these needs and in supporting
efforts to try to satisfy them than our own
delegation.
It is a matter of public record that all four
members committed themselves to higher taxes if
necessary to meet these needs. Indeed, the Alachua
delegation supported efforts to close certain
loop-holes in the tax laws which would have
provided additional revenue.
The circumstances were such, however, that after
the substantial tax increase in 1968, the climate was
not favorable for further advances this spring.

What is obscenity? Are bare breasts obscene? Are human
sexual habits obscene? Or is war obscene? Is the murdering
of natural resources obscene? Is the exploitation of hungry
people obscene? We are going to change the usage of the
word and apply it only to those things which really are
obscene!
Phil Sandford

or many? What is the difference between socialism
and communist? If you were trying to say that one
of the films was made in Cuba and misrepresented
facts of life in the US, then say that but dont
expect to be able to whip out the word
Communist and have everyone flee in terror. We
are finally getting wise to the old tricks.
In further commenting on the films you say
They have no more place in an academic setting
than aKu Klux Klan rally. In this way you try to
associate communists and socialists in general with
the KKK. The fact is that KKK ideas and
explanations rarely appeal to anyone with more
than a primitive grade school mentality while
modern communistic and socialistic ideas have
appealed to many of the greatest brains and
intellects of the modem world. The Ku Klux Klan
could never flourish on any decent campus while
socialists and communists could and do. You know
this. It is no accident that the two best U.S.
campuses, Berkeley and Harvard, have the most
left-wing radicals. In your seemingly generous (to
many minds) fairness in keeping off both KKK and
socialist-communists, you have in reality only
excluded the socialist-communists because the KKK
exclude themselves from any good campus in that
their ideas are so stupid they cant get any support.
In any event judges have been a bigger threat to free
ideas on campus than the KKK will ever be.
In summation you say I must protest this and I
strongly urge you to adopt a policy which will bring
about the rule of law and reason to the University
Campus. It is unfortunate you want both law and
reason on the campus. In the modern state of affairs
you have to take your pick because law hasnt been
based on reason for some time. That is unless you
think it is reasonable to kill courageous Vietnamese
like flies, push fall-apart junk off on consumers,
pollute and pave the landscape, squeeze the life out
of the poor people of the world, smear the Cuban
revolution, and support cheap crooks (Park Chung
Hee, Chiang Kai-shek, etc.) as fascist dictators.
These are all things done legally, so since the choice
comes down to law or reason, Ill choose reason and
thank the law to keep its dirty, bloody,
dollar-crooked hands off this and every other
campus.
MICHAEL CRAWFORD

Indeed, a tax increase this year was not in the
cards no matter how strongly our local delegation
might have supported it.
In the absence of additional revenue, it became
obviously impossible to fund Capital Outlay projects
such as the Health Center expansion and at the same
time meet the minimum requirements for operation
funds. Consequently, the only Capital Outlay
apptopriation for higher education statewide was
the $600,000 made available to the Health Center
to facilitate continued planning for Project I.
Without the effective leadership of the Alachua
delegation, this planning money would not have
become a reality.
The Legislature then worked out a plan wherein,
with a favorable referendum vote in November,
some $44 million in Capital Outlay funds would be
made available from a bond program for the most
critical needs in higher education. With the earlier
approval of the planning funds for the Health
Center, there has been at least tacit agreement at all
levels that the Health Center need would be met
from this total.
If this is done as expected, UF would expect to

By Robert Sistrunk
Make That Grade
Speaking Out
How many hassles has our grading system caused?
What is an A? Well.. .ug.. .hard to say. It differs in value
according to the department, course, and instructor.
Memorizing obscure facts for prog regurgitation often replaces
learning what the subject is all about.
UF students frequently enroll in crib courses to up their grade
point averages, with little intention of learning anything of value from
these courses.
Cheating on finals tells that the grade has become so important that
dishonesty is accepted as part of the final game.
Social pressure cries out: Youre a falure if you flunk our.
Parent-investment adds to the pressure to make the grade.
Our grading system fathers a tragic offspring: censorship. Or,
prof-God acceptance. Or, dont bite the hand of the one who passes or
fails you.
When your prof says A is B, in the back of your brain you say I
think hes nuts, but you digest it rather than disagree. After all, he will
grade you wrong if you disagree with what he says. You may as well
give in and learn it the way he says it is and forget the drag of
trying to see it like it really is.
Now.. .If you spit back this prof-statement, just because you know
you will get a correct on your progress test, have you learned
anything?
Yes. Youve learned to play it safe to get the grade, but, you
have taken the wrong road toward finding truth.
I believe that trying to make the grade is a dangerous side road. It is
a well traveled detour, however, and it is one reason that when its all
over you wonder: I made a 3.8, graduated with
honors,.. .but.. .what in the HELL did I learn that will help me from
here out?
Mel, Youve Been Working Too Hard

receive a substantial share of the total Capital
Outlay funds available to the State University
System. This favorable position for the UF
obviously did not happen by chance. It happened
primarily because of the leadership from the
Alachua delegation.
I could cite many other examples of the
delegations effective leadership how, for
example, it was possible to get approximately
$500,000 in UF operating funds restored in the
Appropriations Conference Committee to counter
earlier cuts by both Houses.
While no one would contend that the University
received all the financial support that was needed
from the Legislature this year, I think it is quite
obvious that under the circumstances we fared as
well or better than could have been expected. Most
of the credit for this is due the four members of the
not so silent Alachua delegation.
In my judgement, no county in the State has a
more effective delegation. Lets applaud rather than
criticize!
E.T. YORK JR.
Provost for Agriculture

