Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Robert Kennedy...
...One Year Gone

By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writer
A hurricane was threatening the shores of Florida
as students hurried to final exams under foreboding
clouds. Heavy rain was coming down as the first
news report came out of Los Angeles. Kennedy was
edging McCarthy.
These were the earlier reports of the night. As
the numbers of the hours grew larger, and then
smaller again, more reports came in. It was
Wednesday morning, 6 a.m., when sobs came from
the clock radio.
Kennedy? Shot?
It was Wednesday. The newspaper stands offered
soggy words from the night of promises before.
Kennedy in 6B seemed so close. California would
decide. Here was the turning point. Here were the
vital delegate votes needed at the convention. Here
was Los Angeles.
And there was Robert Kennedy to greet the
workers, the enthusiastic crowd, that had gathered
to share his victory. It was not an easy win, nor a
large one, but he was in front.
Robert Kennedy was in front again as he had
been while Attorney General. In front against
Jimmy Hoffa, big business, segregation. He had

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 161, No. 151

Berrin Requests
Editors Firing
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Accent 69 Chairman Larry Berrin issued a petition to the Board of
Student Publications (BSP) Tuesday calling for the firing of Alligator
Executive Editor Carol Sanger.
Miss Sanger recently authored a series of articles about the
troubled finances of the student-run symposium.
In the petition dated June 2, Berrin contended Miss Sanger failed
to maintain appropriate standards of accuracy, truthfulness and
fairness, and maliciously impugned the character and motives of
the Accent 69 staff and chairman, in the articles.
Berrin further charged Miss Sanger with misrepresenting and
fabricating quotes, opinions and actions of the then Student Body
Treasurer Phil Burnett, as well as the Accent 69 staff.
He also accused her of failing to publish fairly placed corrections
for the alleged inaccuracies in the articles.
Further.. .Miss Sanger failed tq issue apologies which might in
some small way have offset the willful and malicious damage done to
the reputation of the Accent Executive Committee and its chairman,
Berrin added.
Miss Sanger declined to comment on the charges.
Berrin is* asking the board for a public hearing to resolve the
matter.
The motivations for these proceedings are to cleanse the good
name of the Accent 69 Executive Committee and its chairman, by
presenting the full facts and truth in the public view, he said.
(SEE 'BERRIN' PAGE 12)
Gainesville Rookie
Infiltrates UF SDS
WASHINGTON (UPI) A rookie Gainesville police officer who
infiltrated an SDS meeting at UF told a House committee Tuesday an
SDS leader declared, Its time for the students to take over and form
a truly communistic society.
Bradshaw Mallard, who joined the Gainesville police force last
February, said SDS members cursed him and threatened his life when
they discovered he was a police officer at a student rally on the UF
campus April 11.
Mallard, a former UF student, was the first witness at the start of
hearings by the House Internal Security Committee, formerly the
Un-American Activities Committee, into the role of SDS in campus
riots.
Chairman Richard H. Ichord, D-Mo., told the standing room only
crowd, with several more young people waiting outside, that he would
tolerate no disruptions of the hearing. The crowd in the room was
orderly and was a mixture of well-dressed young people and
middle-aged persons. /
The usual heavy police guard was on hand both inside and outside
(SEE 'SDS' PAGE 2)

The
Florida Alligator

faced the rapids of Colorado, the poor in the
nations ghettoes. the widow of his fallen brother.
Bobby had unmistakable Kennedy looks; the big
grin, the thick hair. His hair, long and tousled, was
almost a campaign issue. It was the hair his brother
Ted had joked about at Homecoming, 67.
All of Wednesday the rains drenched the campus
and strong winds forced windows closed in already
overheated dorm rooms. Kids listened to the radio
during study breaks. Kennedy had been shot and
was being operated on. Condition; critical. Critical
for Robert Kennedy, critical for the nation.
The question seemed unending. Why? Why
Dallas, why Memphis, why now? Was the father of
ten children the ruthless man of Time Magazine?
Was this the fault of society or the work of one mad
individual?
Wednesday night became Thursday and the
bulletins brought less hope.
And then it came. Robert Kennedy was dead.
There was the train ride to Washington and the
millions of mourners along the route. Darkness had
fallen long before the train had arrived, but the
people remained.
That was a year ago. Robert Kennedy is
remembered.

University o f Florida Gainesville

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See Page 2

Parity Raids
Under Attack

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
UF Student Body President
Charles Shepherd, Tuesday said
he wants a clamp-down on
panty-raids currently hitting the
campus.
Shepherd in a statement said
he is requesting campus police
to take appropriate action,
including arrest and detention of

Wednesday, June 4, 1969

persons involved, in order to halt
these acts which interfere with
the rights of other students.
More than 400 students from
mens dormitories poured out of
their rooms late Monday night in
the biggest raid so far this year.
Witnesses said the raiders shouts
of glee could be heard all over
campus as they attempted to
storm nearby womens resident
halls to liberate articles of the
coeds underclothing.
The raid was put down,
however, after campus police
arrived on the scene and
dispersed the raiders. In a panty
raid last week police turned over
several students names to the
dean of mens office for possible
diciplinary action.
Not only do these
disturbances interfere with
students who are presently
studying for final exams, they
also lend themselves to more
serious types of disruption
which could be very harmful to
this university, Shepherd said.
He said he was condifent that
most students taking part in the
raids do so playfully and good
spiritedly.
But, they should know that
their actions are much more
serious than they might intend,
Shepherd said. With this in
mind, I urge all students to
cooperate in putting an end to
this type of conduct.
Much of the blame
apparently cannot be placed
entirely on the men, however.
Reports say that women from
neighboring living areas have
been phoning mens dorms late
at night enticing the boys to
form a group and come on
over.
In the past the list of coed
offenders has sometimes been
(SEE 'PANTY' PAGE 12)

America's
Number One
College
Daily



!. The Florida Alligator. Wednesday, June 4. 1969

Page 2

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GATOR GIRL *******
Today's Gator Girl is Brenda Hill, a Chi Omaga f rtuwCit^Cffi.
" Brenda is a freshman and was recently added to the, t>l
squad. She's majoring in pre-med, so you fellas ear*j|joW^*|^*if,
visits to the doctor for a few years until Brenda'S got her license.
- .. v ;
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Progress Test MentalityCnticized

Local SDS Infiltrated
f FtOM FA6£ OWE
the room where a committee pass was required for admission.
It was the first hearing for the nine-member committee since it got
{chord as chairman, five new members and its new name by House
action earlier this year.
}Chord said the hearings on SDS were held because of evidence his
investigators have turned up about the organization which claims
30,000 members in 300 local chapters. It has been active in several
campus disorders.
He said if news accounts of SDS activities are correct a serious
threat is posed to the countrys internal security.
Ichord said the hearings will help Congress in determining
whether subversion exists in a form that would make necessary
additional legislation.
" r ,j|- 11. OKI PA \l I Ili Al OK is tlu- official student newspaper >l fin
11diversity of Honda anJ is published five limcx weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi weekly, and during student holidays
ind exam periods. I ditorials repress nl only the official opinions id their
authors. Address correspondence to the I lorida Alligator. Kelt/ Lmon
building. University of I lorida. t.aincsv illc. I lorida .'2601. I lie Mhgatoi is
entered as second class matter at the l mted Stales Iost Otliceat t.amesville.
I lorida 32601.
Subscription rate is S 10.00 per year or S.USO per v|uarter.
The Klorida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the tvpographicul tone
of all advertisement!* and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable. r
the I lorida AHigator consider adjustments of payment for any
advertise went typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given, jo #*e Advertising Manager w ithin one day after the
advertisement appears. 4he iforida Alligator will not be responsible tor more
tbin one tncorwcl insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
iiMh>c NoM.cesfnt cu*ire44n.wustbc|rvei! before next insertion.
i tin il| a l|i Hi Kuwidiiwwuiwn 1 111 1 111 ,r

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Graeffe's Folly: Twenty
Ton Backyard Giantess

Thirty-foot women are hard
to come by, hut the Drs. Graeffe
have one, right in their own
backyard.
Just completed this week, it
is an abstract white cement and
sand sculpture of a nude woman
reclining. It measures 34 feet at
its longest, 15 feet at its highest,
and weighs 20 tons. They think
it is the largest female figure in
the world.
Or. A.D. Gfaeffe, professor of
humajiiiies, and his wife, Dr.
Lotte Graeffe, assistant
professor of English, have
dreamed of possessing a giant
woman for some lime.
I wonted something like
this, he said, and now I have
it

Laborer Being Held
For Attempted Rape
GiilhlVyli|, Tyfrii arrested a 23-year-old laborer Sunday and
charged to commit rape of a UF coed Friday
morning; ?
Colin LeeTM|dt i 8 being held in Alachua County Jail with bond set
a slo,oo
White is being <3**iged as a result of an attempted assault fnday
UF student McGuire was nearby and heard the coed
The jttdice she had seen her assailant earlier
that he 'M been staring at -her

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It is the realization of his
favorite fantasy poem, The
Giantess, by French Poet
Baudelaire.
The Graeffes live in a
castle-like house in Micanopy on
the edge of Levy Prairie. Their
home is gray concrete block,
three stories high, with a silo
housing a wooden staircase.
Located on a lonely dirt road,
the house is protected by a
monstrous German shepherd.
His humanities classes often
meet there.
The statue in back is situated
against the wide expanse of the
prairie.
Negotiations for its
construction began over a year
ago with New York artist Shirley

JMtfrther are so
'Teaching toward progs is a
Mttmr he
his classes, and So wants
to hoovered on the exams.
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with essay questions; the modesty
which ins progress will be measured la
the upper division.

West, a former student of his.
It was not a conventional
project, easily undertaken,
Graeffe explained, because of
the technology involved. There
had to be 25 vertical steel rods
as footings into the ground, as
well as a steel and iron armature.
The artist had to be able to use a
concrete mixer and an arc
welder.
Miss West spent three months
learning welding. In September
the building began. This week,
nine months and 2,000 hours
later, the sculpture is finished.
All that remains is the
clearing away of concrete and
debris Mid the planting of grass
to take ks place.
It's real appearance wont be
shown until next spring,
Graeffe said. When the grass
gets growing i expect this to be
very startling. The sculpture has
to grow oik of the soil.
His friends call it Gmtpffes
Folly, He said, but he 2s his
wife express great pleasure at the
way it has turned out.
We took a risk, he j?**d
you do something that
don't know what wffl happen
Its a very exciting
. wondering ff H will succeed. |
The artist too was excited by
the project. I enjoy U
tremendouslyshe slid.
Since
statue, she has received two
commissions for work in the
same medium, although none as
large
The sculpture will.. _jpjj£.;
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They agreed that birds flying
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Reitz Union- Religion Department Misplaced?

