Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 152

Legislature Hikes Tuition To $l5O

A 111
it.. a ~
mm 1 ,*t Ift
£* <%*,*" ,~- ;
||§g<.
zatm Jj | v
p| BMOBWWB^^I^^p
- B ; Hi
WITH THE RASH OF LEGISLATION ON STUDENT ACTIONS
... campuses may soon become barbed-wire compounds

Reaction To Disruptions:
Bills, Bills And More Bills

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of a two part series on
legislative bills introduced
concerning campus disorders.)
By GINGER ANDREWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Campus rioting . San
Francisco State . .Colum .Columbia
bia .Columbia . buildings under
seige ... presidents held at gun
point... unrest throughout the
nation...
This unrest has been greeted
by state legislators with an
almost surging backlash. About
50 bills related to campus unrest
have been introduced since the
April beginning of the legislative
session. They represent current
strivings to curb unrest or to
punish those involved in campus
disorders.
These bills range from
agreeing to abide by rules before
admission, prohibiting admission
of some transfers, suspensions
and readmissions, campus
trespass and campus security
measures, regulation of speakers
on campus, regulation of
firearms, disciplining students,
faculty and administrators,
cancellation of scholarships and
state assistance, prohibition of
disruptive sound equipment, to
the securing of hazard insurance
for universities.
Teople are upset. They are

The
Florida Alligator

demanding that disruptions not
happen in Florida, said
Republican Sen. Bill Young of
St. Petersburg, explaining the
rash of bills.
I have received a great many
letters from voters. They are 20
to 1 in favor of regulations to
govern campus disorders. In
essence the people have said, We
are not going to pay taxes to
provide institutions and facilities
of higher learning for a few to
destroy, said Democratic Rep.

Controversial ROTC Prof Retires

m l s m
H I J I
|L
IPi "'t-
BE;: 4 m i;
i
MAJOR RUSSELL RAMSAY
... back to studying

University of Florida, Gainesville

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) With only slight
opposition the Florida House of Representatives
Wednesday by voice vote passed a bill raising tuition
at UF and all state universities from $125 to $l5O
starting in September.
The $l5O fee also affects Florida A & M
University, a predominantly black school which has
been operating at a quarterly fee of $115..,
Also included in the resolution, which was sent
to the Florida Senate, was a provision setting tuition
of graduate students at $175 per quarter.
Graduate tuition has been $125 a quarter since
the legislature last raised the fees in 1967.
In an amendment by Rep. Donald Tucker,
D-Tallahassee, adopted during the debate, tuition

Legal Ataneuverings
Spotlight Local SDS

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
Two recent developments
the granting of a hearing appeal
for Jack Dawkins, and the
testimony of a Gainesville
policeman concerning SDS
communist ties have once
more put the UF chapter of
Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) into the spotlight.
Dawkins, Mrs. Carol Thomas,
and four others have been
granted a hearing on an appeal

William Conway of Holly Hill.
Many of the more radical of
these newly introduced bills
have been killed in committee.
They were the ones which really
threatened to destroy personal
freedoms and academic freedom
in general.
Several of the rejected bills
called for the suspension of
students for commission of
crimes in campus disorders
before a trial proved guilt, prior
(SEE UNREST' PAGE 2)

By RICHARD McCULLOGH
t Alligator Staff Writer
Major Russell Ramsey, popular and controversial
assistant professor of military science, is leaving the
ROTC department. He has resigned from the
military service.
For the past three years Ramsey has taught
freshman ROTC, as well as History 599 and a
seminar on revolutionary warfare. He was also a
popular lecturer, addressing many campus
organizations and Gainesville civic groups.
Serving as Chairman of the Action Conference
last summer, he helped to establish effective
meetings and initiate proposals and programs for the
summer and fall quarters, before resigning his
position and causing some political backlash.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell said the
leadership of Ramsey was a major factor in the
success of the conference.
Subsequent to the resignation there were reports

by the sth U.S. Circuit Court of
Appeals in New Orleans.
They are asking that three
laws concerning first and second
degree arson and rioting be
declared unconstitutional and
therefore unapplicable to them.
Five Gainesville and Alachua
County officials have been
named as defendants in the
complaint to prevent them from
enforcing these laws. They are
City Manager William Green,
Police Chief W.D. Joiner, City
Commissioner Walter Murphree,
County Commissioner Jack
Durrance and Sheriff Joe
Crevasse.^
lipitN I
iH .vp ;
CHIEF WILLIAM JOINER
... named in Dawkins suit

for in-state medical students was raised from S6OO
to $1,200 a year, instead of to S9OO as
recommended by the Higher Education Committee.
Theres no reason why We should pay the full
cost for medical students, Tucker said.
The state, under a law passed in the late 19405,
however, subsidizes medical school education at the
University of Miami at the rate of $6,000 per year
for each student.
His amendment was approved despite the
contention of Rep. Robert Graham, D-Miami, that
it would be an exhorbitant raise in a one-yeai
period.
Fees charged out-of-state students were
proportionately higher.

of pressure irom the Pentagon. An Army
investigation was initiated by Representative Bob
Sikes, (D-Fla), after he received letters saying the
Action Conference was hippie-oriented,
un-American and had communist overtones.
A desire to remain in acedemia motivated
Ramsey's resignation. He holds a Bachelor of
Science in Engineering from West Point, a Masters
degree in History from the University of Southern
Mississippi and is a candidate for a Ph.D. in Latin
American History at the UF.
In addition he has had a year and a half of
undergraduate work in Spanish, Spanish literature
and history from FSU.
Ramsey has expressed an interest in teaching
history at (JF after completing work for his degree.
While in the army he taught at the school of
counter-insurgency in the Panama Canal Zone and
also commanded a company of parachute infantry
in Vietnam for a year.

Thursday, June 5,1969

Dawkins and Mrs. Thomas
were convicted by a Gainesville
jury of contempt and sentenced
to prison terms. They had been
arrested after axi issue of Black
Issues was given out near the
Alachua County Courthouse at
the time they were appearing
before the Grand Jury there
Dec. 18,1967.
The Alligator received reports
that SDS has been indirectly
supporting Jack Dawkins in his
cause and has at times provided
funds.
Black militant Charles
Fulwood would only comment
on these new developments to
say that when laws are on the
books they can be used against
people.
Bradshaw Mallard, rookie
Gainesville policeman, who
Tuesday testified before a U.S.
House of Representatives
committee that he had heard
SDS members at UF identify
themselves as Communists, has
not yet returned to Gainesville
and it is not known if he will
before the end of the hearings.
R.T. Angel, captain of the
detective division, said Mallard
was merely observing the SDS
activities on the Plaza of the
Americas and was serving no
official capacity as this area is
for the campus police.

America's
Number One
College
Daily



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 5, 1969

Page 2

UF NEWS
SHORTS
Kennedy Mass Scheduled
A memorial folk mass for Robert F. Kennedy will be held in the
St. Augustine Chapel of the Catholic Student Center at 5:30 p.m.
today.
Fr. Michael Gannon urged all students, regardless of faith, to
attend.
Murphree Area Referendum
Murphree area residents turned out Wednesday to give
overwhelming approval to a referendum calling for unlimited open
house hours.
By a vote of 601 to 23, the all-male area approved a resolution
which asks for open house hours to be set by the individual section,
with no time limits to be turned down.
There is presently a university policy which says all women must
be out of mens dormitory areas by 2 a.m.
Murphree Area President Mickey Thursam said he would use the
vote to light a fire under Interhall Council and the Housing
Division, which currently set time limits.
Were going over to the Housing offices Thursday to present them
with this evidence, and to ask for greater hours, he said.
Police Ready For Raids
In the face of end-of-the-year panty raids and even a rumored
jock raid (the female counterpart of the panty raid), University
Police are not taking any steps to prepare for such student activities.
A University Police spokesman, in answer to the question of what
the police are doing in preparation for more panty raids, Wednesday
said, Nothing at all. We just stay ready.
No names were turned in by the police to the Office of Student
Affairs after Monday nights panty raid, said Dean of Men Frank
Adams. Concerning the fate of participants in future raids, Adams,
supporting Student Body President Charles Shepherd, said, If the
situation warrants it, they will probably be arrested.
Students Condition Critical
UF student Robert Sherwood Davis, Jr., has been placed in the
intensive care unit of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and remains in
critical condition after suffering severe head injuries in a car accident
early Saturday morning.
Davis suffered the injuries over the Memorial Day weekend when
his car overturned five times after striking a car he attempted to pass
on US 441.
Engineering Profs Honored
Students and faculty of UFs College of
Engineering will reverse roles briefly next (this) week when
fraternities Sigma Tau and Tau Beta Pi honor their professors with an
award for excellence in undergraduate engineering teaching.
Final selection and announcement of up to six faculty members
will be made at an award assembly in the Reitz Union auditorium on
Tuesday, 2:30 p.m.
V, v,
Accent Theme Chosen
V. V

i\
j;| Tomorrow in Perspective is the theme of Accent7o.
$ Chosen by the Accent executive committee last week, the
V V
theme will encompass progress and problems in many areas of
:j:j knowledge, particularly science and technology. §
:$ The Accent executive committee has been announced by
Chairman Joe Hilliard. Members of the committee are Assistant
% Chairman Vicki Fagan, 3AS; Personnel Chairman Rusty
:j:| Skinner, 4AS; Speakers Chairman Bob Martin, 2UC; Program
Chairman Bill Modlin, 4AS. :£
£ Publicity Chairman Joe Weil, 3JM; Public Relations :£
Chairman George Seide, 3AS; Technical Chairman Alan Howes, :£
>: 4BA; Art Coordinator Sue Durham, 4AR. :j:
Community Affairs Chairman Rick Horder, ILW; Executive :£
>: Secretary Sharon Ward, 4AS; Magazine Editor Janie Gould, *j;
4JM; Honored Guests Chairman Marc H. Click, 4JM; and :|:
§ Finance Chairman Tom Warner, 4BA. :£
*"" P
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
(authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Lanky Poet Walks, Shares

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
There was a simplicity to the
lanky poet as he unrolled his
6foot 2 body and sat on the
sto? e bench outside the UF
Medical Center. Im merely a
guy walking a road, putting
down what I see on paper. One
day I wont be there, and that s
fine with me, he said.
E. Glen Hennig, a ventilation
therapist at the Medical Center
and author of Walking and
Sharing, a volume of poetry to
be published within the year,
says he works mainly to keep a
roof over his head.
Writing is my life, its the
only gift Ive got, he says.
The 25-year-old Orlando man
has had several jobs from
bartending to horsetraining to
truckdriving since he quit
Georgia Southern College in his
second year.
Deciding the gravel trail
wasnt for him, however, he
trained for ventilation therapy in
an Orlando hospital in 1965
before coming to the Medical
Center.

Unrest Results In Legislation

FROM PACE ONE
approval lor convicted felons to
be allowed to speak on
campuses, establishment of a
committee to investigate campus
disorders and approval of
student groups to use university
facilities.
Nine bills regulating aspects
concerning campus disorders
which were introduced by
Young and Democratic Sen.
Mallory Horne of Tallahassee
have been passed by the Florida
Senate.
These bills are preventive
rather than punitive in nature. I
dont think our job is to run the
universities on a day to day
basis. My main aim is toward
preserving education for the
majority. Ill stand up and fight
for those people anytime. And
the lack of disruptions at UF is a
tribute to those of you who
know what a university is
established for, Young said.
We dont build a university
for a birthplace for one

By Popular Demand
Today
11am-9pm
London Broil {)?>
St oak
Large Bowl Salad
French Fries ntfA
Rolls & Butter
Cl U 1225 W. UNIV. AVI.
r Vi BLOCK from CAMPUS
we-re not a giant chain operation so we try hauler

Anybody can buck
anything, he said about the
variety of his jobs.
His receeding reddish-brown
hair, and plain horn rimmed
glasses make him appear older
than 25, but hide a youthful
audacity to master things.
He confessed to joining the
Marine Corps after high school
just to see if I could do it. An
admitted sky diving and baseball
fan, he was once offered a major
league contract, but turned it
down.
He writes because he loves
people. In a low southern voice
which often addresses girls as
Darlin, and Dear he motioned
to four elderly ladies who had
sat down across the way. I love
them, I love everybody, he said.

Man Puts Wife, Car For Sale

CANTERBURY, England
(UPI) Car or wife must go,
read the advertisement-in the
local newspaper Wednesday.
Car 1963 MGB, red, all
extras. $1,200. Wife 1944,
blonde, 5 ft., 36-24-36, $60,000

philosophy or another. Im glad
to see students take a strong
stand. An administrator, faculty
member, student or anyone else
has the right to say what he
believes. But, he does not have
the right to impose his beliefs on
others. He does not have the
right to deny others of their
rights.
These nine bills provide for:
Prior consent from
applicants for admission to abide
by the rules of the university
and the laws of the state as a
condition for attendance.
The Board of-Regents to
be required to adopt rules for
the lawful discipline of students,
faculty and administrative
members who interfere with the
university and its functions.
Punishment for unlawful
disruption or interference with
the lawful administration of
universities.
Employment of legal
counsel and additional security
personnel during periods of
emergency.
Prohibition of admission of

But there are times when he
wishes to withdraw from people
and the city. Hennig lives alone
25 miles out of Gainesville.
He confessed an
overwhelming desire at times to
withdraw when he feels like
70,000 people, with all their
sorrows are around him.
Simplicity and to reach the
essence of living is his goal.
One of the biggest compliments
1 ever received, he said, is Glen,
youre real.
Hennig is preparing two more
manuscripts for plication,
Diocese of Dawn, and
Spectrum of the Species of
Returns.
June 15,he leaves Gainesville,
and doesnt know if hell be
back.

or nearest offer.
Ken Shaw, who placed the
ad, said he is offering his wife
for sale because she complains
his sports car is cramped and
drafty. For the sake of peace in
the home, one of them has to
go, said Shaw.

students who move from school
to school taking part in campus
disruptions.
Legislative definition of
intent of the aims of higher
education so that knowledge of
what conduct and activities may
be allowed and those which may
not be acceptable.
Prohibition of trespass on
campuses.
Injunction power for
university presidents.
Presidential right to seek
help from outside law
enforcement authorities.
Conway fears that too much
attention is being placed on
campus disturbances and he
fears that things may go too far.
The pendulum is swinging
and may be swinging too far.
Ample measures should be taken
with students who cause
disruptions on our campuses but
I dont want emotion to take
over, Conway said.
Trinidad Fruit
Forty varieties of citrus fruit
grow in Trinidad.



Vista Volunteers Glimpse U.S. Racism

(EDITORS NOTE: The
following is the first in a
two-part series on Vista and the
black communities in
Gainesville.) ..
By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
One thing became startingly
clear to the young Vista worker
and his wife from Philadelphia:
The U.S. is a racist country.
Mark and Linda McGrath,
two of 22 Volunteers In Service
To America had not felt that
way before their Vista training.
But six months of living in a
black Gainesville community
changed all that.
Both now feel that poverty
and prejudice must be coped
with in the poor ghetto-type
areas.
They have come to the
realization that a change in the
attitudes of the white
established community is a must
in order to reverse the current
racist attitudes.

