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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
68-69 Academic Year Becomes History

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
and
DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
The year is over, and it is a
time for reflection.
The academic year started
with a bang, when Maj. Russell
Ramsey resigned as chairman ,qf
the UFs young Action
Conference. His resignation was
sparked by an Army
investigation called for by Rep.
Bob Sikes (D-Fla.) who said he
had gotten letters calling the
group un-American, and
hippy-oriented.
The first week of classes also
saw the announcement that
tuition would be upped another
$25 to make it $l5O a term for
undergraduates from Florida.
The initial week was topped
off by the joining of about half
of the members of Forward

PiomAir
All-American

Vol 61, No. 153

Med Center Growth Unsure

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
TALLAHASSEE The
planned $33 million expansion
program for UFs J. Hillis Miller
Health Center may not start in
September as scheduled unless
the Florida Legislature takes
action before the current session
ends.
The session adjourns today at
4 p.m. The state must come up
with $12.7 million in matching
funds for the program, which
includes the new College of
Dentistry, to become reality
with a federal grant of $19.7
million.
The state portion of the
expansion program is included in
proposed legislative
appropriations amounting to
s7l million in capital outlay,
which are matching funds for
federally-sponsored state
educational, mental health and
medical construction projects.
But House Speaker Fred
Schultz and Senate President
John Mathews said Thursday
chances for any major bond or
revenue program in the dying
hours of this session are
unlikely.
Gov. Claude Kirk called on
the legislature to fund the
capital outlay funds along with a
$6.4 billion road program before
it adjourns, hinting he might
otherwise have to veto items in
the $1,092 billion state budget.
Schultz said he would oppose
extending the current session
beyond today, but that a special
session in the next two, three
or four weeks'* is entirely
possible if the lawmakers can
agree in the meantime on a
direction.
Senate Finance Chairman
Lawton Chiles, D-Lake land,
(SEE WED* PAGE 2)
C U v:tJJl.> -I !-1

Party and all of United-First, the
main political parties on campus.
On Sept. 30, the UF chapter
of -Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) said they would
request a charter from the
university.

The
Florida Alligator

LEGISLATURE MUST ACT TODAY

- . if
'fi
J. HILLIS MILLER HEALTH CENTER MAY NOT EXPAND
... unless state provides federal matching funds
Five HC Positions Named

Honor Court Chancellor Craig Lawrence
Thursday announced five new appointments to
Honor Court positions.
The new clerk will be Janet Messing, a sophomore
in Business Administration. She has worked this
year with the Student Center Action Team (SCAT).
The cleric, formerly an elected official, became an
appointed post when the new student body
constitution was adopted last year. Mias Messing is
the first clerk to be appointed under the
change-over of procedure.
Johnny DuPont will be the new bailiff. He has
worked this year as an Honor Court Justice and will

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Many students now receiving National Defense Education Act loans
may be in for a surprise when they are notified of their awards for
next year.
The federal government has cut NDEA loans nationally for the
third year in a row, cutting UF's portion by SIOO,OOO for the next
academic year, said Ira D. Turner, director of Student Financial Aid.
We have lost over $320,000 in three years' time, he said. This is
in federal capital contribution. Add to this the one-tenth which we
match it with, and that amounts to over $350,000.*'
Turner said this will result in a substantial number of students not
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STEPHEN O'CONNELL, MAJ. RUSSELL RAMSEY, CHARLES SHEPHERD
... controversial figures on UF campus during past academic year

University of Florida, Gainesville

FLORIDA NDEA SCHOLARS LOSE SIOO,OOO
Federal Government Cuts Loans

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The group soon added the
name Southern Student
Organizing Committee (SSOC)
to their title, and then dropped
the SDS name.
On Oct. 7, Stephen C.
OConnell was officially

be working with Lawrence this summer on
promoting Honor Court and the Honor System
during freshman orientation.
Lawrence said he will cross-train the two
appointees so that each will be able to handle the
other's job if necessary.
The summer clerk will be Sam Watts, a transfer
from Dade Junior College, where he was an
associate justice of the Honor Court.
Attorney General is Alan Greer, a senior law
student. He is a member of the Moot Court team
and Law Review.
Jeff Barker is the chief defense counsel.

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inaugurated as the sixth
president of the university. The
new president became the first
UF grad to hold the office.
In his address, OConnell
pledged to make the university
first in the South and second to

Friday, June 6, 1969

receiving loans who would have gotten them if the money had not
been cut.
The responsibility for the cuts lies with Congress, not the state or
UF. Last year Congress appropriated $192 million nationally for
NDEA loans, but for this year they dropped the figure S4O million to
SISS million.
Another problem is that the program has been opened to new
junior colleges and new four-year colleges, giving a smaller share of the
total appropriations to UF.
"The real problem is that our Congressmen failed to respond to our
requests for more money,** Turner said.
Continued cuts by Congress could be disastrous. Said Turner,
We*d be out of business if they kept this up for about four more
years. .....
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America's
Number 1
College
Daily

none in the nation.
On Oct. 14, Union Board
President Roger Brown filed a
civil complaint in Honor Court
asking the court to issue an
injunction staying the election
for four posts.
The election went on though,
with Bob White winning by a 2-1
margin.
A week later, another
ingredient was added to
Gatorade, a drink invented by
Dr. Robert Cade, a UF
professor. The ingredient was
controversy. The federal
government, through the
Department of Health,
Education and Welfare, said it
had rights to the drink and
would demand the money.
Sometime during the weekend
of Oct. 26, about $2,000 worth
of stereo equipment was taken
from the library by someone
who hid in the building after
closing.
On Nov. 4, the Honor Court
overthrew the Union Board
election on the grounds that the
Student Senate overstepped its
bounds when it called for an
election.
On the next day, the Alligator
carried a story about birth
control pills being dispensed at
the infirmary. The story, by
Sydney Frasca, told how she fiad
been able to get a prescription
for the pills. The story was to
become one of the most
controversial in the history of
the paper, because of student
and administration reaction.
Nov. 5 was national election
day, and UF radicals planned an
apolitical rally for election night.
An unidentified man burned a
small American flag, and another
put to flames what appeared to
be a draft card.
On the night of Nov. 18, two
Alligator staffers hid in the
library, in the same place the
person had earlier hid before
stealing the stereo equipment.
The apparent gag was carried
through to show that no
attempts had been made to
secure the building after the
theft.
The next day, Samuel F.
Martin resigned as provost of the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center,
saying our relations with
Tallahassee was one of the
reasons for his leaving.
The major story of the first
edition of the winter Alligator
was that Lester Hale, vice
president for student affairs, had
ordered an investigation of the
paper because of several stories
used in the Fall Quarter.
Hale contended that Miss
Fasca had violated a doctors
trust in writing her series on the
despension of birth control pills.
On Tuesday of the first week,
Lavon Gentry was scheduled to
go on trial for injuring a
(SEE CAPSULE'PAGE 4)



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6, 1969

Leaislators Onlv Clarifying Disorder rohcies

(EDITOR S NOTE: This is
the second part of a two part
series on legislative bills
concerning campus disorders.)
By GINGER ANDREWS
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said Thursday much
of the rash of state legislative
bills on campus disorders are
policies which the universities
already have but some may be
clarifying doubtful issues.
A lot of them are stating
powers of policies that are
already in existence but some
may be clarifying doubtful
issues. Others are changing
Board of Regents policies to
state statutes, OConnell said.
He agreed that the rash of
bills was due to public reaction.
This is the obvious result of the
publics focusing attention on
campuses, he said.
University System Chancellor
Robert B. Mautz said the bills in
general express the legislative
and public concern over violence
and disorder on college
campuses.
The bills were not punitive in
nature Mautz said, and they
were well-intended. He said in
Med Center
Growth Unsure
jC FROM P*6E ONt
conceded that unless new
revenue or bond programs are
approved, there will be no
capital outlay in the coming year
for mental health facilities and a
higher education building
program.
Asked if he was proposing
new taxes or would call a special
session if the legislature did not
act, Kirk said the legislature
created the spending program
that created a deficit of s7l
million.
9.
Legislative leaders said the
deficit the governor was
talking about doesnt develop
until the start of the 1970-71
fiscal year and the legislature
will be back in session before
that happens.
But the Health Center may be
threatened with a loss of federal
funds for the expansion
program, say officials at the
medical facility.

Reduced
Summer Rates
University Gardens lm
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
(authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building 1 University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several

I DEPTH
REPORT |l
general legislators were
attempting to write into law
rules and regulations of the
regents or the universities
already on the books. \
We have not opposed them
but we have not endorsed them
either, Mautz said.
OConnell focused his
attention on five of the pending
bills. The first concerned
consenting to abide by rules of
the university before admission.
He said this, too, was putting
into law a policy which already
exists.
Anyone who enrolls now
implicitly agrees to observe all
rules and laws that are
applicable, he said.
OConnell, remarking on a bill
to discipline faculty members,
said that faculty and staff
members who participate in acts
of disruption which might mean
Bureau Aids
UFs Jobless
UF students will be able to
use the free services of a
placement bureau this summer
for finding full and part time
jobs.
Miss Ella Wiley, manager of
Allied Personnel, Inc., 1800. N.
Main, is beginning a new
company program which will
coordinate the job needs of UF
students and Gainesville
businessmen.
The service is being given free
to students in order to
encourage more to stay in the
city during the summer, which
would benefit the businesses.
Miss Wiley is finding possible
job openings with department
stores, factories, contractors,
electricians, and drafting,
cosmetic and insurance
companies.
Registration will be held June
11, 12, and 13 at which time
those interested should come in
and fill out an application.
Allied Personnel, Inc. is
located in the GMAC building
and is open from 9 a.m. to 6
p.m.

the suspension of students could
also mean the suspension of the
faculty or staff member pending
a hearing^
OConnell said that the bills
which outlaw disruptive
activities may be duplicating
existing statutes.
But if they are not, 1 feel
there should be criminal
sanctions against those who
interfere with the operation of
the institution and the rights of
others, he said.
OConnell said there is a law
from the 1967 session which
provided a penalty for
trespassing after a warning has
been issued. He said the new
trespass bill may be a
duplication or it may clarify
points and be useful.
OConnell, commenting on a
bill which would outlaw Firearms
and explosives on campus, said $
UF has only one regulation on
this issue.
We have no authority now
for regulation of Firearms other
than in dormitories,he said.
Circumstances never warrant
the individual taking the law
into his own hands. There is no
way ever to guarantee the
security of people or property
against those who would violate
the law ... A person
inexperienced with firearms or
police action always presents a
threat to the safety of others
and endangers his own life as
well.
University Police Chief A.I.
Shuler agreed with OConnell
stating there is not a law at
present which regulates the use
of firearms on campus.
There is a housing rule
prohibiting Firearms in dorms.
But you can have firearms on
campus as you could uptown or
anywhere in the state now,
Shuler said.
Director of Student Financial
Aid Doug Turner said that he
had not really followed the
pending state legislation which
would require the withdrawal of
state scholarships and assistance
to students participating in
violence on university campuses.
He said that he had not
followed this legislation since he
had been more interested in
federal legislation of the same
kind.
The state legislation will not
affect private dormers. This
legislation could affect the 190
freshmen on the Regents
Scholarship and the 250 on the

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Call or write our office
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Florida State Loan. But the
federal legislation could affect
nearly 5,000 Financial aid
recipients.
Basically I feel that there
must be an answer to the
question of a few students
jeopardizing aid for many.

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Jjfe^
M-iZgP orf' ?$:? gs!
_ ___ _,_. NICK ARROYO
GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator Girl is Nancy Simons. Nancy, a lUC from Miami was
recently initiated into AEPhi. An art major, Nancy is putting her
talents to work in this year's edition of the FLORIDA COED. She is
also a member of the Cicerones, UF's hostess organization, which
guides newcomers around campus. Now, which way is the Century
Tower?
Alpha Phi Gamma Chapter
Founds On Florida Campus
A new chapter of the Alpha Phi Gamma, National Honorary
Journalism Fraternity, has been founded at UF. Delta Xi was the
name given to the new local chapter.
The current officers of tliis fraternity are, Mike Davis, president,
Jim Moody, vice president, Bill Sweat, secretary, Dave Huskey,
treasurer, and Dave Doucette, bailiff. All five officers presently hold
positions in Student Publications.
In order to be a member of APG you must be a college student
connected with Student Publications for a minimum of three terms in
a major position or four terms in a minor position. You must also
have and maintain a 2.0 grade point average.
Membership is based on a persons ability in journalism and his
service. Tapping is carried out twice a year prior to the last day of the
month in April and October.
There will be an informal chartering ceremony of the Delta Xi
chapter on Saturday evening.

I feel the right of legits
dissent must be guaranteed But
a sharp division must be made
between legitimate dissent and
disruptive dissent that involves
the disruption of offices
administration, classrooms and
the destruction of property.