See Editorial Page 6
By LYNNE TIESLAU
Alligator Staff Writer
Religions not dead. In fact,
its living now in the Reitz
Union.
Not only has the Department
of Religion been affiliated with
the new union since its
beginning, but it has been
traditionally-linked with UF
student unions for the past 30
years.
According to Dr. Delton L.
Scudder, chairman of the
religion department, its of
historical significance that the
Department of Religion is
situated on the third floor of the
union.
It all stems back to the early
1920s when all UF had to offer
in the way of religion was the
Young Mens Christian
Association.
The YMCA was not only the
sole campus religious
association, but it was the only
social function for UF
students, said Scudder.
After the depression, money
collected by Bryan was added to
federal funds so that a student
union, what is now the old
union, could be built.
At the request of the UF
administration, the second floor
of the union-was to be used for
religious purposes. It was turned
over to jhe YMCA.

WHATS HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writer
SOUTH OF THE BORDER AND CROSS THE ATLANTIC WAY:
The Brazilian-Portuguese Club meets tonight at 8 at 108 N.W. 22
Drive.
COMBINING CAVEMEN: Florida Speleological Society meets at 7
tonight in room 118 Reitz Union.
LOW CALORIE ENTERTAINMENT: Florida Players present
Theater I Banquet Acts in the Constans Theatre. Shows begin at 8
p.m., June 4-6.
DEADLY DEALING: The Union movie for this Thursday, Friday
and Saturday nights is Diabolique. The thriller begins at 6,8:30 and
11 p.m. in the Reitz Union Auditorium.
ARRAY OF ARCHITECTS: Architectural and city planning
experts will be in'Gainesville Saturday to judge a design competition
dealing with the problem of a town center elevated over a four-lane
interstate highway. Thirty-three UF students are participating in the
C. Randolph Wedding Scholarship Design Competition.
AUTOGRAPH PARTY: Novelist Harry Crews will be at Santa Fe
Junior College Thursday at 8 pjn. in Room 135 at the Colleges East
Center, 615 NE Second St. He will speak on his latest novel, Naked
in Garden Hills, and autograph books.
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Not until after World War II
was the YMCA replaced by the
Department of Religion and the
Student Religious Association.
The Department of Religion
was organized in 1946 with
Scudder as the head of the
academic program.
A year after the organization
of the religion department, the
Student Religious Association,
now called the University
Religious Association (URA),
was created..
When the new union was
built two years ago earlier this
month, the Department of
Religion and URA were a part of
it.
Scudder has seen the
department grow from less than
50 students to the current 555
enrollment. Presently, there are
five professors plus the director
of URA on the staff.
But in the fall, a new
instructor will be arriving.
In a department with four
offices-where will the new
professor set-up his office?
When plans for the new union
were made in 1962, neither
Scudder c rtor the planners
projected such an increase in the
religion department.
It was lack of prophetic
foresight on my part, said
Scudder.
Is it the responsibility of the
union to provide office space for
an academic department?

No, to the contrary, said
William E. Rion, director of the
Reitz Union. It isnt logical
now for the religion department
to be here, but it seemed so
seven years ago.
Now its no longer a
question of whether or not the
religion department should move
out-but where and when, said
Rion.
Scudder admits there is no
longer any justification for the
academic program to stay in the

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union. But he would like to see
the coordinator of URA stay
among the rest of the student
activities.
As far as religious activities
remaining in the union, Rion
said, If its related to student
life, then it should stay in the
union.
Former Student Body
President Clyde Taylor, claims
the religion department is taking
up prime space.
Whos to decide where the

Wednesday, June 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

religion department should go?
I have discussed the problem
with Dr. Scudder, Sisler said,
and I have tried through the
Space Committee to find
appropriate housing for the
religion department.
It has been suggested that the
Department of Religion move
back to its original site, the old
Florida union, now the Arts and
Science building. But theres no
way, since that building is
overcrowded as is, said Sisler.

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Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, June 4, 1969

PRSSA Elects
New Officers
The Public Relations Student
Society of America (PRSSA)~
elected Jim Stanfield, 3JM, as
president for the coming year.
Other new officers include Dave
Huskey, V-Pres.; Terry Beall,
Rec. Sec.; Donna Slattery,
Corresponding Sec.; Cheryl
Raskin, Treas.; Jim Money,
Historian; John Hawkins, Pari.;
and Grier Wells, Publicity
Chairman.

Ultra-Violet Liaht Mav Be Pollution Detector

A ray of ultra-violet light may
eventually tell us how much pollution
our-atmosphere contains, help in
detection of liver or kidney trouble or
check on the gases surrounding distant
planets.
Dr. David T. Williams, professor of
aerospace engineering and physics at the
UF, says that new methods and
so ph istication in the field of
spectrometry offer promise of these and
much more.
Williams research has produced an
experimental method of studying gases
in the air with ultra-violet light that is

UCRA Forming
Freedom Stand
By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
The beginning of the establishment of a body of moderate faculty
opinion at the UF campus was marked last week by the organization
meeting of the UF chapter of University Center for Rational
Alternatives (UCRA).
UCRA is a national organization, founded six months ago, which
now has local chapters at about 60 college campuses.
About 35 professors became members at the meeting Thursday,
according to Dr. Melvyn New, professor of English. An executive
committee was named, consisting of New, Dr. Gordon Bigelow,
professor of English, Dr. Irving Goffman, professor of economics, Dr.
Donald Williams, professor of speech, and Dr. Frederick Goddard,
professor of economics.
The executive committee was instructed to draw up a statement
concerning academic freedom at UF which would be broad enough to
encourage a majority of professors to sign it, New said.
The purpose of such a statement would be to indicate where the
faculty stands in relation to student dissent and in relation to
pressures from the state legislature and from the administration.
There was also discussion at the meeting of the possibility of
UCRA working with the American Association of University
Professors (AAUP), specifically in relation to academic freedom,
although not in other areas in which AAUP has an interest. No
decision was reached in the matter.
The executive commiteee will be drafting a statement on academic
freedom this summer for distribution among UF professors this fall
quarter.
We invite suggestions from anyone, student or faculty member, as
to what should be included in a statement on academic freedom,
New said.
Graduating ?
Its a gas, isnt it
Godding and Clark say congratulations by
footing the gas bill to your new destination.
We don't care if its Walla Walla, Washington.
And if you're not going that far, don't feel
left out. Our substitute gift is a gas too. A
Polaroid? A luggage rack? An AM-FM radio?
You name it. Godding and Clark has it for
you with your purchase of a 1969 Datsun, the
New Leader in Economy Cars.
Come by soon. You successful thing you.
Godding & Clark Motors
2nd Ave. & 2nd St. S.E.
Open til Bp.m. Mon.-Sat.

DROPOUTS
,cn j i
i UH-OH. | H
T

pitch dark even in daylight to a
degree where less than one part of
ammonia in a million and five parts per
billion of ozone are detectable with
equal ease.
So sensitive is the equipment that it
will show an air-content of ammonia
for a long time after the laboratory
floor has been washed.
What we are doing, Williams said,
is developing instruments. And when
we find one that seems to have some
promise, we try to find a use for it. This
is the way all research and development

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is done. You find a good solution and
then look for problems to which it
might apply.
The new approach to
spectrometry measuring the intensity
of the color bands produced by
light has produced evidence that gases
absorb light. Dr. Williams, aided by
graduate student Robert N. Hager Jr.,
has successfully established signatures
for several gases through the study of
how they affect light, and expects a lot
more to sign in anytime.
The research has established findings

BY HOWARD POST

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for common pollutants such as sulphur
dioxide, ammonia, ozone and carbon
monoxide. (Sulphur dioxide combined
with ozone takes up moisture and
becomes the visible smog that hovers
over many of our cities.)
If this all turns out
successfully and its a little early to
predict, Dr. Williams said, we should
be able to take a blood sample, for
instance, tell how many of a half-dozen
different things are present in it and
immediately detect such ailments as
liver and kidney trouble.

. 1 WITH THIS COUPON ONE |
"I COMPLETE $1.15 CHICKEN |
|l DINNER |
l| 1
S COUPON GOOD THRU JUNE 8
I g sth FOR IN STORE PURCHASE g
576 N.W. 13th STREET
2205 N.W. 6th STREET



By LYNNE TIESLAU
Alligator Staff Writer
The Indians are coming!
So claimed Vasant Bhide, an architecture grad
student from Bombay, India. He was responding to
the comment that there are more Indian students on
campus than ever before.
Vasant, whose name means spring-time, is one
of the 60 Indian students now enrolled at UF.
I like it here, Vasant said. Especially since the
climate is very comparable to Bombay. And the
many people that have helped me makes me feel
right at home.
One of Vasants friends, Ravindra Parashar, an
economic student from New Delhi, chimed in
saying: Professors here ale much more
approachable. Unlike India, theres no
student-teacher barrier.
A part-time instructor himself, Ravindra claims
he likes teaching American students except they
just dont seem to be awake on Monday
mornings.
Another Indian friend, Vinay Chande, an
architect student from Bombay, reiterated how easy
it is to meet people on campus.
But Ravindra felt other-wise. In his
Oxford-English accent, he said: People are
friendly. But I dont think its so easy to meet other
students because the campus is so vast.
As far as Indians befriending fellow Indians on
campus, Vasant said: I can be completely free with
my Indian friends since we have similar
backgrounds. But I like to spend time with all my
friends whether Americans or Indians. And I
certainly want to learn as much as possible about
Americans.
Vinay added that some students from India
come over here and try to create a small India
among themselves.
Vasants somewhat sedate roommate, Keshavji
Gala, also an architecture major from Bombay, said
to that: All those students get from the U.S. are
studies.
Thats right, agreed Vasant. I think thats
wrong -for one should try to experience all things.
And I certainly wouldnt want to come all the way
over here and live as I would in India.
On the other hand, said Ravindra, who sports
a large handlebar mustache, Indianness makes me

f Homecoming Heip Needed f
Practical experience and availability during the summer and >
fall quarters are the requirements for students to work on 1970 $
ij: Florida Blue Key Homecoming, Bill Moore, publicity chairman
: said Monday.
; We are in desparate need of students to work, he said. ij
: Applications are being accepted to work on the alumni
jj barbeque, alumni events, FBK banquet, parade, technical ij
jj aspects, and special functions committee. Also publicity ij
promotions, Gator Growl, slogan contest, honored guests, and ij
j: sweetheart contest workers are in demand. :j:
j: Students interested in working on any of the above ij
jj committees may fill out an application at the Student Activities ij
ji desk on the thrid floor of the Reitz Union, or contact Mike ij
:j Hembree in the FBK office from 3-5 p.m.

