Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
fM.
AHA IM'UJM.

Vol. 61, No. 155

' '>.''P &§£ y* J/ % *St&& \ /§j§§@§? '£s*&' ' V V "'*'
-''
/IH
DOUG CASE
WATCHING PROGRESS
A blond-haired, tee-shirted boy watches a crane do its work on the
future Florida State Museum located on the corner of Newell and
Radio Roads. The 4-year-old youth told the photographer that his
name is Russell, but he couldn't remember his last name.
Editorial 'Unfair,
Legislators Say
By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The local legislative delegation has labeled the editorial appearing in
Tuesdays Alligator as being unfair and half-true.
Blasting the legislators as being not so bright and lacking guts,
the editorial argued that the legislature lost $19.7 million in federal
matching funds for capital outlay at the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
because of their failure to pass a $12.7 million center construction
funding package.
The so-called historic session was only that in the sense that it
carried on the fine traditions of penny-pinching ignorance. It appears
the welfare they attended to was their own, the editorial claimed.
We (the local legislative delegation) are stand up types, said Rep.
Ralph Turlington, D-Gainesville.
Seldom have we avoided an issue, he said.
He added the health center was given special consideration in the
legislature over other requests for capital outlay funds.
Consideration was given over Dade and Duval counties,
Turlington said.
The federal matching funds are not gone. I feel optimistic we will
get the money, Turlington said.
Sen. Bob Saunders, D-Gainesville, said the federal matching funds
have gone to other states, but when UF is ready again for the funds,
they will be available.
Saunders said the expansion program at the health center has been
put behind schedule only by about six months.
Support for the expansion of the hospital complex by other
senators has been close to unanimous, Saunders said.
The reason for not funding the project during the last session of the
legislature was given by Saunders as being an issue over the funding of
capital outlay projects by increasing taxes.
The governor and legislature were committed to a No new taxes
(SEE 'EDITORIAL' PAGE 2)

The
Florida Alligator
THE SOUTHEAST'S LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

TOTAL OF $2,286.29

Senate Votes To Pay
Overdue Accent Bills

By ED CROWELL
Alligator Staff Writer
The outstanding bills of
Accent 69, totaling $2,286.29,
are finally going to be paid. The
Student Senate voted Tuesday
night to release Senate funds to
cover Accents bills.
The Senate passed a
resolution authorizing Student
Body Treasurer Jim Roll to pay
the bills with reasonable
amounts of Senate funds. Roll
said, All the Accent bills will be
paid.
The original Senate resolution
included a section stating the
Senate fully expected Accent
69 Chairman Larry Benin to
fulfill his promise of paying at
least part of the Accent debt.
Benin was criticized recently for
exceeding Accents budget and
using a private checking account
contrary to the Student Finance
Law.
This section of the resolution
was deleted at Tuesday nights
meeting. Berrin has since
graduated and an Accent
Investigation Committee found
there was nothing in the Student
Finance Law to cover his
individual case.
The investigating committee
did report Berrin was responsible
for poor financial
management.
The committee said legislation
will be introduced to the
Student Senate concerning a
constitutional amendment to
cover such cases.
Roll said he has been advised
there are no bills that cant be
legally paid.
Berrin also came under fire
for purchasing liquor for

Accents guest room. Roll said if
there were such bills the Student
Senate could not legally pay
them and if no one else picked
up the tab they would stand.
There was debate during the
Senate meeting over the
authorizing of reasonable
amounts to pay Accents bills.

Shepherd Supports
NSA Membership
By HAROLD ALDRICH
Alligator Contributing Editor
UFs Student Government is laying the groundwork to become a
member of the controversial National Student Association.
Student Body President Charles Shepherd announced Wednesday
his plans to ask the Student Senate for authorization to join the
national organization which was once involved in a scandal for
accepting money from the Central Intelligence Agency.
Shepherds announcement followed almost immediately the
All the evidence which we have
examined .. points to the advisability of one-year
trial membership in the USNSA (United States
National Student Association). During that time we
urge the student government administration to
participate as actively as possible in the affairs of the
USNSA.
SG Investigating Committee
publication of a favorable recommendation from a special five-member
committee appointed by Shepherd to study the feasibility of UFs
membership. Lou Tally, ILW, was appointed chairman.
The committee report urged SG to join the national group for a
one-year trial membership, followed by another analysis of the
organization and its benefits to UF students.
All the evidence which we have examined... points to the
advisability of a one-year trial membership in the USNSA (United
States National Student Association), the report said.
During that time, the committee continued, we urge the
Student Government administration to participate as actively as
possible in the affairs of the USNSA... and keep accurate,
comprehensive records on the success of each venture so that... an
objective study can be made on the basis of our own experience
regarding the desirability of our continued membership in the
USNSA.
This marks the second time Shepherd has led a drive to achieve UF
membership in NSA. During his first administration as student body
president two years ago, he considered placing the question on an
election ballot for student opinion.
At the time, however, NSA was reported to have had close ties with
the radical Students for a Democratic Society, and Shepherds
advisors persuaded him not to push the issue.
The major promise of Shepherd's campaign for re-election to the
student presidency was academic reform. NSA operates an
educational reform center for member colleges. The center provides a
national clearinghouse for information and ideas on educational
innovation and reform.
To take advantage of the service, Shepherd wants SG to join the
organization. Membership costs s2l for the first year and S3OO per
year afterwards. r
The study committees report revealed that several objections had
been raised about UFs membership. For example, critics of the
proposal cited the 1967 CIA scandal, which revealed that NSA
members had accepted money from the U.S. intelligence agency to
watch foreign students who might become politically powerful on
their campuses.
Another objection was NSAs alleged affinity with SDS. The
committee contended, however, that the evidence available indicates
(SEE 'SG' PAGE 2)

Friday, June 21, 1969

Sen. Henry Solares wanted a
definite figure and moved to
insert $2,300 instead of
reasonable amounts. This was
passed but later struck out in
favor of Sen. Marvin Sylvests
final wording authorizing Roll to
use reasonable amounts of
Senate funds.



Page 2

The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 27,1969

No Prior Restraint In New Ur Policy

(EDITORS NOTE: This is an interpretive article by John Sugg,
Alligator staff writer and columnist and also editor of the Crocodile.)
By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
Printed materials may be distributed free, or sold on the campus
for reasons that are not commercial, by students, faculty and
staff.. .and prior restraint of such materials will not be exercised by
the University of Florida.
This optimistic statement of campus civil liberties is the beginning
sentence of the new University Policy Concerning Distribution of
Printed Materials. The new policy results from criticisms that the
administration has prejudged literature of a controversial nature, said
Assistant Dean of Student Affairs James T. Hennessey.
The policy provides that University Personnel desiring to
distribute printed material, must file a statement of intent and
acceptance of responsibility at the Reitz Union student activities
desk. Although declared not to be a restriction on the right to
distribute, the filler of such a statement is bound to certain
responsibilities.
These responsibilities include:
The filer is subject to the Student Code of Conduct and to all laws
or regulations of the city, state or nation... .including those relating
to defamation, obscenity, pornography, violent overthrow of the
Government .(or) inciting to riot.
§ Literature may not be left in stacks unattended.
There must be no interference with normal operations of the
University
Distribution may not take place within buildings except where
approved by the governing body of the building.
f All material must contain therein an identification of both the
author and the publisher. Furthermore, if there is any hint that the
material is UF personnel sponsored, it must contain the following
statement, This publication is solely the expression of the author
and/or publisher and it is not an official publication of the University
of Florida, nor is it in any way intended to express any policies or
opinions of the University of Florida, or its personnel.
The history behind this new policy has several colorful chapters.
The free speech fight began in 1966 when SDS activist Alan
Levin sought to sell a pamphlet he authored, Political Meddling and
the Florida Board of Regents, on campus.
Levin and, later, another activist, Lucien Cross, were called before
the Student Conduct Committee. Eventually Cross was expelled and
Levin was put on permanent disciplinary probation until he left UF.
The well known case of The Charlatan was a challenge to UFs
attempt to regulate the private lives of students. Aside from events
surrounding Pamme Brewers leaving UF, The Charlatan was
constantly denied the right to sell on campus.
Several later cases illustrate UF rules the new policy supposedly
supercedes. Former Crocodile editor Richard Zucker was denied the
right to distribute in November, 1967, because, according to a letter
from Vice President of Student Affairs Lester L. Hale, The
Crocodile was obscene and did not meet the personal advocacy
or single issue rules.
These rules provided that a publication be entirely advocated by
the person distributing (and this be so stated) and that the publication
pertain to a specific, single issue only.
Zucker replied to Hale that it was entirely Hales opinion The
Crocodile was obscene and not a legal fact and that Zucker himself
personally advocated everything in the Crocodile. He further stated
the single issue of the Crocodile was oppposition to the
establishment. Distribution was still denied.
Sometime later, New Party sought to distribute a newspaper,
"Thirsty Time
EVERY AFTERNOON
4:30 7:00
ALL COCKTAILS Vi PRICE
ALL DRAFT BEER sl/PITCHER
REMEMBER W.C. FIELDS EVERY MONDAY!
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekely except during
June, July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during
student holidays and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official
opinions of their authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator,
Reitz Union Building, "University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
The Alligator is entered as second class matter at the United States Post
Office at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical
tone of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it
considers objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payments for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for
more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run
several times. Notices for correction must be given before the next
insertion.

, . in a letter from Hennessey, to
i&jrxtrr* f
K"ifwas b fel. by New Party spokesmen that there was little
use in distribution. .
The immediate hh.ory of be new H^sJo^m^
A Anew
new Anew pohey wo^elhm, rate *e
sinele issue and personal advocacy rules. Furthermore, he says
thathe does not feel The university admmrsuationwoidd nutate legal
action against a publication or its distnbutor if it violated a local,
or federal law.
The new policy has already almost caused an mci w
quarter, SDS member Steve Fahrer was told he ot
literature without filing the required statement and another SDS
member Margaret Hortenstine, was told she could not sell hterature at
all since shewas not a UF student. Although threatened with arrest by
UF police, neither was arrested.
SDS spokesmen say that since they feel the university should be a
servant of the people in the community and state, distribution should
not be restricted to UF personnel. Assistant Director of Student
Activities William Cross says the new policy implies no censorship and
that as long as distributors are UF personnel there is no concern with
what is distributed.
A local radicals reply to this statement is that the UF
administration still has a means to selectively allow literature on
campus. Whereas, it would be unlikely the UF would deny the
military the right to distribute literature, as they do now, it is highly
unlikely the same right would be granted JOMO.