Local Black Areas Getting Rise From Vista

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second part of a two part
series on the problems of Vista
workers, and the black
communities in the Gainesville
area.)
By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Life is stirring in the black
communities of the Gainesville
area.
Community action, deemed
essential by Vista workers, is
taking root gradually, according
to four residents active in their
neighborhoods.
Organizing is not easy,
community spirit is an elusive
thing.
You feel like starting right
in, as you would in
housecleaning but its hard
getting cooperation, said
Wilson Robinson of Archer.
To leaders like Robinson,
whose goal is to see the slum
disappear, the first priorities in
a neighborhood center around
home life, recreation for the

WHATS HAPPENING

DEVILS DELIGHT: Diabolique is playing in the Union
Auditorium Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights at 6, 8:30,11.
LIGHTWEIGHT DRAMA: The Florida Players present Theatre I
Banquet Acts in the Constans Theatre tonight at 8.
STARLIGHT ON THE TERRACE: A Union Dance featuring Ron
and the Starfires will be held tonight at 9 on the Union Terrace.
IN GETTING SOMEONE TO PAINT THE SCAT SIGN: Order of
Omega, Project SCAT meets tonight at 7:30 in rooms 150 F & G of
the Reitz Union.
BREAKING BREAD AND TALKING THOUGHTS: Sisters of the
Dragon, Theta Delta Phi, will meet for the last time this year at the
Primrose Inn Sunday 5 p.m.
FLEES FLY WITH BUSINESS BARGAINS: Anyone can use the
tables that will be provided on the Union Terrace today to sell his
whatevers. Its all part of the Flee Market from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
RELIEVING % TENSIONS, INHIBITIONS, ANXIETIES,
FRUSTRATIONS, MAKING LIFE BEARABLE AND PREVENTING
PARTY RAIDS (DARN IT!): The Union Program Council has
planned a week of activities to correspond with finals week. All
activities are part of the Examaganza and are free. Movies begin at
9:30 on the Union colonade and dances start at If on the Union
Terrace Monday through Thursday nights.
THATS ALL FOLKS: Good luck to the graduates and other
assorteds leaving UF. All organizations are urged, begged, pleaded and
commanded to turn in whats happening to them, by, and for them.
FINAL X
EXAMAGANZA'
9:30-1:00 am
Monday-Thursday
June 6-June 12
FREE MOVIES
MON.- TARZAN the ape man
TUES.- SON of KONG
WED.- ONE MILLION YEARS B.C.
THURS.- TALL IN THE SADDLE
DANCE AFTER MOVIES
WITH
THE
EXQUISITE RUSH

ADULT EDUCATION CLASSES PROMOTE SELF INTEREST

young people, and education.
Home extension aides, Mrs.
Aretha Dunmore of Kennedy
Homes, and Mrs. Margaret
Griffin of Gardenia Gardens,
Gainesville housing
developments, have been trained
at the UF in homemaking and
family problems. They show
women how to prepare the
surplus government food and go
from door to door to help
residents in such things as sewing
and budget problems.
In the Northwest Community
Center, Maternal and Infant Care
classes are given, and young girls
have formed a dinner club where
they learn to fix meals for as less
money as possibele.
More than 140 Q people use
the center each week.
All the workers had praise for
the tutors from UF.
I think it gives a two way
education; knowledge and
learning to get on with another
race, said Robinson.
Im from the school of
association, kids from the

By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writer

university get something from
the exposure to a different race
and vice versa, said Walter
Jones about volunteers from UF
who work giving classes and
tutoring.
Robinson himself has run
twice for city council, and has
served on several committees. He
is proud of the fact his
neighborhood had 100 per cent
voting in the last election.
We have reason to send
committees challenging county
commissioners. Five years ago
there wasnt over one tenth of
the poor people probably even
knew one person on the county
board, now its altogether
different.
Walter Jones of Northwest
was recently elected vice
president of Neighborhood
House, the official community
organization of the residents.
No matter how extensive the
activities however, the majority
of the residents are not
participating. Leaders run into
apathy of the middle-aged
residents, and a shortage of
leadership. It is a frustrating,
often discouraging job to work
in community activities.
I try to recruit adults, but I
get little or no response,
Vittss/
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although I have a majority of the
teenagers, Jones said.
Sometimes I think I have a
crowd following me and when I
turn around, theres no one
there, Robinson said.
Mrs. Dunmore who is in
charge of a 4-H group which is
trying to plant flowers around
the bare housing development
meets with pessimistic replies
from older residents:
You cant grow flowers
here,
In a quiet voice with a soft
strength, Mrs. Dunmore
answered slowly and surely. The
flowers will grow, she said. She
is also confident that the
womens club will get the
mailbox they are petitioning for.
Im dedicated to this
community, and involved in

NEW ARRIVALS FOR GRADUATION
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Friday, Juna 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

every community function in
the area. Ill be here as long as
theres a need, Walter Jones
said, admitting that he would be
around a long time.
The search for leadership is
constant. The active community
leaders have neither the time nor
the desire to run everything.
sllO up
Hey There Gals
"Stay at Homes 99
have FUN at home
when you live at
Gator Town
You must see
our new fun
way to live
SIOO holds your apt.
for September
Gatortown
309 S.W. 16th Ave.

Page 3



~ The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6,1969

Page 4

One is -time oiteltest numh^n

By DENISE VALIANTE
Alligator Staff Writer
The night was warm ... quiet... one of the
few times the campus was silent.
And then the boy threatened to jump r\. and
broke the stillness.
He stood atop the scaffolding of the then under
construction NASA Building, and cried that
nobody cared.
A crowd was gathering.
The sophomore looked down at them. He was
slightly deaf and could not make out what they
were saying.
Then he saw another boy start to climb the
scaffolding. The boy was shouting something
about friendship.
Friendship .. he felt he had no friends... he
was alienated ... alone ...
But the boy was still talking and climbing. He
cared ...
The sophomore did not end his life ... and the
Befrienders began theirs.
It was early in the quarter yet there was an
increasing number of students who were seeking
professional help because of loneliness, said Dr.
Art Larson of the Mental Health Dept, one of the
Befrienders founders.
Everyone started thinking along the same
lines. We wanted to find some way to combat this
loneliness.
The Befrienders jelled.
The Befrienders is not a counseling service, nor
is it a crisis-prevention society such as Friends, the
suicide-prevention organization.
Rather, it aims at nothing more than offering
friendship to those students who need it.
This sort of thing doesnt appeal to everyone,
said Mrs. Cathy Huber, the group co-ordinator. It
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'
NASA SCAFFOLDING
.. site of suicide attempt

In A Capsule This Was The Year That Was

FROM PA6E ONE
building by tapeing posters on it,
but the case was delayed a week.
When Gentry finally had his
day in court, on Jan. 14, after
two hours of testimony, Judge
Wade Hamption agreed with
Gentrys attorney that since the
charge read injuring the
building and not defacing it, the
charges against the sophomore
should be dropped.
Friday saw the opening of the
Universitys beer hall, the

Rathskeller, with frauleins,
music and beer, beer, beer and
more beer.
On Jan. 22, the Committee on
Student Organizations held a
rare open meeting to hear the
requests for charters for SSOC
and New Party. The committee
listened to 30 minutes of
statements by members of
SSOC, and then asked questions
for two hours, but no action was
taken.
The next week, on Jan. 28,
the BSP met and agreed, after a

has shades of a do-gooder type thing which turn
Trtmenders is a- student operated
organization benefiting students. There arei no i e
kept, or names written down. The studen
wishes to be a befriender must avail himself to be
on call at all times to the co-ordinator.
Exactly how does the program operate.
Chaplains, resident assistants, doctors, ana
members of the University Counseling Service who
are in a position to talk to a great number ol
students are the prime references. If a studen s
comes in* to talk to them and their current
dilemma in life seems to warrant the need ot a
friend, the staff member will sit down and
describe the program.
If the student seems interested, they will notity
some volunteer or the co-ordinator who will then
match up a befriender to the student.
I try to match up people who would become
friends in every day life, said Mrs. Huber.
Personality is not a good term to use, but I take
likes and dislikes into consideration.
The befriender is given the name and telephone
number of the student. He is not given any
background on the students personal life or
problems.
What happens from there on out, transpires
between just the two students, said Dr. Larson.
They do what any two friends do together
whether that means bowling, drinking, eating
together, going to school events or classes together
or just shooting the bull.
These students are not patients, he
emphasized. They are just students who have not
been able to find a friend or someone who cares
on campus.
Many students going about their hectic business
at UF do not realize the plight of some of their
fellow students. Their loneliness goes undetected
until it reaches the stage where the student cracks.
The Befrienders has been in existence only a
short time yet it has helped many people.
Sometimes the Befrienders feel that they have
benefited more than the friends they have
introduced themselves to.
I think the group has helped me more than it
has helped the other people, said Befriender
William Slobodkin. I think in the time Ive been
with the group Ive learned what goes into the
making of a friendship, and how to maintain a
good one as well as learning to be sincere to
another human being.
This generation is so c 001... too cool. You
see them walking across campus... the cool
girls ... and the cool guys. You see them at the
Union dances... the boys on one side and the
girls on the other. Maybe if they werent so cool,
they may find that they enjoy each others
company.
Another befriender joined the group because
she had belonged to a suicide prevention group at
Berkeley. I found potential in myself that I never
knew I had the ability to be completely honest
with another person.
At their twice-monthly meetings, the
Befrienders explore their own friendships with
each other as well as the friends they meet outside
the group.
We learn how to behave in a loving manner
towards each other so we can transfer this to
other students, said Bren Byan, president and
co-founder.
We try to meet at someones home, said Dr.
Larson. We bring our own food and just discuss
friendship and interpersonal relationships. No
names are ever used although sometimes the
Befrienders will use one of the students they have

sub-committee, not to press
charges against Miss Frasca for
her series on birth control pills
on the UF.
The next day, there was
jubilation in the fraternity
houses, when the Intrafraternity
Council announced an open
house policy for the Universitys
fraternities.
On Jan. 30, several student
senators and members of the
press were asked to leave a
meeting of the University
Senate, although OConnell had

W
Fj?
PJpJ I'feaSf&J'i^llS^ WWWPWpppPiP^Pl
LONELINESS
... prevalent on campus
J
met outside to illustrate a point.
The meetings sometimes turn into a critical
analysis of the students own personalities.
Your personal feelings come out at the
meetings, said Slobodkin. You learn how you
come across to others and you can correct your
own personality quirks right there because
commentary is all on a friendly basis.
There is no technique as such for befriending
a student other than what naturally comes in a
friendship. The organization trys to remain as
unstructured as possible because every student is
different and must be dealt with a different way.
The prime groups of students among which
loneliness is prevalent are international student
wives, freshmen, and those students sitting in
front of the television set on a Friday or Saturday
night, said Dr. Larson. They are the loneliest
students on campus. They are students who want
to be involved but cant; they cant, or dont
know how, to push themselves into the first true
relationship with other students.
On the other hand, it could be a student who,
through some crisis or traumatic experience in his
life, has receded into a shell and cannot take the
first step out.
For example, the young Vietnam veteran who
had attended college for two years before he went
overseas, returned to college life. He had lost
many of his close friends and felt estranged from
the mass of laughing students scurrying around on
the college campus.
An older befriender introduced himself, and
was eventually able to help the young man relax
and become involved in campus life.
Any current Befriender can bring in an
interested person to be a Befriender. They need
have no specific qualification other than a genuine
desire to offer friendship to another student.
Im convinced that this group will stay around
for awhile, said Dr. Larson. It could be the
beginning for a new student organization structure
for a campus.
In one of his first public addresses to the
student body as president, Stephen C. OConnell
said one of his aims was to make UF a friendlier
campus.
The Befrienders are doing their part.

said earlier in the day that he
had no objections to allowing
observers to attend the groups
meetings.
With the winds of February
came the storms of controversy
raging across the UF campus as
the legislature and the university
clashed in what many feared
would be the final step to
violence on this campus.
Sen Tom Slade,
Jacksonville, demanded the
dismissal of Philosophy Prof
Kenneth Megill. The demands

came on the heels of Megill s c
for a strong teachers union 0
join with students in e
take-over of the university*
The Board of Regents and the
University stood firm, and stoo
with the students in deploring
legislative interference.
Megill stayed. But
legislature was not finished
rumors of a- Tallahasse
organized witch-hunt
UF on the brink
unleashed tensions.
(CONTINUED P l6l



Report May Open
'A Can Os Worms

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last of a series.)
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
On about June 6, a committee
headed by Dr. Hal Lewis from
the College of Education will
release a report on the
University College which the
author says should open a real
can of worms.
The committee is operating
under constitutional authority.
Its purpose: to evaluate the
degree to which the college is
following the UF constitution.
What this means is the
committee may question nearly
every facet of the operation,
management and utilization of
facilities in the college.
Under the UF constitution,
every department in- the
university must be evaluated
every five years, and each college
every seven.
Five years after the adoption
of the constitution, it has
become apparent that this
cannot be reasonably
accomplished, so an alternate
system has been proposed where
a college and all its departments
are evaluated at once.
The university college, due to
its simplified structure, and
partly because of its
controversial nature, was chosen
to be the first evaluated.
Lewis, who coordinated the
committee, said it will report
directly to Vice President for
Academic Affairs Fredrick
Connor.
We were told at our
committees initial briefing,
Lewis said, that it was not to
be questioned that UF should
have a program of general
education.
Other than that, however,
there are no lines for the
committee to step over, he
said. First, we are to determine
if the college is following the
letter of the constitution, after
that, we can take on any subject
matter we feel is in the scope of
the University College.
Lewis said he had a
memorandum from Connor
asking that the committee
should look specifically into
curriculum, faculty and
administration.
Our committee has the right
to recommend the removal of a,
department head, or even the
dean of the college, Lewis said.
However, if anything such as
faculty readjustment is asked
for, it will be in the form of a
confidential memorandum to
Connor.