Tuesday, July 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 1, 1969

4
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, c;f,': ' <' 'lisfiiiils^-
MAAS BROTHERS
The 30's make a comeback in
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Join the trend setters by wearing
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Made of 65% dacron, and 35%
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Tuwdiy, July 1, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

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Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
67 Vw Excellent condition transistor
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Call 372-0939.{A-2t-155-p)
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESS! 40%
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Good running 1967 Honda 65. Very
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Zeiss binocular microscope, excellent
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TAPE RECORDER rca 4-track
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Honda 450 Scrambler 69, must sell,
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warranty, not even broken in $llOO
new, sacrifice for $925, call Bill
376-0689. (A-2t-155-p)
1 table 2 chairs, sls, Zenith TV $75,
chest of drawers S2O, Night stand
$lO, 4 drawer file cabinet $25, 2
posturepedic twin beds & covers and
bolsters S4O each, bookcase sls, 4
butterfly chairs $7 each. After 5 PM,
378-9148. (A-3t-155-p)
ONE of the finer things of Life
Blue Lustre Carpet and upholstery
cleaner. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-156-c)
2 ROYAL standard typewriters. 1
elite, 1 pica like new. Cost $260 each
new. Just cleaned will sell for $125
each. Phone 378-6403 evenings after
six. (A-st-155-c)

BOX ffice opens 8:30
SHOW STARTS 9:00
Ist RUN IN GAINESVILLE
Si CECOinrPECK /OMARSHAiaF
9:00 ONLY f^OLD
STEreOPHONIC SOUND ra 1
DIVORCE AMERICAN STYLE*!

Page 10

;.;xxx-xxx-xxnnsx-xxxox<-x*x-x.x>m
FOR RENT 1
fe'wwwmmmwxx-mssswww
RANCH STYLE LIVING two br.
apt. large closets & tile bath. Fully
panelled & AC, use of pool & BBQ
house Walking distance of new golf
course to be opened this summer.
Sorry no children no pets. $l5O per
mo. Call 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-st-155-p)
Furnished 2 bedroom house $125 per
month Ist & last in advance SIOO
damage deposit refundable. Large
yard. Kids & pets OK. 376-9025
anytime. (B-2t-156-c)
3-BR 2-Bath unfurnished house in
congenial neighborhood near Law
complex, a/c, fireplace. Available
July 5. $165. 378-9383. (B-lt-156-p)
Air conditioned 2 bedroom furnished
apt. Avail. 7/1/ Call 376-5828.
(B-4t-l 55-P)
WANTED
: :xxxsssss?x;xxx
1 or more female roommates to share
2 bdrm Vill. Park apt. sllO for
summer. Come by apt. 48 after 4.
(C-3t-155-p)
SEX! CLO has gone coed for the
summmer. If you are looking for an
inexpensive place to stay near
campus were it! Room & 3 meals
a day for S6O a month. Space also
available for fall. Stop by 117 N.W.
15 st. or call Kim or Paul at
378-9420. (C-st-155-p)
One female roommate summer
quarter Landmark lmmediate
occupancy, S9O whole summer air
cond, dishwasher, disposal, pool
Call 378-3518. (C-3t-155-p)
Responsible coed needs job. Willing
to be student assistant, iron shirts,
babysit, anything legal. Call Carolyn,
392-7625, 1003 Tower A.
(C-2t-156-p)

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 1, 1969

WANTED
X*NNv;*x-x*x-x*x-x.NvX XvXX*ySN*X"X*x .*
One or two female roommates for
two br. French Quarter. ONLY S3O
per month!! Call 376-0008.
(C-st-152-P)
:xWiS:vvi ;^(*
HELP WANTED f
j£x.XKxxxxxx.?xyx*x*x*x*>x*xx*sj
Student Assistant 11:45AM I:4SPM
MONDAY FRIDAY 1.50 per hour
free lunch. Call Mr. Avery 392-3701.
(E-155-2t-c)
Babysitter. Four evenings a week for
3 hours each evening. No weekends.
Reasonable rates. Call Cathy
372-7960. (E-2t-155-p)
:^ssx*x*x*:*x*:'X-:-:-:.:.sr;rx*:x*:*x*xxx
- AUTOS |
XX*>XX-X-XX:X XX XX-X-S:X*X XM I fr6W^
1948 CHEVY Unique, ugly, but
passed inspection. Mucho miles, but
runs well. Will negotiate price. Call
378-2294 evenings. (G-3t-155-p)
1963 V.W. Kombi bus, inspected,
1970 liscense. Call 372-0033 after
5:30. (G-5M56-C)
Must sell this week excellent 1960 air
conditioned Cadillac 4 door fine
shape electric windows etc. $350 or
best offer. Bob 376-7402 must sell
(G-2t-155-p)
;:*!XSXX X XX*X*XXvX*>>XX*X*X*X.X.X.X^:
PERSONAL
$
.'V.NXX'X-X-X-XX'V-VXX'X'X-XXXX'XX'XX
Wanted the slides taken from my car
behind towers during finals. Since
they are of no use to you please
return them to Towers Area office
or 1701 N. Military Tl., W. Palm
Beach, Fla. or Union Lost and
Found. (J-3t-155-p)
Please adopt gold and white kittens.
Healthy and playful. Adorable. Call
Lefty 372-6474, 1007 SW 13 St.
(J-3t-l 55-P)