Editorial Termed Unfair

PMst
stand, thus tying their hands for
funding capital outlay projects,
he said.
Receiving the matching funds
for the program depends on the
higher education bond issue
which is due for a November
referendum Saunders said.
Even with passage of the
referendum, the funds for
capital outlay at the health
center will have to be voted on
in a predicted special session
following the successful passage

maRKSIk.
Hi gang - we'd like to welcome you back with our big
' ,_ -- 4-Tt 0 r
MID-SUMMER CLEARANCE SALE
tr ?nni G cK APITTOPRICESON AL L KINDS OF
GOODIES, SUCH AS SUMMER DRESSES FORMALS
PANT DRESSES PANTS SKIRTS SHELLS
TH?ntlwf ; Jp 0 m' LL REALLY like the great
Sm^tcbd^?^ KED DOWN OH, YES, WE HAVE
RE T RE A N SHOP BOTH TWIGS FOR THIS
THIS WEEKEND! MANY DIFEERE NT ITEMS IN EACH.

of the referendum.
Saunders said he doesnt feel
bad about not getting the $12.7
million matching funds because
no one, anywhere in the state,
received requested capital outlay
funds.
Unless we change our system
of taxing to a corporate and
personal income basis, we will
continue to have problems of
meeting the needs of the state.
Rep. William Bill Andrews,
D-Gainesville, said he thought
the legislative delegation did a
good job.
They have the funds to

|SG May Join!
!'Militant* NS Al
ftmm mt"l
that, while NSA sometimes
tends to express leftist political
opinion, it is not controllec by
any one group or organization.
Some critics of the student
organization have claimed that
NSA does not represent the
majority of student opinion. The
committee suggested the best
way to test the allegation is to
join the organiation and then
determine its effectiveness in
representing a broad
cross-section of Americas
students.
The committee report listed
all the services NSA provides
member colleges, including an
information service which
provides a lending library of
ideas, research and programs for
student governments; frequent
conferences around the country
on important current issues; a
tutorial assistance center for
information on various types of
tutorial programs and a legal
rights division, offering
students advice on how to
protect their rights.

complete the plans and
specifications, he said.
We are staying on schedule
However, Andrews felt the
expansion program at the
hospital could be delayed by as
much as a year because of the
lack of funds in the state budget
for capital outlay.
Rep. Kenneth Mac Kay, Jr.,
D-Ocala, said UF received
preferential treatment during
the last session of the legislature.
Other state institutions came
out a lot worse in receiving
needed funds for their health
facilities, he said.
r



Bell Tower Trouble
Almost Fixed Now
By ANGELA RACKLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
At last! The Century Tower bells are ringing out again.
Sort of.
The latest word from UF Carrilonneur Willis Bodine is that, while
some of the music rolls for the chimes are playing, there are still
problems in getting the chimes completely repaired.
The repairman was here and made two visits during the past
week, Bodine said.
Right now he is in communication with the factory in
Pennsylvania to see if the engineers there know what the problem is.
A jammed clock mechanism silenced the chimes last August.
Lack of finances for replacement, repairs, and new music rolls kept
the chimes silent until the beginning of the summer quarter.
I have been trying since November to get this fixed, Bodine
commented, but now everybody is behind the eight-ball.
He expects to hear sometime this week as to when the final repairs
will be made.
There are two schedules on which the bells can be operated.
Students are now hearing the Westminster chimes, which play every
15 minutes.
Five new musical rolls, including academic and school songs, will
be used as the second schedule when the installing of the chimes clock
is complete.
The Department of Music hopes to eventually obtain the two
music rolls which contain the alma mater and fight song of each
school in the Southeastern Conference.
VW Distributors
Disagree With Poll
The Volkswagon distributors in Jacksonville took a definite
interest in an article in last quarters Alligator by Denise Valiante
concerning the personality of their clientele.
Miss Valiante had taken the results from a poll conducted by the
students in the College of Journalism which mentioned the
Volkswagon owner as being cold, dull, reserved, slow and quite
ordinary.
In a letter to the alligator, L.L. Johnson, the public relations
manager for Volkswagon Southeastern Distributor, Inc., quoted the
results from the most recent survey conducted nationally on the VW
buyer.
Psychologically, the average VW sedan buyer is fundamentally
rational, practical and self-assured, Jordan said. He is not a swinger.
He buys the sedan for dependable, economical transportation, he
said.
He sees it as being honest, unpretentious, simple, reliable, basic
utilitarian transportation, well constructed and easy to handle.
He concluded the letter with the suggestion that perhaps these
results might be sent to the instructor of the journalism course in
Public Opinion and Advertising Theory.
Senate Openings
Presently the Senate has IAA lllorRr/>\A/n
openings in the following | IYIIIICI P U Wll
constituencies: I
Summer replacements for I
Jennings, Off-Campus, 1 UC, 2 I
UC, Education, Murphree, I
Architecture & Fine Arts. I ONE MILE /Oy
Senate Vacancies include I NORTH OF fukA
Health Related Professions, I MALL
Diamond Village, Flavet 111, I 07c aceo authorized
Hume-Graham, Off-Campus, I J,D ^ ooz dealer
Physical Education^and I opn tu 7 p.m. nightly
Murphree.
Climb aboard cj)
yThe S.S. Winnjammer* A
/ Meals Mrvtd from 11:00 AM to Ik
yt Midnight Vj
'/ Bernie Sher //
| at tha Organ on Thursday, Friday & Saturday II
J Oysters & clams on the half shell #*)
Michelob on draft \l\
Steak & Seafoods our Specialty \
$
Cocktail Lounge til 2AM Harry Lawton, Manager >\t
Reservations Accepted 520 S.W. 2nd Ave. rl
Closed Sundays A)'
jSwJi -'Qjgttt.

W I
[GAINESVILLE MALL I
2546 N.W. 13th Street I
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. Cool Scooter H
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m of Scooter skirts Ek
ndinate Play tops. HHHHHHHHRh Hh
is wearing one of our f
looks. HHBHHHHHHK H
and Match to Suit pfl ;*>
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top $2.99 M
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UR HEADQUARTERS FOR FASHION I
Open Your Lemer Shops Charge Today I
'v. .^H

Friday, June 27,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



, Ttw Florida AlKgator, Friday, June 27,1969

Page 4

S Shortening
CAN (sis JJ C purchase
No. 303 Can THRIFTY MAID CALIF.
15-oz. FRISKIES FISH, LIVER OR CHICKEN FLAVOR No. 1 Con CASTLEBERRY IJk f /Cl
Cut Food 10/sl. Hot Dog Chili 4/sl. Tomatoes 5/51.
Moz. DEEP SOUTH Apple, Apple BlocLberry. Apple Cherry, Apple Rasp, or Apple Strawberry No. 'A Con VAN CAMP VIENA m V
Jelly 4/51. Sausage. 5/sl. Pears 3/51.
2-Ro# Pkg. ARROW WHITE OR ASSORT. BATHROOM 200-0. Pjtg- WHITE OR ASSTO. FACIAL TISSUE V
Tissue 4/51. Kleenex 4/51. Mints 4/51.

Coffee of Choice w/$5.
more purchase Exclud. Cigarettes
CHASE AND SANBORN
COFFEE %1
4-oz. DIAL SPRAY H-oz. BLUE ARROW |jl|
Deodorant 59* Cleanser 2/25*
I 12-oz. CRACKIN' GOOD SUGAR 20-Lb. CHARCOAL
Wafers 3/sl. Briquettes 39* I
AG 20-oz. DIXIE DARLING PRESTIGE ALL STRAINED BEECHNUT |S§
I Bread 29* Baby Food 9* I
14-oz. DIXIE DARLING LONG FRENCH LOAF 19 oz. DIXIE DARLING Lemon, Yellow, While or Devil Food g@||
Bread 2/49* Cake Mix....3/89* I
IH 8-Pt. DIXIE DARLING RAISIN SOUTHERN SELF RISING OR PLAIN
I Cinn. Buns 3/89* Flour 5 39* I
|H 8-Pk. DIXIE DARLING 25-oz. COLGATE 100
Pecan Buns 3/89* Mouthwash.... 99*
mm 8-pL dixie darling filled 40-0. kotex
| Fruit Buns 3/89* Tampons 88* |

8-or. 34-or. VANISH
Detergent Krispy Crackers ... 37? Spray Cleaner.... 69? fide'Deteraent 91?
_L 1 Potato Chips . 39? Limagrands ... 23? Duz Deteraent 95?
Be xtra|:B-/.Vextra lllextra : r fAI irV-V'ei Tirr i Vir v
mxsatvim ; |||Hi iffiffiplpjfi'
m'irwTiilT...... o^^^^R*TTTrrrTrriiii iuc:.u *'.l. #n COOD RU JULV 2 p a 0000 thru july x
i l inTV..linmai m iuuii > i
1401 N. MAIN ST. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

MEDIUM EGGS 3JI
Gt BLUE WHITE of COLD WATER ARROW-Limit 1 Detergent of choice w/55.00 or more purchme excluding cigarette!
DETERGENT 39*
Gt COLD POWER...Limit 1 Detergent of choice w/$5.00 or more purchaie excluding cigarette!
DETERGENT 49*
2Boi. THRIFTY MAlD...Limit 2 w/$5.00.0r more purchaie excluding cigarette! I
CATSUP 19*
12 oi. Com ALL FLAVORS m
CHEK DRINKS 15/sl.
No. % Cons STAR-KIST LIGHT MEAT...Limit 3 w/$5. or more
purchase excluding cigarettes 28-oz. No Return Bottles CHEK
TUNA 2 Drinks 5/$l
I
COFFE^^^ 3
with each
$3 purchase
/Â¥ E acb week a piece of distinctive Granada dinnerware
wiM be featured for just 295. For each $3 in grocery
- purchases, you are entitled to one piece aMhiS l w
.--- price. Theres no limit ;.. with as 6 purchase you can
iiiiiinir get 2 pieces . and so on. fl|
Excluding: tobacco, liquor and liquid dairy products.



Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Thurs. thru Wed. June 26 July 2 /| H vt*NMltlr
WINN.DIXIE STORES, INC. COPYRISHT ISSS IJJ J JjU| J"_*Ut I KSBMis:
2'A-Lbs. W-0 BRAND GROUND AIL MEAT STEW OR USDA CHOICE WD BRAND CORN FED BEEF CHUCK \V. 5. CHOICE f
GR. CHUCK $ 1 STEAK 69 """ 1 %Bi
BEEF.... 10 $ 4 ROAST 89* JJj
BEEF 5 s 2 4 STEAKS T W W
..: v 4

GAME HENS 2/$l .59 bob white re* sliced
9%-oz. BORDENS BIG TEN ft# fk ft. ft ft BAI
CANNED BISCUITS 2/41* BAIUN
CHEESE FOOD 65* lB JL A
COTTAGE CHEESE 2-59* PKO U7^
U-oz. PALMETTO FARMS
PIMENTO CHEESE 59*
TARNOW Mb. <59<...10-oz. 49<...50z.
SLICED BOLOGNA 29*
12-oz. COPELAND
ALL MEAT FRANKS 49*

J GEORGIA RED I
I SWEET AND JUICY I I I
I Peaches^ 5 I
VINE RIPE "JUMBO"
I CANTALOUPES 3/sl.|
LARGE RED RIPE LARGE VINE RIPE
1 Watermelons 79* Tomatoes > 39* I
B WASH. STATE EXTRA FANCY RED LARGE FRESH HEADS |j|
I Bing Cherries 49* Cabbage... 2 39*
| WHITE SEEDLESS FANCY GOLDEN BANTAM |j|
I Grapes 39* Corn 10 69* I
m LARGE FRESH HEADS Half Gol THRIFTY MAID GRAPE OR ORANGE B|
I Lettuce.... 2 39* Drink 2/79* I

Pkg. HOWARD JOHNSON'S or STOUFFER'S N 0.303 Con DEL MONTE SAFEGUARD . Reg. Size 2/33c .. Both Size mmm
Macaroni & Cheese 39? Tomato Wedges . 352 Hand Soap .... 2/45* 1-Lb. MRS. FILBERTS QTRS. I
DEL MONTE 4*o. SEGO Re - Si 4,c G - SiM 9,c Kir Si MO TOO HHC
Fruit Cocktail 312 Instant Mixes .... 732 Bold Detergent. . $ 1
No. 303 Con DEL MONTE WHOLE 13-oz. COMPLIMENT Chick Supreme Sauce. Pork Souce or Swiss 1-Lb. MRS. FILBERTS SOFT GOLDEN OR SOFT / I
Spiced Peaches . 352 Steak Sauce .. . 392 Whipped Oleo .. 2/792 L____
STAMn I i WWUW wiww i ITiJiy TOP VALIS STAMK LTITI7 TOP VAUJi STAMPS ; TOP VAIUt STAMPS
wTS coSeoi .-o ruWHls. ; ZoOf .TN -v.ne coueow ~e n*cm op m-vm. covet*. ev.c.v. o* *** <"
Oc**rt J owing STMketPe* Chick.n w/Broth Vfi.sh Vr.er' Ground Becf ; j
1401 N. MAIN ST. HI WAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS
130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE.

I OCOMA MEAT ll I
I Dinners J"i I
% Quarts DIXIE WHIP D.ss.rt... Plus 100 Free Stomps W/Cj>ugpn 10-oi. ASTOR
I T0pping.......2/$l Cut Corn 5/$l I
m 1%-Lb. Poly Bag FRENCH SHOESTRING FRY lOor ASTOR
I Potatoes 3/$l Green Peas 5/$l 1
m ESKIMO ICE CREAM !gy- AS l* PEAS RROTS OR
I Sandwiches 2/$l Baby Limas 5/$l I
I Berries2/$1 Fish Cakes... 4/$l I
I Chicken $1.89 Muffins... 39* I
Pint KICHS 8-01. MORTON SPAGHETTI & MEAT or CHEESE & K
| Coffee Rich .4/$i Macaroni....4/88* |

Friday. June 27.1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

SUNNY LAND SMOKED
SLAB BACON -49*
W-lb. FRENCH FRIED
FISH STICKS 99*
9it oi. BORDEN'S BIG TEN
CANNED BISCUITS 2/41*
l-lb. PIUMROSE
CANNED HAM $1.39
6-oz. SUNNYLAND Vac Pal SLICED PICKLE LOAF OR
SLICED BOLOGNA 39*
10-oz. KRAFT'S CRACKER BARREL MELLOW
STICK CHEESE 69*

Page 5



i. Thi Florida Allipior. Friday, Juna 27, 1960

Page 6

'Ti - 1 J l H : i.. _ -~
ARCHITECT'S DRAWING OF FUTURE SIGMA NU HOUSE
... building is expected to start fall quarter.
Sigma Nus Flamed Out,
But New Plans 'ln Fire

By JOHN SUGG
Alligator Staff Writer
Sigma Nu fraternity, its house
gutted by fire April 4, plans to
build an estimated $230,000
house on the site of their old
one. Construction is hoped to
begin in the fall.
Jay Gebhardt, Sigma Nu
adviser, told the Alligator he had
signed the insurance proof of
loss Monday, claiming
$105,000 damages from the fire.
Os this, $85,000 is for the
building and $20,000 is for
contents of the house.
The insurance does not cover
loss of personal property
incurred by individuals.
However, Gebhardt said all but
one personal loss was covered by
homeowner insurance. The
remaining man will be
reimbursed by the fraternity.
The ruin of the old house,
Gebhardt said, will be destroyed
as soon as Sigma Nus insurance
company clears their claim.
Brides from the old house will
be saved, tentatively to build a
fireplace in the new house.
The main problem facing
Sigma Nu now is the financing
of a new building. Gebhardt

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ll
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vy *: <-' | T 4|r' ''J \
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PER PERSON. DIRECT FACTORY OUTLET
"15 MILES AWAY" MEANS REAL QUICK
PERSONAL FACTORY SERVICE NO
MIDDLEMAN 24 HOUR DELIVERY AND
SET UP FULL ONE YEAR GUARANTEE.
SEE MR. ANTHONY, SALES MANAGER.
_ TARGET
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lAitMe vtfetne Sfialeb 'inc
OPEN DAILY 10-BSUNDAY 1-6
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estimated the fraternity would
incur a $160,000 mortgage
which would mean payments of
approximately $1,450 per
month.
Another problem facing
Sigma Nus are zoning laws. The
front section of their property is
zoned for multiple use but the
back section is zoned for single
family residences. Unless the
zoning of the back section is
changed, they could not use the
full extent of their property.
The alternative to this would
be to build on Fraternity Row.
Although no lots are now
available, Gebhardt hoped one
would be made available to
Sigma Nu if they decided to
move on campus. Adviser to
Fraternities Jay Stormer said no
decision has yet been reached.
If the fraternity moved on the
Row, they could sell their
present lot, valued at $200,000.
Since lots on the Row have
previously sold for about
$3,000, this would enable Sigma
Nu to invest much more money
in their house.
According to Sigma Nu
Lieutenant Commander Russ
Butler, remaining on their

present site is the desire of most
of the fraternity members.
Sigma Nu has retained Moore,
May and Harrington, architects,
to design a new house for their
present site. Although under one
roof, there would be two
buildings. The front, U shaped
building would contain living
and dining rooms, recreation
areas, the kitchen and
housemothers apartment. The
back building would be the
living quarters.
The house, to sleep 40 men,
would be a mixture of
traditional and modem. It would
be constructed of concrete and
red brick. Contractor Paul
McKinley has been asked for a
cost estimate for construction.
Sigma Nu, chartered at UF in
1919, had been in its old house
44 years. It was the oldest
fraternity house on campus.
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FIRST...and rtill Bart
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506 E. UNIVERSITY
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I Sportswear 20% off
I Hostess Pantdresses 20% off
I Casual and Cocktail dresses
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ass >
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(Across from the Pizza Hut)



H-C Slogan Contest Opens

The slogan contest for
Homecoming 1969 will start
Tuesday and run through July
31.
The contest, sponsored *by
Florida Blue Key, is open to
anyone who is not on the
homecoming staff or a member
of Blue Key. Entries for the
contest must be mailed or
delivered to the Homecoming

Docs Split Med Grant
Two UF physicians have been awarded a five-year research grant of
$57,000.
The grant by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences will
go to Dr. Clyde M. Williams, professor and chairman of the
department of radiology, and Dr. Melvin Greer, professor of medicine
and pediatrics and chief of the division of neurology.
The research is for study leading to faster diagnosis of metabolic
disorders and identification of problems resulting from faulty body
chemistry.
Mass specytrometry will be used to determine the chemical
composition of various body fluids. A catalog will be used for
unidentified chemical compounds in these fluids.
Quicker diagnosis of Parkinsons disease and phenylketonuria will
result from the comparison of normal amounts of the compounds
with those from persons with neurological disorders.

Computing Course Set

The Computing Center will
offer three non-credit courses
during the summer quarter.
These courses, open to
students, staff and faculty of
UF, and the general public, are
to begin the week of July 7.
The courses offered are
Fortran IV (FORmula
TR ANSlation), PL/1
(Programming Language/One),
and an Introduction to
Computers for Teachers.
The Fortran course will meet
for eight weeks on Thursday
nights, 7-10 p.m., beginning July
10 in Bless Auditorium.
PL/1 will meet for eight
weeks on Monday evenings from
7-9 beginning July 7 in room
SDS Meef
Sunday
There will be a Students for a
Democratic Society (SDS)
meeting Sunday, June 29, at
noon at the Reitz Union, Room
150 C. The meeting will be
sponsored by Student Peace
Union.
During the past week, seven
local SDS members attended the
SDS National Council in
Chicago. These members will
present a report and analysis of
the Council at Sundays meeting.
Afro Association
Meets Tonight
The Afro-American Student
Association (AASA) will hold a
meeting at 7:30 p.m. in room
349, Reitz Union. All interested
students are invited to attend.
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
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(VOLVO)
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ENTRIES ACCEPTED STARTING TUESDAY

Slogan Contest, Florida Blue
Key Office, Reitz Union.
The slogan committee will
award three grand prizes for the
top themes entered.
One of three prizes is a cruise
for two to Nassau sponsored by
the Eastern Steamship Co. and
Gainesvilles House of Travel.
Another is an Orange Bowl
extravaganza, which includes

101 Little Hall, and Computers
for Teachers will meet for six
weeks on Tuesday /Thursday, 2-4
p.m., in room 230 of the Space
Sciences Research Building.
Enrollment in any of the
courses is achieved at
attendance. Textbooks may be
purchased at the UF Bookstore
(Hub).
For further information
contact Frank Towers, room
233, Bryant Space Sciences
Research Building, telephone
392-2061.

advertisement
Classes Beginning Tuesday, July 1 at the Flagler Inn
Hypnosis Helps You
*
Learn To Relax, Rest