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What will the scope of the
committee be, then?
We plan to put our finger on
the sore spots of the college,
Lewis said. I know were
tackling a controversial college,
but were going to try and do
this thing completely.
Tackling this college >s
opening a big can of worms, he
said. I think that after we have
held our final meeting, there
may still be division within the
committee. It may well be that
there will be a majority and
minority report from each
committee, although we want to
avoid that.
Lewis report will be on
Connors desk before the end of
the school term, but it should be
well into the summer before the
Vice-Presidents office is ready
with any specific
recommendations.
When they come, however,
they will be the product of not
one point of view, but many.
Not one person, but of several
groups, spread out over a period
of time.
Whether change is coming is
not at issue, for Connors
sentiments lie with at least one
or two major reforms. The
question is, rather, how
sweeping will the reforms be.
The question is for Connor to
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Friday, June 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6, 1969

Page 6

Tryouts Set
For Comedy
The Florida Players have
announced their major
production for the summer
quarter will be Harold Pinters
The Birthday Party.
Tryouts for this modem
absurdist comedy with a cast
of four men and two women
will be held on June 25 and 26
in the Constans Theatre.

Disadvantaged Are Better Ott

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
Disadvantaged students are
more advantaged than they
think says the UFs director of
student placement.
Its really the problem of
believability that hinders both
black students and coeds from
realizing their full potential of
their marketable abilities, says
Maurice Mayberry.
Black students simply are
not making full use of the
placement office, says
Mayberry. The demand for
black graduates has soared, but
they still dont believe they can
get jobs.
The rise in job openings in
all fields, especially in
management and public contact
capacities, for qualified blacks

Editors Chosen
For Fall Gator

Subordinate editors for the
F all Quarter Alligator were
chosen this week by
Editor-in-Chief Dave Doucette
and Managing Editor Raul
Ramirez.
Retaining the same positions
for next fall which they now
hold are Carol Sanger,
Executive Editor; Vicki Vega,
News Editor; Anne Freedman,
Features Editor; and Mary
Toomey returns as Editorial
Assistant. Dave Osier retains his
position as one of two
Assignments Editors, and will
be joined by Neal Sanders.
Ted Remley will return next
fall to the position which he
formerly held as Entertainment
Editor.
Appointment to new
positions, besides Sanders, were
Helen Huntley, Assistant News
Editor; Janie Gould, Associate

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has been especially significant in
the South, he states.
Today the emphasis is on
qualifying students for
employment rather than
rejecting them, he believes. And
for blacks this is true more than
ever. Salaries are not particularly
higher for blacks than for
whites, but employers are
inclined to make exceptions in
giving them long training
programs and having less
stringent qualification
requirements.
The problem of believability
applied to UF women too, he
says. Fields are opening up for
women because employers are
finding they are just as capable
as men and in some cases are
even more adept. Real

Editor; and Chuck Partusch,
Sports Editor. Sam Pepper, a
transfer student from Palm
Beach Junior College, will be
come Assistant Sports Editor
next fall.

breakthroughs have been seen in
such fields as accounting and
computer technology.
Coeds dont really enlighten
themselves about the
opportunities available. One of
their problems is timidity ... if
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Anarchists Works In Library

By RICHARD McCULLOCH
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Library has
completed the organization of
the papers, books, wood blocks
and metal plates of anarchist and
printer Joseph Ishill. They were
acquired in 1966.
Several inquiries concerning
the collection have already been
received from other libraries,
said Laura V. Monti, chairman
of special collections. Once the
collection is registered with the
Library of Congress it will
function as national source
material, bringing visiting
students and prestige to the
university.
The collection contains over
350 books and 13 boxes of
additional materials including
some original and unpublished
manuscripts.
Ishill was a self-educated
Rumanian who imigrated to the
United States in 1909 when he
was 21 years old. He already had
experience in printing and
worked with a New York
publishing house.
In his home of Berkely
Heights, N.J., he opened a small
private shop under the name of

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Oriole Press. After a day on the
job, he would dedicate many
hours to his private publishing
for which he gained an
international reputation and
high critical praise for his work
of beauty and accuracy.
He printed by hand, not as a
commercial enterprise, but for
technical perfection. He printed
only what he considered
worthwhile with the skill of a
craftsman, Miss Monti said.
Ishill had few resources and
would accept only money to
cover the expense of his
printing. Editions consisted of
less than 50 copies, none of
which were for sale.
His first love was printing. A
man of utopian ideals and great
enthusiasm, he had plans for a
better society and the realization
of equal opportunity.
Ishill was active in the
anarchist-socialist movement and
the combination of being a
libertarian and a printer makes
his collection an interesting one.
He received the collection of
Leon Ferrau, writer, sociologist
and professor at Columbia
University. This includes letters,
manuscripts, and photographs of

distingushed Roumanian poets
and novelists between 1880 and
1960. There are also two small
collections of letters of Dyer D.
Lum and J.B. Barnhill.
As a printer, he corresponded
with authors whose works he
published as well as other
prominent figures. The
collection includes letters from
Theodore Schroeder, Elisee
Reclus, Theodore Debs, Clarence
Darrow and George Bernard
Shaw.
The collection is a source of
research for those interested in
anarchism, the history of Central
Europe, Rumanain culture,
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Friday, June 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

University Shop
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During final week

Page 7



Page 8

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6, 1969

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
x- is the exercise of responsibility ."
Dave Doucette
Raul Ramirez
Pgi/taaiu/v VUiiintjiruj bditor
A ff
, Carol Sanger Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
i >; i; PrlitfK Nows Ft 1 1 tors
THE WHITE HOUSE
WASHINGTON
TO THE 1969 GRADUATING CLASS
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
Each generation, shaped by forces outside and within it, asks
the question it must ask. Sone generations, concerned with
the building of a nation, ask "How?" Other generations,
needing to set priorities for the future, ask "What?
Your generation has asked "Why?"
As Americans we must together ask all of the big questions
seek to find answers. How we build a better America,
what kind of nation we want, why we pursue certain goals
instead of others these are not problems to be faced by
one generation and ignored by another. All of us must face
them. .
A college education in the humanities and sciences teaches
us that the real power to deal with these problems comes
out of the human mind and the human heart. All power
must be disciplined by trained intelligence and tempered
by compassion.
Each of you is a center of power. Your professional or social
or religious or political activity will determine the shape of
the future of your nation and of the world.
o
The question asked by your generation Why? is one that
must be answered not only by the quality of your rhetoric but
by the quality of your lives. It was in your college years
that we were first made aware of those "people talking without
speaking, people hearing without listening."
What you have brought and will continue to bring to American
life is not the sound of silence, but the sound of a generation
which will work to ensure that, in the words of William
Faulkner, "...man will not merely endure; he will prevail."

fluted Columns

Senator Dragbottom sat in his office in
Tallahassee, resplendent in his spotless white suit and
his carefully groomed goatee. He slammed down a
copy of the National Enquirer which he had been
reading and turned to Robert, his shinny faced blue
key up and coming politican assistant.
'Damn it Robert he said. Im angry, angry I
say. And dont think that shiny face will help you a
lick, cause it wont!
Sir? said Robert.
Its these young people today, Robert. Whats
wrong L with them? I say, whats WRONG with
them?
Well, sir, its just. ...
Dont interrupt me, boy. When Im talking to
you, that is. Dont interrupt me any OTHER time
either, you hear?
Yes, sir, said Robert, busily trying to paste his
blue key on the end of his nose.
Theyre wild. Thats what they are. We never
done no sich things as this when I was a boy. All
this riotin and lootin and DEMonstratin.
Columbia, and that BERKeIy place. Its disgustin,
thats what it is, just makes muh blood boil.
Ever time I read about another one of them
campus uprisins with all that violence and all, why,
I just want to go out and clout a passel of em. You
know that? I wonder what makes them do things
like that? Probly didnt have no UPbringing. But the
parents arent to blame. Lokit what I done with my
start! What makes em like that Robert?
Well, Senator, it seems to me ...
Just makes me mad. Fightin mad. Ever time I
read bout another one of em. Why if they was in
Florida, wed take care of em! Boyhowdy, would

Take That, You Scruffy Radicator!

editorial
Thank You

Dont let it be forgot, that once there
was a spot, for one brief shining moment,
that was known as iqaq
The University of Flonda 7 n 96 f : t I
We are happy that the Alligato
editors, reporters, and entire staff- has
been a small part in making this year a brief
shining moment, a moment to remember.
Its been a year of tears and joy, a year ot
frustration and happiness, a year of failure
yet growth. A year, which in the long run,
has made this campus a better place.
But we cant stop here.
If there is onethingweve learned this year,
its that impossible change can become
reality, and we must never stop striving for
the impossible,
It is only through this striving that UF has
met the challenges of this age, and will meet
the challenges of the future.
To those who are graduating, no words of
well wishes, no pats on the back, and no

I.
~ T *- IT" <£***
Ever Since We Infiltrated SDS, Eve Been Expecting Some Kind of Retaliation

we! I just wish we had us some of them
Yooniversities here in mah state!
But, Senator, we DO, said Robert, who was up
on these things, being a college man himself.
Eh? Whats that? You mean we GOT us one of
them here?
Sure, Senator. Theres one right here in town.
Florida State. Theres another one in Gainesville,
University of Florida. And theres ...
Well, Ill be damned. I thought we phased them
things out a long time ago. Ill be damned.
The senator sat back in his chair and puffed
thoughtfully on his cigar, looking at the ceiling.
Robert, he said quietly, Have we got us any
of them radicals around too?
Well, not really. Down in Gainesville theres a
scuffy little band who hand out pamphlets and
things. I wouldnt call them radicals, but once they
had an almost-for-sure demonstration when Dow
Company came to campus to recruit.
You don t say, said the senator slowly, his eyes
widening with interest.
Yes, and once the Florida State crowd started
acting up when they had a student magazine
censored.
Hmmm. said the senator. He got up and
walked slowly around the room, hands clasped
behind him. He was deep in thought.
Robert, he said. Ive just had, I say, Ive iust
had me a BRAINSTORM. Im goin to go up to
Columbia and import us some real gosh-for-sure
radicals to come down here and RADICATE at OUR
schools! Hot damn, I can hear them heads crackin
already!

trite phrases can mean more to you than the
realizaton that your university is moving
ahead with you.
To those who return, we can only ask you
to meet the remaining challenges with us.
The challenges are ours, and they are yours.
Only with the university community
working together may these challenges be
met, and met successfully.
The problems lying ahead are many.
Academic reform. Legislative interference.
Budgetary appropriations. University
sovereignity. Race relations. Administrative
repression. Militant radicalism. Students
rights. But they can all be summed up in one
word: responsibility.
The price of freedom is the exercise of
responsibility.
Thank you,
The Florida Alligator.