TONIGHT!
THE FAMOUS
T.G.
EAT-IN
' 6 PM
. s
*

More Indians Here
Than Ever Before

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feel united. Like the Indian Club is a good
opportunity to talk about Indian things.
When the subject of UF coeds came up, the
Indian students enthuasiasm really showed.
Ravindra spoke First saying: I think they are
charming, friendly and easy to talk to.
In his happy-like manner, Vasant pointed to
Keshavji, and said jokingly: Hes married. He cant
say anything about American girls.
Then Vasant gave his own observation: The girls
here put make-up on every day which is really
surprising. In India the women only wear make-up
to weddings and other special occasions. And only a
few wear lipstick.
Unlike the U.S., there is no dating system as
such in India since all social functions are done in
groups.
It took me about six months to understand the
American dating system, admits Vinay. In India
we dont date as a means of finding a marriage
partner.
Marriage in India is a completely different
concept, explained Vinay, since its up to the family
to decide ones future husband or wife.
One puts his ego below the general happiness of
the family, said Vinay. And through mutual
understanding, love is learned after marriage not
before.
*
Does it work?
Oh, yes it has for the last 3,000 years,
boasted Vinay.
And not only that, there are very few divorces
in India, added Vasant.
All four of the Indians admit they never cooked
in India, but have learned to do so since coming to
Florida.
Ususally we cook Indian food. But when we are
very, very tired then we cook American food,
smiled Vinay.
Like his own name, Vasant explained ail Indian
names have a meaning. For example Vinay means
politeness, Keshavji means god of love, and
Ravindra means sun.
Whats in store for these four young Indian men
when they finish their studies at UF?
All of them said they want to work somewhere
in the U.S. for a few years.
Yet, as Vasant said, the Indians might be coming
but not to stay. India is home.

Curl up with a good hook .
# FLORIDA QUARTERLY

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pr 1%. \ : %*
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4~
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v-
>( ? 3 X.\ ,*>' T f 7" gfE'
RELAXING INDIAN STYLE
... Vinay and Vasant in their Sin City" apartment
WONDER HOUSE:
14 SW Ist STREET
K.C. STEAK pa
BK. POT, SALAD 'pi.DKJ
HAWAIIAN HAM STEAK
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PHOTO BY ERIC LITTLEJOHN MODELED BY CHARLOTTE
Go vacationing in a Bra dress, Lovely for dress up or play in
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$6.00.
fitm/foi/i/
bras/girdles/ LINGERir
GAINESVILLE MALL

Wednesday, June 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, June 4, 1969

Page 6

EDITORIAL
God Needs Room
God is alive and well on the third floor ot the Reitz
Union. !3ut his style is being cramped.
The Department of Religions offices in the Union are
already too small and the arrival of a new professor in the
fall will add to the problem.
The Religion Department was originally located in the
old Florida Union and was moved to the Reitz Union two
years ago. They were originally located there because the
administration at that time requested that the second floor
be used for religious purposes.
There is now no logical reason for the Religion
Department to be located in the Reitz Union. Dr. Delton
Scudder, chairman of the Department of Religion, William
Rion, director of the Union, Student Body President
Charles Shepherd, and former Student Body President
Clyde Taylor agree. And so do we.
It is not the responsibility of the Union to house an
academic department. The Union is lor student activities
and the space that the Religion Department is occupying is
needed by student organizations.
The religion offices are located away from the academic
area of the campus and many students will not make the
extra trip to the Union.
The Intrafraternity Council offices are now located in
Tigert Hall, but should be located in the Union to get them
closer to other student offices.
The university Space Committee is responsible for
allocating space for academic offices. Dean of the College of
Arts and Sciences Harry Sisler, to which the Religion
Department is responsible has said that there is no space in
the old union for the department.
We urge the Space Committee and the university
administration to find space for the Department of Religion
as soon as possible. They need the space as much as the
student organizations.
God may be alive on the third floor, but he needs a new
home.
| Enjoyable Paper

MR. EDITOR.
Several weeks ago Manny
James, Clyde Taylor, and several
other students from the
University of Florida visited the
Alachua County delegation here
in Tallahassee.
1 mentioned to them at that
time it would be very helpful to
us to have copies of the Florida
Alligator available so that we

I would like to correct some of the
misunderstandinds and incorrectly mentioned facts
in Mr. John Suggs artilcle on Korea in May 21st
Alligator.
Mr. Sugg has kindly corrected his former critics
data on the number of North Korean guerillas sent
to behead President Park in January 1968. The
previous number of 31 is right. Later in the summer
of that year another suicide-mission team infiltrated
through the Eastern Coast. Its number was first
reported to be 120 and later changed to somewhere
close to 200. Their mission? Instead of a savage
slaying of the President, this time the target was
innocent civilians. At least 30 civilians were
reported to be brutally murdered including women,
children and an aged mail-man.
Mr. Sugg has also commented on the Popular
support for these guerillas among the Sough Korean
people and pointed out that 400 to 1 odds put
down the agression. Did you know that, Mr. Sugg, a
simple-minded wood-cutter saved the life of the
President by giving early warning to the police
immediately after being released from capture while
cutting the woods at the backhill of his village, in
spite of the terrifying threats from them? (This
caused a change in the tactics of the North Korean
guerillas in their later missions to include the
civilians in their target.) Regarding the 400 to 1
odds, I have this to say. Why is it necessary to
mobilize the whole police in a town to down one
single criminal gun who does not have a single
thought in selecting a target? (This is the kind of
thing which very frequently happens in your

Yp

Aftermath

Your Facts On Korea Mislead, Mr. Sugg

could keep up with events on
campus.
I have been receiving the
Alligator now for several days. It
has been helpful with keeping up
with current events, and I have
enjoyed your format and
content, which is entirely
different from any other
newspaper.
BILL ANDREWS
DISTRICT 31

The Florida Alli^D/tor
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility.
Dave Doucette Poa/koJm
Editor-in-Chief
\fili§jHr7 Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor
.xsz.

MR. EDITOR:
In this strif-torn, tension-filled campus, where all
one hears about is S.D.S., progs and racism, there
is nothing to fill the life of the unconcerned,
bon-vivant, average male. We, as self-appointed
representatives of this class, would like to make a
few suggestions which we consider vital for the
continued contentment of this breed.
Our first and most important demand
(everybody is demanding things nowadays), is the
construction of several regulation-size Jai-Alai

country. Right?)
Mr. Sugg also mentioned that the Puppet, the
former President Rhee, lost power through election
in 1960. It was we, the STUDENTS, who
overthrew his corrupted regime. It was we who
fought the police guns with bare fists just for the
right. It was we who replaced the police in order to
restore peace and order after the revolution until
the following election. And our professors were at
our side with a big sign Let us repay for the
students blood! Arent we far ahead of you as far
as the Student Power is concerned, Mr. Sugg?
Mr. Sugg also mentioned that General Park took
power with the aid of American military and
business pressure. Obviously he did not know that
General Park, when he first seized power, was under
strong suspicion among American officials as a
communist front since he was an unknown figure.
Concerning the quoted data on the Standard of
Living from the UNESCO Report, I would like to
request for a specific reference. I have to admit that
I dont know the truth since I do not have solid
evidence to trust the usually exaggererated
communist propaganda. I could listen to North
Korean radio when I was in Seoul, Korea. It always
claims that they have achieved 300% increase in
annual production of coal, 250% in this, another
400% in that et£. etc. And how come thy North
Korean refugees are surprised to see the glaring neon
signs in Seoul city? Obviously they have never seen
one in Pyoung Yang after all these years of
miraculous economic growth.
If Mr. Sugg does not believe in the presented

canchas. Second in the order of priorities is the
return to your columns of those graceful females
which once adorned your pages, the Gator Girls.
And third, bring back those witty, meaningless
Gator Buttons.
The materialization of these demands, will
provide for the fulfillment of the physical, spiritual
"and intellectual needs of this class.
JULIO PASTORIZA 4AS
GIL PASTORIZA 4EG
TITO CRESPO 4JM
JUAN A. MENDEZ 4EG

By Chang Soo Kim

facts, a stack of recent Korean newspapers, Dong-A
Ilbo, run by the opposition political party, can be
put under his further investigation for truth. Even 1
am willing to present myself for a living-reference.
Mr. Sugg may not worry about the possibility that 1
am a lucky child of a bourgeois family who has seen
nothing but the Nightmare.
Instead of pointing out further misleading
details, I would like to say this simple,
everybody-knows, fact that it is not wise to talk
about a nation, its political climate and their people
without a complete knowledge of the physiology of
the nation or its past history which goes up to 2000
B.C. As a student who never saw a fellow student
burning a Korean Flag, any irresponsible comments
on My Country made just as defense from criticism,
sure hurts my pride in My Country and in what I
am. Elders used to tell us it is not proper to Blow
Your Horn.
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681. 392-1682 or 392-1683^,
r
Opinions express in the Honda Alligator are those <>
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Honda.