The Institute of Applied
Hypnosis, Inc., is beginning
another of its courses in self
hypnosis for self improvement
Tuesday night. The first hour of
the course is free and is open to
the public. Hypnosis will be
demonstrated and its application
to various forms of personal
development will be discussed.
Hypnosis has been proved to
be effective in improving
memory, ability to concentrate,
learning ability, self confidence,
self motivation, sales
performance, creative thinking
and many other Helds.
Using the techniques taught at
the Institute, the student learns to
put his subconscious mind to

Write or Phone for Free Brochure
Institute of Applied Hypnosis
5445 Mariner St., Tampa Phone 872-0698

two 50-yard-line football tickets,
seats in the reviewing stand for
the parade, accomodations in a
Miami hotel and entertainment
at several Miami nightspots.
Also is a Thanksgiving
weekend. This prize includes a
five-day tour of Fort
Lauderdale, courtesy of that
citys Ocean Manor Resort.
Tentative judges for the
contest will be UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, Ray
Graves, Dean of Women Betty
Cosby, and Student Body
President Charles Shepherd.
The three top entries selected
by the judges will then be sent
to the state cabinet which will
select the slogan for use.
The person whose slogan is
selected for use can select the
prize he wants.
Slogans over the past three
years have been Gators Reign
in 6B Campaign, Gators
Embark on a Lark to
Disneyland, and Happiness is
Being a Gator.
Veterans Meet
The University Veterans Club
will meet Monday in Room
150 D of the Reitz Union at 7:30
p.m. All veterans are invited to
join in planning activities for fall
quarter and make arrangements
for Block seating for Football
season.
News Sought
Darcy Meeker, Campus Living
Editor, is interested in Campus
Living news. Club activities,
special events. Dorm news can
be called in or dropped off at
the Alligator Office.

work for him rather than allowing
it to operate in a completely
random manner.
The training is simple and
almost universally successful. It is
easily learned and effortlessly
used. Results are readily seen.
The Institute of Applied
Hypnosis has been teaching
classes in the Suncoast area for
three years. There are Institute
schools throughout the U.S. and
Canada. Local classes are taught
by Mr. Ted. C. Van Antwerp.
The public is invited to attend
the free lecture and
demonstration on Tuesday, July
1, at 8 P.M. at the Flagler Inn.

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summer look from our Village
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GAINESVILLE MALL

Friday, June 27,1969, The Florida Alligator.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 27,1969

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
is t ie exerc se f responsibility
Dave Reddick
I Dave Osier
(vCffel Managing Editor
M r
. Margo Cox Al Jensen
A I nWIIWL Assignments Editor News Editor
- Vw %
/vIVIL N
'\\ millilF] / ( /f
{ \ Vin\ i|| IMuIM Miji Av HI
SHhJA
H'ere Entering A New Phase 77zey Fzg/zf Their War
With THEIR Army

(EDITORS NOTE: John Chamberlain, author of
the following column, These Days, has been
presented with several awards for outstanding
journalism. He thinks of himself as an
old-fashioned 19th-century Liberal, and believes
in a society where people act for themselves and
arent pushed into comers. His columns will be
printed in the Alligator throughout the summer.)
Senator Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania, a liberal
Republican, says that President Nixon has the votes
to win on the Safeguard Anti-Ballistic Missile system
in the Senate. The claim, of course, has been
disputed by Sen. Mike Mansfield, the Montana
Democrat. But when Mansfield went home recently
to mend a few political fences, he was surprised by
the depth of pro-ABM sentiment at the grassroots.
Indeed, the battle of public opinion has swung
dramatically in Nixons favor on the issue.
According to a survey conducted by the prestigious
Opinion Research Corporation of Princeton, NX,
for a group called the Citizens Committee for Peace
with Security, 84 per cent of all Americans think
the UJS. should have an ABM system. And
three-fourths of the public also think that Congress
should approve Nixons Safeguard proposal.
The poll, according to William J. Casey, the New
York City attorney who formed the Citizens
Committee for Peace with Security, cut across all
lines, with Nixon and Humphrey voters
supporting the ABM just about equally. By this
token the issue should cease to be a partisan matter
in the Senate.
With the tide running out on them, the anti-ABM
Senators have been a lot less vociferous of late. The
voice of Senator Teddy Kennedy of Massachusetts
seems particularly muted; he has not been making
the welkin ring with endorsements of the anti-ABM
volume edited by Dr. Jerome Wiesner and Professor
Abram Chayes, who were originally commissioned
by Kennedy to put the book together. As a matter
of record, Teddy Kennedy must find it difficult to
reconcile his personal sponsorship of the

The Country Wants ABM

Eommi ...
Accents Failings
Must Not Recur

In Tuesday nights meeting, the Student
Senate voted to bail out the sinking ship o
Accent 69, commanded by captain Larry
Benin.
The apparently inconsistent Senate, which
only three weeks ago blasted Benin for
misuse of funds, took a complete turnabout
and pledged to pay more than $2,000 in
outstanding, unbudgeted bills chalked-up by
the symposium. t
It therefore legitimized Benin s
irresponsible management of Accent funds,
and set what we feel is a bad precedent.
The Senates inconsistent action, by its
very nature, is in our opinion just as
irresponsible as Benins errors.
It may well be that Benin did not
purposefully exceed his budget. His could be
an honest mistake. The Senate probably felt
the same.
Nevertheless, the Senates action is
ill-advised.
By sanctioning Benins overspending, it
has opened the flood gates, and can
probably expect a reservoirs worth of other
groups, which after apathetically

Pay TV Is Good Competition

MR EDITOR:
The letter by Name Withheld
concerning pay TV which
appeared in the Alligator
Monday, June 2, 1969 is so
spurious that I can only
conclude that it was written by
the management of the Plaza
Theater, which has been
conducting a smear campaign
against pay TV.
In truth, only subscribing

Wiesner-Chayes volume with the position he held
when he was first campaigning for the Senatorial
nomination in Massachusetts.
Teddy had been challenged then to state his
position on the production of nuclear weapons. His
answer was that he did not think we can afford
any kind of stepping back from our strong position
of military posture. When we talk about the
United States today stopping production, he said,
I think that this shows a failing of grasping a basic
problem we know that we have a defense only
so that we are going to be able to retaliate to make
any attack on the United States a suicidal attempt,
John Chamberlain
and therefore it is important that we have this kind
of potential force, only so that we are going to be
able to retaliate. This has been the posture and the
policy of the United States for the last fifteen years,
and I think it is essential that we continue it. We
have seen with every kind of indication, certainly at
Geneva, every attempt we have made we have faded
to be able to come up with any kind of good faith
on the part of the Soviets we should maintain
our strength.*
It can be argued, of course, that the ABM is not
essential to protect the U.S. ability to retaliate in
case of a Soviet first strike. But if the case can
once be made that the Safeguard program will
contribute to the deterrence of nuclear war and also
lead to meaningful arms talks with the Soviet

members would have to pay
anything to watch pay TV;
nobody who did not subscribe
would be affected by it in the
least unless the healthy
competition forced free TV to
upgrade the quality of their
programs. I have no personal
interest in pay TV; I doubt that
I would subscribe to it if I could.
But I bitterly resent Wometco
Enterprises attempts to stifle
healthy competition through

Union, Kennedy must logically withdraw his
objections to it. After all, his brother John F.
Kennedy once said that First... .we must take
immediate steps to protect our present nuclear force
from surprise attack.
The seeming Kennedy desertion of the
maintenance of our strength position is a late
blooming phenomenon; if the country as a whole
feels uneasy about the recent Soviet surge in the
production of three-headed midear monster missiles,
which has gone hand in hand with the deployment
of a Russian anti-ballistic missile protective grid,
Teddy Kennedy's pragmatic instincts as a politician
must take over. He can't afford to be caught short
in 1972 in case the Soviets do not prove amenable
to the idea of limiting the arms race in both
offensive and defensive atomic weapons.
In the battle of the books, the anti-ABM
crowd is at least two years behind the times. The
Kennedy-sponsored volume, published by Harper
and Row, says that we don't need the ABM for
bargaining with the Soviets because we are in... .a
moment of rare and precarious strategic balance.
But the booklet called The ABM and the Changed
Strategic Military Balance, U.SA. Vs. U.5.5.R.,
issued recently by the National Strategy Committee
of the American Security Council, says the Russians
went ahead of us in strategic missile power two
years ago. The strategic balance has shifted to
Moscow, and Ted Kennedy can hardly accept that
with equanimity.
letters policy
In ordw to appear in the Alligator, letter* pwet be
WP*d tianed and double epeeed and should not anoeed
300 words in length. A writer's name may ba withheld
7 Publication only if he dmws Just cauao. No letters
psd with a pseudonym will ba accepted for
Publication. The editor raasteas dw ri*t to edit eN
** tt *r in the interest of *aee. Addremes and telephone
numbers must accompany all letters.

administering their budgets, funded by
hard-earned student feed, end-up in debt.
The Senate can expect no less than a long
line of group treasurers or chairmen
tramping in Benins soggy footsteps
asking forgiveness.
Only recently tne body was backboned by
questioning and responsible senators. One
senator even suggested that the Accent
general chairman might be guilty of
negligence or malfeasance.
No such charges were heard in Tuesday
nights meeting. Student Body Treasurer Jim
Roll was authorized to pay Accents
outstanding bills.
At the final Senate meeting of last
quarter, Roll said UFs reputation was being
tarnished because of the bills, and advised
the Senate to pay a portion of them.
A portion. A part. Not the whole Accent
debt.
It is obvious that the bills have to be paid.
And quickly. We want the bills paid.
But the Senate must immediately
implement legislation to insure that this type
of mistake does not happen again.

innuendo and misinformation.
I urge everyone who believes
that competition especially in
communications media is vital
to free society to write your
congressman (Don Fuqua, in this
district) and urge him to support
pay TV.
JOHN L. WARD
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
OF ART