But senator, said Robert, who was slow to
grasp great ideas in the making, I just told you we
dont have any unrest down here. Why our
campuses are just as peaceful as can be. Weve
never....
Shut up, Dont you see what Im trying to
tell ya? Weve been sittin down here, readin about
all them demonstrations everywhere, gettin all
hopped up and mad and ready to bash some of
them young upstarts, and then.. NOTHIN!
NOTHIN! We dont have us any of em down here!
Taxpayers all over the state are screamin about
them campus radicals lootin and riotin, and we
dont have none to clout! So what do we do? he
looked at Robert expectantly?
Well, I, eh ...
WE GO OUT AND IMPORT US SOME! said
the senator rushing for his phone.
Well, Ill be damned, said Robert, with perhaps
more wisdom than he realized.
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University f
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
Reitz Union. Phone 392 1681, 392-1682 o* 392-1683^
"o|'iii|..:iv i \| iess in Hi.' I lurida Alliratnr are those "I
, l '- 'hi' > u ..I iin*'writer <>l the article and not those
1 11 iiiVfisuv <>t Honda

By John Parker



f|U
Onmlt
Blacks Are Neglected
MR. EDITOR:
I would like to make a few comments regarding the apparently
contradictory statement made by Charles Fulwood at the SDS forum
last week.
Mr. Fulwood stated that he was not a racist but that he was still
down on whites. I was present misunderstood, he also followed this statement with an explanation
that he was down on whites becasue they are the ones that have
had the money and the power to eliminate the injustices present in
theis society, yet they are the ones that have neglected this
responsibility and have done nothing or very little.
If the rich and powerful people will not rectify these wroiv s done
to the blacks then the oppressed people must do it themselves.
Concerning violence: It means nothing to speak of the
responsibility of the black people toward this present society becasue
it is alien to them and has not deemed it necessary to see to the
welfare of the black people.
For these reasons I, also, am down on whites, down on myself,
down on all those who pay lip service to liberty and equality but do
nothing to ensure them for all people.
For what it is worth: At his death, George Washington owned, or
had on leases, more than 160 slaves. He never made a public statement
condemning slavery. Abraham Lincoln once said, I am in favor of the
race to which I belong, having the superior position.
LIEB, 2UC
if A
W£.,; WWmmMM

Speaking Out

UC Provides No Education

Since there is a rising chorus of criticism against
the University College, I feel obliged to chime in
also.
As I understand it, the UC has two main
objectives: to provide for a liberal education
(beneficial in later life), and some direction for
further study in a major area. From what I can
make of the College, it has failed on both counts.
In failing to provide for a liberal and useful
education, the College has made the student test or
grade-conscious with its insulting prog tests and
finals. With hit-and-miss multiple-guess tests that
cover abstract and irrelevant material and heavy
textbook-orientation, the student has little
opportunity ... or desire ... to delve into concepts
more meaningful to him.
Thus, I would venture, the vast majority of
students retain Tittle knowledge of what they have
covered in the UC courses. I would further venture
to say that most professors couldnt pass those
ridiculous tests!
This unfortunate condition is compounded by
poor teaching and poor concepts of education
typified by a CBS biology professor who felt the
prog test is good and fair when the curve is
symmetrical. This is insulting to students.
I find it amusing that the machine-graded test is

9
9 II I

people who actually our planet, so
that it can plan on the basis of the needs those
variations entail?
Why cant this school break away from some of
those traditional aspects of education? The
traditional system that dictates to people the same
requirements to obtain the same degree, the
system that says we are all alike just because we
are majoring in a particular area, and thereby
forcing us all to be alike.
Why cant this school listen to the criticisms of
the system without taking a defensive attitude
against many constructive ideas? Criticisms such
as, continuing the system that is imbued with the
idea that education should be enabling us to
think. Objectives of the present system are
unclear and chances of failure are greatly
increased. And where the objectives seem clear
enough (as far as objectives go) the demands and
standards we are forced to meet are beyond our
preparations.
The system (a quarter system that maintains
the same objectives as the trimester, certain
requirements of the different colleges such as the
language requirement of Arts & Sciences, overall
objectives that are vague and arbitrary, an
impersonal administration that doesnt want to be
bothered with individual needs, etc., etc.) as it is
now, in striving for excellence and steeped in the
TRADITIONS of learning, it values the
INDIVIDUAL in his scholarly quests for truth and
meaning in life so its leaders say, has turned the
tables on the public it speaks of in the great seal
of this university. Os those tables turned,
Wordsworth said:
' ,i
Up! up! my friend, and quit your books,
Or surely youll grow double;
yp! up} my friend, and clear your looks,
' : 4 1; . !
I'.jtt V V : u '
? Vrtf '.

A Mold For Students

MR. EDITOR:
Why is it that we must all
study the same things? Is it
because you want to mold us
into the same thoughts as you?
So we can all talk about the
same things, be familiar with the
same things, think about the
same things in essence never
be confronted with something
new?
Why does this school ignore
the facts of human fariability,
and talk far too glibly about
MAN, an abstraction that
implies uniformity, and has
understood, and sought to
understand, far too little about
MEN? Why does this school
continue to be unrealistic
aobut planning for this
hypothetical abstraction; when
it should be teaching and
learning about the tremendous

Friday, June 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Stephen McGuire

OPEN FORUM:^^
C Aina mi DiiAwt J
no hnp*> fnr tUv
defended as a protective device for the sutdents to
be used against professors subjective attitudes. Are
the professors in the University College so vindictive
and/or incompetent that students must be
protected from them? If this is the case, then some
teachers (and administrators) need to leave this
University or every student be guaranteed a passing
grade by decree.
When the effect of progs, irrelevent material,
poor teachers and administrators is totaled, it is no
wonder that students are disillusioned about further
study in a major field or any more college work in
general.
As a former junior college student (Santa Fe)
AND a student in the University College (A.A. in
6B), I can say with certainty that I learned more at
the much-maligned school down the street. I
especially learned how to THINK without an ax
over my head.

Why all this toil and trouble?
Books! tis a dull and endless strife;
Come, hear the woodland linnet,
How sweet his music! on my life,
Theres more of wisdom in it.
One impulse from a vernal wood
May teach you more of man,
Os moral evil and of good,
Than all the sages can.
Enough of Science and of Art;
Close up those barren leaves;
Come forth, and bring with you a heart
That watches and receives.
This quarter I took Wordsworth by his word
and my grades show it, but on return I penned a
few of my own thoughts to verse:
Sometimes I just cant realize
why this World doesnt individualize.
This Time, this place, this world of faces
where everyone goes through their paces
of maintaining the progressive status quo.
Weve all been put into groups,
regimented into armies of troops,
not even a chance to reiterate
what it was that made this World great.
and....
So cast off those chains of Society,
let everyone live a life of Reality.
Give everyone the Opportunity
to achieve that Propemess
that rightly belongs to all of us.
The educational system now dictates that
students spend two to three times more time
outside of class in order to fulfill course objectives
and to obtain a good grade. Why not make
education an enjoyable experience? Why demand
more of a student than a fultime job, without
freetiipe to go to the movies, or a concert, or a
play, or cook a good meal, or talk to someone
new, or just to relax and live?
The material in quotations came from a PSY
201 textbood, a speech at the College of
Education, and the Student Handbook.
WAYNE M. SAPP, 3AS
LETTERS
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters
to the editor must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters in the
interest of space.
""MfJ ..! 1
,v r V'ilY

Page 9



Page 10

i, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, Juna 6, 1960

c -~ m
V SEPTEMBER SO
by

. Xt' k J'J I *A\
. MBK aSr w~-
'
IjSiHy' H&- -' JIBkI
' y J^^^^H&§i|&%.;
KAn| Bfc,\ pnvnMHr.. Er'T^rr
- ? SH|k
A 3c? wSHBBHte* -^w^wiiLiiJ Wwwjl.il ~
a .w."
Btogf i '** l l l ,*?-
V| V
B
jMF * 1 Mi
~^r
Largest pool in town
\
-'i
&
*
;
u. .ai l ix.,#a
iw ~
: -! ;: :f-. : ..-i;. ;
Z.eai/e r/?e driving to us on the free U.G. T. campus bus
1:;
R of
All-electric kitchen fully equipped

: : r.'jk
*
Planning schedules and waiting in line
i
Hoping you haven't come too late
To get in on that two o'clock class
(the other section begins at eight!)
Meeting old friends and maybe some new
Buying books and assorted supplies
Doing the town before classes begin
Exchanging summer adventures with sighs.
' j :
Yes, September is that month of the year
When students get back into the race
But you'll save time then if you make plans now
At University Gardens Trace.
Si
* Reservations now accepted f
Unfurnished, one or two bedr
SEPARATE BUILDINGS FO
3. non-students and families.
Avenue Hours: 9-5 daily 1
Phone: 376-6720
Univeisil
Tj
the netlon'i N



fl Bk : V H
S / Hk HH ~ I
f *: 'Bn|P H &, '^WGs?
0G -a

It's the campus apartment that's student priced
(with a shuttlebus that runs the half mile)
And there's 18 acres with a private lake
At U.G.T. yoli're in 4 point style!
There's a picnic area and handball courts
Outdoor grills and a HUGE swimming pool
And the spacious apartments have wall-to-wall carpets
And central air to keep them cool!

All electric kitchen ceramic tile baths
Oversize closets you've just got to see
It's the student thing that's in the swing
It's "the" fall address it's U.G.T.
£
* '*.
>r September. Furnished or
>om apartments from sllO.
graduate students 2. undergraduates
jental Office: 708 S.W. 16th
1 11-5 Sunday (or by appointment)


* ..
fcy Gardens
r
'm
M
> No -1 landlord

I WSgS&'W''
: v ; Ji| J
' *
Completely modern furnishings available
b :r;TW*t :: '' J
<-'.r/c*
4 &&&*
L a XKStt
fl Hn
TV, :4- W '>a v JUjfcitf
*
, c
>1
Private lake to do your own thing
*
* fp2##V %a*
w**2*i*t;
: -v '>' l;:
1=- V >y: .wtetgfc. yp v >tL
Playground and free swimming lessons for mini-schoolers

Friday, Juna 6,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
$ J
ature Poodle Pups AKC Reg. 6
. .s Old. White Champion Father,
Black Mother 2 Females 1 male. Call
378-5723 to see. (A-2t-152-p)
20 Flying Dutchman sailboat,
fiberglass, dacron sails, trailer, cdver
racing condition, SI4OO or best offer.
Ph 372-7982. (A-2t-152-p)
1965 Vespa 150 cc, in good
mechanical condition and with spare
tire. $75.00. Call Gary Vickers at
376-9420. (A-2t-152-p)
1965 Honda 305 hawk 8 month old
engine sport bars good
tires extra tools elec, start more
than transp.asking $350 make
offer. Call 372-6162. (A-2t-152-p)
Honda 50cc Model CBIIO. Good
condition S6O. Bell helmet sls. Call
378-3986. (A-2t-152-p)
HONDA S-90 Bought new in Sept,
still like new, only $250 plus helmet
and tools original cost over S4OO.
1200 mi. Call 392-8205. Come see it.
(A-2t-152-p)
B.S.A. Lightning 67 650C.C.s
$775.00. 372-8880 or 309 N.E. sth
St. (A-2M52-P)
Triumph 1964 speed twin 500 cc low
mileage complete with fairing, exc.
for road or woods. Light and fast.
Asking 525.00 Call Woody 378-4119.
(A-2t-152-p)
Motorola 21" Television in good
condition. Best offer over S4O. Ask
for Roger after 9:00. 378-6620.
(A-2t-152-p)
Single size folding bed. Like new;
must sell quickly. $25 Call 378-7584
anytime. 1214 S.W. Ist Ave.
(A-2t-152-p)
New 1969 zlg Theee are nationally edvertltod
brands which are advert bed for
6169.00. These machines can be
purchased for charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $9.00 per month. Sib at
unclaimed Freight. 122$ ME 9 Ave.
GetoesvMo (A-131-ts-c)
to WT
$ New 1969 zlgeag sewing meet), to
be sold for storage and freight
$39.00. These can be mapeedbd at
Ware House 122$ NX. 3 Ave.
OabtosvHle. (A-131-tf<)
66 Trlumpn Spitfire, conv. top &
tanau cover, r&h; new tires; good
condition, 27,500 miles, 1195 or best
offer. Call Dee after 4. 376-8991.
(A-st-148-P)
5uN5 GUNS GUNS. Inventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-?340. (A-18t-136-C)
1966 Suzuki cycle 50cc, 3600 miles
great shape must sell $135 with
. helmet or best offer phone 378-6360
anytime. (A-3t-150-P)
1965 B.S.A. 650 cc. Mechanically
Superb. Call 392-8910 after 7:30
p.m. (A-3t-151-p)
Carrier Air conditioner. 13500 BTU.
reverse cycle. IV2 years old. Good
condition. SIOO. Evenings call
378-9245. (A-3t-151-p)
For sale: 1968 Honda S9O,
1200 miles of use. Including two
helmets and a tool kit taking best
offer. Inquire at the TEP house or
phone 372-6835. (A-3t-151-p)
Motorcycle bultaco 175 cc. 1966
$175. Graduating must sell: Call
Dick Landrum at 372-9363 around
7:00 p.m. (A-3t-151-p)
Home for sale, $14,500, perfect
location for university people. Walk
to Univ., Med. Center, PK Yonge.
Small 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
pleasant neighborhood. Aircond.,
fenced back yard, screened porch.
5V% FHA mortgage, $94.87 monthly
includes principal, interest, taxes,
insurance. Flexible terms on equity.
Can take S4OO-SSOO down. 1227 SW
11th Ave. Call 372-1744 for appt.
(A-8M46-P)
Original etching by Salvador Dali
S6O, also SCOTT AM-FM radio with
15in. speaker S6O. Call 378-8640.
(A-st-149-p)
INVEST YOUR HOUSING $. 3br -1
bath $72/mth Best reasonable
offer takes it. 378-2741. 7:30-8:30
A.M. 'or 5-7P.M. Its' a steal.
(A-3t-151-p)
J!
w^lmmm^

Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday. June 6, 1969

I FORSALE 1
THE WTTN CHER, Tn c
WHOLESALE* Ammunition by the
case hunting or sporting guns
Gainesvilles largest new gun
selection LAYAWAY now with
small down payment and NO
carrying charges. 4821 NW 6th St.
376-4595. (A-6M44-C)
68 HONDA 160 cc, electric start,
dual exhaust, extra muffler.
Excellent condition: $375 or trade
for smaller model. Cali Ingrid,
376-0008 (A-lt-153-p)
Honda 50 1966 excellent condition.
Graduating in June, must sell at best
price offered. Call 376-0612.
(A-lt-153-p)
HAP-HAP-HAPPY SALE 7 records
desk golf clubs & pull cart
ele. shaver tape recorder wood
chess set desk lamp Garcia reel
& lures. 378-0226 (A-lt-153-p)
Moving! Stereo $45, 60 Stereo LPs
$.50 ea., rollaway bed $5, lamps
$4&2, ironing bd $2, heavy duty
window fan $25. Call 372-7353.
Hurry. (A-1M53-P)
Ampex stereo tape player/recorder
speakers, stereo microphones, tapes.
New, first $125 takes it. Russell
372-2911, 378-8774 after 5.
(A-lt-153-p)
FOR RENT I
Economical living for male students 1
blk from campus S6O/m. Room & 3
meals/day. 5 houses dining hall, rec
room & work shop. Pro cook
members summer & fall. Vacancies.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
College liv org. (B-10M45-P)
GUYS & GALS economical living
CLO was gone co-ed for the summer
S6O/mon. Room & meals, peace love
and freedom 1 blk. from campus.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
(B-10t-145-P)
Spacious 2 bedroom apt. >/2block
from Tigert. Air conditioned. $250
for the summer quarter. Call
378-0441. Married couples or coeds
only. (B-2t-152-p)

foapglv tJbieJ* 31
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Cu *
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A COLUMBIA PICTURES presentation starring
Co-starring 1
SKIP WARD CAROL COLE SEVERN DARDEN BEVERLY GARLAND MICHAEL BURNS
Introducing BARBARA SAMMETH Music by DAVID GRUSIN Screenplay by BERNARD GIRARD
and A. t. MARTIN Produced by NORMAN MAURER Directed by BERNARD GIRARD
A NORMAN;MAURER PRODUCTION- COLOR* Sunonudtor wtuat su^snestj^
CS lasranM tfucratwn s*RMe)
a ALSO AT 10:35
SEETHE ASTOUNDING HUNDRED HORRORS' I
'T\ COLUMBIA PICTURES Presents
twdLnv torture
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FOR RENT
x
One bedroom apt. to sublet June 15.
$77 a month. AC, patio, 4 blocks
from campus. Pets ok. 1624 NW 4
Ave. Apt. 2 378-9058. Last chance!
(B-2t-152-p)
SUBLET for summer: large IV2 story
AC apt 3/2 blocks form campus. Call
Tom Moore 378-8552, 1824 NW 3rd
Place no. 36. (B-2t-152-p)
Modern one bedroom furnished apt.
AC, private patio. To sublet for
sumeer with option to rent in fall
SBS/mo. SW 20 Ave. Call 378-7620
spm. (B-2t-152-p)
Sublease 1 bedroom at Tanglewood
Manor Cent. AC. Right on pool.
Avail. June 15 to Aug 15 or longer
$135. Call 378-0990 after 4.
(B-2t-152-p)
SUBLET S2OO plus utilities for
summer 1 bedroom apt air cond tv
fully furnished Modern Age apts. Call
378-7196 after five. (B-5M50-P)
Apt. for person desiring privacy in
frame house. Lge. bdrm., kitchen,
bath. $45 per, plus utilities No
hassles. Take June 15. 372-7477.
(B-2t-152-p)
Roommate, duplex apt., own
bedroom, ac, carpet, tv, IV2 blk.
behind Norman Hall. Available now.
Call Chip 376-1125. (B-2t-152-p)
Air conditioned, 2-bedroom, carport,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6. Avial
6/16/69. (B-st-152-p)
Apartments men or women will rent
to only 1 2 3 or 4 two bedroom
furnished SIOO for summer Quarter
across 13th from campus. Call Stan
or Bill at 378-5796 Located at 1236
S.W. Ist Ave. across from College
Terrace. (B-2t-152-p)
PRIVACY & Extras! S9O/summer no
roommate worries! AC, Pool, parking
1 block form campus! Cool &
contenient! CALL Mike 372-6678.
(B-2t-152-p)
Sublet June rent free! 2 bedrooms
dishwasher, disposal 2 bathrooms,
Spanish furniture, scenic Tanglewood
Manor, call 372-4032 summer
quarter. (B-4M50-P)

FOR RENT I
>>:.x.:.:.;.:.sv>>X'X*>>x-x*:-X"Nv*v.NSNSsywK
Poolside 2 bedroom furnished from
June 16 to August 31 at special
summer rate. Contact FREDERICK
GARDENS. (B-10t-144-c)
Room in private home for mature
male student. Air conditioning,
separate entrance, linen and maid
service. Available June 14. Call
376-5360. (B-3t-153-p)

-
Best Actor' Award I
I I
Suggcict) f. Cl Nfc.Ai a.di.nc.t I I
B PL UP
U| I
WITHLOVE
ItA >1 T ik TRACY I POITIER' HEPBURN
jL :JH "* guess who's
88., PI coming to dinner
IN.W. 13h 51.. 1 23rd RD f **BwJl2££^B
Tlephon 375-2434 I > I MBBHMMIfIMHMMIHM
WAY OUT AND WILD !...
ITS A MUST SEE I
Hijack. %~-
_ Heilo, Nancy. ~~~ r~
Whatll we do tonight ? 7~ ~
How does the cemetery ~~~
luftt
IIMDDV s wmer"movie club starts
nUKKT THUR. BUY TICKETS NOW!
: ': ... r ' < " ' * * '

1 FOR RENT
Apt. to sublet on June 15. 1 br, ac,
patio. 4 blocks from campus.
S9O/mo. Call 372-7762. (B-4M50-P)
Comfortable corner room 4
windows lavatory 2 closets campus
2 blocks ample parking kitchen
phone summer rates week mo. or
69-7O term 378-4645. (B-lt-153-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I 7*.
f frWK-WWWWWW
FOR RENT
&?** 0 B O*WWMBW#WWW Sublease spacious duplex only 2
short blocks from campus. Garage,
pool, ac, June free! 1900 NW 2 av.
See to appreciate $95/mo.
378-9614. (B-lt-153-p)
Sublet poolside French Quarter Apt.
for summer, male. S9O. Call Chuck
at 378-8756. (B-lt-153-p)
Large 10x50 2 bdr. trailer avail,
summer quarter, ac, pool,
completely furnished. SBO a month
incl. util. Call 378-8812.
(B-lt-153-p)
An upstairs 2 bedroom Village Park
apartment sublease for summer or
longer call 372-4650 around 600
p.m. this offer is void in Michigan.
(B-153-p)
2 bedroom apt., air conditioned,
cable TV, 3 short blocks from
campus, 1716 NW 3rd. Ave,
available June Ist, Call 378-9690.
(B-lt-153-p)
Sublet 12x60 2 br. trlr. Furn., ac.
sll6 @ mo. June free. Available
June 12. Mucho privacy. Call
376-9548 late eve or early morn.
(B-lt-153-p)
Arsenic and old Lace type to share
quaint two story gingerbread home
lots of wicker, grand piano two
phones loads of space. S6O a month.
No utilities, lease or deposite.
Female, 378-1964 after 5:00.
(B-3t-151-p) r
TWO bedroom apartment furnished.
Reduced summer rates. $77.50 per
month. Airconditioned. Very near
campus. No car needed. Call Mr. or
Mrs. Jones. Phone 376-5636.
(B-10t-145-P)
Help! Will need 3 male roommates or
will sublet entire apt to anyone.
We're bound to please! Spacious, lux
2 br, l'/2 bath, poolside, apt. 30. ph.
372-8041. (B-st-149-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom apt.
Air-condtioned, washer, close to
campus. $250 for summer quarter.
Call 378-8645. (B-3t-151-p)
Were not responsible for sins
committed in this groovy pad
sublease it from us this summer we
need a rest. 2 pools, wt. room, maid,
rent??? 378-8968. (B-3t-151-p)
Two bedroom trailer cabana
combined. A/C secluded atmosphere.
$l5O for entire summer quarter. Call
378-3938. (B-3t-151-p)
WOW! Reduced rate sin city apt.
sum. qtr. 980 SW 16 Ave., air cond.,
2 bdr., pool, new w/w carpets, SIOO
per mo., call eve. 378-0609.
{B-3t-151-p)
Near campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior men.
For summer AND/OR 1969-70.
378-8122. 376-665*. (B-TF-138-p)
SUBLET leaving town. >/lust rent for
sum qtr. UG 1-bed. linens, kit. sup.
pic. & sprds. incl. TV too if gone by
June 1. Call 378-9877. (B-6M48-P)
Subrent beautiful 1 br. Tanglewood
Apt. Many extras MONETARY
CONCESSIONS MADE. Call
378-0386. (B-3t-151-p)
§ WANTED
Need 2 female roommates for
summer quarter. Landmark Apt. 23
free June rent. Call Phyllis, Sally or
Rosie at 378-7143. (C-4M50-P)
2 female roommates to. share apt.
near campus next year call 392-7635
evenings. (C-4t-150-P)
OPPORTUNITY Women Wanted TO
Sell The Fabulous Pennyrich Bra.
Small Investment Required. Call
Collect 904-733-1073. (C-st-149-p)
3 coeds next year at Tanglewood
Apt. Beautifully furnished, IV2 baths,
dishwasher, disposal, pool. Please call
Leah 372-4032. (C-129-st-p)
SUBLET or SHARE VILLAGE
PARK SBS for all summer, option for
fall; no regressive rent; 2 bdrm
poolside. Call 376-7439. (C-st-149-p)
1 roommate to share cameiot apt
with 3 law students for Sept. 2
bedrooms, 2 full baths, dishwasher,
gas bar b q. Call Dave 376-4104.
(C-4M50-P)
URGENT! Need one fern, roommate
for summer s3O per mo. big
house privacy. Call 378-7930
(Phyliss) (C-2t-152-p) r
Male roommate for fall. Must study
weekdays party weekends. Two
bedroom, poolside, La Bonne Vie
apt. $l4O/qua. + util. Call 392-7499.
(C-st-149-p)
Female roommate needed summer
quarter. French Quarter apt. no. 65.
June rent free. Call 372-5554.
(C-2t-152-p)
2 roommates needed in 2 br. 2 bath
Williamsburg apt. Pay only half
Junes rent. Ph. 378-6013.
(C-2t-152-p)
Need 1 coed to share Landmark apt.
with me. Mpy* in mid-June .Mrfj Aufl '<
$75 only! Kit-ulen inc(.,'*y front
pool 376-8304. Sue 5-7p.m.
(C-2t-152-nc)