Conner Enters Controversy
Before UC Changes Made

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the third in a series on reforms
in the University College. This
part will deal with
Vice-President Fredrick Connor,
the person who must initiate
reforms.)
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Reform, when it comes to the
University College, will be in the
hands of only one man but
the person has shown he will
lend a very sympathetic ear to
proposals concerning UFs lower
division.
Vice President for Academic
Affairs Fredrick Connor will be
armed with reports, proposals
and recommendations, but in
the end, any changes which must
come in the college will be of his
own wording, and the product
of his own values.
How does Connor feel about
the college?
For the most part, Connor
has attempted not to commit
himself, feeling that to do
otherwise would be to deliver a
verdict on the college, while one
committee is still studying it.
Once this final report is in,
Connor will begin assessing all
information.
The committee in question is
headed by Dr. Hal Lewis. It is a
university committee, set up
under constitutional authority
to evaluate the progress of the
UC over the last five years.
Connor makes one exception
with the Action Conference
proposal calling for extension of
Excellence in Food

I see little hope for black
and white unity until there is
black unity, Mrs. McGrath said.
Admittedly the McGraths
come from nice white,
middle-class homes. Neither
had realized the depth of white
apathy nor the harm of
do-good groups and the
tendency of whites to impose
their own values on blacks.
Above all we must not create
a feeling of dependency, said
Vince Jolivette, Vista supervisor
for Alachua County.
He said he would rather see a
program fail miserably with poor
people running it, than a huge
success run by the white
middle-class.
A delicate balance must also
be maintained in what one
worker termed the eternal
struggle of not injecting your
own ideas and values into the
community.
It is hard to find what
residents really want when they
are used to telling you what you
want to hear, said one inner city
worker.
The do-good groups who

the general education program
to four years, instead of keeping
all students in a two year
program until the requirements
for an Associate of Arts degree
are met.
Connor is an outspoken
proponent of this idea, and the
only problem he sees with it will
be in the problem of junior
college transfers, who by virtue
of having graduated JCs, are
assumed to have completed their
UC requirements.
However, what kind of
decisions can Connor propose?
I would guess just about
anything, Connor said. I
might ask that the college be
eliminated, or that no changes
be made in it at all, although I
seriously doubt that either of
these extremes would be
issued.
However, there might be
administrative changes if it
seems that some are called for,
he said. In all, I have to take a
stand on whether the program
should stand or should be
modified.
Within the bounds of
changing the college, Connor

BECOME A
COMPUTER PROGRAMMER
200,000 unfilled job opportunities, growing field
Good pay, excellent fringe benefits
High school and jr. college grads earn good money
ENROLL NOW, CLASSES START JUNE 16
Outstanding faculty
Free programmer aptitude test no obligation
Free placement assistance
Call 378-1615, Gainesville, now for ~v
aptitude test appointment
COMPUTER MANAGEMENT CORP.
1105 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
GAINESVILLE, FLA. 32601
Please send me free information without obligation.
i
Name
Address
City Stat
Phone Zip
High School Grad. Yes No

throw one-shot Christmas and
Thanksgiving parties came under
fire by several volunteers as
doing more harm than good.
They are insensitive and
unrealistic, Linda McGrath
said.
Fraternities and sororities
were singled out by the
- McGraths as among those who
annually do good works to
ease their social conscience and
gain service points.
Jolivette said Gainesville was
- full of potential.
I wish all the clubs who
wanted to help would consider
programs more long range in
nature.
Although every worker has
found some leaders in the
community to become their link
to the residents and often
advisors most of the helpful
leaders eventually move out to
housing developments.
Housing and day care centers
are a major problem in the cities.
The riots and protests these
are things everybody sees, said
Nelso Rios, a city worker with
sensitive black eyes.

will have to work with the
University Senate.
For instance, should one of
Connors proposals be to
Eliminate departmental
(progress) tests, his request for a
policy change will go to the
University Senates Curriculum
Committee. From there, it
would go for a vote to the
senate, where it could be
expected to pass.
Once passed, progress tests
would be eliminated as soon as
the UC was able to reorganize its
curriculum to take the change
into effect.
How soon after he receives
the report of the university
committee will Connor be
making decisions?
Thats hard to say, Connor
said. I will be using all available
data from the reports which
have been made on the college,
plus I want to get involved in the
controversy myself.
I intend to talk to students,
faculty and the deans, he said.
This thing has got to come
down to a personal level, and
when I make a recommendation,
I want it to be the best one.

'\ y
ral mt
| flfHf CiMtM^^^^B^B^^r~"~y~ 7VL w
** V *** y ..-'w .? &'&*' / i S j^salft* l -*T _, * Z^**!
GREEKS CLEAN UP IN DEPRESSED AREA
... Vista workers don't like these frat "obligations."

But you dont see the
smaller tragedies, such as the
child killed in the street by a
speeding car, or by accident in
the home because his working
mother couldnt find care for
him, he said.
In housing, Jack Edwards, a
southwest section volunteer,
found it was hard to fight big
business.
Some of the homes have been
condemned by housing
authorities, he said.,
A lot of the problems
gaining rapport with residents,
finding out what they really
want could be reduced by
black Vistas from the
community itself.
Vista workers admit there
have not been enough workers

a I I WITH THIS COUPON ONE if
| | COMPLETE $1.15 CHICKEN j:
I COUPON GOOD THRU JUNE \ \
| I sth FOR IN STORE PURCHASE |
L 516 N.W. 13th*STREET
Twig Campus Twig Mall
v 1131 W. Univ. Ave. 2552 NW 13th St.
£ gft nm JIB W
(%tU^t^%
Day S S^e
* YOU WOULDN'T BELIEVE SOME OF THE
PRICES DRESSES-PANTS-SKIRTS FOR
$5.00 EACH ONE GROUP OF SWIMSUITS
FOR 3.99 ... .ONE GROUP OF DRESSES AT 1 / 2
PRICE. CHECK US OUT IT'LL
PAY TWIG.

Thuraday, June 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

recruited from their own areas.
Most of the volunteers in
Alachua County are from the
North, Jolivette said.
The local supervisor said that
in the future 80 per cent of
Vista volunteers will be highly
skilled, like lawyers and
architects.
He said Vista was shooting
for 20 per cent black
membership someday. It is
hoped they will return to then thenown
own thenown community as a trained
Vista volunteer.
The McGraths think they
have their role figured out.
Dont blow Vista into
something great. It just gives
nice white middle-class people
like ourselves an insight into the
problems of the poor.

Page 3



i. The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, June 5,1969

Page 4

Summer Students Headed
To 'Cool UF Classrooms

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The searing sun and high
humidity of summer will be of
little concern to most students
attending the UF summer
session this year.
Assistant Registrar Thomas
A. Graham said Tuesday every
effort is being made to
reschedule classes originally
assigned to non-air-conditioned
space on campus.
We are still moving classes
into air-conditioned rooms. A
good percentage of them have
already been moved.
As printed in the summer
schedule of courses, 80 per cent
of all CBS courses, 70 per cent
of all English courses, most
courses in business
administration and many other
classes were scheduled in
building without
air-conditioning.
Graham mentioned several
problems which are preventing
full use of air-conditioned space.
Some classes, such as science
labs presently in unair-condi unair-conditioned
tioned unair-conditioned buildings, cannot be
moved because of equipment
necessary for the classes.
Some professors would rather
have their classes near their
offices instead of in another
building, and so they turn down
offers for air-conditioned
classrooms.

Library Committee
To View Complaints

Students with gripes and
suggestions about the library
now have a special committee to
hear them.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd has appointed
a library committee on the
advice of Dr. Harrer,
director of university libraries.
Members are Bryan Danese,
physics; Allan Horton,
agriculture; Lourdes Soler,
architecture; Andrea Kesler and
Richard Hull, business; Lou
Tally, political science; Dorothy
Mason, math; Kathy Corrigan,
University College; Tom Herriot
and Wilhelm Wolfer, engineering;
and Kathy Spellman, arts and
sciences.

* Zk. |
) Climb aboard v
/The S.S. Winnjammer
Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. w)
j Dinners to 12:00 P.M. Ji
j Bernie Sher t the organ i\
Thursday, Friday & Saturday
Oysters & Clams on the half shell M
Michelob on draft .1^
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (C\
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M.
Reservations accepted
< | -v Harry M. Lanton,Manager
jSIK/ Closed Sundays Yj^pf

Most summer school classes
are held between second and
fifth periods. Graham said if
classes could be scheduled
through eighth period, all classes
could be air-conditioned, but
that most students and
professors seem to prefer having
early classes.
What we are doing this
summer is the same thing we did
last summer, said Graham.
Last summer we emptied
Anderson, the basement of

WUWU Switches
To Smoother Music
Listened to your radio lately? If you have, youve probably noticed
a change in WUWU, 1390.
The change has been away from hard rock and psychedelic
music to a smoother style of music with a lot of rhythm to it.
Bill Marr, station manager of WUWU, talks about the format
change:
In February WUWU was a Top 40, rock and roll station with
some emphasis on psychedelic music.
At that time, explained Marr, there were 4 AM stations in
Gainesville, 3 of which were playing rock and roll. One was playing
conservative good music. There was quite a bit of oversaturation on
the rock side and all stations were competing for a small share of the
audience.
Weve tried to smooth out our format. We felt a lot of people
were being forced to make a decision and go to one extreme or the
other; so we decided to offer them an alternative.
Marr calls the new format a swinging middle-of-the-road young
adult approach.
We want to keep our young sound, but what we have done is
moved a little more towards the middle in our music format. Were
not going from the Beatles to Montavanni, were going from the
Beatles to the Vogues.

Now Taking Applications
at
Summit House
1700 S. W. 16th Ct
/ for
September
(9-10 & 12 month Leases
rates start J-.
1 BR sl2l
28R5147
Summer Term
Special Rates
376-9668

Matheriy and a good bit of
Walker.
He said a large percentage of
courses originally scheduled in
non-air-conditioned space were
finally rescheduled into
air-conditioned space.
As for this summer, Graham
was optimistic.
I think we be able to
accommodate almost anyone
who requests air-conditioned
space.

f
Home in a Hurry
On FLORIDA AIR LINES!
GATOR SPECIALS
SERVICE TO JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA,
SARASOTA, AND FORT MYERS
This exam-week extra schedule of flights from Gainesville
to major cities in Florida will operate daily from June 9 through
June 14. And every flight will be a low-cost, comfortable trip on a
26-passenger, 3-crew (pilot, co-pilot, stewardess) aircraft besides!
SCHEDULE (June 9 through June 14): HHHH
Leave Gainesville 11:55 a.m.
Arrive JACKSONVILLE 12:30 p.m.
Leave Gainesville 2:00 p.m. PPHHN
Tampa HHgl
Arrive FORT MYERS 4:00
Connection:
Leave Tampa 3:00 p.m.
Arrive SARASOTA 3:20 p.m.
Jacksonville $12.00 $ 8.00
GAINESVILLE TO: I*" 1 17 00
Sarasota 23.00 15.00
Fort Myers 27.00 18.00
Plus tax
FOR GATOR SPECIAL RESERVATIONS. CALL 375-1966 (or your local travel agent!-
FLORIDA AIR LWIjS
' Gainesville, Florida

HraFYf JL 1
ppr B
shel w*
W RIpI Mya,
9 wM Rif
flK' V;...:
. f a ... .. "-l
: m %
I ; ; 3' v
NICK ARROYO
GATOR GIRL
Today's Gator Girl is Dolly Tison, an ADPi from Tampa with a
hangup for painting. Dolly is a lUC English major, but don't let her
sedentary-like major nor her pensive pose expatriate the wrong
impression. Dolly's friends say she disseminates felicity wherever she
goes.



Fashions Turn-. Men Buying More Clothes

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Faature Writer
Fashion is the word, Leon Robbins reports,
owner of Stag *N Drag, and the emphasis is on
men.
With this new turn to please men comes an
overwhelming demand for striped bellbottoms,
four inch wide ties of varying colors and
patterns, body (see-through) shirts, apache
scarves, and wing-tipped, French-cuffed shirts.
Store-owners in Gainesville who cater to both
sexes agree that men are buying more clothes on
the whole than women and men have become
more liberal in their choices.
Boys are buying more because the change
has been so rapid. Its a complete turn-over from
anything we have Worn before," Randy Schrader,
2UC and a sales clerk for die University Shop,
said.
Women can buy blouses to go with the same
skirts they have been wearing and do not need to
change their whole wardrobe like the men do, to
stay in fashion," he said.
Unlike other stores, who name stripes as the
biggest seller, Schrader says plaid bellbottoms
have been selling very strong. A coming item
that's just started to move are straight-legged
slacks on the style of stovepipe pants-the
width is the same at the top as the bottom of the
legs.

Top Band Members
Cited At Banquet

4
Skits, speakers, installations,
and awards wrapped up the UF
Gator Band's second annual
banquet at the Holiday Inn last
Saturday night.
Receiving two standing
ovations for his superior service
to the band, past president Mike
Chesser walked away with the
Bachman and Outstanding
Senior awards.
Bill Booth was named
Outstanding Musician and Tau
Beta Sigma, music sorority
awarded Shirley Abdullah the
Outstanding Freshman Girl
award.
The Workhorse award for
untiring service went to Bill
Davis, while Ward Durret was
named Outstanding Freshman
Boy.
Newly installed officers at the
banquet were President, Bill
Davis; Vice Pres., Mark Edwards,
Secretary, Kathy White;
Publicity, Glenda Spencer, and
K -r~ fKTMV
t /

How to bandage a war.
You do it a wound at a time.
A person at a time. With all
your skills as a nurse. With
all the cheerfulness in your
heart. You do it because you
want to. You do it because
youre an Army Nurse.
The Army Nurse Corps.
Nr BM NlhonUmi Mm ahlpiMi fli mmi mM ifch Mpia N
MM VUQMA aw, COUM fAIK, ML MV
M*M
a* = bp
9kmm
-A

Social, Ward Durrett.
Coach Tommy Bartlett and
Directors Richard Bowles and
Robert Forster spoke, and then
the group settled back to enjoy
the skits and built-in
entertainment.

as Teen on tv ~ £ 7
IMPORTERS I
#1 Si, 100% EUROPEAN TEXTURED
HUMAN HAIR
LETS *4
%/ $ FALLS ~ J 9?.P
Vs,. WIGS *l2*o
.* I Colors AM
v HAIRGOODS DEALER
nnn A jklQ lif AW% W A HAIR GOODS Professional Styling
1 I\/lill*" W UXVill/ IMPORTERS onpremises
CORNER I3fh St & Univ. Ave. open
(across from FLAGLER INN) 10-7
l GAINESVILLE MONSAT J
V OTHER SHOWROOMS IN ORLANDO, JACKSONVILLE, DAYTONA BEACH & COCOA BEACH

WOMEN TAKING BACK SEAT?