The Movement Left
Koreo Keeps Tight Control
gy John Sugg

I would like a chance to defend myself against Mr. Chang Soo Kim.
Mr. Chang presents an argument based on authority, i.e. he is
Korean. He states that one (I) should not talk about a
nation.. .without a complete knowledge of its history. The
implication is that only one who comes from a specific country has
this knowledge. This is roughly similar to arguing that to know if
jumping off a ten-story building is bad, one must jump off of such a
building.
Mr. Changs authority is also suspect. First, if we are going to have
Korean authority on Korea, shouldnt we also hear from a North
Korean authority (admittedly, none are available) before accepting
Mr. Chang as the last word on Korea. Furthermore, Mr. Chang does
not mention the kidnapping of South Korean students from foreign
countries who were suspect by the Park regime. Since that time,
South Korea has been very careful about its exchange students. It
must be assumed that Mr. Chang is considered safe by the Park
regime and can therefore be expected to give unqualified support of
this government.
I thank you for correcting my correction, Mr. Chang. I apologize
for the error. However, you mislead about facts also. For example,
you state that 30 civilians were reported to be brutally murdered.
Reported by whom? You dont say but the only legal media in South
Korea is either (1) government controlled, (2) so-called opposition
papers whose criticism of Park is at best, superficial, or (3) American
controlled media. Now, would you have us believe these guerrillas
randomly kill anyone they meet? This hardly would seem very
worthwhile.
Is it not so, that among the 30 killed, most were government
officials or, in some way, in the echelons of the current power
structure? No doubt innocents were killed; this happens many places.
For example, it has been admitted that of the reported Viet Cong
killed each week (by South Koreans as well as American troops), 1/3
to 1/2 may be innocent peasants. However, from the testimony (tor (tortured,
tured, (tortured, perhaps?) of captured guerrillas, it is apparent that they did,
in fact, have definite objectives and were not sent to indiscriminately
kill.
Mr. Chang, you were not quite accurate in describing reasons why
South Korea felt it necessary to mobilize 47,000 troops to counter
120 guerrillas. It does differ somewhat from a police manhunt (in
America) of a wanted criminal. These additional troops were to
augment an already huge standing army plus over 50,000 American
troops.
Considering the panic of the Park regime, considering the damage
the guerrillas were able to accomplish before capture or death,
considering the fact that some are still unaccounted for, considering
the mass kidnappings and arrests by the Park government at home and
in Europe of critical or truly opposing students, it does seem evident
that Park fears mass support for an uprising.
Mr. Chang, I sincerely admire your participation in the events that
overthrew the puppet Rhee. However, you neglected to note that the
government you worked to create was itself overthrown by General
Park. He was, at first, an unknown and undoubtedly suspect by the
Americans. His subsequent actions have proven his loyalty to

i Use With Gardieff
But Wait, Thats 23Hour$!

Another registration session is over and those students who have
successfully managed to survive are now being rewarded by being
allowed to continue their education.
Registration has proven a very effective method of weeding out
those mentally unstable applicants who would not be able to
withstand the later eventual extreme pressures and frustrations which
constitute such an important and integral part of UC.
Unfortunately many students do not realize the importance of this
method. Their wrath becomes most vehement in regards to the poor
untrained counselor who constitutes such a key factor in the
university frustration creating machine.
Many students feel counselors should be given special training for
this job. Their favorite example of such training is the special course
for counselors required at Flodunxy U.
At Flodunky U. all counselors are required to take courses in
counseling, logic and/or child psychology. Since all counselors are
registering there is no one to counsel them except student volunteers.
A typical session goes like this.
A counselor carrying his folder enters a room filled with students
sitting at long tables. Mentally selecting a likely looking student he
approaches his choice.
Good morning.
Morning.
Well, lets see what youve got here. All youve got down is
counseling. Thats only three credit hours.
I thought that was all I needed.
Oh no. Youre required to take 12 hours in any case.
You think so? ...
I know so. Now look, youre going to need logic and child
psychology so Ill put those down.
Child psychology? What for?
To deal with the typical Flodunky student.

American interests, however. Considering the nature of his regime,
your effort seems largely wasted, doesnt it?
Finally, concerning the relative economics of the two Koreas. First,
objective sources, in evaluating North Korea, are difficult to come by.
Park is not going to admit favorable conditions in the North. Neither
are the Americans. Even the UN is suspect, especially since, in Korea,
the UN forces are American. However, trends do become clear.
North Korea has been rapidly industrializing, creating an independent
economic base. The standard of living is rising and is generally held to
be higher than the south. UN sources on world economics are
available in the UF libraries.
South Korea, on the other hand, has an economy based on export
of raw materials and simple, labor intensive goods, a colonial
economy. Japan has stated that her relation with Korea is exactly like
what she would have desired as a result of WWII. Moreover, the
standard of living in the south, by all sources, is low. Wages are
notoriously low, even for that part of the world.
Mr. Chang, I cannot state definitively what it is like in South Korea.
Even less, because of the distortions of reports, can I say what the
north is like. Pardon me for being presumptuous, but it does seem
that the Norths effort to industrialize is somewhat more significant
(especially for her people) than creating a small wealthy South Korean
elite (of a colonial nature) while the majority of the people remain
poor. Come now, what will profit people more, Mr. Chang, building
an independent economic base or building neon signs?

Banks Put People First

MR EDITOR:
In defense of banks and
students who do banking:
The conduct of the University
City Bank employee described in
Mr. Hammonds and Miss
Viscardis letter of 5 June, was
appaling and disgraceful. If this
Mr. Johnson reflects the attitude
of the entire bank staff, then the
University City Bank is indeed
an exceptional one!
As a relative of a bank
executive (in a college town, I
might add), I am familiar with
what a banks method of dealing
with customers should be in
this particular bank, the
president talks to many people,
and students are given as much
priority as the biggest
stockholders. In other words,
here is no discrimination against

students. The president of a
bank is not a demi-god who sits
on a throne hidden away from
the rabble!
Meanwhile, I havent heard
one good word said about the
UCB among people who have
banked there. I suspect that its
convenient location is the reason
why so many students (who
dont have cars) go there. The
majority of them are probably
inexperienced at money matters
and are thus exploited.
If the quotations in the letter
were accurate, then Mr. Johnson
deserves to be canned,
obviously. An employe can sit
on the Board of Directors for
fifteen years and contribute
nothing. Being a board member
has little to do with a persons
position. What matters is the
advancements an employe makes

Theyre not children, theyre young adults.
Oh come now. You say that but would you let your sister marry
one?
The counselor remains silent
I didnt think so. Well put it down then.
You really think its necessary?
I know so. Now lets see. Youve still got room for an elective.
What would you suggest?
How about calculus, humanities, biology or institutions?
What on earth for? Theyre no good to me.
You dont want to be assigning courses to students without
knowing what theyre all about do you?
But I had all these things when 1 was in college.
Come on, old timer. A lot has changed since the turn of the
century. Just look at mathematics. Einsteins equations, the new
math, geometry
p We had geometry when I was in school.
How I envy you getting in on the ground floor. Well, what would
you like to elect?
I dont know exactly, but if you think its necessary
I know so.
Maybe youd better suggest something. You know them better
than I do.
I wouldnt want to take the responsiblity for making a wrong
choice that could ruin your career. Why dont we just put them all
down?
But wait a minute Counting on Angers. ... .that will give
me 23 hours.
Youre right. Well take off child psychology and put it on for
next quarter.
All this to learn counseling? Do you think Ill make it?
Smiling. 1 know so.

Friday, Juna 27.1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

in fifteen years. Why didnt you
tell them what position you
hold, Mr. Johnson? Or isnt it
important enough? How can you
say youre losing a lot of money
(meaning accounts, I trust)
because students are leaving
twon and then say, The bank
wont be hurt by a few
students?
A bank is a place of business
which buys and sells just like
any other. One wouldnt expect
this kind of treatment in a store,
and in a bank it is unpardonable.
And, dear friends, the basic
motivation of a bank is people.
Money is the commodity. I agree
that University City Banks
convenience doesnt compensate
for such unwarranted,
discriminating Discourteousness.
BANK PRESIDENTS
DAUGHTER

By Leslie Gardieff

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 27,1969

'/
X \~~-_^ V 1 y ,'/ SN^! >

SILVERMAN'S
Charisma brings to you the classic elegance of the "Juliet
era" for that special dinner-date, or summer play. This
lovely square-necked, puffed sleeved dress is trimmed in an
embroidered lace, and is shown in a soft and bashful beige.
Modeled by Debby.
STAG AND DRAG
The Mexican flair brought to you by California Model. The
outfit features straight, full-legged pants with the pattern
only on the sides. The red; sheer blouse has a full sleeve and
a four button cuff. Modeled by Sharon.
SEARS
Super Suspension! A jamaica short set in groovie hold-up in
cool, easy care cotton. Pop canvas prints in many colors.
Modeled by Gail.

MAAS BROTHERS
} like vou hi hap e n n S th ere iS Cotton Net that m akes you feel
u that w av An!" 9 0 aM and Cra2 V Horse makes it
neck to Mn Z S,X feet of silk and fr n 9 e around your
tQ p sob Lrf T me : ,ashion soekers. Pants and
by P renda. ' s6 ~ Pantsville Deaprtment. Modeled
SUSAN SCOTT
Du?ol e f niMmlf rnia P !! sems the pantsuit of the season! A
L an Kl Utf,t o made of nylon so soft that it seems
This ZmT th h O-7, Beau tifully cut with delicate detail.
mIK;,?;. PantSUit mak you 9'ad you're a girl.



i mmL i /
li J> f?" Mm k
a?'*| x
Gk mmh
HI mm IM 0 mkE p dplfl *WF^wl" ~i : TnfrjTw
BH bub "'" v Bkk
. : -S'
jy ? bIB \ A |BPIMWfc.. >.: jjragte-.
- 'A*w£xj&, '~, ,W, §-
FIGURE FAIR
Presents... loungewear! All nylon, Jersey print with / V\ \
midriff top, edged with white. Pants have the elephant leg \^\.
for the full elegant look. Wear it for lounge or slumber / y'
parties. Size: Petite, Small and Medium, $12.00. v / /
THE UNIVERSITY SHOP Lil A/Vl \
Sparkfind navv and white is always right. White picjue bells / / \ \
parKiing navy ana wnn is mwy* iv VL^ tfe| 4i.X: n ,v // <; ~ A t L r .?. mate-you si*s ,y^tu
topped by a cool, breezy printed middy. Easy does it ror 1/ \ J
care and for wear. Modeled by Karen. f \J
\
kf- -9*/^

Friday, Juna 27.1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



!, The Florida AlUgator, Friday, June 27,1969

Page 12

IT X K X< X Wm
J 8
;> K"i * i*>^^^g-^> v .. m.Wm / " v J ll^^^^H^^P^P-- : 4H *
LAUREL AND HARDY

Laurel and Hardy at their expressive best in The
Crazy World of Laurel and Hardy, currently playing