EH6A6EMEHT! Advome Ticket Sole Now
./ T|IC MAIL o lewe ALL
i THt % ORDER spM'fy \ U SEATS
t BEST -/tV
% FOREIGN FILM $ > AIY: My?
S, OF THE YEM!" O iToWMj llClWfltf,
-Hmi York Film Critics i
%.-'szz" J? wrl : i l M
ONLY
STATE two part production of LEO TOLSTOY S
WARand PEACE
PRESENTED BY THE WALTER REAOE ORGANIZATION AND SATRA IN COLOR RELEASED BY CONTINENTAL %
r-PART I THEMTTLE OF AUSTERIITZ' JUL 9-12
PART n *"&. JUL 13-15
THE ENTIRE PRODUCTION OF "WAR AND PEACE" WILL BE SHOWN
IN TWO PARTS EACH PART WILL BE SHOWN FOR ONE WEEK!
TICKETS MAY BE PURCHASED SEPARATELY FOR EACH PART
Be Happy! j
Hi \ SPECIALS 11
11V XA tues DAY SPECIAL ||
I FRIED 1
I CHICKEN I
H ALL YOU QQI m
|j| CARE TO EAT / /y |||
|| WEDNESDAY SPECIAL || n
LUNCH AND DINNER
M JUMBO CHOPPED H
i STEAK AO I I|l.
|l. I|l. WITH MUSHROOM GRAVY OOC HI
AND YELLOW RICE T ||f
8 MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS i
||k GAINESVILLE MALL jM

PERSONAL
!; &
Want to buy used textbooks for the
speedwriting home course. Call
376-4801 after 6. (J-3t-156-p)
if LOST A FOUND 1
Lost German shepherd. Vicinity of
towers, Wednesday night. Reward.
Call 378-2289. (L-3t-156-p)
SERVICES 1
y
TYPING ALL SUMMER 5 YEARS
EXP. IBM ELECT. TYPEWRITER
TYPE IN MY HOME. CALL
376-7809. (M-st-156-p)
RAYS Style and Barber Shop
Weekdays 9:00-6:00 and Saturdays
until 5. 1125 W. University Ave.
Phone 372-3678 for appointments.
(M-15t-156-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M55-P)
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
INTRAMURALS BOXING CLUB
CALL LEE 372-9410. IF I AM NOT
THERE LEAVE A MESSAGE.
(M-2t-155-p)
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
SERVICE needs efficient typists to
work either mornings or afternoons.
For an appointment call 376-7160.
(M-155-p)
My office 5s small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
519*/2 SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-155-2t-p)

iMMPfI THRU FRJ
WHTfc AT 3 A 7
A totally new concept in
i U artistic motion pictures
forsdults!
1, a woman;
-RECOMMENDED FOR MATURE ADULTS!-^
AT 5 & 9
ANIMAL
' CARMEN BABY
STARTS SATURDAY
THE ORIGINAL
'KING KONG'
m W.
S3E?'
Dick'VanDyke Sally
Lionel Jeffries
William Holden as Pike Bishop Bishopstraight
straight Bishopstraight as a string with the des desperate
perate desperate men he led.
Ernest Borgnine as Dutch-Pike's
sidekick, a gross and brutal man.
They enjoyed living, loving and kill killing,
ing, killing, and wrote their own epitaphs
and foe alike.
A modern-day story
of faith, courage, LpM
and intrigue! gw
Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer
a George Englund production
starring Anthony Quinn
Oskar Werner
David Janssen
Vittorio De Sica
Leo McKern
John Gielgud
Barbara Jefford
Rosemarie Dexter
__ also starring
Laurence Olivier
anavision and Metrocolor



MISS FLORIDA HOPFFIII

Coed Seeks State Title

By KEN ANDERSON
Alligator Correspondent
Will Miss America of 1969 be a UF coed?
Pert Carol Still, 3JM, has only one more step to
take and she may represent Florida at Atlantic City
in September.
Carol, Miss Panama City, is an entrant in the Miss
Florida contest to be held in Orlando Sunday. If she
is successful, she will go on to the national contest
Sept. 1.
The shapely brunette already has an imposing list
of titles: Miss Long Beach, UF Homecoming
Sweetheart and Army ROTC Sweetheart.
Besides meeting the physical requirements,
(37-24-36V2), Carol is well-qualified intellectually
and socially.
She is a junior of public relations and holds an
upper division grade point average of 3.1.
She drills regularly with the Army ROTC, is rush
chairman of Alpha Delta Pi and belongs to the UF
choir.
For her entry in the talent portion of the Miss
Florida contest Carol will sing This Little Bird.
I started singing soon after I learned to talk,
Carol says.