The color line is thickly drawn between men
and women's fashions as blues, greys and browns
remain the standards for men, and patriotic red,
white and blue are predominately chosen by
women. From the Twig shop, lavender is an
increasingly popular hue bought with the
traditional black and white still high on the
consumer list.
Men and women compete on who wears the
majority of body shirts and bellbottoms.
Robbins said in the past couple of days he has
bought 300 pairs of bellbottoms for men, a large
majority of them striped. The men are buying
more in trying to catch up and pass the girls in
fashion awamess. He says that women are
buying men's bellbottoms because they are
cheaper and the pants with smaller waists fit the
girls better than some of their own styles. These
are not uni-sex bellbottoms; that is, those made
to be sold to either men or women.
Contrary to the statement that men are
buying more is a report from Lichters.
Salesclerk and Gainesville H.S. senior Steve
McKinney said that not only are girls buying
more, but a lot of boys have been buying
straight-legged slacks. \
Older women have conceded the trend of
flared bells, elephant pants, crop-tops (those that
tie under the bust), body shirts (some of which
do not require wearing a bra), and scarves of
their&iccessors.

Just a walk away
from U.F. campus f,
1620 W. UNtV. I
fop^fe UN,VERS,TY PLAZA I
Bettes p A
tim JjHARSTYUST/j
Curt up with a good book ...
FLORIDA QUARTERLY

The little girl look is as strong as ever with
the current emphasis of clothes on youth," Eva
Phillips, slaesclerk for the Colony Shop said.
She said high school teens buy to imitate the
college crowd so there are no drastic differences
between these groups.
While Miss Phillips says that clunky hells are
still popular, the Twig shop says delicate Grecian
sandals, the openlook, is in.
Scarves are the trend-setting accessories in
demand. The look is color and design and the
wearers are men and women. Scarves may be tied
around the neck, worn in the hair, or fastened on
the waist.
Donigans Becky Forbes, salesclerk, couldn't
decide which sex was buying more scarves.
Get set, go and run to buy the newest look
that promises to be big the safari look.
Mrs. Liza Kephart, manager of Franklins
Town and College Shop, defines this as a style of
dresses and blouses. They are generally long
sleeved, sheer, have a high convertible collar, and
the dresses are belted. Shirts have bustline
pockets.
The weather may be hot now, guys, but look
to the future for cooler days and fantastic styles.
Robbins, owner of Stag 'N Drag has just returned
from a fashion show in New York and says fake
fur is the item youll desire for that outerwear
sweaters and jackets.

FLEA MARKET
FRIDAY JUNE 6
REITZ UNION TERRACE
11:00 AM 6:OOPM
See classified Personal
: 392-1655

Thursday, Juna 5,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, Aina 5,1969

Page 6

Summer Jobs
Still Available
V 77 --- \j.
If you are still looking for a
job this summer, Student
Governments Office of Labor
may be able to help you.
A number of summer jobs all
over the country are still
available, most in the recreation
field.
Interested students should
contact Jay Scott in the SG
offices on the third floor of the
Reitz Union.

New State University, FTU, Drops Kequirea rt

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
A second state university has joined the ranks of
those dropping required physical education, but the
prospects for the same happening to UF are still
remote for the near future.
Florida Technological University, Orlandos new
four-year state institution, announced it will drop
required PE, in a move similar to that by Florida
State University last year.
UF students, however, shouldnt be making plans
on selling gym equipment in the near future, as no
such move is planned for Florida.
Weve nothing on the fire just now, said Vice
President for Academic Affairs Fredrick Conner.
However, he said, this doesnt mean that the
issue is dead. Were always reviewing the possibility

Special Projects Head
Needed For Summer

Union Program Council is
looking for someone to take
over the Union Board Special
Projects Committee this
summer.
The qualifications are to be
able to explain that the
Friendship Walk isnt really
crooked, finding out what to do
with left over Goodfellow
Certificates and getting more
fraternities to work on the
various projects the committee
has spearheaded.
Present Chairman Sherri Cox
said the replacement will only be
for the summer, but the
committees work must continue
despite the ordinary summer
slowdown^
As for the Friendship Walk,
Miss Cox said several people
have asked why the walk appears
to have been built crooked.
Actually it isnt, she said.
Plants and Grounds is planning
to build an ellipse in the Plaza
and our walk will be one of the
paths coming out of the ellipse.
Other paths in the plaza will
be tom up and rebuilt to
conform to the ellipse.
Getting help to lay bricks has
been a problem.

VIRGINS
UNITE
TONIGHT
GIRLS DRINKS
2 5C
BPM TIL
mm

DROPOUTS __
JJISWERS TO j

UFS PROSPECTS FOR SIMILAR ACTION REMOJE

Goodfellow certificates are
a recent project of the Special
Projects Committee. More than
100 were given last week at a
special banquet honoring
students who served the campus
without recognition.
Weve still got several dozen
left, she said. Not all clubs
and organizations submitted the
name of a member to receive a
certificate, so the summer
chairman will have to work at
giving all those out as well.

from a legal standpoint.
UF, however, will begin offering one hour of
credit next year for its required program of PE.
Each upper division college will be able to reserve
the right to raise their requirements for graduation
by several hours for students who have received
pass-fail credit for physical education.
Both FSU and FTU have dropped mandatory PE
on a ruling by Attorney General Earl Faircloth that
physical education is not a statuatory requirement
in Florida.
FSU originally asked for the ruling last year, and
began voluntary PE during the Spring 6B quarter.
FTUs voluntary program begins this September.
Dr. C.B. Gambrell, Vice-President for Academic
Affairs at FTU, said the Orlando colleges new
program would not go as far as the FSU one.

/ STUFF \
/ jpawl wggsij

Wishbone
introduces
Fish&ChiPS
with a brave
new two
for one offer.
Try our new Fish&Chips
served in the authentic
British tradition. Fresh Jt i'W
cod filet with generous
chunks of Idaho potatoes. v >
Dinner for
two. only *1.25
I?ts| C ?^^ FRIDAY JUNE 5 AND 6
AT THE LOCATIONS LISTED BELOW.
?**&SS A,,n "- PEN,N SOON AT 6th Avenue S M., 5t,.., S.E. 4,1. .. WIIIMon *<

BY HOWARD POST
( MY^VbRTTj^I

All we are doing is eliminating the PE
requirement for graduation, Gambrell said. We
are still planning to put a great deal of emphasis
upon having students continut in the program.
FTUs original physical education program
carried a one hour credit per course, with three
courses required during the freshman, sophomore or
junior year.
We are going to respectfully ask that all
students remain in the program, Gambrell said,
but no one will be forced to take it.
PE will become one of the elective courses
offered in the general education section of the
curriculum.
FTUs decision came on the recommendation of
the colleges Council of Deans, Admissions
Committee and the faculties of several colleges
within the university.



PR Manager
Appointed
Rick Dupuis, 4JM, has been
appointed promotion manager
for UF Student Publications.
Dupuis, a former Canadian
journalist, will be responsible for
building a better image of the
Alligator, the Seminole and the
Florida Quarterly, both on
campus and throughout the
state. He will be especially
concerned with reaching
students who are now in junior
college or high school.
Dupuis comes to Student
Publications with a background
in public relations and news
gathering. He has worked as a
reporter and photographer for a
newspaper, produced a television
show and served as Canadian
news editor for an American
radio station. He worked with

FEC Reopens in Fall
No Summer Classes;

The Florida Experimental
College (FEC) will not be
offering classes during the
summer, but will be sponsoring
non-credit courses again in the
fall.
As part of the free university
system, the college offered 13
courses in its inaugural winter
quarter and offered 32 classes in
the spring. Spring registration
was about 250 students.
The FEC challenges the
student to assume responsibility
for his own education. The
underlying philosophy is that a
person learns more effectively
that which he wants and needs
to learn.
An attempt is made to create
a benign learning environment.
Sessions are informal and
unstructured with student
interest determining much of the
direction of the course. Classes
are open to students, student
spouses and members of the
community. There is a one
dollar registration fee.
In an effort to explore
McLuhans world, photography,
tapes and field trips are used as
teaching aids.
At this time we are
concentrating on the fall
program. The leadership is not
available to offer courses in the
summer, said Hank Gooch,
member of the FEC Executive
Committee.
m
11, 2, 3 BEDROOM
GARDEN APARTMENTS
Special
Summer Rates
Start At sllO.
Gator-Town
Apartments
309 S.W. 16th Arenue

v* 1 1
- A M jf§^
m
H I A JB!
RICK DUPUIS
... takes over promotions
the Chamber of Commerce in
Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario where
he served both as assistant
manager and acting manager. He
has also worked in the area of
industrial relations and
community relations with a large
Canadian company.

The college has no official
connection with UF, although it
has generated enthusiasum and
interest among UF factuly
members.
King 'Faro
The card game Faro got its
name because one of the kings in
an old French deck of cards
resembled an Egyptian Pharoah,
says Colliers Encyclopedia.

WSr TOP TEN H IT
[7 RECORDS ARE HERE!
1. TOO BUSY THINKIN ABOUT MY BABY-MARVIN GAYE 6. GITARZANRAY STEVENS
2. CISSY STRUTMETERS 7. LOVE MANOTIS PEDDING
3. GET BACK-BEATLES 8. BAD MOON RISINGCREEDENCE CLEARWATER
4. GRAZIN' IN THE GRASS-FRIENDS OF DISTINCTION 9. OH, HAPPY DAYSEDWIN HAWKINS \ A
5. CHOKIN KINDJOE SIMON TO. ATLANTIS-DONOVAN
birthday ALL |1
ALLLPs 45S 1
OFF
Use Your Central Charge Free Parking
Open 9-6


Hilliard And Dippenworth
Given Leadership Awards

Joe Hilliard and Janet Dippenworth were
honored Sunday night at the Annual Leadership
Awards Banquet in the J.Wayne Reitz Union
Ballroom with presentation of the male and female
Outstanding Student Leader Awards for 1968-1969.
The banquet and the awards were sponsored by
the Union Program Council.
Sherry Jo Cox, Chairman of the Special Projects
Committee of the Council, notified all student
organizations to present their nominees for
outstanding student leaders. Judging the applicants
were Dr. Delton Scudder, Chairman of the Religion
Department, Mr. Robert C. Dawson, Program
Director of the Union, Aylene Harper, Assistant
Program Director. Other judges were Diane Baron,
President of Pan-hellenic Council, Randy Williams, a
first-year law student, and Carol Sanger, Executive
Editor of the Alligator.
Hilliard, nominated by Clyde Taylor,
representing Student Government, has been active
in SG dating back to the presidency of Buddy
Jacobs in 1966-1967 when Hilliard was an
administrative aide. He was also Interior Secretary
in the cabinet of Charles Shepherd during
1967-1968. His outstanding activity this year has
been his service as Director of the Rathskeller. In
addition, Hilliard is a member of ODK and has
served as its Treasurer, and is Accent Chairman for
the 1970 program.

VETERANS
Ba a commercial pilot!
NEW G. I. Bill pay* for
Flight Training Call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Araa's only approvaif school
378-2646

i nifiMnm i
mmmammmmmmm ! I ! mu m w
OPTICIANS

Thursday* June 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

I assume that I was given the award on the basis
of my work with the Rathskeller, said Hilliard,
who was the originator of the idea for such an
institution on campus. The most satisfying thing I
have done in my activities at UF is to conceive of an
idea and work with it and watch it solidify.
Miss Dippenworth has so actively pushed for
women's rights on campus that she has been named namedby
by namedby friends in Student Government as no. 1
Suffragette at the UF. During Shepherd's first
presidential term she was chairman of a study
commission which turned in a report which noted a
lack of opportunity for women on campus. Since
then, she noted, three women were appointed to
Clyde Taylors cabinet, and two women are now
serving in Shepherds cabinet.
In September of 1968 one never found a
woman in charge of any program. But now I think
the barriers are slowly coming down. I think
opportunities are available when they werent a year
ago. Girls now only need to be qualified.
Miss Dippenworth is Chairman of Savant, a
member of Mortar Board, and was named AWS
Woman of the Year in 1968. But she is more
satisfied with her direct work with people. She has
been resident advisor in Hume Hall for the past two
years and has participated in the orientation
programs to womens dormitories.

Page 7



Page 8

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 5, 1969

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
~ is the exercise of responsibility.
Dave D ucette
rWgEfy Editpr-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
PwfciW Managing Editor
M\ :
k Carol Sanger Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
Executive Editor News Editors
Students Exploited
MR. EDITOR:
I concur wholeheartedly with your editorial: University City,
Hah! as it applies to the University City Bank. Over a routine matter
of getting an out of town check cashed ($15.00), a minor hassle
developed when one of the Board of Directors, Mr. Johnson, did not
accept the UF picture ID as valid identification (Well, you know a
lot of students are leaving town this week, and we lose a lot of money
that way.) This gentleman promptly suggested that if I didnt like his
way of doing business, I should just part company and not try to
screw the bank out of $15.00. Very insulted at this obvious
discourtesy, I promptly terminated my account.
While waiting to talk to the president on this matter, Mr. Johnson
attempted to prevent our complaint from being heard. It was then
that he showed his true colors, and, we believe the true colors of the
UCB. We told him we didnt like his supercilious attitude and obvious,
unwarranted contempt toward us. It was extremely difficult for him
to understand why one student, Miss Viscardi, would sympathise with
the mistreatment of another. She replied she didnt like doing business
with a bank that doesnt practice what it preaches, i.e., courteous
service.
He asked us why we wanted to see the president. We replied that
we had a just complaint and a right to present it. He laughed. He
informed us that HE had been on the Board of Directors for 15 years,
and WE were merely people the president had never laid eyes on.
The president would never listen to us, he said; furthermore, we were
still wet behind the ears. Just because youve been in college for five
years doesnt mean you know everything.
We said we werent the only ones dissatisfied with this bank; there
were plenty of others. He replied that that statement was obviously
untrue: Look at these lines of people; were the fastest growing bank
in Gainesville. Then he was presumptuous enough to say, The bank
wont be hurt by a few students.
This episode with a man who was, as he told us, an important
man in the bank illustrates the basic philosophy and motivation of
the banks management (money, not people). The tellers smile and
ask, How are you? but the managers know how you are you are a
dishonest, conniving college student trying to get away with as much
as you can during your brief stay in Gainesville. Both of us have
done business with the UCB for the last four years as a matter of
convenience, but as a matter of principle, the convenience does not
make up for their underlying distrust and exploitation of students.
EDWARD HAMMOND, 4AS
LORRAINE VISCARDI, 7AS

Fifth Column

STUDENT PROGRAM OF
THE YEAR: Accent 69. This
was a close race with the Accent
program just nosing (no pun
intended) out last years Gator
Growl. Irregardless of the
subsequent controversy over the
Accent Committee, the program
itself was an intellectual, and at
times emotional experience for
all who attended. It was in the
best traditions of a scholastic
community, and it brought
well-known and controversial
speakers to the campus for all to
hear. The questions raised during
the program were pertinent and
relevant (i.e. the ensuing Megill
hassle), and the quality of the
program will be hard to match in
future programs.
TEAM OF THE YEAR: The
football team. Many will
disagree, citing the Tennis or
Golf team or the Basketball
team due to its NIT bid. But
when you consider the preseason
build-up, followed by the
disastrous Georgia game, one is
forced to admire the unity and

The Second Annual Straight Awards

desire displayed in the fantastic
win over Miami. No team will
ever be more down or come
back better than the Gators did
against Miami.
ADMINISTRATOR OF THE
YEAR: A double award, one
male, one female. Dean Harry H.
Sisler of the College of Arts and
Sciences gets the nod for his
continuing work and
perserverance in the area of race
relations. Due to his leadership,
there is a strong chance that an
Upward-Bound program will be
started next year in order to
prepare under-privileged high
school students for admission to
college. With little controversy
or publicity, Dean Sisler has
already started several black
study courses and is working on
more. Dean Betty Cosby gets the
award for her continual good
work as Dean of Women. If all
the administrators were as
honest, as willing to listen, as
uncondescending as Dean Cosby,
this school would not have the
Tigert-Student gap that

EDITORIAL,, D
All In Fun, But...