Friday, June 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

NTreT
One or two female roommates for
two br. French Quarter. ONLY S3O
per month!! Call 376-0008
(C-st-152-p)
Thinking? Want 1 male for summer
and longer if desired. Own room and
bath. SBO month utilities included
Williamsburg 66. 378-0313 after
7pm. (C-2t-152-p)
Need 2 male roommates summer SBO
for whole summer. Poolside A/C
dishwasher 2 bedroom. Tanglewood
Manor. Call 376-1701. (C-2t-152-p)
1 male roommate to share 4 br.
house with 3 EG s. Private room and
share a bath. $37.50 per mo. and >/
utilities. Call 376-0703. (C-2t-152-p)
Need one male roommate for
summer qtr. French Qtr. apt on pool,
live June 13 to end of qtr for SBS,
Call 376-1437 or come by FQ apt.
52. (C-2t-152-p)
Need two girl roommates for La
Bonne Vie apts beginning fall quarter
SSO per month. Next to Gator Town.
Call 392-9225. (C-2t-152-p)
Female roommate wanted summer
quarter SSO V 2 utilities /mo. Colonial
Manor. Call 378-6959 after 5:00.
(C-2t-152-p)
Leaving for San Francisco noon,
Weds., June 11, need riders to share
expenses. Call 376-5512 after 7:00
p.m. (C-3t-151-p)
1 male roommate needed for summer
and/or fall quarter. Large and
spacious 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
airconditioned apartment. 1 block
behind Norman Hall, sll2 plus share
of utilities for quarter, ca11372-1272.
(C-3t-151-p)
Yes! We still need two mature males
tosublease2 br, 2 bath Cameiot Apt.
for summer. Pool, sauna, private
BBQ. Only $61.50/mo. Call
376-4104. (C-3t-151-p)
2 female roommates for summer
quarter for Village Park apt. V 2 June
rent paid. For further information,
call 378-5950. (C-3t-151-p)
2 roommates wanted for summer
quarter at Frederick Gardens. S9O
plus V utilities. 372-6051.
(C-3t-151-p)
Wanted Males for voice experiment.
Involves x-rays of larynx. If qualified
$lO for three hours. Call Linda
392-2049 Communication Science
Labratory. (c-3t-151-c)
Female roommate to share apt. one
blk. from campus. Own room, share
kitchen and bath, A/C S9O plus utl.
for summer qtr. Call 376-3184.
(C-3t-151-p)
Sabbatical? Mature couple guarantee
excellent care of your completely
furnished home Sept June. No
children or pets. 475-1355 anytime.
(C-3t-151-p)
I have 68 VW with black hi-riser
front seats in excellent condition.
Would like to trade these for 1967
black VW front seats without head
rest. Call 392-8414. (C-3t-151-p)
Senior or grad female roommate to
share 1 bedroom apt. AC 5 blocks
from stadium. Rent s4smo. for
summer. Call Trish Bassett 378-7136.
(C-3t-151-p)
Female roommate wanted. Summer,*-
poolside, cable tv, ac, bbq, I have
car. 1405 sw 10 ter. Only $33 a
month! A 2 bdrm apt! 378-9614.
(C-lt-1 53-p)
1 MALE needed for LANDMARK
apt. poolside, ac, dishwasher. Will
make suitable financial
arrangements. Call 378-0432.
(C-lt-1 53-p)
STUDENTS full-time work
June-Aug. Work available in
Jacksonville, Orlando, Miami,
Savannah. Work full-time this
summer with New York based firm.
We pay slls weekly salary to
qualified applicants. No experience
necessary. $15,000 in scholarships,
paid vacation. For personal
interview in Orlando, call Mr. Ridge,
AC 305-843-1822 Jacksonville, Mr.
Blake, AC 904-398-1689, Miami,
Mr. Schwartz, AC 305-377-4907,
Savannah, Mr. Lip, AC
912-233-6125.(C-lt-153-c)
Help! Coed needs home for fall!
Roommates leaving. Im homeless.
Need a fourth? Please call to talk it
over. Sunny, 392-9370. fC-lt-153-p)
Need two girls to go to Daytona for
the week of June 13-20. Plan to
have a room at the Riviera. Call
378-5131 after 5. (C-lt-153-p)
Roommate wanted summer quarter
1 bdrm tv AC pool 4 blks campus.
SBO pays for quarter plus */z utility
bill. Call Bob 378-6347 univ. apts.
(C-lt-1 53-p)
Wanted female roommate for sum.
to share large 2 br. apartment, S3O
mo. + utilities, 1 block from
campus, stereo. 392-9868 or
392-1712. (C-lt-153-p)
Moving to Miami? Need 2 female
roocnmaje? by July .1. .3.
house* partly furnished* SSOrmonth,
northwest section. Call Martha
378-6236. (C-lt-153-p)

Page 13

I HELP WANTED |
Listeners wantedwill pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Shirley Bracken,
Univ. ext. 2-2046 between 8-5 only
for appointment. (E-3M44-C)
HELP WANTED MALE. Mens
Clothing Salesman. Discount
privileges. Salary commensurate with
experience Apply Wilson Department
Stores, me. (E-10t-145-C)
Wanted additional topless dancer
apply in person at Handlebar Lounge
Friday 9:30 to 12:00 noon. Must be
good dancer attractive and 21 or
over. (E-3t-151-p)
Part-time Secretary. Architect needs
intelligent secretary for part-time
position at any convenient hours.
Good typing essential, shorthand
helpful. Excellent pay for qualified
person. Send resume to P.O. Box
14038, Gainesville or call 462-2599.
(E-5M50-P)
Positions now avaible for two
secretary Ills and one secretary 11.
U of F benefits, 40 hr. week, BAM
to, SPM. Inquire C. Schoenau,
Department of Anesthesiology,
C-504 Medical Science Building,
Univ. of Fla. 392-3441. (E-153-lt-c)
. p n -rfr- p M QQiQ-Q-Q-
AUTOS I
88881 Hi
1954 FORD Just inspected, good
running condition, dependable $l5O.
Call Bob 376-9450. (G-lt-153-p)
1966 Rambler American. Two door.
Excellent condition. $750. Come
by: 125 N.W. 10th Street.
Apartment 5, anytime. (G-lt-153-p)
64 Barracuda, vB, auto, good cond.
must sell priced at $640, well below
market. Also, beach buggy (vw) runs
great liscensed and inspected $275
ph. 378-0634 after 5:30, & Sat. &
Sun. (G-153-lt-p)
1966 SAAB Special fully equipped.
Good Condition, low mileage. Must
sell. Excellent buy. Call 466-3213
(no toll) or 392-0220. (G-lt-153-p)
67 convertible Mustang S2OO below
used car retail, $1440, 19,000 mile;,
6 cylinder, gas economy, must sell,
beautiful. 120 NW 24 St. 376-8565.
(G-12M42-P)
'67 Ford XL 500 convertible like
new, loaded, sporty luxury, new
polyglass tires, 23,400 actual miles.
Phone 376-9851 after 6p.m.
(G-3t-151-p)
1960 Valiant reliable trans. Brakes,
trans, exhaust recently overhauled.
The Red Ogre may lack good looks,
but is loyal & personable. SIOO.
(G-3t-151-p)

REITZ UNION THEATRE 4^
m ~
t&iy\i^iL3i9S
THURSDAY. JUNE 5
FRIDAY. JUNE 6
SATURDAY. JUNE 7
SUNDAY. JUNE S
W 6 00,0 00,10 00 PM,
UNION
AUDITORIUM
fe 9
:;. r
~*<4 i <

AUTOS
v *.
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen dealer, 4222 NW 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-ts-130-C)
Corvair 64. Good condition.
Safety-checked $375 or best offer.
Call 378-1489. (G-st-149-p)
Buick special 63 Air conditioned,
power steering radio, excellent
mechanical condition $450. or best
offer. Call 376-3352 after sp.m.
(G-st-149-p)
Must sell MG Midget 1966 SIOSO.
Call 392-7762. (G-3t-151-p)
Yellow 1967 Opel Rallye, black rally
stripes, glare panels, four new tires,
new battery, year's inspection
sticker, very clean, slls. Call
372-8314, 5-9 p.m. (G-4t-150-p)
Ford 1960 $250 or best offer
,372-7714. (G-4t-150-p)
|
Try studying math at the University
of Florida's math dept. youll
learn a foreign language as well (or
flunk!) (J-lt-153-p)
yvill buy used paperbacks, comics,
playboys, magazines Laurents Book
Shop 1634 W. Univ. 376-9755
(Next door to Carolyn Plaza)
(J-15-153-P)
Dear Sweet Danny Boy: It's time to
straighten up the ballpark; that is,
providing we can find it.
(J-lt-153-p)
$25 reward for info, on the person
or car that hit my white MGA, Fri.
afternoon, May 30 in the parking
lot behind Woody's and the Design
Shop. Phone 378-5565 (L-153-15-P)
TRUCK MIAMI BOUND. Have
furniture, truncks, etc. to go to
miami? Let us take them. Call Phil or
Joe 378-6795. (J-3t-151-p)
Brothers and pledges of Phi Gamma
Delta Best of luck on finals, and
during the summer. Well miss you
all. Us. (J-lt-153-p)
EX AM AG AWZ A Next week after
exams Free movies, & dances.
Mon.-'Thurs. nights June 9-12 on the
Reitz Union Collonade & terrace.
(J-2M52-C)
Who-wa! ebsfngcsapdpcs! Tri-duds
its been real ... take it easy this
summer. Best on finals. Reunion
July 4 Miami. Catch ya Later!
(J-lt-153-p)
TADFOUCL*
There are damn few Datsuns on used
car lots. To buy one see Godding &
Clark down by the main post office.
(J-ts-143-c)
Extra clean Hillman convert. Top like
new. Low miles on this 1961 model.
Economical and fun car. $295. Call
378-4539. (G-2t-152-p)
Poodel puppies, silver and black AKC
six weeks. CaM after 5 372-6733.
(J-6M48-P)

i 0 0 persolTal
, I 4
Hate to say good-bye for the
summer, but well see you in
September.
Love, the Zetas. (J-lt-153-p)
Dear guys in GADDUM, thanks for
making this the wonderful year it
was. Good luck oft finals and hake a
great summer. In our eyes youre
campus champs. Love, Debbie and
Sally. (J-lt-153-p)
Free, loveable black cat, four
months old, to good home. Call
376-0397. (J-lt-153-p)
Free protection from the walking
cat fish menace. 6 wk. old kittens
cute loveable highly trainable. Call
378-3166. (J-lt-1 53-p)
SOS ,>Jeed math tutor to help cram
for STA 320 final. Will pay S3O if I
get a B, S2O for a C in the course.
Call Barbara 376-7985 (J-3t-151-p)
Today is REDNECK
APPRECIATION DAY. Take a
redneck to lunch today. If you
don.t know one, take Mike McGuire
(the rednecks redneck). (J-lt-153-p)
Dear leg: thanks for making this
year so great. Im looking forward
to many more. Since I met you, Ive
felt super-great. Love f&ad, Arm.
(J-lt-153-p)
Have something to sell? Want to pick
up something at a bargain price?
Bring it or come to the Reitz Union
FLEA MARKET. Friday June 6 on
the Reitz Union Collonade at 11:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (J-3t-151-c)
TO MY MERRY SUN: The past
sieben have been GREAT. How
about an extension come fall; We
could be so good togetheragain.
Love your Ath. (J-It-153-p)
WANTED FEMALE TRAVELING
COMPANION to go to California or
open to suggestions (can be out of
country). I have VW. Call Lynne
378-9694. (J-3M51-P)
Congratulations senior PHI MUS
Happy summer to all the rest. I
promise to return Sandy safely in
Sept. Good luck to all. Jim.
(J-2t-152-p)
Cttwowwqs.wwaa ceec
SERVICES |
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)
EXPERIENCED, ACCURATE
TYPING. .45 per page. CALL
LORRAINE. 378-8640. (M-st-149-p)
v. .v. , .v. .v.v.v; Avi X ?XWX ! M V'W.|i|
| LOST & FOUND |
iv.v.v.x.;.x.:.wwsy.vAY.ywv; AV; x x l'!
LOST Camera and Lightmeter left on
log near Ichetuchnee bridge
Saturday. Call 378-6858.
(L-3t-151-p)
Found beautiful well-fed black
puppy with long tail in Flavet
Village. Please call 376-9025.
(L-3t-151-nc



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6, 1969

Orange and
BLUE
BULLETIN

Administrative
Notices

SUMMER QUARTER LOANS:
Students who have been approved for
loan released for the summer quarter
can obtain their money at the
Student Depository in the Hub as
soon as they have registered and
received the fee cards.
OVERSEAS STUDY CENTER:
Applications are being considered for
the Florida State University Overseas
Study Center, Florence, Italy, for the
1970 winter and spring quarters. The
center offers a humanities oriented
program with courses in art history,
classical languages, literature and
civiliazation, English, Italian, history,
philosophy and religion. To be
eligible, students must be registered
in a university of the State University
System, have a sophomore standing,
a 2.0 overall academic average and
one quarters study in Italian before
departure. Cost is $1,675 for
Floridians and $2,125 for
out-of-state students. The fee covers
round-trip air transportation for New
York, room and board, tuition,
medical care and sponsored excursion
trips. Students may request
applications and information from
Dr. Wayne C. Minnick, 212 Williams
Building, Florida State University.
NATIONAL DEFENSE
BORROWERS who are leaving the
university at the end of the spring
quarter are urged to have an exit
interview with a loan officer at the
Student Depository at the Hub.
REGISTRATION FEES: In order
to avoid long lines and late penalties,
registration fees should be paid early.
The Student Depository will not be
open Saturday, June 21. A
convenient drop is provided on the

