Citation
The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
YORK REFUTES NATIONAL REPORTS
UF Germ Warfare Research Denied

By DAVE REDDICK
Editor-1 n-Chif
Agriculture Provost E.T. York Jr. has denied
charges appearing in a national magazine that the
UF College of Agriculture is participating in
chemical and biological warfare (CBW) research.
The charge, in the June 7 edition of The New
Republic, was made by Seymour M. Hersh. Hersh
authored a story on the militarys role in developing
CBW materials. In the last paragraph of his article,
Hersh said that despite many student protests,
research was still being done by colleges.
How many students at the University of Florida
know their Agriculture College has been aiding the
Air Force CBW unit at Eglin AFB, determine the
effects of field testing with CBW agents and
stimulantss upon the plant and animal life of the test
area? Hersh asked.
York said the UF had, in fact, been doing work

I J\il JkwMJM.

Vol 61, No. 155

Health Center Funds Drift Away

See Editorial, Page Six
By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Managing Editor
Because of legislative inaction,
the biggest hunk of federal aid
ever approved for Florida
education may be drifting out of
reach.
Federal funds amounting to
$19.7 million in matching
money for UFs J. Hillis Miller
Center
expansion program were, at the
adjournment of the legislative
session three weeks ago. ready
for delivery.
The state had to come across
with $12.7 million to add to the
federal money for the National

OConnell Asks
Credit Revamp
A request by UF President Stephen C. OConnell for credit hour
adjustment of three-hour courses has been met favorably by most
deans and faculty.
OConnell asked all colleges and schools to begin an earnest
re-evaluation of those courses offered for three or less hours of credit
with the objective of obtaining a four hour average credit by winter
quarter of 1970.
If this request is met, each student would be provided with a full
program of not more than four academic courses.
Previously, in older to have a normal credit hour progress, a student
would have a load of five or six courses per term.
What is needed is to examine critically the course content and
credit awarded for each course with the view of adjusting content and
credit to accomodate the demands and achieve the advantages of the
quarter system, OConnell said.
According to Dr. Robert S. Bolles, Dean of the College of
Architecture and Fine Arts, evaluation of courses is going on
contintinually and poses no problem for his college.
Dean H.H. Sisler of Arts and Sciences reenforced this statement by
a/tHing that this particular re-evaluation plan has been in the making
for a long time.
Most departments needing re-evaluation in Arts and Sciences were
near completion of the task.
Sisler personally approved of the presidents move saying this
would make the quarter system more workable.
It ought to make the courses more appropriate and helpful from
the students standpoint, he added.
Since a re-evaluation program will uncover disadvantages as well as
advantages, OConnell stressed the quarter system is not fixed forever.
The Board of Regents has said the universities, after a reasonable
period, sould come back with a recommendation to continue with the
quarter or change to another system.

The
Florida Alligator

Htt
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SAMUEL MARTIN
Outgoing Provost
Advisory Council on Education
for Health Professions, the

at Eglin in West Florida, but the work dealt entirely
with herbicides, weed and brush killers.
The study, now completing its third year, has
been under the direction of Dr. Daniel B. Ward,
associate professor of Botany, and consists of
merely evaluating the effects of tests which the Air
Force makes on the plant life in the area.
In a June 4 memorandum to the University
Executive Committee, York said he had determined
that the contract, which is for $46,000, called for
the UF team, headed up by Ward, to first make a
survey of the area, about a mile square, and then
maintain a record of the changes in the plant life as
a result of spraying done by the Air Force.
It was obvious that before we ever came into
the thing there was damage being done to some of
the trees near to the area, Ward said.
There was concern that this spray damage was
acting at some distance, perhaps even outside of the
reservation. And so people were concerned, he

THE SOUTHEASTS LEADING COLLEGE NEWSPAPER

University of Florida, Gainesville

granting agency, to fund the
project.
Appropriations bills passed
during the session did not
include any new funds for
eduction construction projects.
The only money forthcoming
for education capital outlay is
$600,000 for planning the
Health Center expansion
program, which includes the
states first college of dentistry,
due to open in September, 1971,
with 60 students.
However, the Alligator has
learned that the federal money
may be no longer available. In a
recent interview outgoing Health
Center Provost Samuel P. Martin
revealed that the matching funds
have been given to other states
with priorites similar to
Floridas.
Washington was ready to
match and they had the cash,
Martin said. It could be that we
may have to wait now a year on
Washington to develop the
money.
If Congress doesnt pass any
building money this summer
then well be in trouble, he
added.
Martin explained that the
federal agency was ready to fund
the program immediately if the
legislature had done its part.
Instead, legislators decided to
include education capital outlay
funding in a state-wide bond
referendum in November.
The vote will be to pledge
state utilities taxes to pay off
bonds which would finance
construction at universities,
junior colleges and vocational
schools. The S3S million bond
issue would extend the Higher
Education Bond Act and has
been termed a stop gap
proposal by Board of Regents
officials.
If the legislature had passed
the appropriation we would have
been guaranteed the building
program, Martin said. Now we
have two ifs.
He said the expansion now
depends on bond issue okay and
on Congressional reapproval of
the federal matching money.

said. I think thats why they got interested in
bringing some outside people into it.
Ward said when he heard of the Air Forces plan
to offer bids for the work be became interested and
planned a project which would be helpful to him. in
his studies of the plant life of Florida.
Im not getting any salary out of this, he said,
what I get out of it is the freedom to do these
other things.
I have no knowledge of what they are going to
do, Ward said. The people I work with (the Air
Force team at Eglin) have scant knowledge of what
is happening.
The people who are testing the equipment are
the people who call the shots, he said.
Our job is merely to monitor, to see what
side-effects, if any, have occurred.
He explained that more than 100 small* testing
(SEE 'GERM WARFARE* PAGE TWO)

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Before we had no ifs, Martin
said.
Legislators said they did not
approve any money for
education captial outlay for fear
of raising taxes.
Martin said he believed the
lawmakers had done the best
they could since no new taxes
were in order. They also gave
us time to work on planning
construction bids, he said.
If the expansion program is
ever approved and gets
underway the estimated value of

/
case

Tuesday, June 24, 1969

the Health Center would rise to
more than S6O million. It is
already Floridas largest
state-assisted medical complex.
Martin is due to leave his
$38,800-a-year post as provost
June 30. He resigned last
November in the face of state
apathy over the operating
budget of the Shands Teaching
Hospital, a unit of the center.
He will be replaced July 1 by
Dr. Edmund Ackell, who is
currently dean of the dentistry
college.



2

:, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 24, 1969

DOUG CASE
A RARE FIND
It's not often one finds the Plaza of the Americas deserted, but
that's the way it was last week. It seems when the students take a
short vacation, the Plaza, often the scene of protests, political ralleys
and even some times classes, gets its own vacation.

Vending Survey Completed

Student Government recently
completed a survey of vending
machines on the UF campus in
an effort to determine if there is
a problem in the functioning of
the machines and if the refund
system is adequate.
According to Student Senator
Ric Katz the survey was
conducted over a nine-month
period where every vending
machine on campus was tested.
Katz reported to Student
Body president Charles
Shepherd he had received a full
refund of $7.05 from the
vending authority on campus.
He suggested to Shepherd that

Germ Warfare Denied

PA6E OMt
stations in the area measure the
effectiveness of various spraying
techniques using airplanes at
varying speeds and altitudes.
He said at first not much
testing was going on, and his
main job was to check the
he was no
expert on biological warfare,
said he felt that the studies,
although they could eventually
be used for anti-personnel
warfare, were aimed only at
weed control.
Common sense would say
that if you can spray one liquid,
you can spray another, he said.
Its very obvious from the
concern they give to the
distribution of the thing, that
theyre interested in complete
coverage of something, in other
words a herbicide, he said.