Think Twice, Thief
MR. EDITOR: r
To well-groomed, clean-cut blond man of medium height and
build and in his early twenties, wearing a moss green knitted
short-sleeve shirt and tan cut-offs, who took a case of beer from the
Pabst delivery truck parked near Shelly's Sandwichshop and ran with
it into one of the apartments of 303 NW 17th Street on Friday, May
30, at about 2:30 p.m. and his associates:
Wh D Cn o U f Wme watehin 8 y u > you judged Id do nothing to stop
you. But I did. Since you outran me, I am appealing to you, through
this newspaper, to reconsider your act.
Youve done no service to warrent the right to that case of beer. So
what s a case of beer to a big company? Part of the output of the
community has been redirected from those who have legitimate claim
to its use, to you the thief. Indirect as it may seem, in such an
interdependent society as ours, your anti-social behavior is skin off my
nose.
The fact is that the deliveryman from whose truck you took the
beer must bear the loss. He looks as if he is working hard to support a
family and make payments on a house. He was sickened by the loss of
$4.20 from his take-home pay.
Mister, neither you nor the residents of the building into which
you went look like you need to steal in order to live comfortably. But
you should see the workingman you abused. How about you and
those who shared the stolen beer mailing a money order in the
amount of $4.29 to your victim Mr. Harry Padget, Mid-State
Distributors, 1215 Old Pine Street, Ocala, Florida?
J.W. LEPPELMEIR, 7BA

' r,,> f

& SdVfo#Fulwood (ildiofit

inut. EDITOR:
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1 would like to fchaok s^l^*
most entertaining eventa£ l m
' Speaking of last
?f*f*** *^ te py
'"leocflcement
and
of how the *>gs"'4NoM*iMML
SK-lb waa tfiApilMl:.
tap* a**
Wm* the
tW m*
staffing to repeat himself a* j-.

Education Shapes intelligence

MR. EDITOR:
Cheers for Dr. Alex Kronstadts enlightening
knowledge on the realities of facts and traditional
fiction about intelligence and heredity with regard
to black-white comparisons.
LETTERS
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters
to the editor must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters in the
interest of space.

was finding ntyjCT-efesjmg my
eyes and trying pig),
he stated, as his
otwnmrmwQ Mp|aP#Were (
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v'"., t -'jS&H*SSSHpiSSv ate in
; ket h *B§|if | iu
Kff Ly ~, tft -.
g*# ***&%&&&&*
hmk
mt
President Nixon for inciting wots
'ft* - v ,'. v .
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it seems natural to expect members of a
university community faculty especially to
see that the educational conditioning of white
americans from which black americans have
traditionally been excluded is because of the
sub-standard quality provided for them by white
americans; and, thus, such university educators
should be aware of the obvious need for revision to
this educational conditioning which will produce
results in intelligence tests that reflect comparative
performances for black and white alike.
But, it is apparent here that to expect such a
natural understanding from hard-hearted,
tradition-riddled faculty is unrealistic.
NAME WITHHELD


FORUM:-^^
C Aim wl ViAAut J
hnp* far tho
UF Exploits The Citizens

MR. EDITOR:
In both the editorial ol May 30, concerning
University City Bank Loans to students, and the
letter of June 2 entitled Water Politics, dealing with
the city of Gainesville paying the universitys water
bill, there is an assumption that is dead wrong!
This assumption is that the university by its very
existence here helps the city and its citizens
because of the increased money the students pour
into the University City. The Alligator, in its
editorial, went to the extreme (of capitalist
fabrication) when it stated that this additional
income helps the merchants, therefore the citizens.
Gainesville is a city approaching a population of
70,000. Sure, the university and its students help
the banks and the merchants but, what about the
rest of THE CITIZENS? Do you actually think that
they benefit from our precious university?
By its presence in Gainesville, the university
raises the price of food, gas, clothing, rent, taxes,
etc., not just for students and merchants but for all
THE CITIZENS. Many students run around this
town like they own it. Some are overt racists.

**e
GHS SOPHOMORE
'jLftjtfjn? '. 'T*' v KJ '* .:
; .J

Speaking Out-
TV Isnt Free
. t.
~ .> * *- '* i
_, i;
i" *'
*) T . \ l .' ; ]
"*** >y Russ Taylor
V* comments on pt£¥V' were *so ft*ll of
misHifonnatiofi and absurd assumptions tfetf he was Well advised to
wifWtoid Ms identity. The crux of his argument against pay-TV seems
to he that I osmt see having to pty for something I am used- to togetting
getting togetting free. Ones he really believe that the (friyel which ceaselessly,
excudes from American TV sets is prodded free of charge? Any wefl
socialized middle class American knows that you get what you pjay
for and you dont get something for nothing.
When sm advertizer pays $50,000 and up for a minute of prime
time, most if not ail of that cost is passed on to the consumer. NW
also alludes that if pay-TV does become a reality it will be foisted
upon us all with no freedom of choice. (Forgive me if I extend a bit
much here but NW is very ambiguous on this particular and so invites
extension.)
One would-be no more compelled to have a pay-TV device installed
on his set than he is now to take a newspaper. NW also directs our
attention to a pronouncement of the three major networks to the
effect that pay-TV would out-bid advertizer supporter programs, thus
denying millions of lower income families the entertainment they now
enjoy free. Once again my middle class frame of reference replies
that this is only the natural outcome of the free enterprize
competitive process which would compel the networks to upgrade
their programming to a competitive level.
It is most edifying to note that NW ran across his petition in the
lobby of a movie theatre and that he invokes testimony given by the
networkds at the FCC hearings. Any fool can see that the large theatre
chains and the networks have the most to lose, economically, if
pay-TV is well accepted. NW closes by exhorting those likemindes to
join in the struggle against this potential infringement. It would
indeed be a disasterous blow to us all if pay-TV and free enterprise
were allowed to infringe upon the economic fiefdoms of the networks
and the theatre chains.

Wednesday, June 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

heaping obscenities on our Black population. Others
go around calling our lower class White citizens
rednecks. In general, spreading their very snotty,
condescending attitudes all over this city. Is it any
wonder that there is a strong anti-student sentiment
among THE CITIZENS of Gainesville?
The university has a good medical center that is
virtually inaccessible to most of our lower class
citizens, both Black and White. This is because that
treatment at the medical center must be preceeded
by a referral from a local doctor that many of THE
CITIZENS cant afford.
To top it all off, while the university employs
many of Gainesville's citizens it pays them
substandard wages. Nonacademic employees are
being underpaid by the very institution that raises
the cost of living in their cities.
There is a conspiracy going on in Gainesville and
other university cities throughout the country. A
conspiracy of local merchants, city councils, and
university boards to exploit THE CITIZENS of this
country and the students are the pawns.
ED FREEMAN, 4AS

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, June 4, 1969

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DONIG AN'S
How about these matching pink and white bell pants and
tunic top by Lanz to capture that summer look? Modeled
by Suzanne.
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Wm *k JjjLA ||J Jilt I
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Candy is ready for fun when she wears this short-short,
red-trimmed, navy denim scooter skirt. A red voile body
shirt accents the outfit.

MAAS BROTHERS
Create your own youthquake with this little crepe dress of
romance. Red berry stain orphan colored, its clingy feels
like a breeze with its Puritan double-sleeved effect. $24 00
is practically nothing for a dress that is really something
Modeled by Linda.

i y i& **W JmS^A Mft ; -.--
S '** jP~ -w^xrwlMm'W^mtHKmf
THE UNIVERSITY SHOP
Jeune Leiguc is known for their great styles and they 've just
proven it again with this new outfit consisting of white
polyester and cotton calotte and a navy and white voile
tunic blouse. Perfect for many various occasions. Modeled
by Linda.
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& BBH IS



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COLONY SHOP
The match-up this week is mini a la gypsy! A short navy
skirt with pleat accent is worn with a wild red blouse.
f/ze sleeves the bigger, the better! For the final
touch scarf worn everywhere, in every fashion.
Modeled by Patty.
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SUSAN SCOTT
Yards of firecracker red voile light up the wildest blouse
ever! The sleeves can be worn full or three quarter length.
Red, white and blue stripes, spattered with flowers scatter
down the wide-legged pants by Elli. Beautiful blouses, pants
with pah-zazz. Two good reasons to shop Susan Scott.
Modeled by Joyce.

w ji| SEHj^HKSg&Sgg
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fzs&g&yt &? +
STAG AND DRAG
You can send up flares in this red and blue horizontal
, striped jumpsuit of iOO% cotton. Jump into this outfit, and
be prepared for fashion fun!
*
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m VERMANS
Charisma presents the fashion latest f/M BIGUM
FASHION INDIAN DRESS! This outfit features braid, and
a small pleated bottom of egg shell colored crepe with a
matching crepe scarf Be a big hit for any chief Modeled by
Marty.
. r
fashion layout by ... Joyce
photography by ... goldwyn & binney

Wednesday, June 4,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



GA T O RTC LA $ SIFIE D S

FOR SALE
¥ ¥
1966 Suzuki cycle 50cc, 3600 miles
great shape must sell $135 with
helmet or best offer phone 378-6360
anytime. (A-3M50-P)
Pentax Hla camera, extras $l2O,
Pentax Bellows with slide copier $75,
vivitar Micro adapter $lO, Sawyer
550 slide projector $75,
Westinghouse transistorized portable
stereo TV $l5O, G.E. portable stereo
$75. Call 376-9569 after 5:00 p.m.
(A-3t-l 50-P)
Home for sale, $14,500, perteti
location for university people. Walk
to Univ., Med. Center, PK Yonge.
Small 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
pleasant neighborhood. Aircond.,
fenced back yard, screened porch.
5A% FHA mortgage, $94.87 monthly
includes principal, interest, taxes,
insurance. Flexible terms on equity.
Can take S4OO-SSOO down. 1227 SW
11th Ave. Call 372-1744 for appt.
( {A-Bt-146-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS. Inventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWTH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-.?340. (A-18t-136-C)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are net tonally sdveNlod
brands which are advertised ter
$169.00. These machines can M
purchased for storage and fMgM
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. Iff* N $ Ave.
uaJnesvttle (A-131-tf<)
6 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mech. fie
be sold for storage and bdP
$35.00. These can be laiwtfX $1
Ware House 122$ N.C 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-tf-cJ
Toy Poodle pups white males, AKC
& pedigree 6 wks old June 14.
392-0930 after 6:30 p.m. 475-1329.
(A-st-148-P)
?* " ;, .
General Electric tabte
. fefrigerator 2V2 cu. ffifJSSm*?
.compartment, 4 mo
dorm living S9O. Call
cat. Ruber Carb^he
clip. Only five .K
376-6280 between 6 I duwfcgjj;
THE RANCHER. Ine.
Ammunition by the case
Os sporting guns ?
**s*? new gun
phon'e
Motorcycle bultaco 175 cc. 1966
$175. Graduating must sirtt: Cali
Dick Landrum at 372-9363 around
7:00 p.m. (A-3t-151-p)
i "y- ,M v ST ATE u
I THRU WED I
I i A
1 JOHN CASSAVETES' 5 J
ifACESIi