Senate Tables Tenure Topic

By SUSAN BROWN
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Senate
Thursday voted to delay action
on a resolution calling for
Florida legislators to oppose
attempts to interfere with the
university tenure system.
The resolution, stemming
from recent controversies
between legislators and faculty
members, concerning academic
freedom and job security, was
tabled since the legislature
adjourned with no action against
the principle of tenure.
The resolution emphasized
the security of the faculty
should not be placed at the
mercy of politicians,
administrators or students
because of transient social
attitudes.
The Senate Committee on
Professional Relations and
Standards noted that many
colleges and universities
subscribe to the principles of
academic freedom and tenure by
requiring a system without
political interference.
Only in such an institution
can there be the unrestricted
search for truth and the free
exchange of ideas, the
resolution said.
Dr. Tony J. Cunha, assistant
chairman of the committee,
clarified its use of unrestricted

$ Climb aboard
The S.S. Winnjammer* }
* Meals served from 11:00 AM to ik
Midnight "I
'J Bernie Sher j(
| at the Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday 41
) Oysters & clams on the half shell I* I
Michelob on draft Ml
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty A
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager \l
Reservations Accepted S,W 2nd Ave lC\
Closed Sundays A)

search for truth.
The university should be a
place where you can study a
problem, research it, and give
the results even if an idea is
discredited, he said. There
should be a search for truth in
any product of any phase of
American life and the results
published, though it may not be
popular with everyone.
The professor has the
privilege of expressing his own
views but has the responsibility
of airing other sides. The teacher
has an obligation to be
responsible in the statements he
makes.
The mistake that people
seem to make is that tenure gives
you freedom from
responsibility, Cunha said.
Tenure is certainly not a
protector.
The resolution said
interference with the principle
of tenure could result in the loss
of accreditation and the loss of
many good faculty members.
Cunha cited the American
Association of University
Professors monthly publication
as a determining factor in
accreditation and acquiring a
good faculty.
Since the publication is
distributed nationally, many
professors refer to it in making
decisions concerning future jobs.

A soprano, Carol has studied voice for more than
a year.
I d like to say I have a good voice, but I better
leave that to the judges, she said.
Music plays a big part in her life. In addition to
her voice training and choir affiliation she also has
been studying piano for four years.
Her other interests are reading and water sports,
especially skiing. On graduation she hopes to do
public relations work in a large city.
I think most girls enter contests not because they
think they will win, but for the confidence they
gain from knowing that they can compete, Carol
said.
If Carol becomes Miss Florida, it will mean a year
out of school and much travel.
Its hard to say what being Miss America would
be. Atlantic City is a long way away. Every little girl
dreams of being Miss America; every teenager jokes
about it, and every Miss Florida prays about it.
Miss America has become a symbol for people in
the U.S.A. She is their American girl. She is a
picture of beauty, sophistication, poise, kindness
and that fresh, wholesome look.
Thats a lot to live up to.

Since the legislature took no
action, Cunha said he felt the
resolution was unnecessary now,
but said it would be available in
case it was needed during the
next session.

[DON'T FORGET]
SSUMMER BOWLING LEAGUES
I ORGANIZATION MEETING f
I JULY 3&3 7:3OPM ROOM 150 C \
l REITZ UNION GAMES AREA t
1 %

SUMMED ACTIVITIES CALEMDAR
i EVER}-/ I
Filrns pm. s 4 t.& Sum.
' TV? PM.
>?. 6 s? Ulllff*;
U liniMU g£ g y
n CHll.DfeeiO's
/ua&tuu y JAP i>BALLET
INT£f2PRGTIUG l\l Stude*d-AcWifies
/T 9AM CE W*f D B flcr P ,^
BE&IMKJIKJ6 EotAMbocLu t*> M LtbH&AIJ
'koOS HI6H HI l a.9 I
MOOEfeM CLO66D
QuJbfr !*M. j \ -aKho, II JOLV &4>.
o-QO PM- I LESSOMS OMjLjULtiri H|

Jfc- .ia^^Ki.
JW gg^

K iUP
M JBl a
ma
Ub js
NEW PREXY AIDE
James A. Beckham Jr., 31, has
been named assistant to UF
President Stephen C. O'Connell.
Beckham succeeds Mel Sharpe,
who resigned to return to
graduate school.
| CIiNTEASY WOODiSBACK
I AND BURNING AT BOTH ENDS .|
j , it you tan take il! t ~..> IH

Tuesday, July 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

RED oX
PIN cf)
NIGHT A
8-10 PM CP
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA
MCI THE
| > r-rJ CROWDS
Jll
Jack Lemmon and
Catherine Deneuve
sire
The April Fools @
BK] O GREAT
|n* ||M X
j irw* we MI t Mmm LIITC
I A WALT
DISNEY
4^SK^ productions
I pascal]
w . the masked bandit I
ALSO..."HANG your
HAT ON THE WIND
GATOR ADS SELL
PRETTY GOOD

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, July 1, 1969

Orange ad

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Campus
Calendar

Tuesday, July 1
College of Education Lecture:
Thaxton Springfield & Ted
Landsman, "Sensitivity
Training: The Newest
Witchcraft," Norman Aud.,
1:30 p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 118
Reitz Union, 7 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D,
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Children's 3allet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3-6 years 1 p.m.; 6
years &up 2 p.m.
Wednesday, July 2
w-.
Music Dept: Outdoor Twilight
Concert, Univ. Aud. Lawn,
6:45 p.m.