Movie Review: Hello Aimless

By CAROLYN HERRINGTON
Alligator Staff Reviewer
Goodbye Columbus, now
playing at the Florida should
have been told goodbye a long
time before it was ever released.
With the losing combination of
an aimless, wandering theme
enacted by an equally aimless
hero, Richard Benjamin, a
viewer wanders from the theater
not quite sure he even saw a
movie.
A direct steal from The
Graduate, the movie tinkers
with the idea of the generation
gap and focuses on a character
who is rapidly becoming
stereotyped the idealistic
young man who is equally
turned off by the materialism of
American life and the barefoot
hippie in the park. To bolster
the rather weak presentation of
these ideas, a class conflict is
thrown in. Benjamins girl
Society Film
Suspense comes alive on the
screen Friday and Saturday
night when the Cinema Society
presents Harper in the J.
Wayne Reitz Union Auditorium.
The film is an action, mystery
story of a private-eyes search
for a millionaire. The
private-eye, protrayed by Paul
Newman, is beaten, knifed and
shot-at throughout the movie.
Newman plays the part of
Harper.
Julie Harris, Robert Wagner
and Pamela Tiffin also star in the
film.
Harper is a colorful,
picturesque movie set in
Southern California. Critics have
called it as good as the Bogart
films.
I Help ran tbe
P
rw Weew'i Aibi Cerpe
.nJF sEf^
to tmm* !>*** ni*V A0 # mm 4 mmik Ito *** lec
am* u*AtcM rrrj
NO VI MMT mm MCMMTm* ONTBICt
tttt vmwv> AW COi**Of PAM. OA WOT
r iMNB,.~' i

played by Ali Mac Craw, plays a
wealthy young Jewess immersed
in her fathers wealth. Benjamin
is a librarian.
For one extra precautionary
method to insure that the
audience doesnt fall asleep,
everyone is made Jewish which
opens a floodgate of potential
jokes at the wealthy but rather
crude Jewish businessman and,
of course, his mother.
Richard Benjamin hardly gives
a performance at all. He is just
there, calmly observing the
absurdities of those around him,
managing to look pretty absurd
himself. He portrays a befuddled
young man with suspicious
insight. His lines are few and at
best those are airy philosophical
generalizations along the caliber
of Im not a planner. Im a
liver. (Yes, his girls reply was,
Im a pancreas. They couldnt

..
J shut
OPEN 9:30-6:00 DAILY
2401 Southwest Thirteenth Street Village Square

at the State Theater. Garry Moore narrates.

afford to pass up a chance for a
laugh.)
Ali Mac Craw gave a more
definitive performance if not
better. She plays a Radcliffe girl
hopelessly enchained in middle
class morality and her fathers
checkbook.
The only unpredictable action
of the movie is a surprisingly
abrupt ending. The audience
however is never quite told what
goes on. It ends with Benjamin
wandering aimlessly down the
street.
mmmmmammmmmm
378-5724
DlCIt liOLMKJ
JmiKi
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
j TROPHIES-ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
>/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Movie Times
Union Harper, starring Paul Newman, Lauren Bacall, Pamela
Tiffin. A slick spoof of a genre. Fri. and Sat.: 1,9.
She Done Him Wrong, with Mae West and Cary Grant. A comic
melodrama of the Old West. Sun.: 7*9.
State The Crazy World of Laurel & Hardy. Through Sat.. 7.20,
9:30. Fractured Flickers, through Sat.: 6:40, 8:50. Sunday: I A
Woman, 3,7, and Carmen Baby, 5,9.
Gainesville Drive-in Fistful of Dollars, 9:02, and For a Few
Dollars More, 10:55. Both with Clint Eastwood.
Center One The Wild Bunch, a western with William Holden,
Ernest Borgnine, Robert Ryan, Edmund OBrien, all classic Western
actors. 1:10, 3:46, 6:22,9:05.
Center II Paper Lion, with Alan Alda, Lauren Hutton and the
real Detroit Lions. 1,4:26,7:52. Support Your Local Sheriff, spoof
Western. 2:48, 6:14,9:45. ~
Plaza I The April Fools, Jack Lemmon and Cathenne Deneuve,
Marriage spoof. 1:55,3:55,5:53,7:52,9:50.
Plaza II Rascal 2:42, 5:05, 7:26, 9:48. Hang Your Hat on the
Wind 1:50,4:12,6:34, 8:56. Disney Duo.
Florida Goodbye Columbus, 1:30, 3:30,5.30,7.30,9.30.
Suburbia Drive-in Mac Kennas Gold, 9:00, 1:20, and Divorce
American Style, 11:30.
11 VJ
1 WITH THIS COUPON SI.OO 1
W § ff N E purchase f 1
V § BUCKET OR BARREL £
L V g COUPON GOOD THRU JUNE j|
§ 30th FOR IN STORE N §
\ § PURCHASE. |
r 1 516 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET
SOB
SEARCH OBSERVE BUY
DRIVING MACHINES
ARE ONE OF YOUR g
BIGGEST INVESTMENTS
BUT DO YOU INVEST
WHEN YOU BUY A CAR? 4 jpTflllj
1969 DATSUN $1969
,.
ONCE UPON THE ROAD IN A DATSUN, YOU MIGHT
CONCLUDE, AS HAVE MANY OTHERS.
DATSUN GIVES YOU MORE FOR EACH DRIVING
DOLLAR.
AND REMEMBER, OUR SERVICE IS ECONOMICAL
TOO.
DOUBLE-BARRELLED ECONOMY
iISJ DATSUN ZSST
Godding & Clark Motors
378-2311 2nd Av A 2nd St & E.
Open 8 PM Mon.-Sat.



g£' r jlPiflffi^flf^l^^^Hlff
jj^M
Bifl | p
CAMERAMAN JAMIE JOBB TAKES AIM U G CASE
filming union for informational film. He will also edit it.

Union Makes Film
. -if 5
The J. Wayne Reitz Union is making a movie of itself 249,080
Square Feet, to show at Freshman Orientation and at Union Films
early in the year to acquaint students with Union facilities. The film
will also be shown at national conferences and at universities planning
new student unions, said Bob Dawson, Union Program Director.
Our facilities are considered among the best in the country.
* r
Footage has already been shot at the Rathskeller and at the Plaza of
the Americas. The Tug of War and the Battle of the Bands, events of
last quarter, are on film, too.
Jamie Jobb, Cameraman-Editor for the project, used telephoto
lenses to capture people behaving naturally. Jobb is a recent graduate
of the College of Journalism. His slide presentation, It So Happens,
was shown in the Union last year.
SUITE FRI. & SAT. 7:20-9:30
; 6:40 8:50 STATEW
ictured Flickers Supercfcickeu \_J
ie Jungle Dudley-Do-Right of the Mouuties J
i
|T \y \ SPECIAL ||
IXJ FRIDAY 1
ff-W SPECIAL I
H LUNCH & DINNER IS
1 SAUTEED FIS Hi
J ALMONDINE g
I 680 |
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS g
||L o ain ESviLif mau^^^J||

Dance Tonight
Tonight on the J. Wayne
Reitz Union Terrace, the Union
will present Eros. Formerly
Pearls before Swine, the group
originated in Florida and now
operates out of New York City.
The dance will begin at 9 p.m.
and continue till one a.m.

a :!
, WWWW|j!j!J^AWJ 11 '' '*"
B - - w.vw
v iV ** ** l **^ l '>wiwiiA>AA>iiww.v.v.'.'.v,v -. .y.N>>. .-^<^*>AiA^>.v*' **!*'**'!*?;' ' *"
; H.. H
Wm HHH Sssr "f^
:
.-....' ..o ...-..-..*.-.,v.;....;*
. . **'(. OF M -*''.e, iAC.
sl/99*

What's the catch? There isnt any.
*1799 the suggested retail price at the port
of entry for the VW sedan.
The price includes the Federal excise tax,and
import duty.
It also includes the built-in heater/defroster,
windshield washer, electric windshield wipers,
outside rearview mirror, padded dash, front seat
headrests, and seat belts front and back.
Not to mention the new electric rear-window
defogger and the new ignition/steering lock.
IWhen the key is removed, the steering wheel is
locked in place.)

MILLER-BROWN **
MOTORS INC. W
. 4222 NW THIRTEENTH STREET L A !K

| m p UF 9 S REPRESENTATIVES |
A - | Jim Bartlett John Potoki
s T^leVla slc L George Corl Skip Lujack j
I Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson I
I Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 w. Univ. Ave.
It NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
J
FOURTH OF JULY
CLEARANCE
CHECK THE COLOR OF THE TAG
FOR YOUR
SAVINGS
25% TO 50%
GREEN 25% OFF
RED 33%% OFF
ORANGE 40% OFF
LILAC 50% OFF
DRESSES
SWIMSUITS
SPORTSWEAR
fji Siuoft; Sceffr
WELCOME BANKAMERICARD
THE MALL GAINESVILLE & CENTRAL CHARGE

Friday, June 27,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Its the price of the real thing, not a stripped strippeddown
down strippeddown economy model.
What else do you have to pay?
The charge for transporting the car from the
port of entry. The dealer delivery charge. And
local sales tax.
There is one optional that makes a lot of sense.
The automatic stick shift. (It eliminates the clutch
pedal.)
Well, that's it.
Unless, of course, you count the cost bf gas and
oil it takes you to get here in your present car.