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES
Intersession Schedule
June 14 22, 1969
Mon.-Fri.
Saturday Sunday June Saturday Sunday
June 14 June 15 16-20 June 21 June 22
College Library Bam-spm Ipm-spm Bam-spm Bam-12N Closed
Research Library Ipm-spm Bam-spm Bam-12N Closed
PKY Lib. of Florida History closed Closed 8:30a.m Closed Closed
Special Collections closed Closed B:3oam-spm Closed Closed
Arch. & Fine Arts Library B:3oam-spm
Arch. 8t Fine Arts Building closed Closed Bam-spm Closed Closed
Chemistry Library Bam- 12N Bam-12N
216 Leigh Hall Ipm-spm Closed Ipm-spm Closed Closed
Education Library
341 Norman Hall Closed Closed Bam-spm Closed Closed
Engineering & Physics Library Bam-12N
410 Engineering Building Closed Closed Ipm-spm Closed Closed
Health & Physical Ed. R.R. Bam-12N
305 Florida Gymnasium Closed Closed Ipm-spm Closed Closed
Health Center Library 20th
LlO2 Med. Sci. Bldg. B:3oam-12N 2pm-10pm B:3oam-10pm B:3oam-12N 2pm-12N
Hume (Agriculture) Library
C McCarty Hall 9am-Ipm Closed Bam-spm Closed Closed
Journalism & Communication R.R. Bam-12N
Stadium 337 Closed Closed Ipm-spm Closed Closed
Law Library
Law Building Closed Closed B:3oam-spm Closed B:3oam-11pm
Mead Library (PKY Lab School #
Library) Yonge Bldg. F Closed Closed Closed Closed Closed
Teaching Resources Center
Offices Closed Closed ? am Closed Closed
ipm-spm
Record Room Closed Closed Bam-12N
* Closed June 16-19 Ipm-spm C,OSed C,OSed
**Closed June 13-23

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT c UNION f
f-W" 1 9 7s.
* \ f
w> gr Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From \ r\/F
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... y/
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel,
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your /
A 1 fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole y/
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! j[Jn \ M
o>***t*^~ % -*~' -"V r
** If

east wall of tne depository. Do not
"drop or send cash through the
mail.
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
PROJECT DIRECTORS NEEDED:
Applications for the following
positions are available in Room 305,
Reitz Union: outdoor amphitheatre,
campus grocery-book store
cooperative project, Gentle Monday,
computerized campus opinion poll,
student government public relations
agency and junior college affairs. No
previous student government
experience is necessary, although
applicants must be enrolled for the
summer quarter. For additional
information, contact Charles Harris
at 392-1665 from 3 to 5 p.m.
BANKERS SCHOLARSHIP: The
Board of Trustees of the Florida
Bankers Educational Foundation will
meet on July 9 to review
scholarship/loan applications for the
coming term/quarter. All applications
and supporting papers must be
returned to the Florida Bankers
Educational Foundation Office by
June 30 to be considered at the July
meeting. Applications can be
obtained in the Office of Finance and
Insurance, Room 204, Matherly Hall,
College of Business Administration.
STATE TEACHERS General Loan
Scholarship money has arrived. It
may be received in the Student
Depository from Mrs. Robinson or
Mrs. Hunt.
ORANGE AND BLUE NOTICES:
June 6 will be the last issue of the
Alligator and the Orange & Blue
Bulletin for the spring quarter.
Summer quarter publication will
resume Tuesday, June 24.

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Friday, June 6
Program Office, Flea Market, Union
Terrace, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Union Movie, Diabolique, Union
Aud., 6,8, &10 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, Caine
Mutiny, West Wing Main
Cafeteria, 7 & 9:30 p.m.
Student Contractors Meeting, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: Theatre l Banquet
Acts, Constans Theatre, 8 p.m.
Union Dance, "Ron and the
Starfires," Union Terrace, 9 p.m.
V
Saturday, June 7
Union Movie, Diabolique, Union
Aud., 6, 8 & 10 p.m.
Murphree Movie, "Caine Mutiny,
West Wing Main Cafeteria, 7 &
9:30 p.m.
Sunday, June 8
Union Movie, Diabolique, Union
Aud., 6,8, &10 p.m.
Monday, June 99
Union Movie, Diabolique, Union
Aud., 6,8, &10 p.m.
Program Office: Exam Week
Extravaganza Dance, "The
Exquisite Rush, 10 p.m., Union
Colonnade; Movie, 9:30 p.m.
Tuesday, June 10
Bridge Lessons, 150 C Union, 7 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, "War Wagon,
West Wing Main Cafeteria, 7 & 9
p.m.
Program Office: Exam Week
Extravaganza Dance, The
Exquisite Rush," 10 p.m.. Union
Colannade; Movie, 9:30 p.m.

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VILLE MALL



Its Been A Long Year
For University Senate

(EDITORS NOTE: Alligator
staffer Kathie Keim has worked
for the paper four years and has
held various jobs of editorial
importance. The following
wrap-up story on the University
Senate is her last at UF. She
graduates with a BS in
Journalism June IS.)
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The University Senate has
gone through an eventful year,
questioned on its membership,
accused of tyranny, and deep in
controversy for its stand against
militant students.
The Senate first came into the
news in October, 1968, when it
was reported that the
quazi-legislative body would deal
with proposals for decentralizing
the making of policy and for the
separation of a faculty senate
from the UF administration.
As set up, the US wasand still
is composed of 573 deans,
administrators, and faculty
members, all but 50 of them
appointed.
The proposed changes came
out of the now-defunct Action
Conference and its Task Force
on the Governance of the
University. Included in the
proposals were recommendat recommendations
ions recommendations that the membership be
trimmed to 150 and that all
positions be completely elected.
No changes have yet been
instituted, however.
Late in November the Student
Senate adopted a resolution
charging the UF with tyranny by
denying students voice in
determining regulations of
student conduct.
The UF, said the resolution,
should relinquish the power of
regulating student conduct and
concern itself with academic
problems.
But perhaps the most
well-known story to come out of
the US was a Dec. 3, 1968,
proposal by Dr. John Greenman,
a professor of agricultural
economics, to apply the full
force of the Code of Student
Conduct and criminal
prosecution to militant students.
The so-called Greenman
resolution urged the
administration to quell campus
disturbances by all means that
SHARE THE
ARMY ADVENTURE
as an OFFICER in the
WOMENS ARMY CORPS
... M.nM*.. rikM *!..**.. IW .at Mil Ikh i" *
ATTN. UUICM ? r~l I
MO US. ARMY THIRD RICRUITINO DISTRICT ~ I I
j IMR VIRGINIA AVI. COLICOC MM. OA 10JJ7
j Mm. [
j AA*. J
j C '*T tiR j
| Hm._ 1 I
L J

are available when a crisis
occurs.
Immediate student reaction to
the Greenman resolution labeled
the proposal as alarmist,
degrading, irrelevant, and
paranoic.
Organized student retaliation
in the form of a Student Senate
resolution censuring the US were
not needed at the time, since the
Greenman resolution was sent to
committee along with a second
resolution guaranteeing the
presence of free speech and

MUCHAS GRACIAS AMIGOS!
LA MANCHA NOW HAS ONLY 12 OF THE
MOST PRIVATE APARTMENTS IN TOWN
REMAINING. THESE WILL BE
AVAILABLE AT OUR ON SITE RENTAL
OFFICE FROM 4:00-7=00 EVERY
DAY TO JUNE 10.
WSmMSmkiM mSL
BiJHB V
v ..-. dmsmr jM ;..m||p
4' r *mm aip^^* WBiB
' vmSS^* yr r r +g;M
gif ] fpL-/ L jM^ y mai -|f|
11 HstH HU H wm HHHB* MA* mASt B I
If .-la Wf V / \JE WSS J SilimmJ.-. I|JIH ilB U W!m f
m Hpi'jll HI y I MB UtidiMtMiM &% I b r ItllcH fl If ijL||MHgMn ?,-g|
agMbe v Hws ~A| 'fHi^*rL f f 4 *mu .-/ IB
Sg 1 m as/ MKMUjr T LiJ j Jt..-W vWii (*.,jH WM&j WM&j---i
--i WM&j---i .1. lljl j*-
.JL4 .a MW\ *) ftl Jmmrk i ? Au ff
4 PRIVATE BEDROOM EACH STUDENT
Tgl FINEST BARCELONA FURNISHINGS
MfiVAlfi two blocks from campus next
TO SORORITY ROW
apartments SECLUDED SPANISH PATIO AND
914 SW Bth AVE. swimming pool
~ BLOCK BEHIND NORMAN haII)SINGLE STUDENTS ONLY

academic freedom.
The US broke tradition at
that meeting by opening its
meeting to the press and Student
Government leaders.
At its next meeting it went
back to enforcement of its
by-laws barring all attendance by
non-members

^llWaii Ur S REPRESENTATIVES
-yj-j/ vrr Jim Bartlett Tom Stewart
- George Corl Mel Ward
Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN

m people wm mu m ram |
-BECKUM OPTICIANS
ll West Umvrtity A> Csiiwwillc, yj : __njw_32M|l| a i

Friday, June 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6, 1969

Page 16

Reflections Capture 69 Campus Year

PAGE 4)^|
Accent 69 came to campus,
bringing with it such famous
names as Louis Harris, Julian
Bond, Wayne Morse, Strom
Thurmond, William 0. Douglas,
and Madalyn Murray.
The Rathskeller beer license
was given its final birthright in a
formal sanction of the State
Beverage Department.
The Action Conference
drafted a list of radical changes
for University College and
introduced a proposal for a
tripartite governmental structure
of distinct student, faculty and
administrative bodies.
UF built a Friendship Walk to
encourage friendliness on
campus, but somebody stole the
first brick!
Fuel was added to the
campuss tension as Florida
State President John Champion
resigned because of disorders
there.
The University Senate passed
a policy decision prohibiting
student demonstrations that
disrupt the normal university
routine and opened its doors to
the press.
The Grade Appeals Board was
given a boost with the
acceptance of the plan by the
College of Arts and Sciences, the
universitys largest.
While February didnt exactly
go out like a lamb at UF, March
came in like a raving lion and
threatened to take the campus
with it.
The SDS was denied charter
at FSU, and violence broke
loose. Less than two weeks later,
the SSOC charter was denied
here, and violence threatened for
days after as demonstrations in
Tigert, sit-ins and rallies
reflected the shortened tempers
of administrators and student
radicals.
Student Government put its
head on the chopping-block
March 5 as a referendum gave
students the power to abolish
it... it lived, and began
breathing talk of the coming
presidential campaign.
Gov. Claude Kirk ordered an
investigation of the Rathskellers
finances, and the beer taps
threatened to sputter to a
sudden stop. However, Kirks
investigation was lost and nearly
forgotten in the capitals
red-tape and the beer flowed on.-
Chairman of the Board of
Regents D. Burke Kibler came to

Graduating ?
Its a gas, isnt it
Godding and Clark say congratulations by
footing the gas bill to your new destination.
We don't care if its Walla Walla, Washington.
And if you're not going that far, don't feel
left out. Our substitute gift is a gas too. A
Polaroid? A luggage rack? An AM-FM radio?
You name it. Godding and Clark has it for
you with your purchase of a 1969 Datsun, the
New Leader in Economy Cars.
Come by soon. You successful thing you.
Godding & Clark Motors
2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E.
Open til Bp.m. Mon.-Sat.

UF and was faced with a
walk-out in the middle of his
speech by protesting SSOGers
7 and their sympathizers.
And then came the tranquility
of spring break, reversing the
seasons by making the campus
winds blow cooler in the spring
than the winter.
Launching April, OConnell
and Charles Shepherd found
themselves pitted against each
other in a bid for the governors
mansion, after OConnell
resigned as president of the
university and handed his title to
SSOC head, Ed Freemann ..
but it was all April Fools.
The student body presidential
campaign raged among five
candidates: Shepherd, John
Mica, Vic Ramey, Joan Warren
and Jim Devaney. To the victor
went the spoils... all but one
seat in the Student Senate in a
near-complete swep of the
campus by First Party and
Shepherd.
Accent 69 came back to life
in a controversy revolving
around broken finance laws and
a budget possibly up to $3,300
in excess. And the senate
demanded to know why. Final
solution of the matter is still an
event of the future.
Carnigras came to campus
burdened with a $1,300 tax
levied by the city, and 13
Gainesville businessmen picked
up the tab. Shepherd sought
legal advice in bringing a case
against the city to get the money
back and to test a larger issue:
university sovereignty.
Several students were slashed
by roving groups of Blacks
during Carnigras weekend and
University Police identified some
of the marauders as members of
JOMO.
The national secretary of the
SDS spoke on campus, calling
UF a racist institution. A
rookie Gainesville policeman
infiltrated the SDS gathering
and was threatened by a group
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of radicals when discovered. He
testified before the House
Internal Security Committee in
June, drawing national attention
toUF.
OConnell renewed his request
for more police on campus and
rejected what he called
government by crisis.
Meanwhile the policemen on
duty at the campus traffic
check-points got little wooden
houses to protect them from the
sun and the campus winds.
IFC brought the Rascals to
campus for an outdoor concert,
and somebody else brought the
rain clouds leaving IFC with a
$5,000 debt. The debt shrank to
$2,000 and the senate agreed to
bail out the IFC.
Come May, SG and the senate
got in a not-so-friendly food
fight over who was to pay for
the SG Inaugural banquet. The
senators voted down the needed
S6OO for the banquet and
adjourned to much cookies and
punch. The bill is still not paid.
The first weeks of Shepherds
administration brought reforms
in the methods of appointing