Administrative
Notices

GOLF LESSONS: Beginning
July 1, 3.E. "Buster Bishop,
new Golf Club pro, will be
available for private and group
lessons at the University Golf
Club. Appointments can be
made by calling 392-0689.
Individual, 30 minute lessons,
* including shag boy, are $5.50. A
series of five individual lessons,
30 minutes each, including shag
boy, costs $22.50. Group
lessons, eight lessons with six per
group, including shag boy, are
S2O.
PRE-MEDICAL AND
PRE-DENTAL STUDENTS:
Must register with
pre-professional counseling
office room 105 Anderson Hall
starting Tuesday, July 1 through
Friday, July 11. Be sure to bring
with you the full names of all
your instructors in the course
and section numbers.
SUMMER QUARTER
LOANS: Students who have
been approved for loan releases
for the summer quarter can
obtain their money at the
Student. Depository in the Hub
as soon as they have registered

(Low Interest Rates Still Available wiggiS BPMMB 111 l BLmI
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I
sh Avenue at the comer of 12th Street Hours : 800 am. 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday I

Speleological Society Meeting,
346 Union, 7 p.m.
Thursday, July 3
Y.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, Children of all ages,
11 a.m.
Friday, July 4
F ilms Committee: "Capt.
Newman, M.D.," Union Aud.,
7 & 9:15 p.m.
BOX OFFICE: Tickets for the
Arabian Dinner are on sale at
the Union Information Desk.
$3.00 per person.

and received the fee cards.
OVERSEAS STUDY
CENTER: Applications are
being considered for the Florida
State University Overseas Study
Center, Florence, Italy, for the
1970 winter and spring quarters.
The center offers a humanities
oriented program with courses in
art history, classical languages,
literature and civilization,
English, Italian, history,
philosophy and religion. To be
eligible, students must be
registered in a university of the
State University System, have a
sophomore standing, a 2.0
overall academic average and one
quarter's study in Italian before
departure. Cost is $1,675 for
Floridians and $2,125 for
out-of-state students. The fee
covers round-trip air
transportation for New York,
room and board, tuition,
medical care and sponsored
excursion trip. Students mev
request applications and
information from Dr. Wayne C.
Minnick, 212 Williams Building,
Florida State University.

BLUB BULLETIN

[

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES



MOVIE review
Where Eagles Dare Excites, Intrigues

By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Within a minute after this
movie begins, before the titles
tell you so, you can tell Where
Eagles Dare is based on an
Springfield And
Landsman Speak
Thaxton Springfield and Dr.
Theodore Landsman will lecture
at 1:30 p.m. today in the
Norman Hall Auditorium. Their
presentation, Sensitivity
training: Newest Witchcraft, is
under sponsorship of the
Faculty Lecture Series. All
interested persons are welcome.

WRUF-FM New Programs
This is the last weekend for the Lush-A-Go-Go sound on
WRUF-FM. The University radio station, WRUF, is in the process of
revamping its entire FM programming, says Bob Leech, programming
director. The result will be thirty per cent classical, with pop,jazz and
rock, in that order, making up the rest.
Weekday evening programming will include Stereo Montage,
concert popular music, Patterns in Jazz for a new sound in dinner
music, Radio Center, programming by the College of Journalism,
and Concert Hall, classical masters. Because of a great interest
shown by students in acid rock, programming from midnight on
Friday and from 11 p.m. on Saturday till 2 a.m. both nights will be
103.7, underground rock. Monday nights, 7:30 to 10:30, will have
the Boston Pops recorded live.
The change-over will be done gradually and part of the new sound
will be the inclusion of more modem composers in the classical music
programming.
Movie Times
Union Captain Newman, M.D., starring Gregory Peck, Tony
Curtis and Angie Dickinson. Friday and Saturday, 7 and 9 p.m.
The Well-Diggers Daughter, Marcel Pagnels 1946 comedy, features
both French masters of hilarity Raimu and Fernandel. Sunday, 7
and 9 p.m.
Gainesville Drive-In Fistfull of Dollars, 9:02, and For a Few
Dollars More, 10:55. Two of Clint Eastwoods Italian-made Westerns.
Good music, good story-lines, good acting. Opening Wednesday:
Where Eagles Dare, 8:57, and The Glass Bottomed Boat, 11:30.
Plaza I The April Fools, starring Jack Lemmon and Catherine
Deneuve. 1:55, 3:55, 5:53, 7:52, 9:50. Opening Wednesday, True
Grit, starring John Wayne. From a bestselling novel which was also
serialized in a popular magazine. Promises lots of action and personal
. conflicts.
Plaza II Rascal, 2:42, 5:05, 7:26, 9:48, and Hang Your Hat on
the Wind, 1:50, 4:12, 6:34, 8:56. Disney Duo. Opening Friday,
Finigans Rainbow.
State Ia Woman, 3 and 7 p.m., and Carmen Baby, 5 and 9 p.m.
Opening Saturday: the one and only, the original King Kong. 3,5, 7,
9.
Florida Goodbye Columbus, starring Richard Benjamin. Steal of
The Graduate. 1:30, 3:30, 5:30, 7:30, 9:30. Opening Friday:
Chitty Chitty Bang Bang starring Sally Ann Howes, Dick Van Dyke,
and Lionel Jeffries.
Center I The Wild Bunch, a western with William Holden, Ernest
Borgnine, Robert Ryan, Edmund OBrien, all classic western actors.
1:10,3:46,6:22,9:05.
Center II Paper Lion, with Alan Alda, Lauren Hutton, and the
real Detroit Loins. A writer decides to get the inside story of playing
football; trains with the Lions and plays in a game. 1, 4:26, 7:52.
Support Your Local Sheriff, spoof western. 2:48,6:14, 9:45.
LEARN JUST f or oUf I
_lntroductory Flight Lesson
I Vr Discover why the swings to wings.
P| m a Try our introductory flight lesson in a modern
LT I Piper Cherokee. Come see us today.
VETERANS!! Your G.l. Bill pays for Commercial Pilot
Training. For full details, call Gainesville's only approved
school 378-2646.
370-2646
tm CASSFLS IN THE AIR, iwc,