W
1 tfatmaHy of Florida and is published fire times weekly except during June,
wXuty and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student koUdagra
: Kmd exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
Ijenthota. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Unke>
I'Building, Udmrib of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
ImAtered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
liFlorida 32601.
It Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 pm quarter.
lj The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
itof all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
[objectionable.
I The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any 1
I advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
luriNertieement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
Idhan one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
giIPM. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

an agency or an individual be
named to handle the vending
machine situation. Last year,
Katz proposed to the Student
Senate that a Food and Vending
Authority be named, however
the authority was never created.

Stetson Prexy Killed

Paul F. Geren, Stetson
University president forced to
resign recently was killed in a
two-car accident in Kentucky
Sunday, one day before his
resignation was to become
effective.
Gerens resignation capped
off a year-long effort by the
facility to have his ouster. On

Theyre not interested in a
bacterial type of spray, where
one spot here and there would
spread.
It looks to me like they are
really interested in herbicide
work, not in biological warfare,
he said. I see no way this could
be used for radioactive
compounds thats a different
problem entirely.
Obviously this is for a liquid
which would carry something in
solution, like a herbicide.
Regardless of whether the UF
is indeed participating in CBW
research, the program will soon
be over, Ward said.
The original three-year
contract is due to expire soon,
and Ward knows of no [dans for
the Air Force to renew it.
friday night
is fun night at
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SOCIALIST SPEAKS THURSDAY |
Left Wing Group Forming

Young Socialist Alliance
(YS A), a nationwide
revolutionary socialist
organization, is organizing a
chapter at UF, Kurt Garrett,
local YSA secretary said Sunday.
The first activity of the local
YSA will be a speaking
engagement and organizational
meeting at 8 p.m. Thursday, at
the Reitz Union.
Speaking for YSA will be
Doug Jenness, a leading YSA
national member from Atlanta,
Ga. His topic will be Dynamics
of World Revolution. The
public is invited.
Also speaking will be a Marine
Corps veteran with two-years
duty in Vietnam. He is currently

He said that although a part
of the problem is lack of student
involvement, individual area
councils and other special
interest groups could be
influential in working out a
solution to the problem.

May 2 he tendered his
resignation, only to have the
trustees refuse to accept it. The
faculty countered with a
unanamous vote of no
confidence.
Stetson students backed up
the faculty and picketed the
Geren home. This led to his
second resignation last Friday.
A five-member committee
was named by the trustees to
find a replacement.

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an anti-war GI organizer and
editor of an underground
servicemens newspaper, Head
On, at Camp Lejeune, N.C.
YSA plans several educational
projects this summer including
several speaking engagements

SG Committee To Meet

Interested student
government officials are asked to
attend a meeting tonight to hear
a report by Lou Tally, chairman
of the investigation committee,
concerning the UF Student

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and film presentations.
YSA also plans to work with
anti-war GFs and veterans this
summer in the formation of a
Student Mobilization Committee
Against the War in Vietnam
(SMC).

Government participation in the
National Student Association.
The meeting will be at 8 p. m
in Room 316 of the Reitz
Union.



ARCHIE CARR SAYS

Gator Is 'World Heirloom

By Alligator Services
Living with alligators is one of the challenging
obligations of these times like learning to live
with young people and nuclear fission, says UF
naturalist Dr. Archie Can.
Addressing a UF audience as faculty lecturer of
the year, Carr called the alligator a world heirloom,
a relic of times beyond the dinosaurs.
The renowned zoologist said having come this far
without obliterating this spectacular remnant of
Triassic life, people must solve the problem of
keeping it wild in a taming landscape to prove to
posterity there is some sense of unpriced values.
The real threats now to the alligators are the ruin
of habitat and soaring price for gator hides, Carr
said. Only a short time ago, a six-foot hide brought
the hunter less than sl.
Can said by 1968 the price had risen to $7 or $8
a linear foot, and the poachers, combined with the
drainers, scrapers, fillers and bulkheaders of the
landscape... are wiping out wild alligators at an
alarming rate.
Citing the lesser known values of the alligator,

Kimball Wiles
Tat Printed
A new text in secondary
education dedicated to the late
UF College of Education Dean
Kimball Wiles was released June
18.
Wiles was killed in a Tampa
automobile accident in early
1968.
The memorial volume, edited
by Dr. William Alexander, a UF
education professor, is entitled:
The High School of the Future:
A Memorial to Kimball Wiles.
Other contributors to the
book include Dr. Maurice R.
Ahrens, Dr. Arthur W. Combs
and Dr. Glenn Hass, all
professors of education at UF.
Published by Charles E.
Merrill, all royalties earned from
the book will be given to the
Wiles Memorial Committee to
advance the ideas of Wiles at the
College of Education, Alexander
said.

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Can characterizes the animal as an extraordinary
member of the pond community. His excavations
and dredgings influence the relation between water
and land. His comings and goings open channels,
and modify the successional processes by which
ponds give way to marsh.
Noting that alligators are being killed steadily
and the rate of the habitat-loss is rising. Carr
suggested that one way to save the wild gator is to
educate the unknowing as to the values involved.
Another step is to organize a campaign to kiD the
fad for alligator leather. Perhaps the most practical
solution to the leather side of the complicated
problem is commercial alligator farms.
But the main hope is the conscience of the
people, and whether this will mature in time cannot
be foretold, he said, while the active forces in the
loss we face are illegal killing and min of
wilderness.
The obstacles in the struggle against these is a
public mind slow to want any but the most material
goods. To the thoughtful man, losing the alligator
will seem a disaster.

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Marshall Named
PermanentFSU Head
J. Stanley Marshall was named president of Florida State
University June 6.
Marshall had been acting president since the resignation of
John Champion. Before that, Marshall had been dean of the
FSU College of Education. He joined the faculty in 1958 as
head of the department of science education.
He is a graduate of Slippery Rock State Teachers College and
Syracuse University.
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Tuday, Juna 24,1969, The Florida Alligator.

3



4

i, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, Juna 24,196 S

It is also my hope all
will agree that it is
imperative the
University, and the
people of this state,
permit and encourage,
study and discussion of a
\full spectrum of ideas,
opinions and beliefs,
both popular and
unpopular, in an
atmosphere of freedom,
confident that in doing
so no threat of loss of
rights or status will be
suffered by student or
faculty. We should know
that far less damage can
be done by exposition of
ideas, bad as they might
be, than by creating a
condition under which
men will fear to express
them.
From OConnell's letter
to Sen. Tom Slade
over the Kenneth
Megill dispute.
IflHHWl^nillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHHllllllll
* -it
* fKK I
SPEAKS TO PROTESTORS
... All In A Day's Work

Crocodile Paper Pending
Funds Needed For Printing

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Crocodile, an
opinion-format magazine which
was scheduled for a January
appearance at UF, is dead.
John Sugg, campus activist
and editor of the publication,
said Sunday that due to the
reluctance of a local printer to
handle the Crocodile account,
there will be no magazine.
The printer presently owes
the staff of the Crocodile an
undisclosed sum awarded the
staff on May 29 in the Alachua
County Court of Record.
Permission to sell the
magazine on campus was given
on January 8 by die Committee
ou Student Affairs, followed by
approval from the office of the
Vice President for Student
Affairs, Lester L. Hale.