Page 10

| FOR SALE I
17*/2 Ft. SuperFolbot Kayak paddles
& seat cushions motor brack. Make
offer. *6B Eveinrude IV2 HP motor.
Melrose 475-5745 after 7 p.m.
(A-2t-151-p)
INVEST YOUR HOUSING $. 3br -1
bath $72/mth Best reasonable
offer takes it. 378-2741. 7:30-8:30
A.M. or 5-7P.M. Its a steal.
(A-3t-151-p)
FOR RENT |
SUBLET S2OO plus utilities for
summer 1 bedroom apt air cond tv
fully furnished Modern Age apts. Call
378-7196 after five. (B-5M50-P)
Married students, one br apt on SW
16 Ave, pool, all electric, slOl mo.
Call 378-4323. (B-2M50-P)
Sublet June rent free! 2 bedrooms
dishwasher, disposal 2 bathrooms,
Spanish furniture, scenic Tanglewood
Manor, call 372-4032 summer
quarter. (B-4t-150-P)
Apt. to sublet on June 15. 1 br, ac,
patio. 4 blocks from campus.
$ 90/mo. CaH 372-7762. (B-4t-15G-P)
Large one bedroom furnished apt.
AC and heated available June 15.
1825-A NW 10 St. Phone 376-4265
very nice. (B-3t-150-P)
Sublease 2-bedroom 16th Ave. apt.
TV on cable incl. Call 376-5588.
(B-3M50-P)
For rent: Concrete block cottages,
ind r vidual living units, furnished,
change decor per imagination, no
lease S7O monthly, 372-4407 after
8:00 p.m. ask far Steve. (B-3t-150-P)
Economical living for male students 1
bfk from campus S6O/m. Room & 3
meals/day. 5 houses dining half, rec
room & work shop. Pro cook
members summer & fa)!. Vacancies.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
College Uv org. (e-ldt-145-P)
hep campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior men.
For summer AWGWQ& 1969-70.
376-8122. 376-5652. (EMT,-136-P)
-.>'. >m v-frtr-
GUYS & GALS economical' ttvmg
..iJMJ was gone e*ed le# She auwrmer
fAiitymen. Roam £ chaffs. peace Ibve
T&& freedom samfdtrt.
h!Hlay ilf mu
HJjMjk W -p)
y-er-
£dblet for summer: Frederick 2
.bedroom apt. Reduced rates CaH
t£-4t-149-pl
f urmshed.
v Reduced summer rates. $77.50 per
VfSgMfh, Aircondltidned. very near
. campus. No oar needed. Calf Mr. or
izmmil Wfti** $76-5*36.
feSFiMfc***** fiMem*-. tins
SSZSZ c>>l
m U s '*' 25

rSf?
W HEPBURN
i BIG -< ,N
\ guess who's
. 1 coming
HITS I to dinner
Rock Hudson Claudia Cardinale
A Fine Pali

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, June 4, 1969

:<^S^WW<4o>eCWfr>M FOR RENT 1
Sublet luxury townhouse Tanglewd.
apt. 2 bedroom, all the extras. For
only a small amt! Great for married
grads or undergrads. Call 378-7000.
(B-3t-149-p)
Help! Will need 3 male roommates/or
will sublet entire apt to any ne.
Were bound to please! Spac ou lux
2 br, l*/2 bath, poolside, apt. 30. ph.
372-8041. (B-st-149-p)
Sublet Landmark apt. for summer. 4
people. Only S9O per person for the
entire quarter. Many extras left in
apt. for summer. Call 372-5041.
(B-st-147-p)
Poolside 2 bedroom furnished from
June 16 to August 31 at special
summer rate. Contact FREDERICK
GARDENS. (B-10t-144-C)
TO Sublet. Two bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. for summer
quarter. Call 378-8564. (B-5M48-P)
SUBLET leaving town. Must rent for
sum qtr. UG 1-bed. linens, kit. sup.
pic. & sprds. incl. TV too if gone by
June 1. CaH 378-9877. (e-6t-148-PJ
2 females roommates wanted to
sublet apt 17 French Quarter. $166
for quarter. CaH 376-6569. Ask for
Lani or Mickey. fB-3t-149-p)
V 1 *'
STOP URGENT desperately need 2
female roommates Summer qtr. at
Summit Mouse Apts. CaH 372-8716.
(B-2t-151-p)
.0 '.V>
Sublet 1 bedroom apt.
Air-conditioned, washer, close to
campus, $256 for summer quarter.
Call 378-8645. {-3t-151 -p)
were not responsible for sins
committed in this 6|N|pyy
sublease H TNwrt tW this sammor we
need a rest. $ #aots, wt. room,, maid,
rent???
'' ~ '

!" WANTED |.
Need 2 female roommates for
summer quarter. Landmark Apt. 23
free June rent. Call Phyllis, Sally or
Rosie at 378-7143. (C-4M50-P)
2 female roommates to share apt.
near campus next year call 392-7635
evenings. (C-4t-150-P)

PIABOLIQUE
__ ;
REITZ UNION THEATER
..
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Vy-e.-t : >' * >/ '*V-W'jWWJWWrSWT'-^r,^/,'..HS*i*S*T?-V
I W* OjHMf*!' Oj|to m,' § ********* .-.
CO-FEATURE AT 10:35
tfSmmltfr: \^Lwt.MBows
N ags
tle^e^kSS
1-1 v ' ' < - : [jgj AN AMICUS PRODUCTION TECHNICOLOR*

Best Actor Award
I I
m ra i
-' l* H
CLASSIFIED
ADS SELL!!



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

* t m
WANTED
Female roommate wanted. Share 3
bedroom La Bonne Vie apartment
with 3 other girls fall to spring. Rent
$57.50 plus. 376-8153. (C-5M48-P)
Need 2 coed roommates now at
Tanglewood luxury Townhouse apt.
Get own room SSO mo. or share large
room SIOO qtr. Pool, ac, bbq, etc.
376-1015. (C-3t-149-p)
Male roommate for fall. Must study
weekdays party weekends. Two
bedroom, poolside, Le Bonne Vie
apt. $l4O/qua. + util, call 392-7499.
"(C-5M49-P)
1 roommate to share Camelot apt
with 3 law students for Sept. 2
bedrooms, 2 full baths, dishwasher,
gas bar b q. Call Dave 376-4104.
(C-4M50-P)
Female to share spacious apt. Pvt.
bdrm., ac, tv, stereo, for summer qtr,
SSO mon. Call 372-7204 p.m., ask for
Randi. (C-2M50-P)
1 male wanted to share poolside F.
Quarter Apt. $95.00 for entire
summer. Available June 11th. Please
stop by no. 77 Fr. Quarter or call
378-7968. (C-st-147-p)
OPPORTUNITY Women Wanted TO
Sell The Fabulous Pennyrich Bra.
Small Investment Required. Call
Collect 904-733-1073. (C-st-149-p)
3 coeds next year at Tanglewood
Apt. Beautifully furnished, lVz baths,
dishwasher, disposal, pool. Please call
Leah 372-4032. (C-129-st-p)
SUBLET or SHARE VILLAGE
PARK SBS for all summer, option for
fall; no regressive rent; 2 bdrm
poolside. Call 376-7439. (C-st-149-p)
1 male roommate needed for summer
and/or fall quarter. Large and
spacious 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
airconditioned apartment. 1 block
behind Norman Hall, sll2 plus share
of utilities for quarter, call 372-1272.
(C-3t-151-p)
Yes! We still need two mature males
tosublease2 br, 2 bath Camelot Apt.
for summer. Pool, sauna, private
BBQ. Only $61.50/mo. Call
376-4104. (C-3t-151-p)
2 female roommates for summer
quarter for Village Park apt. V 2 June
rent paid. For further information,
call 378-5950. (C-3t-151-p)
2 roommates wanted for summer
quarter at Frederick Gardens. S9O
Plus 1/4 utilities. 3 72-605 1.
(C-3t-151-p)
One female roommate needed
summer. June rent free. $45/m, A/C,
IV2 baths, disposal, dishwasher,
carpeting. Landmark Phase 11.
378-6339. (C-3t-151-p)
Roommates for summer, option for
fall or whole house. sbdrm., 3
fireplaces, 2bath, ac, $42.50 mo.
Total 9rms. Side lot & patios. 1406
NW sth Ave. 378-7061. (C-2t-151-p)
One male roommate wanted to share
luxurious one bedroom French
Quarter apartment (already leased)
beginning in September. The junior
premedical student wants a
non-smoker only. Rent is S7O. per
month, plus. 392-8363. (C-2t-145-p)^
Leaving for San Francisco noon,
Weds., June 11, need riders to share
expenses. Call 376-5512 after 7:00
P.m. (C-3t-151-p)
Wanted Males for voice experiment.
Involves x-rays of larynx. If qualified
$lO for three hours. Call Linda
392-2049 Communication Science
Labratory. (c-3t-151-c)
Female roommate to share apt. one
blk. from campus. Own room, share
kitchen and bath, A/C S9O plus utl.
for summer qtr. Call 376-3184.
(C-3t-151-p)
Sabbatical? Mature couple guarantee
excellent care of your completely
furnished home Sept June. No
children or pets. 475-1355 anytime.
(C-3t-151-p)
I have 68 VW with black hi-riser
front seats in excellent condition.
Would like to trade these for 196 7
black VW front seats without head
rest. Call 392-8414. (C-3t-151-p)
Senior or grad female roommate to
share 1 AC 5 blocks
from stadium. Rent s4smo. for
summer. Call Trish Bassett 378-7136.
(C-3t-151-p)
INTERESTING COED for fall
quarter share apt. own room walk to
campus. $35 mo. 392-7896 digit.
(C-2t-151-p)
| HELP WANTED ]
Listeners wanted will pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Shirley Bracken,
Univ. ext. 2-2046 between 8-5 only
for appointment. (E-3M44-C)
HELP WANTED MALE. Men's
Clothing Salesman. Discount
privileges. Salary commensurate with
experience Apply Wilson Department
Stores, 1 np.,(E-lot-145-C)