Alistair McLean novel.
The scene is cold, barren,
murderous. It will demand extra
endurance, ingenuity, and skill
of the heroes in the execution of
their task. Then the titles are
over, and at last someone speaks.
This little piece of dialogue
heightens the already mounting
tension; dialogue is being used as
an essential part of the art, not
used as window-dressing. The
master at work is Alistair
McLean, who wrote the
screen-play too.
New complications at every
turn make the movie exciting,
suspenseful, and intriguing. Just
when the complexity might

begin to boggle your mind, its
all cleared up, consistently and
satisfyingly.
Concert Tomorrow
The first of three outdoor
twilight concerts by the Summer
Gator Band begins at 6:45 p.m.
Wednesday night, on the
University Auditorium lawn.
Robert E. Foster will direct.
Tryouts Open
Tryouts for two one-act plays
will be held at the Constans
Theatre Wednesday and
Thursday at 7 p.m. Plays are: No
Exit and There Comes a Strange
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
(vSS)
w
Good Sorvice Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

A W i
de firm
fa drm up
uour summer
coardrohe
Ufil/mt drmiruj down
uour hard acoounf
we're having a
at
Sike/mat&
225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
NATIONALLY KNOWN
SUITS, SPORT COATS,
SHOES, AND FURNISHINGS
e
HART SCHAFFNER AND MARX
KINGSRIDGE, CRICKETER,
DEANSGATE, AND MARTINILLI.
SUITS-SPORT COATS
Raducadl
20%
were now
$45 to 13500 $36 to 1 08

H
Ufaty/attef |
lIFRIEP CHICKEN!

gooooooooo ooooooooooooooooooooooooc
5 HAVE A SAFE JUL Y 4 HOLIDA Y 5
"Thirsty Time"
EVERY AFTERNOON
4:30 7:00
ALL COCKTAILS 'A PRICE
ALL DRAFT BEER sl/PITCHER
REMEMBER W.C. FIELDS EVERY MONDAY!

Tuesday, July 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

SWITH THIS COUPON SI.OO 1
OFF ON THE PURCHASE OF g
BUCKET OR BARREL §
COUPON GOOD THRU JUNE i
§ 30th FOR IN STORE 1
§ PURCHASE. S
emMMtim&i ywmM&mS
516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET

vfif vfifi<
i< vfifi< Ox-:oMdoqk&s ffty v vwX'A^XvtoqK.'': :jc- < %
IV
Y; : x< : : :: :Jr&
\?BMoocoo50w8oflHBBB
S'- *
MANHATTAN SHIRTS.
BOSTONIAN AND
MANSFIELD SHOES.
SLACKS, KNITSHIRTS,
SWIMTRUNKS, BERMUDAS
OPEN 9:3OAM TO 6:OOPM
FRIDAY 10AM TO 9PM
FREE CUSTOMER PARKING
AT REAR OF STORE

Page 13



Page 14

L The Florida Alliptor, Tuesday, July 1, 1969

I Miff
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I I
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I '\>'Shr!sSw£'vx?'x< 'aMT/
'Manhattan At Gallery