FIRST TWO Yf APf TEST HIS METTLE
OConnell Surmounts Problems

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C. OConnell spent his
second year in office immersed in a myriad of
problems ranging from posters on walls to budget
cuts.
Six hundred state leaders assembled on the UF
campus in October to honor the UFs sixth
president, at his formal inauguration. A full day of
speeches, tours and even an operetta highlighted
OConnells inaugural.
The festivities were but an interlude from the
headaches that began with troubles in Action
Conference. In September, Action Conferences
chairman, Maj. Russell Ramsey, resigned under fire.
U.S. Rep. Bob Sikes (D-Fla.) demanded the
resignation, labeling the conference un-American
and hippie-oriented.
OConnell defended both the conference and
Ramsey, saying the conference acted in the best
American tradition. This incident was the first
of several dispui between the UF and various
legislators, and OConnell often found himself in the
middle of these squabbles.
A relatively insignificant event caused much
debate and possible political implications during the
fall. Lavon Gentry, 2UC, was arrested by city police
for putting Bust the Draft signs on buildings after
being warned not to.
Many believed Gentry a victim of selective law
enforcement, but OConnell maintained the crucial
issue was respect for authority. He stated, There
has never been any attempt to single out anyone for
his political beliefs. He stuck to his guns, but
Gentry was eventually acquitted in city court.
When the Alligator pill series broke in
November, detailing an individual case
philosophy for dispensing contraceptives, OConnell
was quoted as opposing die practice.
... prescribing and dispensing contraceptive
drugs should not be a function of the Student
Health Service, he said, adding that the practice
could be interpreted as university approval of
premarital sexual intercourse, which, he said, is
against Florida law.
Some thought he would shut down the service,
but in January he gave official approval to the pill
policy, which called the prescription of
contraceptives (except to minors) a professional
decision between patient and doctor.
The Roman Catholic president surprised many
when be said the policy is a sound policy and is
approved for continued use.
OConnell spent much of his time grappling with

Although the Crocodile as a
magazine is dead, the birth of a
newspaper by the same name is
in the making, Sugg said.
Plans call for a four-page
newspaper, containing
opinionated works similar to
those that would have appeared
in the magazine, plus news of a
timely nature.
Sugg said that it will be about
four weeks before the newspaper
will be published, provided the
staff can raise the needed funds
for printing.
Publication of the newspaper
is dependent on funds which are
still owed the Crocodile staff by
the printer who refused to
publish the magazine.
Staff members are available
for work on the newspaper,
provided the printer pays us the
money he owes us, Sugg said.

The price of the newspaper
has not been determined yet,
but Sugg feels that copies should
be sold to students to help
support the publication.
The newspaper will come out
on a weekly basis receiving
support from the Young
Socialists, a new organization on
campus still in the planning
stages.
A special feature of the first
issue of the magazine would
have been an article by Herbert
Marcuse, a professor at the
University of California and
noted authority on Marxist
studies.
/
An article by Kenneth Megill,
UF professor of philosophy, is
being saved for possible
publication in the Crocodile
newspaper.

a perennial problem-the budget. At a press
conference in January, he said skimpy financing was
forcing the UF into mediocrity, and he laid the
blame partially on expenses of newer state
universities. He presented the UFs budget requests
to a legislative subcommittee at a tedious 8-hour
meeting in February, and all indications were that
appropriations would fall short of requests.
Winter was the season of discontent, and the
brunt fell on OConnells shoulders. Kicking off the
season was the Sen. Tom Slade-Prof. Ken Megill
clash. Offended by remarks made by Megill at an
Accent session, Slade ordered OConnell to fire the
young philosophy professor.
OConnell refused to fire Megill but ordered an
inquiry into his statements. Eventually OConnell
cleared Megill, much to the dismay of Slade, who
called OConnells inquiry the greatest whitewash
since Tom Sawyer painted the fence.
On the lighter side, OConnell dedicated the
Friendship Walk on the Plaza of the Americas,
bringing to mind the old sayind, Hi, 1m...
Early in March, OConnell denied SSOC a charter
and it looked like the dam was ready to burst. Two
hundred angry students marched to OConnells
office where they demanded reasons fc* his
decision. Later that night, the group assembled at
the Reitz Union to plan protest strategy but it
never came off.
Despite the furor, OConnell remained adamant.
He based his decision on the fact that SSOC was
open to non-members and was aligned with SDS and
JOMO.
Fortunately, the quarter ended soon after the
SSOC fracas, and when spring quarter convened,
OConnell was faced with what he considered a
dangerous shortage of campus police. With
numerous slashing incidents and reports of students
arming themselves, OConnell issued to the
Legislature a request for 19 additional policemen.
The problems of black students became a
semi-issue in May. OConnell met with 30 black
students one evening. The group discussed its
gripes-not enough blacks on campus, student
bigotry, housing problems but OConnell
promised little and the whole thing was rather
indecisive.
The year ended rather quietly. It had been a year
of hassles, with the Legislature, radical students
problems, rumors, threats and ultimatums, and
OConnell was, by virtue of his position, the man in
the middle.

Student Veep
Elects Marriage
Charles Harris, vice-president of the UF student body, took a
big step in May when he hitched up with Charles Sheppard to
undertake the problems of university life.
Last Tuesday, he went one further and hitched up with
Jeanne Angela Dammas to undertake marriage.
The graduate students were married at 7:30 pjn. in a
University Lutheran Church ceremony officiated by Rev.
Richard Hans.
Parents of the bride are Mr. and Mis. Erwin Dammas, Miami.
The bridgroom is the son of Mrs. Edison Harris of Orlando and
the late Mr. Harris.
Given in marriage by her father, Miss Dammas wore a gown
ot candlelight, a long veil of bridal illusion, and carried a cascade
of white lilies.
A reception was held in the Holiday Inn on SW 13th Street,
a ter which the couple left for a honeymoon in Atlanta.
n 3 , a Kappa, graduated with honors and a degree
in Political Science. He worked in the Senate of the SG until he
ranfor election of vice-president during the Spring quarter and
He and his bride are now waiting for word on his acceptance
into arvard Law School, and currently plan to move to Boston.
fa < *vrv** *v -s

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; J ' V
S |f 111
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... At inauguration
iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiitHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
My short experience
here indicates that this
institution is on a sound
constructive course.
Here is a demonstra demonstration,
tion, demonstration, a protest, that all
can join and hail as a
constructive effort and
one that I pledge to
leave: To make the
University of Florida first
in the South and second
to none in the nation.
We will require
reason and logic to be
shown for our policies,
rules and regulations and
we will treat inefficiency
and waste as an evil that
must be rooted and
cured, and obsolescence
as deadwood that must
be removed to make
room for new growth.
- From OConnells
inaguaration address
Oct. 8,1968
IINIIIIHI)HillllilililllinHilllilUilltlllllillllllllllHIIIIIIII



Are Sororities Doomed

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TOM KENNEDY
Prof Says Yes
... Girls Say No!