I HELP WANTED
Part-time Secretary. Architect needs
intelligent secretary for part-time
position at any convenient hours.
Good typing essential, shorthand
helpful. Excellent pay for qualified
person. Send resume to P.O. Box
14038, Gainesville or call 462-2599
(E-5M50-P)
Wanted additional topless dancer
apply in person at Handlebar Lounge
Friday 9:30 to 12:00 noon. Must be
good dancer attractive and 21 or
over. (E-3t-151-p)
, xxx.S!J! i x xa'
AUTOS
i-WW iXXWtt-Xfr: WX-X-X-X-X.;.:.;.:.:.:#
62 VW seadn ww tires r&h good
condition 55000 miles call Luis
378-5141 or 372-9307. (G-4M50-P)
Ford 1960 $250 or best offer
372-7714. (G-4t-150-p)
Yellow 1967 Opel Rallye, black rally
stripes, glare panels, four new tires,
new battery, years inspection
sticker, very clean, slls. Call
372-8314, 5-9 p.m. (G-4t-150-p)
Corvair 64. Good condition.
Safety-checked $375 or best offer.
Call 378-1489. (G-st-149-p)
Buick special '63 Air conditioned,
power steering radio, excellent
mechanical condition $450. or best
offer. Call 376-3352 after sp.m.
(G-st-149-p)
'59 TR-3. Roll Bar, wire wheels; good
condition. $325. Call 376-6280
between 5 and 7 p.m. (G-3t-149-p)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen dealer, 4222 NW 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-ts-130-C)
Pontiac, 1966 Tempest sport coupe
326 with Hurst 4-speed. Excellent
condition, MUST SELL. Come and
see it, then make an offer. Call
372-5688 between 5-7 p.m.
TODAY!. (G-5M49-P)
67 convertible Mustang S2OO below
used car retail, $1440, 19,000 mile;,
6 cylinder, gas economy, must sell,
beautiful. 120 NW 24 St. 376-8565.
(G-12M42-P)
1965 Volkswagen good condition,
rack, trailer. $700.00 Ph. 378-1187
after 5 p.m. (G-st-148-P)
Must sell MG Midget 1966 SIOSO.
Call 392-7762. (G-3t-151-p)
'67 Ford XL 500 convertible like
new, loaded, sporty luxury, new
polyglass tires, 23,400 actual miles.
Phone 376-9851 after 6p.m.
(G-3t-151-p)
1960 Valiant reliable trans. Brakes,
trans, exhaust recently overhauled.
The Red Ogre may lack good looks,
but is loyal & personable. SIOO.
(G-3t-151-p)

|f \ SPECIALS f||
M J J WEDNESDAY |||
IjUMBO CHOPPED!
I STEAK -1'
H WITH MUSHROOM GRAVEY W
H AND YELLOW RICE ||
II THURSDAY
I ROAST TURKEY I
111 WITH DRESSING, CRANBERRY SAUCE, |||
|l AND CHOICE OF POTATO j||
I MORRISON'S 1
I CAFETERIAS i
m
',fy4F *

Wednesday, June 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

PERSONAL
TADFOUCL*
There are damn few Datsuns on used
car lots. To buy one see Godding &
Clark down by the main post office.
(J-ts-143-c)
SOS Need math tutor to help cram
for STA 320 final. Will pay S3O if I
get a B, S2O for a C in the course.
Call Barbara 376-7985 (J-3t-151-p)
Wanted female traveling companion
to go to California or open to
suggestions (can be out of country). I
have VW. Call Lynne 378-9694.
(J-3t-151-p)
Have something to sell? Want to pick
up something at a bargain price?
Bring it or come to the Reitz Union
FLEA MARKET. Friday June 6 on
the Reitz Union Collonade at 11:00
a.m. to 6:00 p.m. (J-3t-151-c)
TRUCK MIAMI BOUND. Have
furniture, truncks, etc. to go to
miami? Let us take them. Call Phil or
Joe 378-6795. (J-3t-151-p)
Crusaders working at Cape Cod?
please visit Cher Gil 277-1525 5
Winchester St. Brookline Mass, or call
Sigma Kappa House here. 372-8716.
(J-lt-151-p)
Dial 378-5600 & hear an electronic
factorial any time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING, 16 NW 7th Ave.
(J-5M46-P)
Luv one more week and itll be all
over for you. Thanks for a great year
youre wonderful! Victory through
vegetables! Love Goldie.(J-lt-151-p)
Need ride to Miami, June 13. Will
split trip expenses and U-Haul-lt. Call
Sydel 392-9859. (J-4M48-P)
Poodel puppies, silver and black AKC
six weeks. Call after 5 372-6733.
(J-6M48-P)
TRAVEL ABROAD flights only or
vacation seminars 6wks.
Departures June 22 and July 6.
Various itineraries all over Europe.
Call 392-1655 Rm 310 Reitz Unio:i.
(J-5M48-C)
Pull a train? Call 378-0151 after 6
p.m. (J-2M50-P)
~;.x-x.x.;*x.v.-.v., x *fcs*x*x*x, x x *x-x-x-vs*;v
I LOST & FOUND |
v y
y>X.X*XX*X*XXX*X*XX*X*X.XXXX*XXXX*X
LOST Camera and Lightmeter left on
log near Ichetuchnle bridge
Saturday. Call 378-6858.
(L-3t-151-p)
Found beautiful well-fed black
puppy with long tfdifin Flavet
Village. Please call 376-9025.
(L-3t-151-nc
Lost spiral notebook with business
ad. notes between union and frat.
row. need them for finals! Call Arch
378-7511 after 11 or 392-1655
anytime. (l-2t-151-p)
! 5 8<3!
Volkswagen parts and served.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Cali
376-0710. (M-14t-123-p)

Page 11

I
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
526 S. W. 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus station 378-4480.
(m-lt-106-p)

NOTICE
To All Alligator Advertisers
DISPLAY & CLASSIFIED
last day!
to submit advertising of any kind to
during THIS QUARTER
Copy, either display or classified rs V.
FOR ADVERTISING JS
for the remainder of this quarter V /
MUST BE SUBMITTED
to the Student Publications f\
Business \
Office BY 3:00 PM s<4/ \
located in room \ j
330 REITZ UNION
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowiig 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredAiinimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior lo starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
- n
I ii I ocmDPcicm £
c 2 $ $
< ? 2 o 2. a 3
_' to 8 ? | Si i ft
"a | >
o
MM ..i ..i---'
--' ..i---'
O Q
_ >
Ul U N H
Jgi 8 8 8 8 8 8^
mmm < < *< < < 3
M
. Mg, M
" ii m a /s
S S 2

a 5 a a w 2
XXX 5
ig s z
3 3 3
TO
io> 3 z
? -< c >
-< O o
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mmA mmmmmi
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__ __ .. /
I, i 1.1 -l-L. r I i .- ' ." i.

gtaaflflftMftMNywiwoooaoaeflM b
I SERVICES |
EXPERIENCED, ACCURATE
TYPING. .45 per page. CALL
LORRAINE. 378-8640. (M-st-149-p)
A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-1 32-C)



!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, June 4, 1969

Page 12

Students ApproveOf AmericanusinessSystem

(EDITOR S NOTE: This is
the last of three articles
summarizing the findings of a
survey conducted for the
Standard Oil Co. by Roper
Research Associates.)
Contrary to a popular
impression, most college student
approve of the American system
of business and industry, a
nationwide attitude study
shows.
A career in business or
industry is also the most
prevalent career plan among
seniors graduating this spring. At
the same time, business and its
leaders are not exempt from
criticism.
These are among the major
findings of the survey of student
attitudes, values and beliefs. The

Berrin Asks Sanger Firing

r FROM PAGE ONE
Me also hopes a hearing
would challenge the Alligator
when il has overstepped its
bounds.
A public airing of the matter
would show that all people are
capable of mistakes, including

Parity Raiders Hit

FROM PA6E ONE
bigger than the one for male
raiders. In a big panty raid at the
end of November counselors
turned over a long list of girls
names to the dean of womens
office for possible action. That

Austin America
WHOLESALE
COOL-SALE
V j Mf'i
1969 America Sedan 5 1765
Air Conditioning 398
Fully
$134 Extra
SAVE S J7O
and BEAT THE HEAT!
CRANE IMPORTS
MB) 506 EAST UNIVERSITY
fevtjilA PARTSSALESSERVICE
t ________

SURVEY SHOWS INDUSTRIAL CAREERS PREVALENT

survey covered all types of
colleges and universities, large
and small, public, private and
religious.
The study focused on male
seniors but, for comparative
purposes, included smaller
surveys of freshmen and alumni
of the Class of 1964. In general,
the three groups freshmen,
senior and alumni expressed
similar views on business and
industry.
The students were asked to
appraise four integral U.S.
institutions the political
system, the judicial system,
business and industry, higher
education. All four were judged
basically sound, but the
greatest approval -by 87 per
cent of the seniors was
accorded to business and

the editors of the Alligator, and
that when they are wrong they
should stand up and admit the
truth, he said.
could not be reached
for further comment at press
time.
BSP Chairman Glenn Butler
told the Alligator Tuesday no
action will be taken on the

raid also came right on the eve
of final exams.
Police on the scene at that
raid said they recorded room
locations of girls encouraging the
raid.
However, informed sources
say that only a few boys names
were taken in Mondays raid.

industry.
A majority did find room for
some improvement in the
business and industrial system,
but only a very small minority, 3
per cent of the seniors, thought
it needed fundamental
overhaulings. The assertion,
frequently made, that most
students are .anti-business in
their attitudes appears
completely unfounded.
Further confirmation of this
appears in seniors choice of the
kind of job they plan to get after
finishing school or military
service, as the particular
circumstance may be. The
greatest number said they
planned to go into business or
industry. The second largest
group plans a career in
education, followed, in

matter until the next board
meeting, at the end of June. He
declined to comment on the
petition.
All board meetings are open
to the public.
Indians Vs. Army
On Nov. 9, 1912, a halfback
named Dwight David
Eisenhower played for a favored
Army football team which lost
to the Carlisle Indians 27-6.
Playing his first game for Carlisle
in that game was the legendary
Jim Thorpe.