Spring. The days grow longer and hotter.
The nights, shorter and muggier.
Students press the books as the year
draws to its interminable end. lhe
unrelenting pressure is racing for its climax.
A young mans fancy .. and the beat goes
on.
As the bewitching hour of midnight
nears, exhausted minds and restless emotions
fuse. Down on the Row, the teams square
off for mortal combat with water hoses.
Panting and dripping, the victors shout
their prowess, the losers vow a rematch. And
the growing crowd of watchers cheers both
teams.
Rambunctious with spring fever and tired
of the regimen of three quarters of study,
the crowd becomes aware of its entity and is
primed for action. On a sticky spring night
-when a young mans fancy ... action spells
panty raid.
The chant fills the midnight air: PANTY
RAID, PANTY RAID. Scantily-clad young
men pour out of fraternity houses and
dorms, and several hundred shouting
fun-seekers charge down Radio Road toward
Graham and Hume halls.
The crowd and its bravado grows.
What happens next depends on a number
of factors, perhaps the most important of
which is the path taken by rampant,

-9^^ mkL./1
\ *"% y f I -/* j A. : nT : - o^gttgk.
t < 'JI ? *^mUJi' jiij
r **' |||

presently exists.
TEACHER OF THE YEAR:
Dean Henry Fenn of the Law
School. An example of his
dedicaton will explain. Two
years ago Dean Fenn taught a
course in contracts. He had not
taught it again until this quarter.
But he had taped every one of
the classes two years ago. He
correlates those tapes with his
present classes to insure that any
difficulty incurred by the
students two years ago will not
re-occur. His friendliness and
professional demeanor make one
proud to be a law student.
FRATERNITY OF THE
YEAR: Alpha Tau Omega wins
in a close race. Whereas one or
two other fraternities may have
more specific brothers in
extra-curricular activities, that
alone does not make a good
house. Along with such
intangibles as pride, style, and
brotherhood, constructive
activities by the house as a
whole won the award for the
ATO s. Their quiet but thorough

planning and organization of the
Gator Olympics for the benefit
of Johnny Samuels was a
refreshing relief from the usual
pat-me-on-the-back attitude of
most fraternities when they do a
community service project.
SORORITY OF THE YEAR:
Delta Phi Epsilon. This wasnt
even close. One of the few
sororities that emphasies studies
for more than just a collective
grade-point average, the
Deephers have a high degree
of campus activity involvement
and yet maintain their
individuality as persons and are
not just sorority girls. Their
volunteer work at Sunland
Training Center and active
participation in SAMSON are
welcome changes in the usual
beauty contest syndrome of
most sorority particpation;
which is not to imply that the
girls arent pretty they are
that and more.
STUDENT OF THE YEAR:
Clyde Taylor. Although Clydes
on-campus reputation mav he

unpredictable mob psychology. It can drive
a group of fun-loving men into a rampaging
mob, its rationality drowned by crowd
hysteria and personal anonymity.,
The scene is a familiar one on our
campus. Nearly every spring as finals loom
on the horizon, the action starts, s
Supposedly, its all in fun. Usually. Most
of the time.
A panty raid can be generally acceptable,
relatively clean college fun. Or it can become
a destructive riot.
Such is not the stuff universities are made
of. The innocent panty raid could, like
wildfire through dry brush, quickly explode
into a riot, with resulting personal injuries
and destruction of property.
Furthermore, as Student Body President
Charles Shepherd noted in a statement
Tuesday, the recent midnight raids are
disruptive and interfere with the rights of
other students who may be sleeping or
studying.
The pursuit of knowledge must be first in
what we do here. The exhilaration of fun is
important, too. But it has a time and a place.
Midnight in front of Broward hall is
neither.
So lets get back to the important
business at hand. Before something more
serious, something we may all regret,
happens.
-i mm f/lIBU

Jason Straight

somewhat gamy, his
representation as student body
president to the state at large
was admirable. For all his bluster
about left-wing radicals, no
one was quicker or more
obdurate in the defense of
student dissent, whether the
criticism came from Tigert or
from Tallahassee or from the
news media. With a minimum of
press releases, his administration
made many contributions to the
students of this university.
The
Florida
Alligator
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices
in Room 330, Reitz Union, Phone
Ext. 2832.



FORUM:
(AAiia cud Viaut /)
hope fnr n.
4
Tenure Is Needed
MR. EDITOR:
Kenneth Megill is at it again. (Florida Alligator, May 30,1969) The
same tired cliches. Yes, every professor has a right to employment
provided he or she is able and competent to do the job as teacher and
scholar. The first priority of the University is to provide a faculty
accomplished in teaching and scholarly enterprise. The provision of
jobs must logically be a spin off the primary goal.
In practice, the faculty (and hopefully in the near future the
students may also make a contribution) judge their fellow members in
the awarding to tenure. In some few instances the administration may
feel compelled to question the wisdom of the facultys actions since
tenure in effect weds the University to the faculty member.
The administration has the duty and the right to be convinced that
the faculty member to be tenured is fully competent as a teacher and
scholar. To do otherwise would be a neglect of their job
responsibilities. Such action on the part of the administration is a
serious step for which there should be proper justification. Such
action does not of itself constitute a violation of an employees
security but helps insure that the granting of tenure will result in
the most effective faculty.
For those who will look behind the facade erected by Dr. Megill
concerning faculty and student control of their own working
situation they will see a more inflexible and freedom-deficient
administration deciding the fate of faculty and students alike.
DANIEL BILLEN
Professor of Radiation Biology

Another View

(EDITORS NOTE: Major Russell
Ramsey, ROTC instructor and former
chairman of the Action Conference, is
now leaving the UF to complete a
doctoral disseratation at Columbia
University this summer. He will return
to UF in the fall to teach a Latin
American History course.)
For the past three years it has been
my privilege to teach Army ROTC on
this campus. I believe that all who
despair for American society would
find, as I have, that college students of
this era are the real hope for a better
world. I saw American youth perform
with valor and self-restraint in Vietnam;
I saw their intense quest for knowledge
and values on this campus. They are the
most responsible, dedicated, and well
informed youth in 'the history of our
nation.
cfifAtgjh to views of a
r. ( £_ ... -j Jk -'i 4T r $ t
C'vfOt '* VUVfv
soviet Y* I way# . Fls; last
£s), : Sr : T
ft ; T m . e of
'aj i s k
-'A v *s j|!
V-ft * *'. w^#.ir-.JL-, -.> W f ; V Ai WVJ J, 4 .r
way of 'goodbyeafcs
you for if
campus life.
Societies contain individuals and
minority groups which take the light of
violence into their own hands from time
to time. The causes are many: moral,
social, economic, criminal, and political.
All the citizens have a basic right to be
protected from violence and disruption,
from all sources, and simultaneously to
express peaceful dissent without fear of
retribution.
On one side people shout for law and
order. On the other side they agitate for
greater latitudes, fewer restraints. And
both sides miss the fundamental value
which is at stake: the neutrality of
societys peacekeeping mechanisms. The

A Neutral Force To Maintain Peace

policeman is not hired to punish sin, nor
to tolerate minority disruptions. His is
not the mission of enforcing social
orthodoxy, or of obstruction behavior
which is merely bizarre. At the same
time, his mission is not to stand aside
while groups which usurp to themselves
a monopolistic claim to a superior
morality disrupt society or cause
violence.
The policeman who clubs a peaceful
protester is in the wrong; so is the
person who naively ascribes moral
motives to a protester who threatens a
policeman with villification or with
violence. The issue is neutrality. Police
manuals have stated this for a century,
but in the current waves of
emotionalism we seem to have formed
the erroneous notion that one side or
V>. efff&er hr
|MeM&i
The deesa?* *s W *ip6^ : ?WiP
kt m im hsmk, fraaifc, ifey: .
wllp. vosftfidK' U-i
- >:: T
*ri
which wiwA hv
ApT "id, ipi:
ife .ftsu* m vmjtdfi
' hlm.
rn-c their Vs ufrslity-fcs a
for learning -iiacTnig iSd* It values
wldcli they .idficvnoc Ty their Twn
partisan causes. Tliey s:
action against a certain county and
believe that the military mans
endorsement of their views will help
sway their countrymen. Or they desire
military withdrawal from a region and
seek a military mans reservations about
the efficacy of successful combat in that
zone.
The military man must be intelligent
enough, and concerned enough, to
inform himself of ail possible influences"
which his existence can have; intelligent
enough to recognize that even neutrality

MR EDITOR:
Weve been hearing an awful lot of criticism of
University College lately, but someone seems to be
overlooking one fact Those who scream loudest
are those few people who get screwed and
receive a D or an E. They all claim they were
given a D or an E. When if they get an A, they
EARNED an A.
Mr. Sistrunks article in which he relates how he
dissuaded his sister form attending U. of F.s
University College in favor of Junior College, is a
sad example of the all too-prevelent disinterested
student claiming theat the U. of F. is a Trivia
Factory.
Sure, CBS 262 contains tons of useless trivia,
but it was intended as a pacifier for those who
would not enroll for a more enlightening course.
Their majors arent technical so they scream, We
dont want all this super-scientific technical stuff.
Their horizons are so narrow that they dont care to
learn about the world they live in or the other living
creatures they share it with.
The University College gives ample opportunity
for people with true intellect to substitute more
stimulating courses for those pacifiers I mentioned.

JP U LAW
Br &
ORDER?

lgaOlSayigiCJ.V wit 'v- 'O-r? 'i-.V 'S. 4-

iS.;
f# fmTfds ]^4a^y
eff/cacy oc eveii cast
aside by civiligp
He knew?, the alteiuajive-miila)jii
hulucijo?. oehmd the dft-dsion to w
avoid conflict is railed a
malady which alters the 'fundamemal
values of his society, and the precepts
upon which his military service ft based.
Rarely has the conscious neutrality
of the military officer been described
accurately. A profesional soldier
Major General Frank Merrill of
Merrills Marauders which fought in f
Burma in World War II passed away in
December, 1955. His obituary in Time
Magazine began with these words:
It is the destiny of the
professional soldier to wait in

A Defense Os UC

Thunday, Juna 5,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Chemistry for Physical Science, Zoology or Botany
for CBS, and Mathmatics for Logic. Honors courses
are available for Humanities, English, and
Institutions which eliminate the trivia in the
instruction. (It is assumed that an Honors student is
already familiar with these pieces of trivia.) We
havent heard from anyone complaining because
they received an A.
The really regretful thing that Mr. Sistrunk has
done is to prevent his sister from becoming
acquainted with the greatest (yes, the Greatest) part
of college the acquaintance with hundreds of
people who teach by just being there. The U. of F.
is a place where a person can learn fifty times more
about life and its values in his dorm than in a class.
Thats the value of a college education, Mr. Sistrunk
the PEOPLE one meets. Only from meeting and
reacting with and among people can a person find
the answer to the question Who am I?
I have nothing but regret and pity for your sister,
who, because of your selfishness, has been
persuaded to give up the best part of college and to
attend a Junior College all because of your D in
CBS 262.
ROBERT STANTON, 3A$

The streets of our country are in
turmoil The Universities are filled with
students rebelling and rioting.
Communists are seeking to destroy our
country. Russia is threatening us with her
might and the Republic is in danger. Yes,
danger from within and from without. We
need law and order. Yes, without law and
order our nation cannot survive. Elect us
and we shall restore law and order.
Adolph Hitler, Hamburg, 1932

By Russell Ramsey

m iiM&
& &fe>. :.V ve ?J '* tifectMf/ 40000
i>yqfc£blii ?oJd2S&* ia have
' mi p&x&b& £_
w u a
tut the military
profession have usually grasped the full
import of those words. Generally, these
citizens are too thoughtful and too well
informed to be caught up in such
shallow, emotional dichotomies as
hawks or doves, patriots or
cowards, or militarists or pacifists.
They know that peace is always
preferable and frequently even possible.
And like the good policeman or the
thoughtful military officer, they know
that the issue concerning societal force
is neutrality.

Page 9



Page 10

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 5, 1969

i Prices effective thru
V- ta Wednesday noon, June 11,1969 jj^H
r cf>lSE soup- 1 Quantity rights reserved
CHILLED YOGURT
IMI r ottl
gummeKime.fe
\ w i 7 MCtft6&to f A&apwM. (£*
Vv-jb ( i\
Baby Food T- 9 { T | I
Fruit Drinks ... 3 ?.r 1 V J I
Tomato Juice IHM|f^yy||B^H
Salad Traat,
Pear Halves .. 4 cans #3OO t Qc
FtP Flavor Perfect Fruit Napkins 3 XV. 99 c Kidney Beans .. 2 cans
s --- 91 eg #303 $H 7 s.i Gr... oqi
*OCKlail can, Dog Food 6 ;-- 99 c Caesar Dressing .. U JV
Golden Corn 2 "* 29 c cut Beets ? io c Dill pickles
D..,.. o..r, COc Petite Peas 4 ' $ 1 B1 f Peanut Butter '
asOll(Cr
White or Asserted Colors TOVYIOtO SflUCe 10 Orape Jelly
Kleenex * P<... Sandwiches £ 43' Tomato Catsup 23
KIOMMX White ar Decorator Colors N.blsc. Mary Kitchen Roast #J O3 A,Q c
Paper Towels 3 T,u 99* Potato Snacks *3T 39= Beef Hosh 4
-A*
* Prices effective thru large medium personal safeguard zest heavy duty
Wednesday noon, June 11,1969 ivory soap ivory soap ivory soap deodorant soap beauty bar lava soap
Quantity rights reserved 2 *2. 39c 2 h-r. 25c 4 -"> 33c 2 45 c 2 tl 45c 2 *" 29c