By JOE ANSON
Alligator Correspondent
Will sororities eventually
vanish from the UF?
Thats a question which is
posed by a recent article in
Trans-action magazine by
University of California Prof.
John Finley Scott.
Scott feels that sororities are
ill-adapted to cope with the
changing moods on todays
campuses, where academic
standards are rising, competition
is keener, and admission
requirements are becoming more
demanding.
He says sorority life conflicts
with studying, keeps noise at a
peak, and affords little privacy
to the members.
Scott also notes that the
number of pledges is dwindling
each year.
Dr. Betty W. Cosby, UF dean
of women and panhellenic
adviser, agrees the percentage of
pledges may be declining but she
attributes the lack of sororities
to accommodate prospective
members and not a lack of
interest as being the reason.
Ideally, there should be a
place in the sorority system for
everyone, she said, but
quotas can only go so high.
In response to Scotts claim
that new chapters are formed,
for the most part, on either new
or low prestige campuses, Dean
Cosby agrees but cites the high
costs of starting a new sorority
at an institution such as UF as
being a key factor.
She considers sorority life to
be no more harmful to
academics than a number of
other time-consuming activities.
Scholarship is one of the
things we always stress, she
said.
Scott also argues that the
arcane rituals so facinating to
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each year.

high school girls, grow tedious
and sophomoric to college
seniors, and labels the old
sorority songs sung at rush and
chapter meetings mortifying.
Carol Still, Alpha Delta Pi
rush chairman and 1967 UF
homecoming queen, admits that
seniors dont usually make the

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best sisters.
Most seniors have what we
call senior slump, she said.
After four years, enthusiasm
dies because the girls are just
simply tired.
No one is hurt from it we
expect it, she said.
Freshmen love the newness
of a sorority and they are our
life blood.
Miss Still, however, took a
different view on the sorority
songs.
If a song is old and still
hangs on, its because we like it
or because it serves a certain
need, she said.
And what needs does the
sorority fulfill?
To Sigma Kappa Karen Hosty
it means having real close
friends.
For Phi Mu Linda Hill, it
means a nice place to live with
people you choose to live with,
and working together toward a
common goal.
It gives you more
individuality youre more of a
person, says Susan Abbott of
Alpha Chi Omega.
Many sisters do prefer the
privacy Scott speaks of.
Mary Amann, a junior college
transfer and a Chi Omega,
prefers living in an apartment.
If I was a freshman or a
sophomore, Id love to live in
the house, she says, but Ive
never lived in a dorm and Im

To Extinction?

used to the privacy.
Miss Amanils roommate,
Brenda Brownig agrees.
Miss Brownig, also a Chi
Omega, says, Im just not used
to community living.

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Tuesday, June 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

She adds that living out of
the house also has other
advantages.
Sometimes you just dont
want to know every little thing
thats going on, she said.

5



6

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 24,1969

The Florida Alligator

i?*t
All
A IMttUM

EDITORIAL
Four Silent Men
For years, UFs huge, multi-million dollar J. Hillis Miller
Health Center has been undermined by a lack of financial
support from Floridas supposedly public-minded
legislature.
Money problems at the medical facility, which is
Floridas largest state-assisted health complex, have gone
from mildly ill to catastrophically diseased.
Now legislative inaction has placed the center in jeopardy
of losing its planned $33 million expansion program, which
would, if ever completed, make it one of the best medical
research and teaching centers in the nation. The $12.7
million in capital outlay, which lawmakers saw fit not to
approve, would have meant an additional $19.7 million in
federal matching money.
The federal money is now gone. Lost to other states,
whose legislators apparently have more guts than ours.
In an almost asinine attempt to appease the citizens of
the Sunshine State, the not-so-bright lawmakers refused to
provide the needed money. They feared voter backlash if
taxes were raised.
Instead, they took the always easy road out by calling for
a referendum bond issue. This leaving it up to the people
is nothing more than a not-so-cleverly disguised passing of
the buck. f
It is obvious the Florida Legislature has forsaken its
responsibilities to the people. Legislators were sent to
Tallahassee to attend to the public welfare. They did not.
The so-called historic session was only that in the sense
that it carried on the fine traditions of penny-pinching
ignorance. It appears the welfare they attended to was their
own.
Not once did any member of the area legislative
delegation voice strong support for the raising of taxes to
gain the money.
Lets take a close quick look at th is districts legislative
delegation. First, theres Bob Fuel-oil Saunders, who was
elected on a Im for the UF-rah, rah, campaign. Then
theres Kenneth Ex-UF fraternity man McKay Jr., who
felt no compunction against using his old frat house as a
home away from home during his campaign. Then, we find
Ralph HangiiT-in-there Turlington, who seems to be the
same man elected ages ago to do nothing. Rounding out the
fearless foursome is Bill I-like-to-talk Andrews, who
uses words like a builder uses cement splat ting them
everywhere.
All we can say is that it is fortunate these men are not
doctors because you cant revive a dead man by changing
physicians.
Time for a change? Yeh!

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V
The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Reddick
Editor-in-Chief
?
Dave Osier
Managing Editor


Margo Cox
Assignments Editor

Al Jensen
News Editor

Life With Gardieff

Stiletto Jabs Radicals

Lately it appears to many
people that the actions of
certain legislators at the state
capitol imply an underlying
hostility towards the university
community.
Admittedly such actions as
proposing the end of tenure in
Floridas universities and
repeatedly cutting the education
budget lend themselves to
misinterpretation. However, it is
at times like these that
understanding is most necessary.
To get the other side of the
argument I went to Tallahasse to
interview State Sen. Dick
Stiletto.
Sen. Stiletto achieved
prominence three months ago
when, on the day following
disclosure of the fact that
extremist professors at
Flodunky U. had assigned then thenclasses
classes thenclasses readings from the works
of Russian author Fyodor
Dostoevsky, he introduced
simultaneously bills into the
Senate calling for replacement of
Flodunky campus police with
two battalions of armed
paratroopers, drafting of
Flodunky student govenment
leaders followed by automatic
court martials and assignments
to Leavenworth, Kan., and
razing of the Flodunky student
union, after which salt would be
plowed into the earth on which
it stood.
My first question put the
problem to Sen. Stiletto rather
bluntly.
Senator, is it true that you
feel deep seated antagonisms
toward the university
community?
The senator nearly bit his
cigar in half.
Absolutely not. Where on
earth could such an asinine,
libelous slur have originated?
Ive always looked upon myself
as a champion of higher
education.
Well senator, I believe some
people may have misinterpreted
those bills you intorduced about
three months ago after the
Dostoevsky controversy.

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Those bills were aimed at
left-wing extremists attempting
to take over Flodunky U., not at
the university itself. The
students dont realize where
academic freedom would go it
those nuts were to take over.
Are you familiar with the
author in question, senator?
I sure am, son. Ive read all
his works. Wasnt he that fellow
living in London with Marx?
No, senator, he died before
Marxs time.
Well then its obvious where
Marx got his ideas from.
Senator, when your
argument is obviously with the
professor why did you also
propose steps to be taken against
student leaders?
Because most of them are
cheap politicians who dont
represent the student body any
more than I do. If they werent
working with thos extremist
professors this situation never
could have developed. They
could have forced the professors
to have used decent American
literature if they had wanted
to.
For instance?
Zane Grey, Earl Stanley
Gardner, Charles Schultz. Thats
what.
l

Alligator Staff
... .. .
Mary Joomey Darcy Meeker Marcia Baker
ditorial Assistant Campus Living Editor Copy Editor
blished by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz
Union. Phone 392-1681 or 392-1683.
or oHhewriter* P f r^?f ed in the ,-, orida Alligator are those of the editors
o the article and not those of the University of Florida.