, in. 4N ^
Home in a Hurry
On FLORIDA AIR LINES!
GATOR SPECIALS
SERVICE TO JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA,
SARASOTA, AND FORT MYERS
< '
< This exam-week extra schedule of flights from Gainesville
to major cities in Florida will operate daily from June 9 through
June 14. And every flight will be a low-cost, comfortable trip on a
26-passenger, 3-crew (pilot, co-pilot, stewardess) aircraft besides!
. . 'f'
SCHEDULE (June 9 through June 14):
Leave Gainesville 11:55 a.m.
Arrive JACKSONVILLE 12:30 p.m.
Leave Gainesville 2:00 p.m. HI
tampa tmmmM
Leave Tampa
Arrive FORT MYERS 4:00 p.m. HiBBSS
Connection:
Leave Tampa 3:00 p.m. B
Arrive SARASOTA 3:20 p.m.
.
Jacksonville $12.00 $ 8.00
Tampa 17.00 11.00
GAINESVILLE TO: c A AA __ _
Sarasota 23.00 15.00
Fort Myers 27.00 18.00
"Plus tax
FOR GATOR SPECIAL RESERVATIONS, CALL 378-1966 (or your local travel agent).
FLORIDA AIR LINES
Gainesville, Florida
-

cabinet and SG agency heads as
he opened SG to more students.
OConnell went to the
legislature with requests for a
new air-conditioned gym for UF,
hoping to bring some cool air to
a hot campus. Meanwhile, the
state senate confronted the
university with a bill that would
eliminate tenure on state
campuses.
Accent 69 Chairman Larry
Berrin demanded that Alligator

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Executive Editor carol danger
be fired for her series on the
Accent financial troubles. On
June 2, he demanded a Board of
Student Publications hearing.
Thoughts of caps and gowns
ended the year fittingly as the
University Senate proposed
graduation from UF be made a
quarterly event.
And so another year becomes
history and memories for the
1968-69 UF student.



Bartlett Named 'Gator CoacnOf Year

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs Head Basketball Coach
Tommy Bartlett today was
named the Alligators
Coach-of-the-Year, according to
Alligator Sports Editor Marc

COACH TOMMY BARTLETT
... talking to his players during a game
Baseball Standings
American League Standings National League Standings
By United Press International
East East
w 1 pet. gb w 1 pet. gb
Baltimore 37 15 .712 Chicago 35 16 .686
Boston 31 18 .633 4'A New York 24 23 .511 9
Detroit 26 21 .553 814 Pittsburgh 25 24 .510 9
Washington 27 28 .491 IH4 St. Louis 24 26 .480 \OV
New York 24 28 .462 13 Philadelphia 18 27 .400 14
Cleveland 14 31 .311 1914 Montreal 11 34 .244 21
West West
w 1 pet. gb w 1 P ct §b
Minnesota 28 20 .583 Atlanta 29 19 .604
Oakland 24 23 .511 314 Los Angeles 28 20 .583 1
Chicago 21 23 .477 5 Cincinnati 25 20 .556 214
Seattle 22 26 .458 6 San Francisco 25 23 .521 4
Kansas City 22 28 .440 7 Houston 24 29 .453 714
California 16 31 .340 1114 San Diego 23 30 .434 814
Climb aboard C
/The S.S. Winnjammer ft
V Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. *7
| D inners to 1 2:00 P.M //
fv U
\ Bernie Sher at the organ #*\
' on \ A
Thursday, Friday & Saturday \
Oysters & Clams on the half shell Jf
Michelob on draft V/
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (AA
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. v
Reservations accepted
. -v Harry M. Lanton, Manager M /
Closed Sundays m\
_ N jyQ'
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR.. If
THE REFRESHING ONE A

Dunn.
Coach Bartletts 1968-69
team finished 18-9 on the season
and received on the strength of
their upset victories over
National Collegiate Athletic
Association bound Kentucky
and National Invitational

IN ALLIGATOR SPORTS POLL

Tournament bound Tennessee, a
first-ever bid to the NIT.
Voting for the award was
done by UFs Sports
Information Director Norm
Carlson, Assistant Director
Richard Giannini, Chairman of
the Committee on
Intercollegiate Athletics Mandell
Glicksberg, former Alligator
Assistant Sports Editor Bill
Bunn and Alligator Sports
Editor Marc Dunn.
Due to Bartletts three-year
success of 55 victories against
only 23 losses, UF Athletic
Director Ray Graves announced
earlier this week an
unprecedented four-year
extension of Bartletts contract.
Bartletts brand of basketball
has brought standing-room-only
crowds to Florida Gym this past
season. His mixture of studied
defensive strategy with a
fast-breaking, high-scoring
offensive to produce the kind of
basketball action the fans love.
The fiery 5-foot-8 coach
brought the Gators their finest
basketball season in history,
21-4, in his first season in
1966-67.
In 1967-68 Bartletts team
finished 15-10 and in addition to
wins over the three top 10
teams, polished off National
Collegiate Athletic Association
tournament bound Florida State
University twice.
Bartlett, 40, graduated from
the University of Tennessee in
& ygjjgkwf

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1952 following an outstanding
collegiate athletic was
captain of the Vol basketball
team and led the tennis team to
the Southeastern Conference
title in 1952.
In 16 years of coaching
Bartlett has never been
associated with a losing team.
Bartletts 17 year career record

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Friday, June 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

now stands at a healthy 440
wins against 104 losses.
During the off-season Bartlett
is a rnan-on-the-move traveling
about the state and nation
speaking at functions and
conducting clinics. He also
conducts a very successful
summer basketball camp for
youngsters.
CRANE IMPORTS
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ffITRIUMPIb
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CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

Page 17



Page 18

E, The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6,1969

Melnyk, Pressly Split 'Athlete Os Year Honor

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UF All-Americans Steve
Melnyk and Jamie Pressly were
the co-recipients of the most
outstanding athlete-of-the-year
award sponsored by the
Alligator Sports Department.
Voting for the award was
done by UFs Sports
Information Director Norm
Carlson, Assistant Director
Richard Giannini, Mandell
Glicksberg, chairman of the
mm
--WZi A
*
*
. 11l
WSWKvxv
STtVE MELNYK
.. All-SEC golfer

Jr. Track Program Starts

The UF Track and the
Howard Bishop Junior High
School Track will be sites of the
eight week Junior Champ Track
and Field Program designed for
boys and girls, ages seven to 18.
The program is jointly
sponsored by the City of
Gainesville Recreation
Department and the Gainesville
Jaycees.
Weekly clinics will highlight
the program with a competitive
track meet every Friday at 4:30
on Florida Track. The clinics
will offer instruction in the
f u ndamentals of running,
jumping, and throwing.
UFs seven foot high jumper
Ron Jourdan, broad jumper Ron
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The
Florida
Alligator
Committee on Intercollegiate
Athletics, former Alligator
Assistant Sports Editor Bill
Dunn and Alligator Sports
Editor Marc Dunn.
The awards were based on
scholarship, leadership, athletic
ability and recognition brought
to the UF.
Pressly has an overall 604
record in tennis competition for
the Gators. The West Palm
Beach resident has won singles
titles three years in a row in the
Southeastern Conference and is
the current Cape Coral
Tournament champ.
Golfer Melnyk tied an NCAA
golf record by winning five
consecutive major collegiate
tournaments; the Senior Bowl,
Florida Intercollegiate, Miami
Invitational, Gulf American and
Houston All-American. The
Brunswick, Ga. native has tied
Houstons Hal Underwood
NCAA record of eight major
career tournament victories.
Both Gator athletes have
excelled in academics as well.
Pressly has been tapped by Phi
Beta Kappa, on the Deans List
and Phi Kappa Phi. Melnyk has a
2.8 overall average in Business
Administration.
The UF golfer was captain of

Coleman, and hurdler Jerry
Fannin will highlight the clinics
with instruction to the
participants.
Clinics will be held at Howard
Bishop beginning at 8:30 a.m.
and at Florida Track beginning

RELEASE TENSIONS
DANCE and LISTEN TO
RON and the
STARFIRES
TONIGHT
UNION TERRACE A
V UNION
9-1 ITS FREE N|T
I CLASSIFIEDS 1

the 1968 team.
The Alumni Association has
awarded Pressly the outstanding
graduating athlete in 1969. The
five-foot-seven senior also was
the recipient of the U.S. Army
Medal for enhancement of
ROTC.
Alpha Tau Omega member
Melnyk twice shot rounds of 66
jn dual match play this season
and had a 71.7 average in
tournament play.
Pressly is ranked 31 nationally
JBjaf
. 4|| Wm it
jgPSMS9HH|HL

v i >'
l|||i§
*
JAMIE PRESSLY
... Phi Beta Kappa athlete

at 3:00 p.m., Monday through
Thursday.
Registration for the program
will begin on June 16 at Howard
Bishop from 8:30-11:00 a.m.
and at Florida track from
3:00-6:00 p.m.

in mens singles and was
co-winner of Junior Davis Cup
championship in 1968 with
fellow Gator Armi Neely.
The Gator tennis star won the
Florida State Open
Championship in 1966, was
second in the World Junior
Championship in 1965, and
winner of the Southern
Intercollegiate Championship in
1969.
Jamie Pressly is the greatest
competitor I have ever
coached, Tennis Coach Bill
Potter said.
UFs golfing great is past
champ of the Florida
Intercollegiate and Southeastern
Conference, placed second in the
Georgia State Amateur
Tournament and was third in
1968 in the New Mexico
Intercollegiate.

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ROMPIN STOMPIN SUPfR STOCKS
RETURN I
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3 Complete Rounds Heads-up at 130 mph.
* Hemi Doges H Firebreathing Plymouths
* 427 T-bold Fords 427 Chevys
GIANT RACING PROGRAM
* 2 Rounds of stock
* 2 Rounds of Superstock/Street
* Competition Eliminator
Saturday Nite June 7
Time Trials sB p.m Races 8:30
Cr^^NiEBRIB#
3'A Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225

Steve is one of the finest
golfers ever to come to the
University of Florida, Golf
Coach Buster Bishop said.
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Super Stocks Return To Drags
For Lift Off Saturday Night

The Gainesville Dragway
presents a return of the
sensational South Alabama
Super Stocks Saturday night.
Ten of these highly modified

yff /Vi
- - /Jf # / a, 5
Lews Strength Quizzed

ATLANTA (UPI) Atlanta
Hawks coach Richie Guerin said
Thursday he questions
whether super-rookies Lew
Alcindor is strong enough to
stand the gaff of an arduous
National Basketball Association
schedule.
Dont get me wrong, said
Guerin. I think Alcindor is
going to be one of the NBAs
all-time greats. But, unless he
puts on a lot more weight than
he now has, hes going to have a
tough time against the likes of
Wilt Chamberlain, Bill Russell,
Nate Thurmond and Zelmo
Beaty.
Guerin said Alcindor, who is
7-foot-2, has indicated that hell
try to play at his coDege
weight about 230 but will
try to put on weight later if he
finds that this is a handicap.
A lot of 6-foot-6 and
6-foot-7 men are playing at 230
or 235 and they dont even have
to go up against those big
centers, Guerin pointed out.
Speaking of playoffs, Guerin
was asked whether he thought,
as some have claimed, that

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ears will compete on a Round
Robin Southern Style basis. The
Hemi-Dodges, Firebreathing
Ply mouths, T-bolt Fords and
Rat Motor Chevys will race

signing Alcindor will enable the
Milwaukee Bucks, this past
seasons last-place Eastern
Division team, to win twice as
many games in 1969-70.

heads up, with no handicap, at
130 m.pii.
Highlighting the Held will be
Billy Jacobs in his Legal Eagle
Dodge from Enterprise,
Alabama. Jacobs clocked an
11.03 at 130.99 during his last
visit to the Dragway, with the
front wheels off the ground and
hopes to defeat current champ
Jackie Haistens with his 427
Ford.
Billy Denby of Dothan,
Alabama hopes to have his
handling problems cured as he
could not keep his 427 Chevy II
in a straight line here on May 3.
The ten super racers will
compete three complete rounds
and promises to be a bigger show
than the last one, with several
new cars expected to enter.
A full racing program will also
be held with 2 complete rounds
of Super Stock, Street and Stock
car eliminations.
Proceeds from Saturday
nights drag show will be awarded
the Elks Charities, sponsored by
Elks Lodge No. 990.
Time Trials begin at 5 p.m.
and run until 8. The Ultra
Stocks blast off at 8:30 p.m.

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with Gainesville's largest supply of

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Friday, June 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



l. The Florida Alligator, Friday, June 6, 1569

Page 20

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