(WOufi Dcii/tu Dept.
eliciou. Dairi-Fresh g. |b
Cottage Cheese 59 c
ro Sliced tnd. Wrapped <
jalami Cheese o9 e
Wisconsin Cheese lor Mild __
.onghorn Cheese . 89
Medium Cheddar 67 c
:ro ft Aborted 8-ox. CCc
Cheese Dips -p 55
(Blue, Onion, Clam or Bacon-Horseradish)
(raft's (4c off label) # 1-lb < m
Miracle Margarine .... .; 35
Kraft's (4c off label) |..| b mm c
Whipped Parkay 45
Pill.bury's 9Vi-ox. nn c
Cinnamon Rolls can oo
Breakstone's! rangy 6 . x.
Sour Cream *. ov
Cheese 5pread......... m 99
Fam (W Wedt Deft
e
iwift's Premium Flaworful
Sliced Bacon U 9 79 c
Swift's Premium Boneless Canned
Hostess Hams ~ $ 4
(Plus 200 Extra S&H Green Stamps with coupon!)
Premium Label/ All Meat |-lb A
Swift's Franks p" 69 c
Swift's Premium Butter-Basted (all light meat) 2.|b. .
Turkey Roast pkg- *3
Swift's Premium Butter-Basted (light & dark)
Turkey Roast It *2
Armour's Star Nutritious Sliced
Beef Liver '> 59'
Tarnow's Zesty Flavored r
Smoked Sausage 1" 79 c
Herman's Orange-Band Variety Pak or 1-lb n
Sliced Salami 79'
(Plus 50 Extra SAH Green Stamps with coupon)
Swift's Premium Sandwich Spread or
Braunschweiger ... e e chub 3 5
Rath's Tasty Honey Cured %
Boneless Ham ,b $ 1 39
(Plus 100 Extra S&H Green Stamps with coupon)
Copeland's Tasty, Fresh Sliced 5-ox. 10-ox. 16-ox.
Bologna .. 29' 49' 69'
Seafood Treat, Ready-to-Eat
Smoked Mackerel V 79'
Seafood Treat, Fresh Tasty
Flounder Fillets V 89'

1 11 1 !* !_M-kAIXIJ
HfVT i^H

PUBLIX
i f SHOPPING CENTER' WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
GAINESVILLE MALL GAINESVILLE Univewity Avenue a t 34th Street
2630 N.W. 13th Street 1014 N Maln Street store. hour.: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Set

l,:_ renew your drivers
u mr clean downy Camay biz
spic & span comet ; liaukfcleaner liquid cleaner fabric softener toi | e t soap (new pre-soak) license in your
r cleaner cleanser *- 6 ** 31c 2 37c

Rtem Oiw, fWn Fewt Dept.
Pictswoot Froxen Florida Orongo Cone.
Orange Juice .. 6 !7. *1 ,#
Minute Maid Froxen Cenc.
Lemonade .... 4 t, 49 c
Stauffer's Frexen Chicken, Beef or Turkey
Pot Pies pkT 49 c
Ore-fda Frexen Crinkle Cut Potatoes or
French Fries e e 3 pkgs. 89 c
Southland Froxen
Green Beans Vo, 39 c
Booth's Family-Pack Froxon
Fish Sticks U 59 c
Singleton's Froxon Stuffed
Fillet of Flounder .. X 49 c

j Dont
I redeem your[o^^l
I Good only through |une 11 for
FREE MASTERPIECE lB
Don't miss a chance to collect your FREE \ / m K-.';:-:'
reproductions of famous paintings! \ W:|:


L I
Hpp y

SWIFT'S PREMIUM
PROTEN GOV'T.
inspected heavy rrolen
WESTERN BEEF SALE

Dbuw fWuce Lute
U.S. No. 1 Fotatoes
Red Bliss 10 ut A9
Crisp Salad Perfect
Bell Peppers ..... 3 "3*
Tender Western large
Cauliflower head 39
Sweet Juicy 0000*
Pineapples 3 89
Fresh Florida Tropicana
Orange Juice 69*

Swift's Premium Proten Bone-In
Pot Roast 1" 79*
Swift's Premium Proten Boneless English Cut
Beef Roast 1"1.09
Swift's Premium Proten, Grillin' Good!
Chuck Steaks 1 79*
Swift's Premium Proten
Beef Short Ribs lb. 59 c

Heaftft
Auk Special
Extra Dry
Arrid
Deodorant
8.8-oz. nn (
can trm
Mouthwash
Antiseptic
Listerine
ST 89*

Fftmi Oia (Mcaleuoi Dept. |
Fresh or Smoked )
Liverwurst 99' |
Kitchen-fresh
Potato Salad 39 c j
Freth Zesty Flavored
Cole Slaw 39 c
Always A Family Favorite!
Bar-B-Q Fryers .... 1b r 79 c

Thursday, June 5. 1969, The Florida Alligator,

EXTRA W.M
4tfGreenStampsM
WITH THIS cogfON AN* rgtCNAta # BUfll
Swift's Premium Boneless
r Canned Hostess Hams
S four pound can
I 1. (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969)
EXTRA IS3I
MareenStampspy
I Rath's Tasty Honey Cured
Hostess Hams
2 (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969) |
ini
Wishbone 1
Italian Dressing |
16-oz. bottle
; 3 (Expires Wed. June 11, IHt) I
xaaaaaaaaftftanaftftaa'annMimMMMMMMiinAaA*
EXTRA pr^i
Pepsodent
Toothpaste
5-oz. tube
;4. (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969)
jfaftftflftftflftftflxaaaeoafaaAaaaaaaftaflflaaaAK
EXTRA
Stamps py
WITH IHI COUPON AND PUOCHASi O,
{Assorted Styles & Sizes
VO-5 Shampoo
5 (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969)

fllll JWG reeri Sta mps P]
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUICHASI Os
100-ct. bottle
Anacin Tablets
A. (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969)
aaaaaaaaaPaAaaAaaaaaaftaA AaaX
7 EXTRA fT'"%
-JwGreenStampspy
WITH THIS COUPON AMD PUICHASI Os WhM
> Herman's Orange-Band !|
IVariety-Pak or Sliced Salami !|
1-lb. pkg. !j
7. (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969) ;|
EXTRA W"'^
IPublix Corn Oil
Margarine
1-lb. ctn.
8. (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969)
<
jaaaaaaaaAAAaftftaaAfaAAaAaaftftftaAAaaA^
Rn^GrlenStampsP
FreeZer Queen
Gravy & Sliced Beef
2-lb. pkg. T
9 (Expires Wed. June 11, t 969) |
XAAAA^AAeAAAAAAAAIAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA*
EXTRA W"'%
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUICNAtI Os HHiiidi
I. <
Brilliant Frozen <
Cooked Shrimp <
10-oz. pkg. <
10. (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969) <
xaaaaananftaaaaaaaaaafeaaaAaaAaeAaaeAaeJ
M EXTRA P-'
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUICHASI OF IHftiiitf
> Regular or
Super Kotex
pkg. of 12

11* (Expires Wed. June 11, 1969)
xaaaAaaaftftaaftaaaAafcaaAaAAaaaaaaaaaa:
pH
Where shopping
is a pleasure
>

Page 11



Page 12

(VSffifih ONLY TWO WEEKS
YOUR GRANADA
COMPLETE YOUR SET AT
ISSljiK C Jj
cocktail 3 i|
Bp £1 £ i 1 I 1 Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Wd. Noon thru Wed. Noon June 5-11
I mWp mM § 'wtf 9 \ A coPYrneHT-wiNM-Dixie storks, inc.isss
No. t Can van camts Vienna m AS J? R SUPERBRAND Gr. 'A'All White Fresh Flo. LARGE
Sausage 5/$l ||l|| Oi| 39* EfldS 2 001 89*
NaMO Ca STOKELY CUT AG -- f||f P f WlB W Ml MM 4# Jfal WJW
e|ei|||iiei|||t V/ Cl M&&M / - Quart KRAFT MIRACLE WHIP
K w Mirade Whip 59-
F*MMSn STOKELY VAN CAMPS DOLLAR SALE
tomato catsup s/m.
f,PFFN BEANS SPI
Limit I Coffee of Choice w/$5. or more purchase Exclud. Cigarettes I
con st kely wh kernel
UipPb No. 303 Can STOKELY 3-Sv. ALASKA GREEN Juice...4/sl.
HP PI PBBU |p STOmY TOMATO
1-LB. CAN 1-LB. CAN 303 c " sto ly sliced j III CG l
To MA "' ,LL tebp^S^Carrots6/$ 1. iES: o/*
3|| M Beans 4/sl.
JTr MJT Beans 5/sl. Beans 5/sl.
IMoAHAAf C/#! Co green
No. 2Vfc Con STOKELY YC Sliced or naives VV f?frllfrCs 9/ I # Kf*flllC A/ \l
ff%r* A T No. 300 Con VAN CAMP SPANISH / 1
PEACHES 3/89'lPP Rice....5/sl. cinZt7sl.
GIANT GAIN 49' PAPER TOWELS 3/89<
Gt. White, Blue or Cold Water Arrow I imit 1 deergent of choice w/$5. or more pur. exd. cig 250-Ct. ARROW §
DETERGENT. 39- PAPER NAPKINS 29-
ESISis3 i till!/ j Hili J w vKSTEKfe tbTiTitMyTu% liCT J.llg a 1 i
| ONK CHAISE I N, WM coupon and 0* TOP VALUE STAMPS I; TW VALUE STAMPS I '
000 n 2 OOD "^ UNt 1 oooo^H*u^uNi r i 1 JooD^ er l Electric"sweeper '' V N IM q^|
2* LOG CABIN I V 4 Con RED BIRO jacks Eli..iSmimSSam,,
Syrup Potted Meat .. Cherry Tarts .... 43* Margarine 'Am
1 Vienna Sausage . 2/23r Fudge Sandwiches . MargaHne" 3/t|
' ; SJ > .! {i i. '*. ~mL

!, The Florida Alligator, Thu reday, June 5. 1969



LEFT to complete
DINNERWARE SERVICE
ANY WINN-DIXIE UNTIL JUNE 18th __x|§|§§fs^
swift's premium __ _
m|ms
BAKING HEN5.....-.39 ,£&%
SfiwKTO^^MTcfoiY sssssi B PORK STEAKS 65* \
&!£!£, M£P N 49* NECKBONES 3-69* CtS§§SBBE2P^
SSL sl 5 18 99* TURKEY RQAST....2 $1.99 Ml. h
BEEF LIVER 59* IHf STEW?i: 2 .99* W IilH
C 9U.AGECHEESE 2 59* BEEFSTEAKS 79* W&
PORKSAUSAGE 59* PIMENTO CHEESE 59* W% fc" feS F
mNowjizzA chls|food::: 69 < wF = ff-
PORK SAUSAGE 79* VELVEETA 2 $1.19 I A a
PORK ROAST 55* CANNH) 815CU1T5.....2/39* C^AU
ICE Milk 1- si 9 pkg -'A
IVII III% JKm I # WITH COUPON below
TOPPING 2/sl. COFFEE RICH 4/SI FRESH:PRODUCE
MEAT OIhHERS... i9< FRYPOTAtO ES 3/$ I. BLUEBERRIES 49*
MACARONI 49* DONUTS 3/si. Corn 10 69* Cabbage 2 39*
Sf w hSHCAKtS 4/sl. Lemons...ll/49*Tomatoes!...-39*
BLACKBERRIES... 59- CROQUETTES.. 69- t 4,,
SajAht Cantaloupes
. rniiNTnv FRESH FROZEN I
RED RIPE :iar :Blr £ k :KT "EmSST
||l I jpeg ;
UUnrAKmPmnc itliU^^^llliiiyii^Rflil
fldlCl IH C,llll:> JJTII ilf &-*= n w
i-g-x-A. j. n i J *t .ovi ioc*i wimn 0.1.1 #97
7W GERBER JR. VEGETABLE 4 22*-oz. BETTY CROCKER FUDGE 7^z jjBBY *n l^"^-^.R, Dr.oTri..iii
Ham 3/49* Brownie Mix . . 57* Corned Beef . 45* I
7Vm rrnam MMV -.wvaSTiSKS 2J££Vj*
2r z GERBER JR. 28-oz. PETER PAH 13V4-oz
Dutch Apple . 3/49* Peanut Butter . 99* Derby. Tamales 39* ilfy SSfST i
1401 N. MAIN ST. 130 N.W. 6TH ST. 3421 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. HIWAY 441, HIGH SPRINGS

Thursday, June 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I forsalT \
i i
Minature Poodle Pups AKC Reg. 6
wks Old. White Champion Father,
Black Mother 2 Females 1 male. Call
378-5723 to see. (A-2t-152-p)
20 Flying Dutchman sailboat.,
fiberglass, dacron sails, trailer, cover
racing condition, SI4OO or best offer.
Ph 372-7982. (A-2t-152-p)
1965 Vespa 150 cc, in good
mechanical condition and with spare
tire. $75.00. Call Gary Vickers at
376-9420. (A-2t-152-p)
1965 Honda 305 hawk 8 month old
engine sport bars good
tiresextra toolselec, startmore
than transp.asking $350 make
offer. Call 372-6162. (A-2t-152-p)
Honda 50cc Model CBIIO. Good
condition S6O. Bell helmet sls. Call
378-3986. (A-2t-152-p)
HONDA S-90 Bought new in Sept,
still like new, only $250 plus helmet
and tools original cost over S4OO.
1200 mi. Call 392-8205. Come see it.
(A-2t-152-p)
B.S.A. Lightning 67 650C.C.s
$775.00. 372-8880 or 309 N.E. sth
St. (A-Jt-152-P)
Triumph 1964 speed twin 500 cc low
mileage complete with fairing, exc.
for road or woods. Light and fast.
Asking 525.00 Call Woody 378-4119.
(A-2t-152-p)
Refrigerator 11 cu. Ft. one yr. old
excellent condition $80; engagement
ring 1/5 K solitare $65; TV console
S2O; call 378-0589 anytime.
(A-lt-152-p)
Motorola 21 Television in good
condition. Best offer over S4O. Ask
for Roger after 9:00. 378-6620.
(A-2t-152-p)
Single size folding bed. Like new;
must sell quickly. $25 Call 378-7584
anytime. 1214 S.W. Ist Ave.
(A-2t-152-p)
* New 1969 zig-zag sewing maeblMfc
Theee an nationally advertleed
brand* which are adeortNed for
6169.00. Thai* machines can be
suwekeMil
purvfiniH wi oewflfi uva Trff^n
charges for 669.00 and can be paid
for 66.00 par month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1226 NC 5 Ave.
aalpeavWo (A-131-tf<)
6 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
635.00. Theda can be bispocjttd at
Ware House 1226 N 2. 5 Ave.
QameevlNe. (A-131-tf<)
Trlumpn Spitfire, conv. top &
tunau cover, r&h; new tires; good
condition, 27,500 miles, 1195 or best
offer. Call Dee after 4. 376-8991.
(A-5M48-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS. Inventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-?340. (A-18M36-C)
STARTS TODAY
forgive tliem
forgive tliem
forgive them
t r If p
starring
STELLA STEVENS
SHELLEY WINTERS
COLOR* |B|[f§
ALSO AT 10-35
"TORTURE GARDEN