By Leslie Gardieff

Senator, to vary the subject
a little could I ask you why,
when the universities in this
state are in such desperate need
of financial aid, you voted
against increased appropriations
for them?
Let me state just once more
that I feel no quarrel with the
universities as such. I just felt
the universities would get the
most benefit from the states
limited resources if the
legislators were given a good
healthy raise.
Would you care to clarify
that statement?
Certainly. Bettor education
will only come through better
legislation. Well never get better
legislation unless we get rid of
the cheap politicians in our
midst. That will only happen if
we offer decent salaries.
Im sorry to rush off now
but if youd like, son, we can
continue this interview next
week.
Next week?
Yes. You see with the
miserable salary Im paid now I
have to take a week off now and
then to attend to my business.
Oh, what type of business do
you have?
I have the largest used car lot
in my county.



d
J
Extinct Hero
Died Amidst
Unfelt Revolt

SDS Film Termed Obscene

MR. EDITOR:
An open letter to UF President Stephen C.
OConnell:
The May 29 edition of the Alligator reported
that the UF Student Government sponsored a
function of the Students For a Democratic Society
at the University Auditorium. This function,
described as educational consisted of two films.
The first film, entitled Now was produced in
Cuba and presented a capsule view of black
oppression with many scenes of police brutality.
The second, Blade Liberation Movement, is a
Black Panther propaganda film which fades out
after an obscene statement is uttered.
These films appear to be obscene, racist,
anti-intellectual arid communist produced. They

Defending Newspapers May Be Lost Cause

MR. EDITOR:
A Marxist friend has once
more, in good faith, published
his many grievances against the
newspapers, and I must admit
that I am tempted to hop onto
the same bandwagon and
preach the gospel.
Indeed, one does find the

Os Joy And Grace:
Graduation Time I
MR. EDITOR: I
What an exciting event it will be. As the President tips his
mortarboard in recognition of the degree having been conferred,
lift your tassel from right to left* and when applause subsides,
be seated.'*
This is just one example of the fine planning that went into
this years Commencement Convocation as quoted in the I
commencement instructional sheet. The tremendous amount of I
recognition 111 receive standing there amongst my fellow
colleagues is a memory to behold.
The pageantry of sitting in the hot sun, listening to a guest
lecturer will be remembered for years to come. And Im sure the
Mack cape will be comfortable. But then what can you expect I
from a sls rental. At least the color will pacify the radicals and
maybe Ill even hold up my fist, so my parents can find me.
The coordinator told me I could keep the tassel and the I
diploma too. It only costs $lO, and I cant wait to show it to
my parents when it arrives in the mail.
Speaking of the mail, I had to write and tell my parents not
to come early. You see, the announcements said 4 pjn., but it
really doesn't start until 5.
I explained that a big important university like Florida
sometimes overlooks the minute details. Anyway it was only a I
quarter a card mistake, so Im just glad they got the date right. I
My cousin is graduating from Auburn and he said they re
having a fun commencement too. Os course that didn t impress I
me any since theirs is going to be indoors and they don t even
have a guest speaker.
He said that they're devoting the entire time to the awarding
of a record 1,403 degrees. When I told him about ours, he
chuckled.
MICHAEL SMITH I

MR EDITOR-
Capitalism is a myth. We no longer have a system where a mans
wealth makes him economically important. The old capitalist the
hero or archfiend, depending upon whether you read Nixons speeches
or Mao is extinct. He died in an unfelt revolution begun by Henry
Ford and terminated in the Roosevelt era.
We have what is called a mixed economy where both government
and private interests play major roles. In both, decisions are made by
management or administrators. Big corporations make the big
decisions and are managed by hired professionals who draw top wages
for long hours under heavy pressure.
Under capitalism, motives were to simply maximize profits. Now
the system is more complex. Executives are motivated to maximize
the security and prestige of their positions. However, most decisions
are usually made at lower levels by managers who may be merely
trying to minimize headaches and ulcers.
At any rate, the results form a pattern we may call productionism.
Mass production, mass advertising, mass sales, and mass consumption
result. Success is measured by an increase in output or sales. It is very
materialistic.
Two conflicting situations occur. High levels of production demand

intellectual standards of, say, the
Orlando Sentinel to be no higher
than the highest key of the
loudest piano of the bawdiest
whorehouse in Damnation or
Orlando, but that is nothing.
And to say that even the St.
Petersburg Times does not
participate wholeheartedly and
liberally in the Marcusian
framework of repressive
tolerance would sound

have no more place in an academic setting than a Ku
Klux Klan rally.
I find it shocking and shameful that the
university is a partner to this kind of hate.
The universities of today are in danger of being
destroyed by anarchy and racism. Efforts to
preserve the integrity of the university against this
onslaught are indeed difficult; but they become
impossible when the university itself joins forces
with these agencies of hate and destruction.
I must protest this and I strongly urge you to
adopt a policy which will bring about the rule of
law and reason to the University Campus.
LEWIS KAPNER,
JUDGE, PALM BEACH COUNTY

emphatically bourgeoisie. But at
the risk of losing my intellectual
credibility and all my Marxist
friends,here I sit, serene, content
and delighted; wrapped up neat
as a fish, enjoying the Gainesville
Sun.
Fool, you say! Petty
bourgeoisie! Capitalist! Yes, ail
true. Here I sit. With my
Gainesville Sun, at ease in Zion.
What is my excuse? Am I, like
Oscar Wilde, reading this paper,
as a learned man might say to
keep in touch with the ignorance
of the community? Yes and No.
I am here, you might say, to
keep in touch with myself, fori
submit, there is no vehicle on
earth save a newspaper to assure
a man that he is not the only
poor imbecile on this
ferris-wheel; there are other
idiots who have bought tickets
for this gaudy, unintelligible,
and detightbul circus. When one
thinks of all the stupendous
treachery, the knavery, the
preposterous charlatanry, the
scandalous idiocy, the
uproarious comedy, and the
terrifying and beautiful drudgery
of daily existence, one can only
think of a newspaper where it
is all documented before the
baked iris if one is willing to
see.
Os course, not all of it may
appeal. Page 1A headline reads,
for instance, NO NEW TAXES
AHEAD SPEAKER SCHULTZ
SAYS. It sits fine with me. No
need to read the story.
VATICAN EDITORIAL SAYS
SAINTS NOT ABOLISHED.
Keen. Here is the colossal theme,
the classic instance of erasure of
Holy Writ. I shall read this story
with a chuckle, wondering if
there wasnt a picture of St.
Christopher on my mazzuzzah
and should I have it removed?

W*:*:*:*?:*
effort and investment which justify inequality of wages and high
returns to savings. However, high levels of consumption require that
purchasing power be spread more evenly among people. A negative
income tax is likely to become law not because of concern for poverty
but because it will be necessary to stimulate the consumption of
ever-increasing output.
The American worker is highly productive. The fact that he has
good tools and equipment to work with, makes him worth more. His
earnings are increased no matter who owns the other resources.
The conflict is over distribution of output. It is human nature for
everybody to want his share increased. Minority groups, especially
those people involuntarily unemployed or underemployed have
legitimate complaints mainly that they have been left outside the
system.
The weakness of the system is not in the existence of idle rich but
rather in the fact that the imposed sales-oriented psychology generates
dissatisfaction well in advance of political readjustments affecting
family incomes.
Know what you are revolting against; otherwise you will merely be
revolting.
JOHN L.BIEBER7AG

IllllllllllllllllillllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUllllllUlllllin
The Universities of
today are in danger of
being destroyed by
anarchy and racism.
Efforts to preserve the
integrity of the
University against this
onslaught are indeed
difficult; but they
become impossible when
the University itself joins
forces with these agencies
of hate and destruction.
nMuninniiniiiiHiiiHiiiiiiiiinininuniiiiiiiuiiii

So even the church is quite
human.
Ah, yes. ETHICAL REFORM
POSES DOUBLE STANDARD.
What does it mean? The headline
is so ambiguous, I am forced to
read the story. (Here is a lesson
for JM 301 students.) Does it
come as a blow 4o me my
congressman is a disingenuous,
sniveling, incompetent shyster?
Am I shocked he lies to me? Not
on your life! If you have read
H.L. Menckens Notes On
Democracy, you expect to
delight in such revelations. If
Democracy is a sham and a
fraud, then by golly, look to the
crooks who mn the show. Its
Riverville with The Duke and
the Dauphin at large. Ah, well.
CCC YEAR OVERALL
SUCCESS. Members of the
Coordinating Council of
Concern were told their first
year had been one of some
frustration and despair, but
overall had been a success.
There you have the sum total of
human endeavor the story of
mankind in brief. Thousands of
years of thousands of
committees of millions of people
with concern. Frustration and
despair, but we keep moving on.
How long?
Here is a gaffer. HURRIED
CHANGES INSTITUTED TO
AVOID PROTESTS. Another

LETTERS POLICY
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters must be typed
signed and double-spaced and should not exceed 300 words in
length. A writers name may be withheld from publication only
if he shows just cause. No letters signed with a pseudonym will
be accepted for publication. The editor reserves the right to edit
all letters in the interest of space. Addresses and telephone
numbers must accompany all letters.