An art show called Manhattan Observed opens today in the
University Gallery of the Fine Arts complex. An exhibition of
drawings and prints traveling under the auspices of the Museum of
Modem Art, Manhattan Observed stands as testimony to the
attraction the city holds for artists. There are several thousand
working there now. The works represent a multitude of different styles
including the intimate and poetic images of Hopper, the dissonant and
fragmented works of Rauschenberg and the cool impersonal style of
Richard Hamilton. Selections begin with the turn of the century.
To foreign artists New York has often seemed an imaginary mecca.
George Grosz had not yet visited the United States when, in 1916, he
drew MEMORIES OF NEW YORK. Groszs kaleidoscope of
Manhattan (with Chicago and Denver as its suburbs) is a visual
counterpart to Kafkas novel AMERIKA (1913), disquieting and
fantastic. The Colombian artist Omar Rayo, depicting a gray flannel
suit by inkless intaglio, characterizes his image of Madison Avenue.
Three artists suggest the pulse of New York as a throbbing
metropolis: Eduardo Paolozzi situates a pair of robots between a
babel of architecture and a conglomerate of mechanisms that conspire
to suggest the accelerated agitations of a computer. Robert
Rauschenbergs image of automobiles and athletes racing down
Broadway combines transfers of photographs which, when disciplined

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into a lithograph, convey the
nervous tension of the citys life
and traffic. The last, Oskar
Kokoschkas sweeping vista,
looks down and across central
Manhattan. The view,
memorable and Olympian,
illustrates eloquently what
Henry James described as the
fine exhilaration of New York.
The works were selected from
the Museum of Modern Arts
collection by William
Lieberman, former director, and

Bernice Rose, Assistant Curator,
Department of Drawings and
Prints.
[Miller-Brown
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"THE GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM"
.... by Richard Hamilton.
Now on view at the
University Gallery in
"Manhattan Observed"
showing.
If/vr
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WP /
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How to bandage a war.
You do it a wound at a time.
A person at a time. With all
your skills as a nurse. With
all the cheerfulness in your
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want to. You do it because
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The Army Nurse Corps.
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Bacheler Gains
AAU 6-Mile Title

UF Track Clubs Olympic
runner, Jack Bacheler nosed out
Juan Martinez by four-tenths of
a second to win the six-mile run
in the sun-blistered AAU
championships in Miami
Saturday.
Bacheler was a member of last
years U.S. Olympic team but
was unable to run due to illness
after he had qualified for the
finals. The victory was his first
major title of his track career.
For Bacheler it was his second
victory of the day as he and his
opponents convinced the AAU
officials to delay their event
until later in the day. The event
was scheduled for the early
afternoon but was delayed to
give the runners a chance to
compete without the intense
heat that has been scorching the
state recently.
Other UF athletes competing
in the meet did not fare as well
as Bacheler. Jerry Fannin, UF
record holder for the 440-yard
intermediate hurdles placed fifth
in his heat which did not qualify
him for the finals. Bob Lang,
running the half-mile, finished
last in his heat. Land has been a
consistent 1:50 half-miler this
season for the Gators.
A few major upsets were
happening while Bacheler was
running. Unheralded Ivory
Rocket of Southern Illinois
defeated an overconfident
John Carlos in a photo finish
that clocked the first three
finishers at 9.3 seconds. Just last
week Carlos ran a 9.1 at
Knoxville to win the NCAA
championship. He also won the
220 yard dash at the meet.
World record holder in the
mile, Jim Ryun, and this years
NCAA champion who upset
Ryun last week for the title,
Marty Liquori, lost their heats in
the trials.
Ryun finished second behind
Brian Kivlan of the Long Island
Athletic Club. Both were
clocked at 4:07.7. liquori
didnt run well in the intense
heat and finished last in the heat
won by Bob Day of the U.S.
Army at 4:20.2.
Bob Seagren, the premier pole

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7:30 to 10:30P.M.
GOMMjbV'Mfo Ui (M/mM/A OjJo
$3.00 per person
TYcfceft on sale NOW at the Information
Desk of the Reitz Union. Deadline for
tickets: July 9

nr ,
JACK BACHELER
.. wins major title
vaulter in the world today, went
after the magic 18-foot mark
twice but failed when he
brushed the bar with his arm
after it appeared he was over the
mark.
Ron Jourdan, who just placed
third at the NCAA
championships last week failed
to place in the meet. Jourdans
best mark this season was 72H.

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'4l' Retired
Florida basketball fans will
no longer see jersey number 41
in action. UF coach Tommy
Bartlett announced last week
that the Gators first
All-American, Neal Walks
jersey would be retired.
It marks the first time a
basketball player at UF has
had his jersey retired. Walks
uniform will also be on
permanent display at the
Naismith Memorial Basketball
Hall of Fame in Springfield,
Mass.
Neal added a great deal to
basketball at the University
of Florida and is well
deserving of having his jersey
retired, said Bartlett. He
was truly an All-American
and should be an asset to the
Phoenix Suns and the NBA.
Walk was the second draft
pick in both the National and
American Basketball
Associations annual
selections.
While a player at UF, Walk
set five single game records,
eight season records and 10
of 11 career records.