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

[FOR SALE
67 VW Excellent condition transistor
radio. New tires. $1375 or best offer.
Call 372-0939.(A-2t-155-p)
BE gentle, be kind, to that expensive
carpet, clean it with Blue Lustre.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-155-lt-c)
WE WANT YOUR BUSINESSI 40%
OFF TO STUDENTS. 2-Drawer
suspension files, list for $49.50, you
pay $29.70. jr Office Furniture Co.
620 S. Main St. Phone 376-1146.
(A-5M55-C)
Good running 1967 Honda 65. Very
good condition. Cheap SBS. Get
some wheels for the summer. Bob
376-7402. (A-2t-155-p)
Zeiss binocular microscope, excellent
specifications, brand new, good for
med school, a real bargain, $795. Call
376-9551. (A-st-155-p)
TAPE RECORDER rca 4-track
stereo, exc. cond. $l5O. Also
aluminum forearm loop crutches
$lO. And 6x weaver rifle scope $lO.
376-1155. (A-2t-155-p)
Honda 450 Scrambler 69, must sell,
absolutely perfect, 700 miles,
warranty, not even broken in $llOO
new, sacrifice for $925, call Bill
376-0689. (A-2t-155-p)
1 table 2 chairs, sls, Zenith TV $75,
chest of drawers S2O, Night stand
$lO, 4 drawer file cabinet $25, 2
posturepedic twin beds & covers and
bolsters S4O each, bookcase sls, 4
butterfly chairs $7 each. After 5 PM,
378-9148. (A-3t-155-p)
FREE KITTEN! Cute. Loveable.
Yellow with blue eyes. 12 weeks old.
378-3166. (A-1M55-P)
2 ROYAL standard typewriters. 1
elite, 1 pica like new. Cost $260 each
new. Just cleaned will sell for $125
each. Phone 378-6403 evenings after
six. (A-5M55-C)

' iMupHirnri
v. l
V Jr 'lv
I I
toH&L I
- u A 7 m. BTf^l
iTT^iitHiiirTiTTnrTliliTTPrr
iffAw m
I W ScaV p*
I JCTfWI X \I rB
[if! '% l :. ...
wwmmmn^mwi'
HOLDEN BORGNINE (GAN OBRIEN
JOHNSON [ft]

Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 27,1969

FOR RENT
? .. $
>. X.SSV.vW%Wit: ,v, ;W>K*maw
TWO bedroom apartment furnished.
Reduced summer rates. $77.50 per
month. Airconditioned. Very near
campus. No car needed. Call Mr. or
Mrs. Jones, Phone 376-5636.
(B-10t-145-P)
GUYS & GALS economic! living
CLO has gone co-ed for the summer
S6O/mon. Room & meals peace, love
and freedom, 1 blk from campus
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
(B-10t-145-P)
Efconomical living for male students 1
blk from campus S6O/m. room & 3
meals/day. 5 houses dining hall rec
room & work shop. Pro cook
members summer & fall vacancies
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
College Liv Org. (B-10t-145-P)
Air conditioned 2 bedroom furnished
apartment for summer quarter.
Reduced. 376-5828. (B-4M55-P)
Room for rent in private home for
mature male student. Air cond.
separate entrance linen and maid
serv. Off-street parking Call
376-5360; (B-lt-155-c)
RANCH STYLE LIVING two br.
apt. large closets & tile bath. Fully
panelled & AC, use of pool & BBQ
house Walking distance of new golf
course to be opened this summer.
Sorry no children no pets. $l5O per
mo. Call 376-3900 or 376-1146.
(B-st-155-p)
Air conditioned 2 bedroom furnished
apt. Avail. 7/1/ Call 376-5828.
(B-4M55-P)
| WANTED ]f
One or two female roommates for
two br. French Quarter. ONLY S3O
per month!! Call 376-0008.
(C-st-152-P)

| WANTED I
One female roommate summer
quarter Landmark immediate
occupancy, S9O whole summer air
cond, dishwasher disposal,
pool call 376-8304. (C-3t-155-P)
One female roommate summer
quarter Landmark lmmediate
occupancy, S9O whole summer air
cond, dishwasher, disposal, pool
Call 378-3518. (C-3t-155-p)
WANTED: Manservant to travel with
couple. Services are in exchange for
share in adventure. Must be
extremely competent, versatile
person (any sex). Unobtrusiveness
essential. Prefer cross between
Samuel Johnsons Boswell and Rufo
of Heinlein's Glory Road.
Dedication: should be willing to
support the three of us if our money
runs out. Call Ken or Donna at
378-3166. (C-lt-155-p)
1 or more female roommates to share
2 bdrm Vill. Park apt. sllO for
summer. Come by apt. 48 after 4.
(C-3t-155-p)
SEX! CLO has gone coed for the
summmer. If you are looking for an
inexpensive place to stay near
campus we're it! Room & 3 meals
a day for S6O a month. Space also
available for fall. Stop by 117 N.W.
15 st. or call Kim or Paul at
378-9420. (C-st-155-p)

sA/OU/ SIWWIHCf AT 5:53 7:52
r. = -*i 9:51
He has a wife. She has a husband.
With so much in common they just have to fall in love.
.
-Rrv : :
V
Jack Lemmon and Catherine Deneuve in "The April Fools
Also starring Peter Lawford, Jack Weston, Myrna Loy
and Charles Boyer :
Title song sung by Dionne Warwick. Title Music by Burt Bacharach\md Lyrics by Hal David
Music from original sound track on Columbia Records. A Jalem Production.Tethnlcolor D d
Screenplay by Hal Dresner Produced by Gordon Carroll. Directed by Stuart Rosenberg
A National General Pictures Release. A Cinema Center Films Presentation.
M ZZLm-mmmlmmmmmmJZSZZ^SZZEZ
mmw:. 1 __
" ,^ s==^==== m
AN ALL-WALT DISNEY
HELL FRACTURE YOUR FUNNYBONE BBOMI M mm
WHILE HE STEALS YOUR HEART! mRIUnHIII
f WAIT DISNEY ||| j5Sg
K CtiND)
wo); a*, i, amwsil
ENdTT^T^TbY

| WANTED J
&
1 male roommate at $35 mo. In
Village Park. Call Steve, Jim, or Jim
at 376-0381. (C-lt-155-p)
WANTED TO BUY 3SOCC+
CYCLE $450 cash Immediately for
clean one. See Mac, Landmark apt.
101 weekend or after seven.
(C-lt-155-p)

CUNT EASTWOOD iSBACK J
I ANDBURNING ATBQTH ENDS <
lrA, f \ Lgj 'f> jA|
mfMLi\

HELP WANTED f
Student Assistant 11:45AM I:4SPM
MONDAY FRIDAY 1.50 per hour
free lunch. Call Mr. Avery 392-3701.
(E-155-2t-c)
Babysitter. Four evenings a week for
3 hours each evening. No weekends.
Reasonable rates. Call Cathy
372-7960. (E-2t-155-p)



AUTOr 1
1948 CHEVY Unique, ugly, but
passed inspection. Mucho miles, but
runs well. Will negotiate price. Call
378-2294 evenings. (G-3t-155-p)
Must sell this week excellent 1960 air
conditioned Cadillac 4 door fine
shape electric windows etc. $350 or
best offer. Bob 376-7402 must sell
(G-2t-155-p)
MGB 65 new top, tires, freeflow
exhaust. Mechanically sound SI2OO.
See Judy at 101V* NE 7th St.
(G-lt-155-p)
f PERSONAL I
Wanted the slides taken from my car
behind towers during finals. Since
they are of no use to you please
return them to Towers Area office
or 1701 N. Military Tl W. Palm
Beach, Fla. or Union Lost and
Found. (J-3t-155-p)

H, REITZ UNION 1
.5 THEATER
! ni'"\
I 7:oO*^
PaulA ' #s l
Newman
IS DOlmicttssiibrrlltiip!
Harperir"'
Harper looks for trouble. | ;
See Harper look. ; i~. i.
See Harper. ;
See Harpi-r
iigsvtf l l
LjJfef SlAra)
j'Thi.afight. VKI fi
Harper has many fights. These
1 See the fights. I are people.
V These
! trickv people
I ~ Sc-t-Harpur*
A GERSHWWKASTNER Production
lP C*i o^x*.
. wp? JUJt ARTHUR JANET PAMELA ROBERT SHELLEY
. BACALL HARRIS-HllL-I£IGH-TIFHN'WAGNER'WINIBtS
TECHNICOLOR MNAVIHON' FROAI WARNER BROS.
WR^ mmm
Mll 1 BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:30
SHOW TIME 9:00
A GIANT OF A MOVIE
vjrff >y 6
BRE ?ecs
| MACBENM'S BOLD
!-.v* awX yss. v *^H^nMMhx.
mWrsmLas
IIUE \EHIM CAM Lit SP\RV kECVW tt 1W TFH HSSIDV
and THE GENTLEMEN JJjjJ
ril II 111 i/Ml Directed by J LEE THOMPSON Screenplay by CARL FOREMAN
Llji If.ilililvll Based on the novel by WILL HENRY-Music by QUINCY JONES 1
Produced by CARL FOREMAN and DIMITRI TIOMKIN -- >
SUPER PANAVISION -TECHNICOLOR STEREOPHONIC SOUND
|nr Jolt fecuno sna t-ie KICatYMS i-..: ''] I ~ xatiidc ,,rt.nr 1
- | oie turtle,iu/iim-wiitw rcaKunjnAj s.- j Suggested for MATURE audiences^^^
PLUS CO-FEAYuRE AT "HSo 1 (parental discretion advised) *4*
DIVORCE AMERICAN STYLE"
Dbble Reynold's & Dick Van Dyke I

CLASSIFIEDS

| PERSONAL
..............
How about a good cheap basis for a
sound system? Monarch 60 watt solid
state amp & Lear Jet 8-track taoe
fjYt 6 V 29 Ca
(J-lt-155-p)
Please adopt gold and white kittens.
Healthy and playful. Adorable. Call
Lefty 372-6474, 1007 SW 13 St
(J-3M55-P)
The Spanish Main has gone EAST.
We now have beautiful clothing,
Jewelry, bells, incense and holders,
water-pipes and more goodies from
India and Morocco at beautiful
prices. The Spanish Main, 105 w
Univ. Ave. 372-1667. (J-lt-155-p)
If you dont get a chance to see our
new clothing from the EAST this
weekend, look for us at the
ATLANTA POP FESTIVAL, July
4-5. The Spanish Main, 105 W. Univ
Ave., 372-0667. (J-lt-155-p)

SERVICES |
Tennis Racket restringing free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-ts-155-p)
INTRAMURALS BOXING CLUB
CALL LEE 372-9410. IF I AM NOT
THERE LEAVE A MESSAGE.
(M-2t-155-p)
FESSI NAL TYPING
SERVICE needs efficient typists to
work either mornings or afternoons.
For an appointment call 376-7160.
(M-155-p)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
519Vz SW 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-155-P)

ttouK/iAiljj. TK* Qjmh pimuti

r A B I
MAE WEST DOES IT TO CARY GRANT IN
"SHE DONE HIM WRONG"
SUNDAY, JUNE 29 UNION AUDITORIUM
7:00 AND 9:00 P.M. ADMISSION: 50d
SUMMER BOWLING LEAGUES will meet to organize the week of June 30th. We will attempt
to form leagues for Monday, Wednesday and Thursday nights for the fourth quarter. The
organizational meeting wiirbe held in room 105 C of the UNION, June 30th, July 2, and July 3,
at 7:30 p.m. All interested persons are asked to attend these meetings or to contact Pat Day at
the UNION GAMES AREA (tele. 2- 1 637) prior to the meeting time if they can't attend.
Attendance is important because league officers, rules and exact charges will be voted on at this
time.
*
Cost for bowling in the leagues average about $1.50 to $1.65 per week; this includes the charge
for three games of bowling, trophy fees, and secretary fee. The exact cost will be decided at the
meeting.
APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE*
AT REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

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Friday, June 27,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

Ip The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 27,1969

T g n
TIL #*
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Friday. Jim* 27,1960. Th Florida Alligator,

fmm
RKK T

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, Juno 27, 1960

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GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator Girl is Candi Dodson. Candi is a DG and was 1969
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Quarter System
Here To Stay
By DIANA LATHAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Chancellor Robert Mautz,
Wednesday denied the rumor the
quarter system may be abolished
soon.
Mautz said the survey
questionnaire which was
answered by the students in the
spring about the quarter system
was designed to find out what
the students thought of the
system.
It was not a poll to change the
system.
The survey itself was
instigated by the state
universities student body
presidents who questioned the
quarter system.
A faculty-student committee
was then established to write up
the questionnaire which the
board distributed to the
universities.
Mautz said the results of the
poll are being compiled by the
regents but as yet the findings
havent been completed.
When asked about the
possibility of changing all state
university names except for UF
and FSU, Mautz said the idea
had been explored.
There was quite a bit of
backlash from the various
universities whose names were in
consideration for change, and
the Board has put this matter
aside, Mautz said.
Staff Meets
There will be a mandatory
meeting of all Alligator staff
members at 4:30 p.m. today in
the Alligator newsroom.