Home in a Hurry
On FLORIDA AIR LINES
GATOR SPECIALS
SERVICE TO JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA,
SARASOTA, AND FORT MYERS
~ r
This exam-week extra schedule of flights from Gainesville
to major cities in Florida will operate daily from June 9 through
June 14. And every flight will be a low-cost, comfortable trip on a
26-passenger, 3-crew (pilot, co-pilot, stewardess) aircraft besides!
SCHEDULE (June 9 through June 14): MBMBHt
Leave Gainesville 11:55 a.m.
Arrive JACKSONVILLE 12:30 p.m. I
Leave Gainesville 2:00 p.m.
Arrive TAMPA 2:50 p m. HBHMBh
Leave Tampa 3:10 p.m. BpHH
Arrive FORT MYERS 4:00 p.m.
Connection: HHCHH
Leave Tampa 3:00 p.m.
Arrive SARASOTA 3:20 p.m.
* Jacksonville $12.00 $ 8.00
Tampa 17.00 11.00
Sarasota j 23.00 15.00
Fort Myers 27.00 18.00
c PI us tax
FOR GATOR SPECIAL RESERVATIONS CALL 378-1966 (or your local travel agent).
FLORIDA AIR LINES
Gainesville, Florida

preference, by professional work
and government service. Only 7
per cent of the seniors had not
made a definite career choice.
The top job requirement?
Mentally stimulating work.
Todays students also tend to
be individualistic. Large
majorities said they desired jobs
where they would not just be
cogs in the machine, and where
they would have a chance to be
creative. A chance to rise to the
top the traditional success
syndrome was far down on
the list of career requisites.
Seniors who plan a business
career have their financial sights
set somewhat higher than those
who intend to enter other fields.
Half of the business-bound
students expect to be making
$12,000 or more five years after
graduation.
A sizable majority of seniors
said they thought top business
management had become more
concerned with the national
welfare during the last five years.
It would appear that the

social image of business has
improved in recent years among
undergraduates. A sizable
minority, however 33 per cent
of seniors and 19 per cent of
freshmen still think that the
American system of business and
industry is too much concerned
with profits. This is at the
expense of other things, mainly
social responsibility.
Business leaders do not come
off as well in seniors esteem as
do educational leaders. Political
leaders trail both.
The survey sampled 1,000
seniors, 500 freshmen and 673
alumni from a random selection
of 96 colleges and universities in
all parts of the country. It was
initiated in the spring of 1968
when unrest on college campuses
had increasingly become major
news.
The praticipating students
and institutions were selected at
random but on a weighted
representative basis, and the
interviews were made during the
winter of 1968-69.
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL Hfl
376-4552 AUTHORIZED
DEALER
Open til 7 p.m. nightly



By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UFs Gator cagers rebounded off a mediocre early season to come
on strong enough for a National Invitational Tournament bid in
March.
Gator All-American. Neal Walk consistently led the cage attack
during the 1969-70 season averaging 24 points and 18 rebounds a
game.
Walk was drafted second in both the National and American
Bartlett Faces New
Faces In 70 Season

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
The loss of an All-American
and three senior starters from
the 1968-69 Gator basketball
team points to a rebuilding year
for the next edition of the UF
cagers.
Coach Tommy Bartlett has a
very difficult task in finding a
replacement for Neal Walk, who
set every major UF basketball
record and was the second round
draft choice of both professional
leagues.
The only starter returning
from the Gator National
Invitational Tournament team is
Captain Andy Owens. The
six-foot-five 210-pound
All-Southeastern Conference
player averaged 16.1 points a
game and 8.6 rebounds.
Junior Ed Lukco returns to
try for the right wing position
but will have competition from
Earl Finley, a 6-7 West Palm
Beach Jr. College transfer.
Another transfer Tom Purvis,
also 6-7, will be pushing for one
of the two wing positions. The
M |
"V.
< 4 v **
*** m w i
MIKE MCGINNIS
... in modified jersey
9
TONIGHT!
THE FAMOUS
T.G.
EAT-IN
6 PM

lyoy Gators Earn First NIT Bid

two transfers will give the Gators
the height they will need.
Freshman Cliff Cox, 6-6, has
an excellent outside shot and
will be in contention for the
wing position.
The biggest rebuilding spot
for the Gators will be at the
point guard. Leading the list of
candidates will be Tony Duva,
6-0, and Jerry Hoover, 6-0
Duva was red-shirted this past
season although he dressed-out
for every game. Hoover was also
red shirted this last season.
Replacing Walk will also be a
tough job for Bartlett. Gary
Waddell measures up to Walk in
height, both are 6-10, but has
not had a chance to prove his
credentials in varsity
competition yet. It is doubtful
that Waddell, who was the
leading frosh scorer, will be
another Walk but the Gator
All-American was not
outstanding as a freshmen either.
It looks like UF will be off to
another slow start until Bartlett
is able to find the right
combination of green cagers to
play with Owens.
One advantage the Gators will
have over this years starters is
height. If the starters are Owens,
Finley, Purvis, Waddell and Duva
the average height will be 6-5,
two inches more than this
season.
At best the Gators must be
considered dark horse candidates
for the SEC title, but another
tournament bid looms on the
horizon.

ALL-AMERICAN WALK LEADS WAY

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Ladies Shop Sale
Dresses 1/3 OFF
Slacks $7.00
Skirts 1/3 OFF
Bermudas 1/3 OFF
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Knit Tops 1/2 OFF
Shoes $5.00
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Basketball leagues. He signed with Pheonix Suns of the NBA for an
estimated $300,000.
After the first 12 games UF was 6-6 suffering losses to Jacksonville,
Louisiana State, Northwester, Vanderbilt, Kentucky -and Tennessee.
Five of the six losses were on the road. The lone loss at home was
to Vanderbilt and the loss to the Volunteers was by one point.
The Gators were hampered by poor free throw and field goal
shooting during the first half of the season plus the loss of Todd
Lalich, Skip Lewis and Mike McGinnis.
Fortunately the play of Boyd Welsch and Ed Lukco was good
enough to help revive the team.
Coach Tommy Bartletts cagers adopted a new more aggressive
personality in the second half of the season, winning 12 of 14.
In five days the Gators knocked off nationally ranked Kentucky,
Tennessee and LSU at home. Andy Owens came on strong in these
games averaging 18.8 points a game.
Owens and Welsch led the team from the free-throw line averaging
close to 80 per cent.
Welsch tied Kentucky by sinking a toss from the free throw line in
the closing minute that enabled the Gators to beat the number four
ranked Wildcats.
Playmaker Mike Leatherwood directed the Gator attack and led
the team in assists with 129.
Os the starting six Mike McGinnis had the best field goal
percentage, hitting 52 per cent of his shots.
Towards the end of the season talk began concerning an NIT berth
even with a second or third place finish in the Southeastern
Conference. The conference rules were changed in 1969 to allow
teams other than the conference winner to play in post-season
tournaments.
UF traveled to Mississippi for two away games against MSU and
Ole Miss. They returned home wounded by a loss to the Rebels by
two points but NIT hopes were still alive.
Before the last SEC game the Gators had to travel to Jacksonville
for a game with West Virginia. UF won that one 75-57 playing in their
practice jerseys due to a mix up in who was to wear dark and who was
to wear white.
A day before the season finale the NIT selection committee invited
the Gators to play in New York, UF celebrated by beating Alabama
73-60.
UF ran into Temple, the eventual NIT champion, in the first game
and came out on the short end, 82-66.
It was an abrupt ending for the high-flying Gators but they were
outclassed by a superior Temple five. The Owls came on strong after a
slow first half to sweep the Gators off the court with excellent
shooting and ball-handling.

NEW ARRIVALS FOR GRADUATION
OLYMPIA PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
THE BEST only $114.50
Or $19.08 DOWN PAYMENT & $lO Per Month
THIS DEAL CAN NOT BE BEAT
OLYMPIA IS RATED EXCELLENT TOO
KISERS 604 N. MAIN
DONIGANS
MEMS SHOP SALE
Ties $1.99
4 for $7.00
SI
Sport Jackets 1/3 OFF
Shoes 1/3 OFF
(Loafers & Wingtips )
One Week Only:
Gant Shirts 20% OFF
All Trousers 20%QFF
FR 2-0473

Wednesday, June 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, June 4,1969

FOOTBALL* 7
r GOLF MARC DUNN. EDITOR TRACK 9
Coed Golfers Go North
For National Crown
UFs Womens Golf Team will be competing in the Division of Girls
and Womens Sports National Intercollegiate Championships June
15-21 at Pennsylvania State University.
Representing the UF will be Tammy Bowman handicap 3, Cindy
Meyers handicap 3, Linda Parker handicap 5, Jenny
Scrivner handicap 9, and Terry Russell handicap 10.
The tournament is played primarily on an individual basis, as many
schools do not have good womens programs to send four or five
women to compete on a team basis according to Betty Graham, UF
Womans Physical Education assistant department chairman.
The tournament does include a two girl team division.
An 18 hole qualifying round will be played the first day of the
tourney to narrow the field to the lowest 32 players. The low 32 will
then play in match play to determine the individual champion.
Team play is determined on the basis of the scores from the
qualifying round.
Our girls have an excellent chance to win the team and the
individual titles, said Coach Graham. Our girls have played excellent
and have the needed experience to pull it off.