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Racing News
DATSUNS CAPTURE FIRSTS BEFORE RECORD
CROWD AT "LITTLE ROAD RACE OF CHAMPIONS"
ELKHART LAKE, WIS. JUNE 14-15
A record 412 entries and 61,288 spectators, the largest
crowd in recent history to view an amateur sports car race,
turned out at Road America last weekend for the National
Championship Sports Car Races which have been
appropriately labeled the "Little Road Race of Champions."
In the much heralded D Production contest Datsuns from
the east and west coasts met head-on as expected, with Jack
Scoville of Corvallis, Ore. emerging victorious.
Scoville, who remains undefeated so far this year, finished
well ahead of the second place car, another Datsun 2000
driven by Jim Fitzgerald of Clemmons, N.C. Two other Datsun
2000 s driven by John Coen of Olney, 111. and Ivan Crawford of
Flint Mich, finished third and fourth respectively, making it a
clean sweep for Datsun.
In the F Production contest Bob Sharp of Wilton, Conn,
returned to Elkhart Lake to repeat his 1968 victory. Sharp,
driving a Datsun 1600, had to ward off challenges from no less
than three dozen Spitfires, Austin Healeys and Alfa Romeos to
capture his second F Production win of the year. His closest
competition came from a Group 44 MK3 Spitfire driven by
John Kelly of Washington, D.C.
SEATTLE INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY, Kent
Wash. June 14-15
A D Production Datsun 2000 driven by Ray Kaehler of
Corvallis, Ore. captured first place 12 seconds ahead of the
second place finishing Triumph TR-4A driven by Gary
Blodgett of Portland, Ore. Kaehler, who has had his national
racing license for only one year, finished third overall in the
combined C, D Production, B, C and D Sedan and C, D Sports
Racing event
DATSUN WINS FIRST IN JERSEY 150 RALLY
NEW JERSEY JUNE 14-15
A Datsun 510 four-door sedan, driven by Charles Goldfarb
of Newton Center, Mass, got headed in the right direction and
wound up taking first overall and first in Class A Equipped at
the Jersey 150 Divisional Rally.
Test drive a real sports car... at your Datsun Dealer!
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2nd AVE. & 2nd ST. SI.
"HOME OF THE NEW LEADER

Tuaaday, July 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday/July 1, 1969

Page 16

UF Drops To Fifth At NCAA

-xv..* ~A ,v
' .-----
JOHN DARR
... shoots 309 at NCAA
! UF Sports l
v !;
fHappenings}
!$ By TOM EASON ij
>; Alligator Sports Editor ;
£ j:
|: Whats sports about in the summer when <
j theres no football games to go to, or no tennis j:
j matches to watch, or no track meets to see? j:
:j What does the UF student-jock do with his :j:
ij leisure time now, since before it was spent ;:
ij watching his favorite UF team in competition? ::
ij Well, our athletic-minded campus has shifted :j:
ij their interests to less competitive sports such as :j
ij. beer drinking while floating down that immortal ;j
ij; river. Or maybe its swimming around a pool ;j
ij; while watching the young hoodogs sun their ij
ij: bronze bodies. Or maybe its weight-lifting to ij
ij: pump that bc&y up so you can compete with the jj
ij other freaks around the pool. ij
ij Or maybe youre a real conscientious jj
ij American and concerned with your health so you jj
jji might be a handball bug. Whats better than to go jj
jj play two hours of handball, sweating profusely jj
ij every minute youre on the court, and then go to jj
ij the 90s and replenish your body fluids with jj
ij good oP suds. ij
ij But whatever sport you dig, do it now and ij
j:j enjoy yourself because the way American men jj
jij deteriorate once they reach their sophomore jj
ij year, youll probably consider yourself too old to ij
j participate in such grueling sports by the time jj
i:j next year rolls around. x
>

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AFTEBNOON WINDS Kftl UF

The Gator golf team tied for fifth place Saturday
in an unsuccessful defense of their 1968 NCAA title
at the Broadmoor Country Club in Colorado
Springs.
UFs first round one-stroke lead increased to
nine strokes after the second days play. The Gators
were then given a late starting time for the third
round and had to battle gusty 65 m.p.h. afternoon
winds after Houson and Wake Forest had completed
calm morning rounds.
The winds and cloud cover over the high
altitude created conditions that were impossible to
play in, said All-American John Darr. It was even
hard to walk and very frustrating to see a good shot
blown off the green by the winds. It took over six
hours to play a round that should have taken four.
Houston went on to win its 11th NCAA title
finishing with 1,223 strokes. Wake Forest, the third
round leader, finished second.
Led by senior All-Americans Steve Melnyk and
Darr, the Gators finished at 1,241 to tie the Georgia
Bulldogs, the team that beat the Gators for the
SEC Championship played in Athens two months
ago.
Melynk, who tied two NCAA records during the
1969 season by winning five consecutive major
tournaments and bringing his total career record to
eight major victories, finished in a tie for third place
with a score of 302.
Darr had a four-round total of 309. Both Ron
Mahood and Richard Spears shot 320s and frosh
star Andy North finished at 324.
Softball Anyone
The Intramural Departments Summer Softball
League will open Monday. Anyone interested in
entering a team must do so by Wednesday at 5 p.m.
You may enter your team in Room 229 Florida
Gym or call 392-0581.
Later in the summer, a three-man half-court
basketball league will be organized' if enough
interest is shown. Also, tournaments will be held in
handball, tennis, golf, womens volleyball and mixed
bowling. Any
person interested

in these activities
can contact the
intramural
department.
Softball
umpires are also
needed. Pay is
$2.50 per game.
There will be two
games a day,
Monday Thurs Thursday
day Thursday at 5:30 and
6:30 p.m.

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