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By TOM EASON
Alligator Sports Editor
The big controversy*
concerning UF basketball coach
Tommy Bartlett and a
prospective job with the
University of South Florida has
diminished as fast as it flared up.
I withdrew my name
Wednesday night at 10 pjn.
after I had talked with President
OConnell and Coach Graves,
Bartlett said. I told OConnell I
wasnt ready to get out of major
college basketball and that all I
had done was inquire with Dick
Bowers, their athletic director,
who happens to be a very good
friend of mine from college days
at Tennessee.
Bartlett had applied for the
new job of head coach at the
Tampa school Sunday and was
to go for an interview today.
The application consisted of a
verbal interest by Bartlett to
Bowers and a completed

Frazier Finds His Quarry

By IRA LEE RIDDLE
Alligator Sports Writer
In 1964, A broken wrist
meant that Joe Frazier of
Philadelphis would represent the
United States in the Olympic
sport of boxing. Frazier was not
the odds-on favorite to win the
gold medal, but he did in what
was later called mudfi ease.
Woon after that victory, he
turned pro, and began a long
string of victories, mostly over
lesser-known pros. He bloodied
George Chuvalo of Canada,
considered one of the better
contenders then for Muhammad
Alis crown. Chuvalo had never
before been floored, and this
fight was no exception, although
Frazier was obviously much the
better fighter.
Jerry Quarry, on the other
hand, lost out on a chance to
become heavyweight champion
of the world when he
participated in the WBAs
elimination matches to decide a
champ to replace the deposed
Ali. But Quarry lost to Jimmie
Ellis, the champion.
Ellis is now the recognized
world heavyweight champ,
except in five States and a
number of countries overseas,
which recognize Frazier as the
champ. The Quarry-Frazier bout
was thought by many to be a
preliminary to a real
championship bout with the
winner going against either Ellis
or Clay, if Clay is released by the
government and decides to begin
fighting again.
Immediately after the bout,
challenges were issued by both
Frazier and Ellis, and a possible
bout in October looms on the
horizon. For Frazier, it will be a
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Bartlett Stays With Gators

questionnaire turned into USF
listing Bartletts credentials.
Bartlett said this was only
technicality and was not" a
formal application.
The only thing people look
at when hiring a college coach is
whether they win or lose, not
who they are or what they did in
college or what kind of grades
they got in school, Bartlett
said. So all Dick Bowers
wanted was my record over the
years and that is what the
application consisted of.
Bartlett has compiled a 55-23
record for his three seasons at
UF along with second, third and
forth place finishes in the SEC.
Last years team was also invited
to the National Invitational
Tournament, a first for a Florida
basketball team.
Ive been here three years
now and I can say it has been
Floridas best ever but we are as
far as we can go in our program
now, Bartlett said. The

vindication of the route he has
traveled, by not participating in
the WBA elimination bouts. This
last bout on the route, against
Quarry, went much the same
way as most of his latest bouts
have.
Pre-fight publicity made
Frazier a slight favorite,
although many sport swriters
claim his opponent was a better
puncher.
Frazier has rarely been
awarded the first round, and this
fight was no exception.
However, after that, the fight

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UF NEEDS A COLISEUM

problems are evident and they
must be solved before we can
start recruiting the boys we
could get.
Bartletts problems stem from
the fact UF is without an
adequate athletic center to
compete with the other major
colleges in the South. The high
entrance requirements are also a
hindrance to the athletic
program.
UF has the contracted services
of Bartlett for the next four
years, but due to recruiting, his
future hopes are not optimistic.
This past freshman team has
good height, so they should help
our program and we have
recruited a good freshman team
for the coming season, but I
cant predict a championship
team, Bartlett said. We need
people who care, or our
problems wont get solved, and
UFs program will remain at the
place it is today.

was all his.
Frazier opened a cut under
Quarrys eye in the third round,
and by the end of the seventh
round, Quarry could not see out
of it. The Garden doctor
examined the eye, and called the
bout. By the rules, Frazier was
awarded a seventh round TKO,
even though it lasted till
between the seventh and eighth.
Somehow, even after
battering Quarry, Chuvalo, and
Buster Mathis into almost
bloody hulks, sportswriters still
think Frazier cannot punch well
enough to be a world champion.

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Friday, Juna 27,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 27,1969

As The Big T Sees It

Some thoughts on the
national sports scenes:
Anyone care to attempt
picking the National Leagues
Manager of the Year?
Admittedly, its still quite
early in the season, with just
under half of the games played,
but it may be assumed (or so it
says here) that the present
trends will continue fairly
closely. So, who can it be?
After Jenkins, who can you
name on the Cubs pitching
staff? Not on the pitching staff?
Well, Randy Hundley is a decent
catcher, theres Banks at first,
and Williams in the outfield, but
except for Banks and Williams,
the Cubs have no one in the
superstar class.
On the other hand, the Mets
have not one player who could
be called a superstar at all. The
pitching staff is unbelievably
young and mature (okay, so it

l-M Softball Begins

The Intramural Departments
summer softball league will open
July 7.
Anyone interested in entering
a team must do so by
Wednesday at 5 pjn. Teams may
be entered in room 229 Florida
Gym or call 392-0581.
Later in the summer, a
three-man half-court basketball
league will be organized if
enough interest is shown. Also,

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By IRA LEE RIDDLE wow
Alligator Sports Writer
has to be believable because
theyre there). Nolan Ryan, Tom
Seaver, Jerry Koosman, Jim
McAndrew and Gary Gentry, to
name but five of them. Koosman
and Seaver could easily win 20
games each, while Ryan could
come close. (Seaver just won his
11th last week in the double
sweep over the Phillies).
Looking at the other division,
we find that a team picked to
finish anywhere from third to
sixth is fighting away to keep its
hold on first, yes first,
place ... the Mod Squad, led
by Walt Alston.
The Dodgers are hurting with
Drysdales injuries (3-3 on the
season so far), but the addition
of Wills and Mota has to be one
of the better moves OMalley has
made in a long time, making up
for his trading Wills to the
Pirates a few years back. Andy
Kosco hasnt hurt the team any
either.

tournaments will be held in
handball, tennis, golf and mixed
bowling. Any person interested
in these activities should contact
the intramural department now.
Anyone interested in
officiating softball should also
contact the intramural
department. Pay is $2.50 per
game. There will be two games
per day starting at 5:30 p.m. and
6:30 pjn.

In fact, any of the first five
teams in the NL West could
easily win the crown, with only
the Padres being ruled out for
the moment theyre just 1614
games behind.
Another thought keeps
arising how many of baseballs
eternal records are really that?
One record that seems to be
beyond everyones grasp is
Ruths lifetime total of 714
homers.
Looking at the swat list today
we find Willie Mays with 596,
only 118 benmd the Babe. Mays
is 38, but he plays and talks as if
he were about 28. With a few
more good seasons, he might
come close to the mark.
Another slugger, with possibly
a better chance, is Henry Aaron.
Aaron has hit 18 homers so far
this season, nine more than
Mays, to give him a total of 528,
only 186 behind Ruth.
Assuming that Aaron
continues at his pace for the rest
of the year, hell hit about 23
more, leaving him 163 from the
magic figure of 714. Aaron has
at least five or six good years in
him, if he has no bad injuries.
This was to be the year of the
hitter, right?
So far weve had three
no-hitters, all in the NL, and
there are over 10 pitchers being
picked to win 20 this year.
Niekro has 12, to lead the
parade.

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... runs Saturday nite
Funny Cars Run At Drags
Gainesville Dragway will feature three of the Souths fastest Funny
cars Saturday night in Round Robin match race competition.
The Funny cars were originally given that peculiar designation due
to their radical appearance and fantastic top speed. They have since
become more conventional in appearance, while retaining their
incredible quarter mile performance.
Scottie Scott, of Atlanta, receives top billing, as he holds the local
track record at 181.18 mph in his Hemi-powered Funny Jeep. Scott
staged a tremendous duel there with Della Woods on April 5, smoking
his 13 inch drag tires the entire quarter mile. He will be defending his
mile-an-hour mark against Tom Donahoe of Melbourne.
Tom owns and drives Mr. Donahoe, a new psychedelic Corvette
body mounted on a tubular chassis sporting a bored 427 injected
Chevrolet power plant, Donahoes Vette displays one of the bossest
paint jobs ever.
The James Gang, a flip-top Camaro, will take on the winner in a
best two of three match race.
These Funny cars bum nitro-methane for fuel, producing some
1,200 horsepower. The cars weigh in at only 1,600 pounds. When the
lightness of the car is coupled with a 1,200 hp engine, ear splitting,
tire smoking, flame throwing side by side, 180 mph races are the
result.
Event Director Terry Earwood explained there would be no
increase in admission, even with the special show, and that over 100
E.T. (elapsed time) entrants are also expected. Gates open at 5 p.m.
with time trials until 8. Races begin promptly at 8:30 p.m.
Gainesville Dragway is sanctioned and insured by the National Hot
Rod Association and is located three and a half miles north of the
Municipal Airport on SR 225.