Tuwday, Jura 24,1909, The Florida ARkpetor,

clear, precise, headline. What
does it really say? This
newspaper is tricky. You are
forced to read the stories, the
headlines are murky. It seems as
if colleges are finally realizing
students exist. Its about time.
I suppose even Marcuse would
be pleased to see once more that
the fruits of revolt are often
sweet. But Max Lemer admits a
sense of futility in trying to
speak with the young radicals
and would rather see change
come peacefully. Lemer,
ironically, puts some trust in the
radicals. The Marxists put no
trust in Lemer. Who is right? It
surely is a puzzle.
And certainly THE
WEATHER. Generally fair
through Monday. Low 50s, high
80*s. A range that will suit even
an Eskimo! Its a good day to
101 l around Wauburg with your
best girl.
But, then you see, we are only
on the first page.
Perhaps the Marxists are right
in saying the papers are the tools
of the capitalists. And all news is
not good news. Nevertheless, I
would like to add this corollary:
If a person cannot read the
daily newspaper with
amusement, empathy and
concern then he must be
suffering from a special
blindness.
MICHAEL ABRAMS

e

7



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CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-155-C)
FOR RENT $
TWO bedroom apartment furnished.
Reduced summer rates. $77.50 per
month. Airconditioned. Very near
campus. No car needed. Call Mr. or
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(B-10t-145-P)
GUYS & GALS economicl living
CLO has gone co-ed for the summer
S6O/mon. Room & meals peace, love
and freedom, 1 blk from campus
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Economical living for male students 1
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members summer & fall vacancies
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Room with private bath in home
with elderly widow in exchange for
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Good typing essential, shorthand
helpful. Excellent pay for qualified
person. Send resume to PiO. Box
14038, Gainesville or call 462-2599.
(E-5M50-P)

8

t, T}he Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 24, 1969

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Please adopt gold and white kittens.
Healthy and playful. Adorable. Call
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SERVICES
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Orange and

address all campus calendar
notices to public functions
OFFICE, FLORIDA UNION

Campus
Calendar
Wednesday, June 25
Speleological Society, 346
Union, 7 p.m.
University Films Committee
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7 p.m.
University Film Series, Film,
"Playground," Union Aud., 7
& 9 p.m.
Thursday, June 26
Christian Scientists Meeting, 357
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Friday, June 27
Union Movie, "Harper," Union
Aud., 7 & 9 p.m.
Union Dance, Union Terrace,
"The Certain Amount," 9
p.m.

FIRST PROGRAM OF THE SUMMER SERIES!
TU TiA Qbh/MA '69
phlAlM/fo
iPLAYGROUND
-Oj dhtoMOu
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 25-7:00 and 9:00p.m.
union admission
AUDITORIUM 254
"SHE DONE HIM WRONG
also introducing CAYGANT
BHHMMukvL
"" i .
OTHER SUMMER SERIES FILMS:
"BIG BROADCAST OF 1938" with W.C. FIELDS and 808 HOPE VON STERNBERG'S 'THE
BLUE ANGEL" with MARLENE DIETRICH "RASPUTIN AND THE EMPRESS" with ALL of the
BARRYMORES MAE WEST AGAIN! in "BELLE OF THE NINETIES
. .AND MORE!!! ~

GAINESVILLE FLOTS^^ FEDERAL CREDIT UNION A A
sth Avonuo at lha cotnot ol I2lh straat Hqttfti.-00o.ai. 3:30p-. Monday through Friday ~

SUMMER QUARTER
LOANS: Students who have
been approved for loan releases
for the summer quarter can
obtain their money at the
Student Depository in the Hub
as soon as they have registered
and received the fee cards.
OVERSEAS STUDY
CENTER: Applications are
being considered for the Florida
State University Overseas Study
Center, Florence, Italy, for the
1970 winter and spring quarters.
The center offers a humanities
oriented program with courses in
art history, classical languages,
literature and civilization,
English, Italian, history,
philosophy and religion. To be
eligible, must be
registered in a university of the
State University System, have a
sophomore standing, a 2.0
overall academic average and one
quarter's study in Italian before
departure. Cost is $1,675 for
Floridians and $2,125 for
out-of-state students. The fee
covers round-trip air
transportation for New York,
room and board, tuition,
medical care and sponsored
excursion trips. Students may

BLUE BULLETIN

Administrative Notices

request applications and
information from Dr. Wayne C.
Minnick, 212 Williams Building,
Florida State University.
THE UNIVERSITY SENATE
will meet Thursday, June 26 at
3:30 p.m. in McCarty
Auditorium. The following items
are on the agenda:
Action Items
1. Proposed New Curriculum
for the College of Medicine
2. Proposed House Staff and
Clinical Fellowship Programs for
the College of Medicine
3. Proposed Reduction in
Credit Hours Required for the
Bachelor of Science in Nursing
Degree
4. Proposals Concerning
Required Physical Education
5. From the Committee on
Professional Relations and
Standards: A Resolution on
Tenure.
STUDENT UNREST
PROVISIONS Department of
Labor, and Health, Education
and Welfare Appropriation Act,
1969.
LAWS AND DISSENT:
Recent Federal laws have been

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

enacted to deal with campus
unrest and disruptions. These
laws provide for withholding
Federal monies from students
who violate criminal statutes.
The following are the provisions:
SEC 411. P.L. 90-557. No
part of the funds appropriated
under this Act shall be used to
provide a loan, guarantee of a
loan or a grant to any applicant
who has been convicted by any
court of general jurisdiction of
any crime which involves the use
of or the assistance to others in
the use of force, trespass or the
seizure of property under
control of an institution of
higher education to prevent
officials or students at such an
institution from engaging in
their duties or pursuing their
studies.
HIGHER EDUCATION
AMENDMENTS OF 1968
Eligibility for Student
Assistance
SEC 504. P.L. 90-575 (a) If
an institution of higher
education determines, after
affording notice and
opportunity for hearing to an
individual attending, or
employed by, such institution,
that such individual has been
convicted by any court of record
of any crime which was
committed after the date of
enactment of this Act and which
involved the use of (or assistance
to others in the use of) force,
disruption, or the seizure of
property under control of any
institution of higher education
to prevent officials or students
in such institution from engaging
in their duties or pursuing their
studies, and that such crime was
of a serious nature and
contributed to a substantial
disruption of the'administration
of the institution with respect to
which such crime was committed
then the institution which such
individual attends, or is
employed by, shall deny for a
period of two years any further
payment to, or for the direct
benefit of, such individual under
any of the programs specified in
subsection (c). If an institution
denies an individual assistance
under the authority of the
preceding sentence of this
subsection, then any institution
which such individual
subsequently attends shall deny
for the remainder of the
two-year period any further
payment to, or for the direct
benefit of, such individual under
any of the programs specified in