COLD WEATHIR CLUBS STALL ALIGNMENT
'Snow Belt Chills NFL

NEW YORK (UPI)- Na National
tional National Football League owners
were again thrown for a loss
Tuesday in attempts to realign
themselves for the 1970 season.
Commissioner Pete Rozelle,
after another full day of talks
with NFL owners, revealed that
the number of possible
realignment plans was reduced
Quits Baseball
MONTREAL (UPI) Maury
Wills, the fleet infielder who set
the all-time major league record
of 104 stolen bases while playing
with the Los Angeles Dodgers in
1962, retired from baseball
Tuesday night just before he was
supposed to take the field for
the Montreal Expos.
The 36-year-old Wills reftised
to make any comment to the
press but it was common
knowledge that he has been
unhappy all season.
The announcement of Wills
retirement was made by Jim
Fanning, general manager of the
Expos.
Tonight, Maury Wills asked
for and submitted a letter
requesting voluntary retired
status, said Fanning. We had a
nice visit and there is no in my mind that he is
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to only nine, each of which,
however, had at least two or
three objectionable
characteristics.
Any internal realignment
must pass by a unanimous
vote a situation Rozelle
admitted he is unhappy with.
Rozelle said a number of the
plans still under consideration
carried 12-1 votes in favor of
approval, but in each instance
one owner refused to consent. In
each instance, it was a different
owner who objected.
The biggest hang-up facing
the owners seemed to involve
the teams comprising the NFLs
snow belt Green Bay,
Chicago, Detroit and Minnesota.
Those four teams have no
objection to staying together but

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376-S22W

Mens Intramurals Over,
1969 Champs Announced

Men intramurals drew to an
exciting close last week as all
divisions ended competition.
Fletcher S won the Murphree
area championship managing to
win but one sport, tennis, in the
whole campaign. The Fletcher S
Sleuths were managed by
Dave Davidson.
The Newins Bruins won
the Graham Area championship
in a more convincing way as Jeff
Joiner led his section to
championships in volleyball,
basketball, handball and softball.
In Hume Hall, it was the
Gaddum Gotchas managed by
big Mike Hawkins that won the
championship with big victories
in football, basketball, and
softball. The Tolbert 2 Tubs
won bowling and softball
enroute to the Tolbert
championship. Alex Tocascio
was the spearhead behind the
Tub attack.
East Campus was led by the
Jennings 2 Few which won
bowling and softball. Jeff

want a warm weather team in
the division also. No owner of
such a team could be found
willing to join the snow belt
clubs.
Our best bet would seem to
have someone get a case of
ulcers, Rozelle said, referring to
last months realignment of the
National and American
Conferences when Cleveland
owner Art Modell agreed to
move into the AFL after coming
down with an ulcer attack.
The commissioner said there
is no sense 'of urgency in solving
the NFL internal realignment
issue since it will not take effect
until the start of the 1970
season, and schedules for that
campaign will not be drawn up
until December.

Seibert was the Jennings
manager.
In the Independent League,
the Tallywhackers easily walked
away with the crown as Brad
Sutton led his group of
independent minded students to
victories in basketball, bowling
and softball.
In fraternity action, Chi Phi,
managed by Bill Carter had to go
to the last sport to clinch the
Blue League championship but
did it very convincingly with

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victories in football, volleyball
and softball. In the Orange
League, Stu Kalb engineered his
TEP athletes to another
championship with wins in
football, volleyball, tennis and
handball.
The Intramural Departments
summer softball league will
begin play on Monday, June 30.
Anyone desiring to enter a team
must do so no later than June 26
at five pjn. To enter come by
room 229 Florida Gym or call
392-0581.



Tennis Team Shines In 'Year Os The Gator

By JEFF FRANK
Alligator Sports Correspondent
Though the year for UF
athletics in general was one of
great expectations and greater
frustrations, the 1969 edition of
the Gator tennis team came
closest to realizing the elusive
Year of the Gator.
The team started with a
victory in the Southern
Inter-collegiate in Athens, Ga. in
October. UFs number three
player Jamie Pressly upset
number one Armistead Neely in
the finals of the singles.
pj % B a_. . a

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'

"**"
.;. MtMM* teH with a backhand 1 i

UF Considered DBtfoone
In NCAA Champimwiio

Retirement
HOUSTON (vri) -A J.
Foyt Jr., three-time winner of
the Indianapolis 500, said
Tuesday he plans to continue
racing despite his fathers desire
that he get out of it.
Foyt, a veteran of 13 Indy
races, started last Saturdays race
in the pole position but finished
eighth after spending 22 minutes
in the pits with manifold
trouble.
Your Genorator.
I OVERHAULED Soeciol l
ISA 50
\ INCUIOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
SOI nw Mi avi. tmnvuu
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Mn

Neely and Steve Beeland. The
over all team title went to the
UF, over a field which included
most of the SEC teams.
The dual match season ran
from Feb. 28 to May 17, but
practice was really a year long
proposition with only brief
breaks during the holidays.
Judging from the seasons results
the netters dedication paid off.
The Gators boast an 18-M
record, and their only loss was
to UCLA, ranked second in the
nation.
The victories include wins
over Florida State, Stanford,
Oregon, Georgia. LSU,

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Tennessee, and Miami. The latter
team was ranked fourth in the
nation, one notch above the
Gators. Since their lone loss to
UCLA, the UF has won 12
straight.
The Gators also won the
prestigious Cape Coral
intercollegiate Tournament in
April over a strong field of
schools winch included Rollins,
Florida State, and Oral Roberts
University.
A unique feature of the
victory for the UF team was the
fact that the singles
ehamjpionsfcip was won by a
flayer completely overlooked in
the see-dings. UFs Pressly won
the title by beating both Neely
jwt Charge Oswms, who play
Ifcead of him osi-ihe UF squad,
tV. The high point for the team
,iwr in Mta ftottge on May
10. The occasion was the SEC
"nKountiir .h.re ihe Calm

* .
UF OWENS
... to play in As NCAA finals
The only remsirnng teat for
the UF nette comes June
16-21 at Princeton at the NCAA
charapiondui*. The Gators wM
try to huprewe on their UNb
place finish of 1968. The
favorites are BC, UCLA, Rice,
and Trinity. l
In his remaaks at die tc mb |
banquet, Coach Patter £*&*&§
this tea_'*%s} arealeet Jan^l

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Wednesday, June 4, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

team that has ever played for the
UF.
A good showing at the NCAA
in June will substantiate his
statement.
In speaking of the prospects
for the 1970 season Potter is
somewhat non-committal. He
faces the unhappy task of trying
to replace three of the toughest
Competitors and most consistent
winners in UF tennis history in
the persons of Neely, Beeland
essiy.
Bhas returning Owens,
, and Paul Lunetta from
toft squad.
K> available are Will
; Bruce Bartlett, and
.MlTfe** who saw limited
actlwi #d year. Heading the list
of entering freshman players is
Buddy Miles from Jackson,
Miss,, a top ranking Southern
junior, who just this week signed
with the UF. He will be joined
*bv pcesnrsing Florida players
Kay ;|pfy from Jacksonville,
Ail Ml Landrum from sort
i how the
riaying at
l with a
|£yS#des

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, June 4, 1969

ADVERTISEMENT

H3iEflSE£lt£K

392-2097

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-DANCE -DANCEGENE
GENE -DANCEGENE MIDDLETON FRIDAY NIGHT

You made it. Four years worth. Finally, at last. Or
maybe it was five years, or six or seven. No matter, it's
all over.
To help you seniors calm any nervous feeling about
having to actually work for a living, the Rat is dedicating
its Friday afternoon TGIF to all of you. The beer will be
very cheap, including the eight or ten brands of
imported bottled beer. TGIF this week is in your honor
so come on over Friday from 2-6 and be honored with
that great equalizer... BEER ... and that's not all.

GREEKS
This is it Greeks, the last Wednesday Greek night at
the Rat until the Fall. You've given us great support and
we love it. That's one of the reasons we honor different
houses every We. night. Tonight the special honor goes
to the Sigma Chi's, Sigma Phi Epsilon's, Alpha Gamma
Rho'sand the Alpha Epsilon Phi's. In fact, the Rat will
make this Wed. really Greek night and invite all the
houses over for cheap beer. Make the Rat the last big
gettogether for all greeks before the quarter ends. Come
on over, all greeks, and drink and sing.

FINAL WEEK AT RAT

GRADUATING SENIORS

U. OF F. FACULTY CLUB INC.

NEWS

RATHSKELLER CLOSES SATURDAY

On Saturday, June 7th, the Rat again honors the
graduating seniors with a sort of graduation party. We've
got to empty our kegs before we close for the quarter
late, late Sat. night (actually Sun. mornign). Beer prices
will by cut, slashed, lowered and reduced until all the
beer in the house is gone. Everybody is invited to help
the seniors get their start on the non-academic world.
Come drink some really cheap beer, Saturday evening
and night. 3ring a professor, maybe he has already made
up the final.

WE THANK
YOU ALL
Thanks, University of Florida, for
helping the Rathskeller become a
smashing success.
The Rathskeller Board thanks all the
students, faculty and staff that have
given us the great support we needed.
Weve got even bigger plans for next
year, so make the Rat your first stop in
the fall.
The Rathskeller Board

But But
But ')"*
Oh what a week!
This is it, the last week the Rat is open this
quarter. We open again in the fall, ready for
action. But to finish off our first full quarter of
operation we've planned a week for you to
remember through the summer.
THURSDAY
IMPORTED BEER FESTIVAL
We've got a lot of imported bottled beer to sell by
closing time Sat. night. Here's your chance to get
the best beers in the world at low, low prices. As a
end-of-quarter sale all imported beer will be
only 50 cents a bottle. Yes friends, only 50 cents.
I want to sell you a beer! We've got Red Eric from
Denmark, St. Pauli Girl from Germany, Amstell
and Heineken from Holland, Carta Blanca from
Mexico, Harp from Ireland, Kirin from Japan, San
Miguel from the Pfiillipines, Tubog from Denmark,
and Ballentine Ale from the good ole USA.
Impress your girl, your prof, or yourself with some
worldwide drinking. Thursday at the Rat
FRIDAY TGIF
The last Friday afternoon TGIF is this week. Just
so happens it's also the last day of classes. Why not
celebrate both occasions with some cheap beer at
the Rat. Lets have an old fashioned beer blast to
end the school year. Cheap beer and good times
from 2 'til 6 this Friday at the Rat. Come on over.
FRIDAY DANCE
Friday night Gene Middleton will be at the Rat for
the last Dance of the Quarter. Starts at 9:30 and
jumps, grooves and swings 'til the wee hours. Gene
Middleton has the sound made for dancing. Plan
ahead and be here Friday night for the last dance.
£
SATURDAY BEER SALE
We've got to sell all our beer before we close Sat.
night. We'll cut the price until it's all gone. If you
like beer, here is your chance to get all you want
at low, low prices. NOTE: Beer on brain helps you
study for finals Fu Manchu 16311738.

ADVERTISEMENT

392-2097