| FOR SALE I
1966 Suzuki cycle 50cc, 3600 miles
great shape must sell $135 with
helmet or best offer phone 378-6360
anytime. (A-3M50-P)
Pentax Hla camera, extras $l2O,
Pentax Bellows with slide copier $75,
vivitar Micro adapter $lO, Sawyer
550 slide projector $75,
Westinghouse transistorized portable
stereo TV $l5O, G.E. portable stereo
$75. Call 376-9569 after 5:00 p.m.
(A-3t-150-P)
1965 B.S.A. 650 cc. Mechanically
Superb. Call 392-8910 after 7:30
p.m. (A-3t-151-p)
Carrier Air conditioner. 13500 BTU.
reverse cycle. l*/i years old. Good
condition. SIOO. Evenings call
378-9245. (A-3t-151-p)
Honda 90 good condition $125 or
best offer. Must sell before June 11.
Hemmi bamboo duplex slide rule
S2O. Call 372-4944 anytime,
(A-2t-151-p)
1966 SUZUKI 80, oil injection.
Good condition, must sell, leaving
country. $175 or best offer. Ph.
378-5460 after 5:30, 3308 N.W. 10th
St. (A-2t-151-p)
For sale: 1968 Honda S9O,
1200 miles of use. Including two
helmets and a tool kit taking best
offer. Inquire at the TEP house or
phone 372-6835. (A-3t-151-p)
Motorcycle bultaco 175 cc. 1966
$175. Graduating must sell: Call
Dick Landrum at 372-9363 around
7:00 p.m. (A-3M51-P)
General Electric table model
refrigerator 2V* cu. ft. ice tray
compartment, 4 mo old. Ideal for
dorm living S9O. Call Mike 372-9317
between 8 and 9 p.m. A-st-148-P)
Home for sale, $14,500, perfect
location for university people. Walk
to Univ., Med. Center, PK Yonge.
Small 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
pleasant neighborhood. Aircond.,
fenced back yard, screened porch.
5V4% FHA mortgage, $94.87 monthly
includes principal, interest, taxes,
insurance. Flexible terms on equity.
Can take S4OO-SSOO down. 1227 SW
11th Ave. Call 372-1744 for appt.
(A-8M46-P)
Toy Poodle pups white males, AKC
& pedigree 6 wks old June 14.
392-0930 after 6:30 p.m. 475-1329.
(A-5M48-P)
Original etching by Salvador Dali
S6O, also SCOTT AM-FM radio with
15in. speaker S6O. Call 378-8640.
(A-st-149-p)
17V2 Ft. SuperFolbot Kayak paddles
& seat cushions motor brack. Make
offer. 6B Eveinrude IV2 HP motor.
Melrose 475-5745 after 7 p.m.
(A-2t-151-p)
INVEST YOUR HOUSING $. 3br -1
bath $72/mth Best reasonable
offer takes it. 378-2741. 7:30-8:30
A.M. or 5-7P.M. Its a steal.
(A-3t-151-p)

i tursday special i
111 Lunch & Dinner ||||
I Roast Turkey 1
H| Dressing, Cranberry Sauce, m W jl |||
lH Choice of potato w M ||||
I FRIDAY SPECIAL K
|H Lunch & Dinner |||
I Trout Almondine 1
111 with Tartar Sauce 68*1
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS i

Page 14

The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 5, 1969

JaJMOOCGCWftSSSSiSSSSWWSSftQIWqWOWW'WC'S]
FOR RENT
§ j
Apt. for person desiring privacy in
frame house. Lge. bdrm., kitchen,
bath. $45 per, plus utilities No
hassles. Take June 15. 372-7477.
(B-2t-152-p)
Roommate, duplex apt., own
bedroom, ap, carpet, tv, IV2 blk.
behind Norman Hall. Available now.
Call Chip 376-1125. (B-2t-152-p)
Air conditioned, 2-bedroom, carport,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6. Avial
6/16/69. (B-st-152-p)
Apartments men or women will rent
to only 1 2 3 or 4 two bedroom
furnished SIOO for summer Quarter
across 13th from campus. Call Stan
or Bill at 378-5796 Located at 1236
S.W. Ist Ave. across from College
Terrace. (B-2t-152-p)
PRIVACY & Extras! S9O/summer no
roommate worries! AC, Pool, parking
1 block form campus! Cool &
contenient! CALL Mike 372-6678.
(B-2t-152-p)
Emergency. Must sub-lease one
bedroom, poolside FQ apt. no. 41 by
June 14. Call 372-3240. (B-lt-152-p)
One bedroom apt. to sublet June 15.
$77 a month. AC, patio, 4 blocks
from campus. Pets ok. 1624 NW 4
Ave. Apt. 2 378-9058. Last chance!
(B-2t-152-p)
SUBLET for summer: large IV2 story
AC apt 3V2 blocks form campus. Call
Tom Moore 378-8552, 1824 NW 3rd
Place no. 36. (P-2t-152-p)
Modem one bedroom furnished apt.
AC, private patio. To sublet for
sumeer with option to rent in fail
SBS/mo. SW 20 Ave. Call 378-7620
spm. (B-2t-152-p)
Sublease 1 bedroom at Tanglewood
Manor Cent. AC. Right on pool.
Avail. June 15 to Aug 15 or longer
$135. Call 378-0990 after 4.
(B-2t-152-p)
Spacious 2 bedroom apt. V2block
from Tigert. Air conditioned. $250
for' the summer quarter. Call
378-0441. Married couples or coeds
only. (B-2t-152-p)
SUBLET S2OO plus utilities for
summer 1 bedroom apt air cond tv
fully furnished Modern Age apts. Call
378-7196 after five. (B-5M50-P)
Economical living for male students 1
blk from campus S6O/m. Room & 3
meals/day. 5 houses dining hall, rec
room & work shop. Pro cook
members summer & fall. Vacancies.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
College liv org. (B-10t-145-P)
GUYS & GALS economical living
CLO was gone co-ed for the summer
S6O/mon. Room & meals, peace love
and freedom 1 blk. from campus.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
(B-10t-145-P)
Near campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior rhen.
For summer AND/OR 1969-70.
378-8122. 376-6652. (B-TF-138-p)
Last half of June free sublease for
summer a/c disposal pool one bed
room. Married couple or one person
only. slOl per month. 376-2791.

| FOR RENT ]j
Sublet June rent free! 2 bedrooms
dishwasher, disposal 2 bathrooms,
Spanish furniture, scenic Tanglewood
Manor, call 372-4032 summer
quarter. (B-4M50-P)
Apt. to sublet on June 15. 1 br, ac,
patio. 4 blocks from campus.
S9O/mo. Call 372-7762. (B-4M50-P)
Large one bedroom furnished apt.
AC and heated available June 15.
1825-A NW 10 St. Phone 376-4265
very nice. (B-3t-150-P)
Sublease 2-bedroom 16th Ave. apt.
TV on cable incl. Call 378-5588.
(B-3M50-P)
Arsenic and old Lace type to share
quaint two story gingerbread home
lots of wicker, grand piano two
phones loads of space. S6O a month.
No utilities, lease or deposite.
Female, 378-1964 after 5:00.
(B-3t-151-p)
Best Actor Award I
IIOMM I
JIH t* ISI
PLUS . I

Reduced
Summer Rates
' University -Gardens
=f guess
| who's
NOW I coming
Spencer, Sidney Katharine Jto dinner
TRACY 1 POITIER 1
GREAT HITS |
" 1 LOT*
I Tlp< 37-2434 LgJ J 9[l 1
fci4i
O'NEAL-TAYLOR-YOUNG l|lll||
RESTRICTED PERSONS UNDER Ift NOT ADMITTED 81111811 1888111 1111
UNLESS ACCOMPANIED BY PARENT OR ADULT GUARDIAN MHHI Ml gig WmM^m
I ENDS "A FINE I
| TODAY PAIR I
gSUMMER MOVIE CLU B TICKETS NOW ON?
| SALE-FIRST SHOW 10 A.M. THUR..JUNE 12*
V * ***** l#
| FOR RENT |
Sublet for summer: Frederick 2
bedroom apt. Reduced rates. Call
378-8134. (B-4t-149-p)
TWO bedroom apartment furnished.
Reduced summer rates. $77.50 per
month. Airconditioned. Very near
campus. No car needed. Call Mr. or
Mrs. Jones. Phone 376-5636.
(B-10t-145-P)
Poolside 2 bedroom furnished from
June 16 to August 31 at special
summer rate. Contact FREDERICK
GARDENS. (B-10t-144-c)
Help! Will need 3 male roommates/or
will sublet entire apt to anyone.
Were bound to please! Spacioulux
2 br, lVz bath, poolside, apt. 30. ph.
372-8041. (B-st-149-p)
SUBLET leaving town. Must rent for
sum qtr. UG 1-bed. linens, kit. sup.
pic. & sprds. incl. TV too if gone by
June 1. Call 378-9877. (B-6M48-P)
T
H itxh
H'i'iih



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.v,'.v o 'WMWMniinv.ww.'.i I Miiff
FOR RENT |
fa.y.SrWK iiQCOIOB MWSSBBPfIIJ l,i jUU uu fl Bift
TO Sublet. Two bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. for summer
quarter. Call 378-8564. (B-st-148-P)
STOP URGENT desperately need 2
female roommates summer qtr. at
Summit House Apts. Call 372-8716.
(B-2t-151-p)
Sublet 1 bedroom apt.
Air-conditioned, washer, close to
campus. $250 for summer quarter.
Call 378-8645. (B-3t-151-p)
Were not responsible for sins
committed in this groovy pad
sublease it from us this summer we
need a rest. 2 pools, wt. room, maid,
rent??? 378-8968. (B-3t-151-p)
Two bedroom trailer cabana
combined. A/C secluded atmosphere.
$l5O for entire summer quarter. Call
378-3938. (B-3t-151-p)
WOW! Reduced rate sin city apt.
sum. qtr. 980 SW 16 Ave., air cond.,
2 bdr., pool, new w/w carpets, SIOO
per mo., call eve. 378-0609.
(B-3t-151-p)
For rent: Concrete block cottages,
individual living units, furnished,
change decor per imagination, no
lease S7O monthly, 372-4407 after
8:00 p.m. ask for Steve. (B-3t-150-P)
Subrent beautiful 1 br. Tanglewood
Apt. Many extras MONETARY
CONCESSIONS MADE. Call
378-0386. (B-3t-151-p)
Landmark apt phase 11. Pool, ac,
dishwasher, every convenience will
sublet to 1,2, or 3 Come by apt
102. (B-2t-151-p)
yMvJivWWawwwc :c:
WANTED I
>foSSIWWIWt>I IWWKWWWNMMW!
WANTED female roommate sum.
qtr. to share 2 br trailer >/2 mi from
campus. $25 a month + utilities,
close to med center ideal!!
Interested, call Jo 2-9273.
(C-st-148-P)
Need 2 female roommates for
summer quarter. Landmark Apt. 23
free June rent. Call Phyllis, Sally or
Rosie at 378-7143. (C-4M50-P)
2 female roommates to share apt.
near campus next year call 392-7635
evenings. (C-4t-150-P)
Female roommate wanted. Share 3
bedroom La Bonne Vie apartment
with 3 other girls fall to spring. Rent
$57.50 plus. 376-8153. (C-5M48-P)
Male roommate for fall. Must study
weekdays party weekends. Two
bedroom, poolside, Le Bonne Vie
apt. $l4O/qua. + util call 392-7499.
(C-st-149-p)
OPPORTUNITY Women Wanted TO
Sell The Fabulous Pennyrich Bra.
Small Investment Required. Call
Collect 904-733-1073. (C-st-149-p)
1 roommate to share Camelot apt
with 3 law students for Sept. 2
bedrooms, 2 full baths, dishwasher,
gas bar b q. Call Dave 376-4104.
(C-4M50-P)
3 coeds next year at Tanglewood
Apt. Beautifully furnished, IV2 baths,
dishwasher, disposal, pool. Please call
Leah 372-4032. (C-129-st-p)
SUBLET or SHARE VILLAGE
PARK SBS for ail summer, option for
fall; no regressive rent; 2 bdrm
poolside. Call 376-7439. (C-st-149-p)

Thursday, June 5, 1969, The Florida Alligator

f "''""wanted
.. r 1 n n n r n n nniomamui 0 it 0000%
URGENT! Need one fern, roommate
for summer S3O per mo. big
house privacy. Call 378-7930
(Phyliss) (C-2t-152-p)
Male roommate for fall. Must study
weekdays party weekends. Two
bedroom, poolside, La Bonne Vie
apt. $l4O/qua. + util. Call 392-7499
(C-st-149-p)
Female roommate needed summer
quarter. French Quarter apt. no. 65.
June rent free. Call 372-5554.
(C-2t-152-p)
2 roommates needed in 2 br. 2 bath
Williamsburg apt. Pay only half
Junes rent. Ph. 378-6013
(C-2t-152-p)
Need 1 coed to share Landmark apt.
with me. Move in mid-June thru Aug
$75 only! Kit uten incl., by front
pool 376-8304. Sue 5-7p.m.
(C-2t-152-nc)
Thinking? Want 1 male for summer
and longer if desired. Own room and
bath. SBO month utilities included.
Williamsburg 66. 378-0313 after
7pm. (C-2t-152-p)
Need 2 male roommates summer SBO
for whole summer. Poolside A/C
dishwasher 2 bedroom. Tanglewood
Manor. Call 376-1701. (C-2t-152-p)
1 male roommate to share 4 br.
house with 3 EG s. Private room and
share a bath. $37.50 per mo. and V
utilities. Call 376-0703. (C-2t-152-p)
Need one male roommate for
summer qtr. French Qtr. apt on pool,
live June 13 to end of qtr for SBS,
Call 376-1437 or come by FQ apt.
52. (C-2t-152-p)
Need two girl roommates for La
Bonne Vie apts beginning fall quarter
SSO per month. Next to Gator Town.
Call 392-9225. (C-2t-152-p)
Female roommate wanted summer
quarter SSO Vz utilities /mo. Colonial
Manor. Call 378-6959 after 5:00.
(C-2t-152-p)
One or two female roommates for
two br. French Quarter. ONLY S3O
per month!! Call 376-0008.
(C-st-152-p)
1 male roommate needed for summer
and/or fall quarter. Large and
spacious 4 bedroom, ? bath,
airconditioned apartment. 1 block
behind Norman Hall, sll2 plus share
of utilities for quarter, call 372-1272.
(C-3t-151-p)
Yes! We still need two mature males
to sublease 2 br, 2 bath Camelot Apt.
for summer. Pool, sauna, private
BBQ. Only $61.50/mo. Call
376-4104. (C-3t-151-p)
2 female roommates for summer
quarter for Village Park apt. V 2 June
rent paid. For further information,
call 378-5950. (C-3t-151-p)
2 roommates wanted for summer
quarter at Frederick Gardens. S9O
plus V 4 utilities. 372-6051.
(C-3t-151-p)
One female roommate needed
summer. June rent free. $45/m, A/C,
IV2 baths, disposal, dishwasher,
carpeting. Landmark Phase il.
378-6339. (C-3t-151-p)
Roommates for summer, option for
fall or whole house. sbdrm., 3
fireplaces, 2bath, ac, $42.50 mo.
Total 9rms. Side lot & patios. 1406
NW sth Ave. 378-7061. (C-2t-151-p)
Leaving for San Francisco noon,
Weds., June 11, need riders to share
expenses. Call 376-5512 after 7:00
p.m. (C-3t-151-p)

advertisement
ii*v***i ma
M IlpsS|
I mm% 1
krul.. %$W- &
4iJ§> jM-xm ,; 'f*l£jf-.' 4 '
iffi|
Jack Palance, seeking Edgar Allan Poe mem memorabilia
orabilia memorabilia in this scene from "Torture Garden,"
finds a living dead man and other horrors of
the unknown. "Torture Garden," written by
Robert Bloch, shock author of "Psycho," also
stars Burgess Meredith, Beverly Adams and
Peter Cushing. It is a Columbia Pictures re release
lease release in Technicolor. NOW SHOWING AT
THE SUBURBIA DRIVE IN THEATRE.