Tuesday, June 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

subsection (c).
(b) If an institution of higher
education determines, after
affording notice and
opportunity for hearing to an
individual attending, or
employed by, such institution,
that such individual has willfully
refused to obey a lawful
regulation or order of such
institution after the date of
enactment of this Act, and that
such refusal was of a serious
nature and contributed to a
substantial disruption of the
administration of such
institution, then such institution
shall deny, for a period of two
years, any further payment to,
or for the direct benefit of, such
individual under any of the
programs specified in subsection
(c).
(c) The programs referred to
in subsection (a) and (b) are as
follows;
(1) The student loan
program under title II of the
National Defense Education Act
of 1958.
(2) The educational
opportunity grant program
under part A of title IV of the
Higher Education Act of 1965.
(3) The student loan
insurance program under part B
of title IV of the Higher
Education Act of 1965.
(4) The college work-study
program under part C of title IV
of the Higher Education Act of
1965.
(5) Any fellowship program
carried on under title 11, 111 or V
of the Higher Education Act of
1965 or title IV or VI of the
National Defense Education Act
of 1958.
(d) (1) Nothing in this Act,
or any Act amended by this Act,
shall be construed to prohibit
any institution of higher
education from refusing to
award continue, or extend any
financial assistance under any
such Act to any individual
because of any misconduct
which in its judgment bears
adversely on his fitness for such
assistance.
(2) Nothing in this section
shall be construed as limiting or
prejudicing the rights and
prerogatives of any institution of
higher education to institute and
carry out an independent
disciplinary proceeding pursuant
to existing authority, practice,
and law.
(3) Nothing in this section
shall be construed to limit the
freedom of any student to verbal
expression of individual views or
opinions.

9



10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 24,1968

By DARCY MEEKER
Campus Living Editor
Nanami, playing at the State
Theater, is Japans entry in the
Berlin Film Festival. It is fairly
incomprehensible and its
technical tricks stick out on it
like sore thumbs.
The photography is
deliberately amateurish over overexposures,
exposures, overexposures, underexposures,
pictures jumping up and down as
though the camera was being
carried by a cripple, stills made
up to look like old photographs,
and in general a grainy quality of
picture which calls attention to
the fact that this is only a movie
after all. Perhaps the makers of
Nanami sought a certain
credulity-by-association by
making the quality %of
photography correspond roughly
to old newsreels. One scene had
nice, professional and dramatic
photography: a bunch of women
making love to each other,
flagellating each other, strangling
each other, and such, for money
the voyeurs with cameras have
paid them.
Nanami, the female romantic
lead, was hired to be in these
revelries from a nude studio,
where a lot of women sit around
unappetizingly naked, breasts
flopping down over rolls of
slouched fat. Even Nanami, who
is not slovenly, is not sexy. She
displays the same lack of sexual
awareness as the other
Movie Times
Center I Winning with Paul
Newman. Widely acclaimed but
a worn out story about a
winning race driver and his
losing life. 1, 3:05, 5:10, 7:12,
9:25.
Stretched out TV fare with
bland faced TV actors. 4:02,
7:46. Play Dirty with Michael
Caine and adolescently cynical
crew. Covers, with out of
character behavior, the stupidity
of war. 2,5:41,9:32.
Florida Goodbye Columbus
with Richard Benjamin. 1:30,
3:30,5:30,7:30,9:30.
Plaza n Baby Love with
Ann Lynn, Keith Baron, Diana
Dors. 2:15, 4:08, 6:01, 7:57,
9:53.
Plaza I, Tues. Guns of the
Magnificent Seven with Arthur
Kennedy. 1:42, 3:40, 5:38,
7:39,9:40.
Wednesday April Fools
with Jack Lemmon and
Catherine Deneuve.
State Nanami, 3,5,7,9.
Pinter Play
Auditions
Harold Pinters The Birthday
Party will be the Florida Players*
summer production. James
Lauricella, who directed After
the Rain this year, will direct the
absurdist comedy.
Scripts can be read in room
363 of the Arts & Sciences
Building. Auditions for four
male and two female roles will
be Wednesday and Thursday at 7
pjn. in Constans Theatre.
The plays production
meeting will be Tuesday, July 1,
at 7:30 pjn. in Constans
Theatre. Those who would like f
to work on lighting, publicity,
construction, and technical et
cetefaisWill be r welcome. *

Movie Review:lnferno Os Non-Love

women theres nothing
interesting about being naked.
The focus of the story is
16-or-so-year-old Shuns
confusion over his sexual
identity. Shun and Nanami meet
and decide to go to bed
together, which they do without
success. Then they try again, but
Shun cant do it; he rolls away
to laugh into the pillow.
Later Shim visits his little
girlfriend, Momi, who is about
three-years-old and hangs around
in a graveyard. They have a
running-laughing scene, like in
Elvira Madigan and deodorant
commercials. Then Shun takes
Momi into a secluded place and
pulls up her skirt. Some men see
him and chase him and catch
him so he has to go to the
psychiatrist. Before Shun is
hypnotized, the psychiatrist
turns into a dog once, and

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ESS 1§3]83

occasional canine panting is on
the sound track.
When Shun is under hypnosis,
we get to see his father make
love to him as a little boy, and
then Shuns real mother
(presumably) give him a juicy
long sexy kiss. All this mental
stuff is going on on a screen
Shuns supposed to see before his
eyes. Smoke rolls and billows
across the screen, making it
difficult to see and follow the
fragments. In the background
are the sounds of something
thick bubbling.
Afterwards, we get to see
Shun masturbate, and watch his
father watch him. For the
voyeur voyeurs in the audience.
The next morning Shun
rejects his fathers advances. It
appears Shun is beginning to
grasp his sexual identity. But, of

course, happy endings arent
profound. As Nanami stands
looking at the disaster, the
sound track takes up a happy
humming tune, like A Man and
a Woman but more overtly
joyous.
The story line is hard to
trace, and the time sequence
isnt clear. Both these points are

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bad enough to make against a
movie, but the tricky technical
stuff which makes it exceedingly
difficult to understand what is
on the screen, the
incomprehensible juxtapositions
of music and content, can only
be deliberate obfuscations, an
actual attempt at being hard to
understand. McLuhan fans
should like it.



I Gators To Defend NCAA Golf Crown

Dirk Mosig Wins At
Karate Grand Nationals

Dirk Mosig and a small
group of students of
Universal Karate Doio drove
23 hours to Kansas City to
compete in the U.S. Karate
Association Open Grand
National Karate
Championships, held on June
15.
June 14, national
aw ards were presented to the
top four champions in each
of the divisions (Black Belt,
Brown Belt, Colored Belt,
Women Juniors). Awards to
the Best National Champions
of the Year were given to the
competitors who
accumulated the most First
Places during the preceeding
year.
Mosig and four other UF
students qualified for such
awards. Mosig earned the title
for fourth place in Black Belt
Sparring; he also won the
award for Third Place in
Blade Belt Kata. Steve
Leonard qualified for Second
Place in the Brown Belt Kata,
while Dan Fryer, a Florida
Frosh currently with the
Coast Guard, took Second
Place in Brown Belt Sparring.
Dave Corson took Third
Place in Colored Belt Kata,

Jackson On Streak

NEW YORK Reggie
Jacksons just a kid. Hes just
trying to find himself. When he
does, hes really going to be
something.
So said Bob Kennedy, former
manager of the Oakland
Athletics streaking young
outfielder, in an article in the
current issue of Sport magazine.
. ~.id Kennedys appraisal was
certainly justified during a
recent three-game week-end in
Boston when Reggie exploded
for nine hits, including four
home runs and a total of 29
bases, resulting in 15 runs batted
in. n the middle game of the
series, Jackson went 5-for-6 with
a near-record 10 RBIs.
In the article, appropriately
titled, Reggie Jackson, Hot and
Cold, Reggies maddening
inconsistencies are accurately
described. Overall, last season
Jackson showed tremendous
promice with a .250 batting
average, 29 home runs and 74
runs batted in. But he also
struck out 171 times, just four
less than the record.
In the field, according to the
article, Reggie made some
sparkling catches and throws,
but also got hit on the head with
one flyball, misjudged others
and threw some balls into the
stands.
But this year, with added
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DIRK MOSIG
while Ed Nevared, a Florida
Alumnus, qualified for
Second Place in Colored Belt
Sparring. Nick Nicosia, who
earned Fourth Place in
Colored Belt Sparring, could
not attend, and was thus
unable to win, as his presence
was mandatory.
Mosig also earned the title
of Best Karate Coach of the
Year, bringing home the
coveted 5-foot trophy.

experience and maturity,
Jacksons bad periods are
shortening and his hot streaks
are lengthening. He has joined
the league leaders in RBIs and
home runs and most experts
expect him to stay right there.

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Melnyk, Darr Lead Strong Team

The Gator Golf Team
journeyed to Colorado Springs
seeking their second consecutive
NCAA title when they tee-off in
the five day tournament on the
famous Broadmoor course this
week.
Led by seniors Steve Melnyk
and John Darr, the Gators hope
to defend the title they won last
year in Las Cruces, N.M. Both
Melnyk and Darr earned
All-American honors last year.
Melnyk, a senior from
Brunswick, Ga., tied two NCAA
records during the 1969 season
as he led the Gators to a 9-1
record and five tournament
victories.
The 6-1, 230-pound Business
major, tied records when he won
five consecutive major
tournaments and added a total
of eight major career victoried to
his credit. He captured
individual honors at the Senior
Bowl, Florida Intercollegiate,
Miami Invitational, Gulf
American, and the Houston
All-American.
Darr, who hails from Fort
Lauderdale, was the highest
Gator finisher last season at the
NCAA, capturing fourth.
Richard Spears, a member of
last years winning team, will
make the trip along with Melnyk
and Darr. The other two spots
on the five-man team go to
junior Ron Mahood and frosh
star Andy North.
Floridas five man team
averages were: Melnyk 71.7;
Darr, 75.4; Spears, 75.4, North,
75.5, and Mahood, 76.1.
Our boys are looking
forward to defending their
NCAA title, says Coach Buster
Bishop. We have worked very
hard to reach the top of the

Send data for as many
persons as you wish.
Commentary on
compatability if requested,
$2 extra.

ladder and with dedication and a
great effort on the part of our
team, we hope to stay on top.
The Gators won the Senior
Bowl, Florida Intercollegiate,
Miami Invitational, Gulf
American Classic, and the Pike
Peak Invitational. They took
second in the SEC and third in
the Houston All-American.

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Tuesday, June 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

We are familiar with the
course and most of the teams
well bace, added Biship. We
have played against most
competition except Southern
Cal, Stanford, and Wake
Forest.
With Melnyk and Darr leading
the way, Bishop hopes to bring
back Floridas second straight
NCAA crown.

11



12

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, June 24,1969

Norm Carlson, Ray Daniel
Assume New Athletic Posts

UF Director of Athletics Ray Graves announced
Saturday the appointment of Ray Daniel as Business
Manager of Athletics.
Percy Beard, assistant director of athletics since
1960, remains in that capacity and will serve as
coordinator of spring sports and director of physical
plant for the athletic department.
We need concentrated attention on care of
athletic facilities, Graves said. Our physical plant,
including golf course, Florida Field, Yon Hall and
its training table, athletic and intramural fields have
expanded as our program has grown.
In addition, in reorganizing his athletic staff,
Graves promoted Norm Carlson from Sports
Publicity Director to Assistant Director of Athletics.
Norm will continue to head our overall public
relations program, which I consider to be one of the
most vital areas of our operation, said Graves. He
will work with football publicity and promotion
and be involved in all areas of our total program.
Daniel, 32, is currently vice president of the

Tonto Coleman: Looking Over
The Current SEC Commissioner

As part of a series on SEC
happenings, the Alligator
introduces the Commissioner of
the Conference, Arthur
Coleman.
Coleman, affectionately
known as Tonto coast to
coast, is in his fourth year as
Commissioner of the
Southeastern Conference. He
was elected to succeed the late
Bemie Moore by unanimous
vote of the presidents Jan. 28,
1966, and assumed office April
1 of that year.
Since graduation from
Abilene Christian College in
1928, 8.A., English major, a
three-sport letterman with
membership in Blue Key and Phi
Kappa Phi, his life has been
teaching, coaching and
administering athletics. In 1966
his alma mater honored Tonto
as Alumnus-of-the-Y ear.
Bom at Phil Campbell, Ala.,
then reared at Roscoe, Texas,
where his family moved when he
was 12, the commissioner
returned to the SEC area in
1950 as an assistant coach to
Bob Woodruff when Woodruff
resigned as head coach at Baylor
and accepted that position at
UF. He had coached in Texas
high schools for ten years, then
at Abilene Christian for nine,
where he was conference
coach-of-the-year in 1948,
overlapping three years in the
Air Force, where he helped
coach Randolph Field to the
service teams championship. In
1952 Coleman transferred from
UF to Georgia Tech and served
14 years as assistant football
coach and assistant athletic
director before the SEC tapped
him for the commissionership.
Tonto is dedicated to the
proposition that competitive
athletics are a sound
complement to the formal
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376-4552 AVrHOKagD
DEALER
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education of youth. He works
constantly on refinement of the
compatibility of teaching on the
field with teaching in the
classroom. He is a speaker of
national repute and has no peer
as a master of ceremonies.
Coleman is married to his
campus sweetheart, the former
Ann Arnold of Abilene, and
they have two married
daughters, Kay and Nancy, both
ACC graduates teaching in

OPEN
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Mon. thru Fri.
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave
VIRGINS I
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TONITE BPM TILL
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THIRSTY

Pinellas Central Bank and Trust Company of Largo,
Florida. He has been in the banking field the past
nine years, serving with four different member
banks of the First Florida Bancorporation. A native
of Haines City, Daniel is a 1958 graduate of Florida
with a BSBA Degree in Banking and Finance.
Carlson, also a UF graduate with a BSBA Degree
in Insurance-Real Estate, has been in charge of the
Gator Sports Publicity Department since 1963 and
Director of Athletic Public Relations since 1967.
Beard has been with the UF athletic department
since 1936 and at times has served as Head Track
Coach, Business Manager and General Manager of
Athletics and Assistant Director of Athletics.
The operation of our department has become so
complex and far-reaching in recent years that it is
now necessary to further delegate authority and
responsibility in key administrative areas, Graves
said. This is progress and we are fortunate in
having capable people to fill these positions.
All changes are effective July 1.

Texas, and a grandson, Michael
Skelton, now 2 years old.
Tonto underwent major
surgery April 11, by which an
obstruction of the lower colon
was corrected. There was no
malignancy, and he is fully
recovered. He returned to the
office May 12, continuing the
duty as commissioner in his
regular manner, described by the
Conference at the 1969 annual
meeting as excellent.

Sports Shorts
Gators finished sixth in NCAA Tennis tourney, as the doubles
team bowed out in Saturday competition. USC easily won,
followed by UCLA, Trinity, Tex., Rice, and Miami of Florida.
* *
Ron Jourdan jumped 7-1 to take third place in the NCAA
Track and Field Championships. His 6 points for placing put
Florida in a tie for 25 th. *
Duplicate Bridge begins anew tonight in Reitz Union 150-C.
Plans are underway to begin a novice program, and if interest
develops, a regular Thursday night game.
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