Page 15

| WANTED |
Wanted Males for voice experiment.
Involves x-rays of larynx. If qualified
$lO for three hours. Call Linda
392-2049 Communication Science
Labratory. (c-3t-151-c)
Female roommate to share apt. one
blk. from campus. Own room, share
kitchen and bath, A/C S9O plus utl.
for summer qtr. Call 376-3184.
(C-3t-151-p)
Sabbatical? Mature couple guarantee
excellent care of your completely
furnished home Sept June. No
children or pets. 475-1355 anytime.
(C-3t-151-p)
I have 68 VW with black hi-riser
front seats in excellent condition.
Would like to trade these for 1967
black VW front seats without head
rest. Call 392-8414. (C-3t-151 r p)
Senior or grad female roommate to
share 1 bedroom apt. AC 5 blocks
from stadium. Rent s4smo. for
summer. Call Trish Bassett 378-7136.
(C-3t-151-p)
INTERESTING COED for fall
quarter share apt. own room walk to
campus. $35 mo. 392-7896 digit.
(C-2t-151-p)
HELP WANTED
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Shirley Bracken,
Univ. ext. 2-2046 between 8-5 only
for appointment. (E-3t-144-C)
HELP WANTED MALE. Mens
Clothing Salesman. Discount
privileges. Salary commensurate with
experience Apply Wilson Department
Stores, Inc. (E-10t-145-C)
Part-time Secretary. Architect needs
intelligent secretary for part-time
position at any convenient hours.
Good typing essential, shorthand
helpful. Excellent pay for qualified
person. Send resume to P.O. Box
14038, Gainesville or call 462-2599.
(E-st-150-P)
Wanted additional topless dancer
apply in person at Handlebar Lounge
Friday 9:30 to 12:00 noon. Must be
gSod dancer attractive and 21 or
over. (E-3t-151-p)
AUTOS |
62 VW seadn ww tires r&h good
condition 55000 miles call Luis
378-5141 or 372-9307. (G-4M50-P)
Ford 1960 $250 or best offer
372-7714. (G-4t-150-p)
Extra clean Hillman convert. Top like
new. Low miles on this 1961 model.
Economical and fun car. $295. Call
378-4539. (G-2t-152-p)
196 2 Falcon, needs work on
transmission, must sell. A good deal
for $l5O. Call Louis at 378-6277.
(G-lt-152-p)
Yellow 1967 Opel Rallye, black rally
stripes, glare panels, four new tires,
new battery, years inspection
sticker, very clean, slls. Call
372-8314, 5-9 p.m. (G-4t-150-p)
Pontiac, 1966 Tempest sport coupe
326 with Hurst 4-speed. Excellent
condition, MUST SELL. Come and
see it, then make an offer. Call
372-5688 between 5-7 p.m.
TODAY!. (G-5M49-P)

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
4 4 private bedroom for
| each student. one
I block behind norm an
vjifyf I A hall
fpWa
|| II APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT-CALL 372-2662
SMI
THURSDAY. JUNE 5
FRIDAY. JUNE e
I SATURDAY JUNE 7
SUNCiAY JUNE 8
6 00.6 00, lO OOPM
union
AUDITORIUM
i'.''.y*k admission 75$
t Downtown Geh wtviHt ]
\^^>VECC^^^^Ci- o:nK!KEjr*^ N '' v '- sl > 'M TEf^^L&!^^^/
jvW^
Funny, nobody
thinks about a bw
thfw^
the first time"
Jacqueline Bisset A COLOR by Deluxe j I
Stern Rick Kelman Wink Roberts
IIIL Ti j -~j l >.J""~ 1 " i ~ 11 lll,M^
V r *V # Jk * . : -Mi .* \*



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 5,1d69

CLASSIFIEDS

I AIITOS j
Corvalr 64. Good condition.
Safety-checked $375 or best offer.
Call 378-1489. (G-st-149-p)
Buick special *63 Air conditioned,
power steering, radio, excellent
mechanical condition $450. or best
offer. Call 376-3352 after sp.m.
(G-st-149-p)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen dealer, 4222 NW 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-ts-130-C)
Must sell MG Midget 1966 SIOSO.
Call 392-7762. (G-3t-151-p)
*67 Ford XL 500 convertible like
new, loaded, sporty luxury, new
polyglass tires, 23,400 actual miles.
Phone 376-9851 after 6p.m.
(G-3t-151-p)
1960 Valiant reliable trans. Brakes,
trans, exhaust recently overhauled.
The Red Ogre may lack good looks,
but is loyal & personable. SIOO.
(G-3t-151-p)
67 convertible Mustang S2OO below
used car retail, $1440, 19,000 mik£,
6 cylinder, gas economy, must sell,
beautiful. 120 NW 24 St. 376-8565.
(G-12t-142-P)
1965 Volkswagen good condition,
rack, trailer. $700.00 Ph. 378-1187
after 5 p.m. (G-5M48-P)
PERSONAL |
Congratulations senior PHI MUS
Happy summer to all the rest. I
promise to return Sandy safely in
Sept. Good luck to all. Jim.
(J-2t-152-p)
Need ride for 2 to Akron Ohio area
any time after Wed. June 11. Phone
372-8716. (J-lt-151-p)
EXAMAGAWZA Next week after
exams Free movies, & dances.
Mon.'Thurs. nights June 9-12 on the
Reitz Union Collonade & terrace.
(J-2t-152-c)
TEPS good times are here again!
pay-fly laterdont rush till
sum mer better things are
brewing rally thumbs
upAMF-HC. (J-lt-152-p)
To the brothers of Kappa Sig thanks
for making this a great year for us.
Good luck on finals and have the
greatest summer yet! Love, Lil siss.
(J-lt-152-p)
Hung-up Heads: Hang on. Call
378-8959 tonight 7pm midnight.
(J-lt-152-p)
Dial 378-5600 & hear an electronic
factorial any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING, 16 NW 7th Ave.
(J-5M46-P)
Have something to sell? Want to pick
up something at a bargain price?
Bring it or come to the Reitz Union
FLEA MARKET. Friday June 6 on
the Reitz Union Collonade at 11:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (J-3t-151-c)
TRUCK MIAMI BOUND. Have
furniture, truncks, etc. to go to
miami? Let us take them. Call Phil or
Joe 378-6795. (J-3t-151-p)
WANT
ADS |
I OFFSET FACILITES |
Specializing in
Thesis and Dissertation
Reductions and §
Enlargements &
Open Til 11 P.M. |
Highest Quality
r We Guarantee it!
7 day* 1
I OUIK-SAVE
I* University Plena |
1620 W. University |
378-1001 |

| PERSONAL "-"jj'
TADFOUCL*
There are damn tew Oatsuns on used
car lots. To buy one see Godding &
Clark down by the main post office.
(J-ts-143-c)
SOS Need math tutor to help cram
for STA 320 final. Will pay S3O if I
get a B, S2O for a C in the course.
Call Barbara 376-7985 (J-3t-151-p)
Poodel puppies, silver and black AKC
six weeks. Call after 5 372-6733.
(J-6M48-P)
TRAVEL ABROAD flights only or
vacation seminars 6wks.
Departures June 22 and July 6.
Various itineraries all over Europe.
Call 392-1655 Rm 310 Reitz Unio:i.
(J-5M48-C)
WANTED FEMALE TRAVELING
COMPANION to go to Califomia or
open to suggestions (can be out of
country). I have VW. Call Lynne
378-9694. (J-3M51-P)
Post a found!
LOST Camera and Lightmeter left on
log near Ichetuchnee bridge
Saturday. Call 378-6858.
(L-3t-151-p)
Found beautiful well-fed black
puppy with long tail in Flavet
Village. Please call 376-9025.
(L-3t-151-nc
Lost spiral notebook with business
ad. notes between union and frat.
row. need them for finals! Call Arch
378-7511 after 11 or 392-1655
anytime. (l-2t-151-p)
j "services J
'Volkswagen parts and servue.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-123-p)
Tennis racket restringing satisfaction
guaranteed free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19M07-P)
EXPERIENCED, ACCURATE
TYPING. .45 per page. CALL
LORRAINE. 378-8640. (M-st-149-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)

4 WONDER HOUSE
14 SW Ist STREET
LONDON BROIL (1 OC
BK. POT., SALAD W **
PORK CHOPS d*i q c
SALAD, POTATO.
FREE DESSERT
Graduating ?
Its a gas, isnt it
Godding and Clark say congratulations by
footing the gas bill to your new destination.
We don't care if its Walla Walla, Washington.
And if you're not going that far, don't feel
left out. Our substitute gift is a gas too. A
Polaroid? A luggage rack? An AM-FM radio?
You name it. Godding and Clark has it for
you with your purchase of a 1969 Datsun, the
New Leader in Economy Cars.
Come by soon. You successful thing you.
Godding & Clark Motors
2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E.
Open til Bp.m. Mon.-Sat.

AT AIR ACADEMY

Nixon Defends Military

AIR FORCE ACADEMY,
Colo. (UPI) President Nixon
rose to the defense of the
beleaguered military
establishment Wednesday.
He branded some critics as
new isolationists** and
suggested they were bent on
achieving unilateral American
disarmament.
Lamenting what he called the
present open season on the
armed forces,* the President
accused some unnamed
detractors of seeking U.S.
withdrawal from the world
scene.

Central Highlands Area
Bombed By US 852 s

m
SAIGON (UPI)-U.S. 852
bombers striking in five waves
dropped up to a million pounds
of bombs on Central Highlands
jungle areas where allied forces
have reported killing almost
1,000 Communists in heavy
fighting in the past three weeks,
U.S. military spokesmen said
Wednesday.
The new raids, carried out
Tuesday night and Wednesday,
followed a record month of 852
bombing that official statistics
showered 24,500 tons of
explosives on Communist troops
and installations in South
Vietnam in May. It was the
heaviest month of such raids this
year.
The stepped-up missions by
the eight-engined American
Stratofortresses woe disclosed
as Communist forces increased
terrorist attacks in South
Vietnam, killing 22 Vietnamese
civilians in mine and bomb

That course, Nixon told the
Air Force Academys 1969
graduating class, would be
disastrous.
We must rule out unilateral
disarmament because in the real
world it wont work, he
declared. If we pursue arms
control as an end in itself, we
will not achieve our end. The
adversaries in the world today
are not in conflict because they
are armed. They are armed
because they are in conflict, and
have not learned peaceful ways
to resolve their conflicting
national interests.

explosions and wounding an
American civilian with a
grenade.
In the worst incident, 17
persons were killed and seven
wounded when a commercial
bus struck a mine in Vinh Binh
province 70 miles southwest of
Saigon. On Wednesday morning a
time bomb exploded in the
market place in Ben Luc, 16
miles southwest of Saigon,
killing five civilians and
wounding five others.

k
MHB^jgE|^p?^SS^^^MaSK6^J|
Gator Beach Towels
W/ri/e background with the Alligator
colored in Orange and Blue
An ideal gift to take home
1710 West Across from
University Ave.4SH!ffiPF Murphree Area
mR / ||
QITOB SHOP!
1

The Presidents spirited
defense of the military
constituted the second major
speech he delivered in two days
*on a topic of prime controversy.
And as he did Tuesday, when he
chose a small untroubled college
in a remote section of the
Midwest to denounce campus
extremists, he selected a
similarly appropriate site for his
latest pronouncement.
The forum was the
commencement address to the
676 cadets making up the 11th
and largest graduating class of
the 15-year-old school.
The 40,000-seat Falcon
Stadium was filled to
near-capacity and most of its
occupants were friendly and all
were respectful.,
The crowd cheered when
Nixons helicopter came into
view. It cheered again when he
and his wife Pat, standing in an
open car, circled the field.
But while the mood was
pleasant, the presidents message
was often grim.
He told the young men seated
before him they were accepting
their commissions at a difficult
moment in military life. In
Vietnam, he said, they were
being asked to make unlimited
sacrifice in a limited war.



owim I earn Loses 13-Year SEC Reign

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Aangnments Editor
It was a year of letdown for
what was surely the most
talent-laden Gator swim team in
the history of the school.
As incumbent conference
champions for some 13 years
running, Coach Bill Harlans
swimmers went to the SEC
championships on the heels of a
record-pulverizing season. Their
record was an impressive 11-1 in
dual meet competition.
That included a water
droplet-thin loss to arch rival
Florida State and an undefeated
slate against all conference foes
as well as always rugged North
Carolina State and North
Carolina.
But Tennessee gave the
Gators grief at the SEC meet at
Vanderbilt. It was sweet revenge
for the Vols after the Gators
dumped them at an earlier meet
at the UF pool.
Next year, the swim team will
be caught up in the same
dilemma that meant its deafet at
the SEC meet this season. It
seems that as the conferences
rich get richer, the poor are
following suit. While the Gators
will return a strong corps of
sophomores who will turn
juniors, their competition will be
stiffer than ever.
Bruce Williams, who achieved
a No. 1 ranking nationally for a
time in the 200-yard freestyle,
will be bade. So will the other
half of the Gators most
Bulldogs Lose
Top Ranking
Golfer To Pros
ATHENS, Ga. (AP) -The
lure of professionalism has cost
the University of Georgia golf
team another regular in its bid
for the NCAA title.
School officials announced
Tuesday that senior Pete
Davison of Augusta has taken a
job as assistant pro at the
Atlanta Country Club and will
miss the NCAA tourney at
Colorado Springs, Colo. June
23-28.
The Bulldogs, who hold the
Southeastern Conference golf
crown, had alrgady lost regular
Lynn Lott because of a car
wreck.
Despite the loss of Lott and
Davison, Coach Howell Hollis
said, I feel we have enough
reserve strength to be in a
position to shoot for a high
finish in the tournament.
Georgia will use a senior, one
junior, two sophomores and a
freshman as its representatives in
the national tournament.
I M iller-Brown I
I ON EMILE
NORTH OF I
THE MALL BH
AUTHORIZED I
I DEALER
I Opt til 7 p.m. nightly j

dynamic roommate duo, Mark
McKee.
Other stalwarts all
presently sophomores join the
pair: Mike Chalbeck, Bob Link,
Jamie Murphy, John Scafuti and
Jim Perkins. Junior Tom Peek
and freshman reliable Bill Strate
figure heavily in future plans.

it
RUSSO TAKES OFF
... during a home meet
r.
* JM I Hfek
; V
HARLAN GETS WET
... courtesy of swim team members
PmSSSR
The Best In Steak^^
Meals^^^Qj|^^dwi che 1
KoLOR TV & BILLIARDS^
11718 W. University Ave.
I 'On The Gold Coast

AS UT TAKES CHAMPIONSHIP

Richard Ahrews, Steve Hairston,
Hank Hough, All-American
Andy McPherson and Barry
Russo will get diplomas.
But what is happening in the
enemy camp appears awesome.
At Tennessee, this years entire
35-man championship team will
be back.

P6^sAll
r GOLF* MARC DUNN, EDITOR TRACK rl

But the fact that not one of
the Vols is a senior is not the
worst of it. Because not one of
the this years Vols was a junior
either. The entire squad will be
intact for the next two seasons.
Ultimately, the UT athletic
department and the Tennessee
legislature have put more into
their swimming program the past
year than what the UF foresees
in the near future at least until a
coliseum is built. Blue chip
recruits comparing present UT
and UF swim facilities have little
choice, unless of course there is
some overwhelming UF
allegiance. A look at the UT
roster reveals no less than nine

GOING HOME?
CANT TAKE IT WITH YOU?
WELL BUY IT!
Gator PAWN SHOP
LOANS BUY SELL
"We specialize in Gator-Aid"
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575
... A '' ; ' -'
I Austin America
WHOLESALE
COOL-SALi
1969 America Sedan 5 1765
Air Conditioning 398
SlOftC-^
~ Felly Aetoeietu
w mu oMiud>n
MmHmHmilimMMammMn
SAVE 5 17-
and BEAT THE HEAT!
yjR. CRANE IMPORTS
VUjj 506 EAST UNIVfRSirr
PARTSSALESSERVICE

Thundey, June 5.1969, The Florida Alligator,

Florida natives alone.
The Gators can again be
expected to be one of two
strong teams in the SEC next
year. But they will no longer be
a shoo-in as in the past 13 years.
Williams and McKee
particularly should both blossom
into the national limelight, again
carrying most of the Gator point
load.
1. Tennessee 506
2. Florida 457
3. Alabama 335
4. Vanderbilt 203
5. Georgia 146%
6. Kentucky 125%
7. L.S.U. 72
Auburn, Miss. St., Ole Miss, did
not compete.

Page 17



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, June 5,1969

Page 18

1968: Gator Grid Year That Never Was

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
The UFs 1968 football battle
cry was The Year of the
Gator, but at the end of the
season the wimper was The
Year That Never Was as the
Gators disappointingly Finished
6-3-1.
In the beginning the experts
predicted that the UF would
take the Southeastern
Conference title and place high
in the national polls. But the end
result was a sixth place tie with
Ole Miss in the SEC with a 3-2-1
record and no mention at all
among the nations top twenty.
In the Gators opening game
it was the UF over Air Force,
23-20, and a dent in the UFs
hopes for a prominent national
808 COLEMAN COVERS
his man and blocks a pass

SEC Gms All Gms
W-L-T Pet. W-L-T
1. Georgia 5-0-1 .917 8-0-2
2v Tennessee 4-1-1 .750 8-1-1.
3. Alabama 4-2-0 .667 8-2-0
3. L.S.U. 4-2-0 .667 7-3-0
3. Auburn 4-2-0 .667 64-0
6. Florida 3-2-1 .583 6-3-1
6. Ole Miss 3-2-1 .583 6-3-1
8. Vanderbilt 2-3-1 .417 54-1
9. Miss. State 04-2 -167 0-8-2
10. Kentucky 0-7-0 .000 3-7-0

| ON SALE! 1
| Florida Quarterly |
\ ON SALE! t
- CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SEFVICE SALES-SEFVICERE
RE SALES-SEFVICERE PAIRS
(VOLVO)
Good Sorvico Starts
CRANE^MPORTS
90S K Untv- Ave. 372*4373

ranking.
In the seasons second game
against bitter interstate rival
Florida State University, the
Gators defense socked it to the
Seminoles 9-3.
The third game saw the
Gators offense finally get rolling
in a 31-14 win over Mississippi
State University. The Gators
rolled up 450 yards rushing and
passing against MSU.
In the fourth game against
Tuland University the Gators
fourth quarter blitz rocked the
Greenies 24-3, bringing the UFs
record to 4-0.
Things changed quickly for
the UF as the skies opened up
along with North Carolinas
offense, which shattered the
Gators 22-7 in a driving
downpour.
We beat ourselves, was
Head Football Coach Ray
Graves only comment after the
loss.
The next weeks game saw the
Gators still feeling wet as they
were shocked by Vanderbilts
14-14 tie, which many experts

i Albert
| Predicts \
Albert The Alligalor-^-**
For all my thousands of fans who have been wondering whats
going to happen to poor ol Albert, this is just to let you know that
Im going to be back next year, with dirty jokes, morale-boosting
messages for the Gators, and most important of all, plenty of
predictions on the college football season.
UFs boozingest gator also will have a new line of drinks for
making victory parties a success.
So, start looking for Alberts column in September, and help me in
my fight to stay by Century Tower. Which brings me to a joke: Why is
my cage the safest place on campus to stand by?
(Get out the gatorade and grain) Its the only place on campus you
can be sure youll never get hit by falling bricks.

Anyway, see you next year.
Old Games
The ancient Olympic Games
are believed to have begun
around 776 B.C. and ended in
392 A.D.

ii I a- i.i .i m w \m \m
JUL l STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
t 3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

DISAPPOINTING SIXTH IN SEC

nff ilk ap Jr m v
W* \ Sfrt&Alnkk.. %
JERRY VINSETT TAKES
an Eckdahl handoff and heads for paydirt

felt killed the Gators chances for
their first-ever SEC title.
With successive losses to
North Carolina and Vanderbilt,
a tie is like kissing your sister
and with Aubufh and Georgia
coming, things didnt look good

FULL OR PART TIME
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
FOR GRADUATE OR
UNDERGRATUDATE
ELECTRICAL ENGINEER ENGINEERING
ING ENGINEERING STUDENT WITH GOOD
KNOWLEDGE OF SOLID
STATE CIRCUIT DESIGN
TO ASSIST INVENTOR IN
DEVELOPING
ELECTRICAL PATENTS
AND DESIGN AND
CONSTRUCTION OF
ELECTRICAL CIRCUITS
FOR INNOVATIVE
DEVICES IN CABLE TV.
OPPORTUNITY FOR FULL
OR PART TIME
PERMANENT EMPLOY EMPLOYMENT.
MENT. EMPLOYMENT. CONTACT MR.
MCVOY 462-2499.Aduerf is merit

for the Gators.
And they werent as the
Gators fell silent at the hands of
Auburns Tigers 24-13.

, , fv UF f S REPRESENTATIVES
Jinn Bartlett Tom Stewart
~\\r George Corl Mel Ward
Dan Sapp Artie Watkinson
Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN
FOR THE
GRADUATE
WHO LOVES MUSIC
THEY WILL BE PROUD
YOU GAVE THEM A
*5
AM-FM-RADIO
FROM COUCHS
Model Z434W The GLISSANDO
WE WILL GLADLY
GIFT WRAP IT TOO
couchs z:,
LASTING GIFTS FOR ALL

Things got even worse as the
Bulldogs from Georgia
humiliated the Gators in their
annual battle in the Gator Bowl
51-0.
Nothing more could be said
about the Gators season after
the Bulldogs scrap. All that
remained was the salvation of
the Gator.
We win the Gators squeak
by Kentucky 16-14.
The UFs football season
came to end with a sudden and
unexpected 14-10 surprise upset
victory over the Hurricanes from
Miami.
The year of frustration had
finally come to an end for the
Gators, who finished with a
respectable record.
Although the Gators didnt
win the SEC, they did manage
enough muster to claim
themselves as the Florida Stale
Champions for 1968.
Not quite the same as an SEC
title.



m
j V flu
2jf|s

Being of the opinion that All-American selections are a publicity
poll and pre-season predictions are impossible to make, it is with
extreme trepidation that present my selections for the final
Southeastern Conference 1969 football standings.
1 have decided to get on the bandwagon and give the title nod to
Ole Miss just to see how they handle the kiss of death.
Anyway in order of finish here goes:
MISSISSIPPI The Rebels return 27 letterman and 16 starters to
the gridiron in the fall which should be enough to clinch the title.
Quarterback sensation Archie Manning will again be at the helm of the
6B Liberty Bowl champs. Coach Johnny Vaught has the only SEC
team with experience on both offense and defense.
AUBURN The offensive backfield must take shape quickly if the
Tigers are to pose a serious threat. Sophomore quarterback Pat
Sullivan will have to put life in the offensive unit. All the defensive
starters from 1968 will be returning along with 26 other lettermen.
GEORGIA The defending SEC champs will be hampered on
defense with the loss of All-American Bill Stanfill and Jake Scott. The
Bulldogs will return 37 lettermen including quarterback Mike Cavan,
the SECs leading rusher Bruce Kemp and receiver Dennis Hughes. It
will be tough to improve on the best record of a major college in the
South.
TENNESSEE Although the Volunteers lost their entire starting
backfield from 1968 but sophomore Bobby Scott is ready to take
over. Only four offensive and six defensive starters return in the fall.
The defense will have strong leadership with All-American Steve Kiner
returning at linebacker. The play of newcomers will determine the
fortune of the 1969 Vols.
ALABAMA Coach Bear Bryant will be devoting full time to the
football team in the fall now that he has stepped down as Athletic
Director. With more time for football Bryant will be building a team
that must recover from a humiliating 35-10 loss to Missouri in the
Gator Bowl. Three defensive starters will be back along with most of
the offensive team from 1968. Quarterback Scott Hunter will be
taking to the air again trying to make the Tide the threat it once was.
UF The Gators also face a rebuilding year, but the prospect of
having John Reaves at quarterback rates them the darkhorse candidate
of the SEC. The loss of All-Americans Larry Smith and Guy Dennis
plus Jim Yarbrough, Larry Rentz, Tom Christian, Bill Dorsey and
David Mann will hurt. But if Reaves clicks with his sophomore
receiver Carlos Alvarez the Gators will be unstoppable in the air. On
defense pre-season All-American Steve Tannen leads the list of
experienced returning lettdrmen.
LOUISIANA STATE The Tigers return only three starters to the
gridiron in 1968 but experience at quarterback should help. Mike Hill
will be calling the signals but unless his new crop of receivers come
through it could be a long season.
VANDERBILT An outstanding crop of freshmen which is the
result of subdued recruiting requirements could give the Commodores
an even better season than 1968. Vandy had their first winning season
since 1959 last year.
KENTUCKY Even with the hiring of John Ray, former Notre
Dame assistant coach, the Wildcats will not be a serious contender in
1969. The loss of Dick Lyons, an outstanding runner, will be the Cats
most serious setback.
MISSISSIPPI STATE The return of All-SEC passing combination
Tommy Pharr and Sammy Milner will make the Bulldogs a threat in
any game but a weak defense and lack of a serious running game will
hurt. State can be scored on as easily as they can score and lack of
depth will prove disaster for the Bulldogs.

mfflm
**> Whom, Sport*
C, Trucks, 4-wheel
drive.
No. 1 in Jopon
Codding fr Clark
Motors
S. E. 2nd Ave and S. E. 2nd St.
Ops* AM. t P.M.
378-2311
I^JPI
5 ADS || JJ
Pi REftcH LI
s IpEOpiEVfX
sVI_ UHb
6 7

C^ators
Darkhorse
In 69
Grid Race

By Marc Dunn

I sllO up
I Hey There Gals
I "Stay as Homes
I have FUN at home
I when they live at
I Gator Town
I You must see
I our new fun
I way to live
I SIOO holds your apt.
for September

Gatortown
| 309 S.W. 16th_Ave 1

All-American Careers End
For Gators Smith, Dennis

By IRA LEE RIDDLE
Alligator Sports Correspondent
1968 was to have been the
Year of the Gator in the SEC,
but for a number of reasons, it
just wasnt to be. For seniors
Larry Smith and Guy Dennis,
however, the season saw a
number of additional honors
heaped upon their shoulders.
Both were named to a
number of All-American teams,
in addition to the All-SEC team.
Fullback Smith exemplified
the Gators lack of true passing
strength, as he trailed only
Heisman Trophy winner Steve
Spurrier in total offense, piling
up 2514 yards, of which 141
came by the air route. In
addition to throwing, Larry
caught 50 aerials, good for 607
yards and five scores. The fifty
catches put him into fourth
place on the all-time Florida
catching statistical sheets.
Overall, Smith holds a
number of Gator records, among
l
0
GUY DENNIS
... All-American guard

$ Sltin!manZ
1 LADIES DEPARTMENT
p : r- .£§£
§ 225 W. University Ave. Mezzanine Floor
§ fi
II Clearance j
Selected groupsof fine fashion apparel reduced for this |||
event. Current styles, spring and summer fabrics. All from |gj
pants Reduced! 4
DRESSES
I SUITS eg / H
SWIM SUITS 1 /_
KNIT TOPS | /%
SHORTS V J OFF I
SKIRTS / §j

them most runs from scrimmage
(541), most net yards rushing
(2373), and most scores via the
ground route (23).
As a sophomore, the Los
Angeles draftee showed great
promise, being named SEC
Sophomore of the year, leading
the Conference in rushing, and
being named to the AILSEC
team. He repeated this honor his
junior and senior years, as well
as being named to a number of
All-American Second teams his
junior year.
In 1968, he made the first
team in the Sporting News and
Football News polls.
However, all gains are
generated by the front four of
the offensive line.
Anchoring that line for the
past three seasons was Guy
Dennis, the Gator offensive
captain. Dennis also made the
1966 All-SEC team, and the
1968 All-American first team of
the UPI and the New York Daily
News.

EXAMAGANZA
FINAL EXAM WEEK RELIEF
MON-THURS 9:3opm-lam
I MOVIES & DANCES
REITZ UNION COLLONADE

Thursday, June 5,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Kr i
Pw I
KAyr k H
LARRY SMITH
... All-American fullback

Page 19



Page 20

I. The Florida AHlgtor, Thuruday, June 5,1969

SHOP
fin''
\\\\n V
The store that
cares about you!

Super-Right" Western Beet CHUCK EXTRA SPECIAL
In W
"Hickory Ranch Sugar Cured Sliced Grade 'A Fla. or Ga. Fresh Ice Packed WHOLE
Old Mfwaukee p i Special Mis. Fibeifs 2< off Label Special 111 I > %# I
BEER 61 99 OLEO 499 < J3HSSIL
Yukon Oub Every-Day Low Price Ann Page Maccroni and Cheese rnmn Lu \. A ,, r
KOLAl2~9s
§ :;:|iK

"Super-Right" Western Beef CHUCK

Ih m M I

"Super-Righf Western % Pork Loin Sliced "Super-Right Steed Western
PORK CHOPS is. 68c BEEF LIVER lb 39c

LEnUCE - 19c
POTATOES UK 48c
WATERMELONS 99c
IF UNABLE TO PURCHASE ANY ADVERTISED
ITEM" PLEASE REQUEST A RAIN CHECK.
Prices in this Ad are good through June 7,1969.

Every-Day
Low Price!

\ 'EXTRA
I BONUS! |

* T T1 TTTTTTtmTTfTm?TTTmm
t [ CERTIFICATE ] 3
t : GOOD FOR ONE l 2
I I GMFT+'CHEK j j
| WITH THIS CERTIFICATE 5 1
AND A PURCHASE 3*
t OF $7.50 OR MORE i
Certificate good thru June 8, 1969
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaas