Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

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BUD SKIDMORE
PAINTINGS AND ARTIFACTS
... now on view at the University Gallery

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 148

Pay Pressures
Prompt Profit
By RICHARD McCULLOCH
Alligator Staff Writer
A pay increase might be
forthcoming for UF employes
to help combat the rising cost
of living.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has requested the
support of State University
System Chancellor Robert B.
Mautz to amend the state pay
plan permitting cost of living
or longevity of salary
increases for veteran
employees.
All policies affecting UF
employees are established by
the State Personnel Board.
UF authority is limited to
recommendations made
through Mautz.
In a letter to Mautz,
OConnell said UF employees
should be entitled to cost of
living pay increases once they
reach the maximum salary for
their position, similar to
adjustments made by
industry and some
governmental agencies.
Such an increase would
permit the employee to be
rewarded in some measure
and maintain a relative

Odds Against Black White Roomies?

(EDITORS NOTE : This is the last of a two-part series on black
and white students living together in UF dormitories.)
By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
When and if the initial racial shock wears off, black and white
roommate pairs find they are just two human beings living together in
the same dormitory room.
For some the reaction is simple acceptance. For others its
enthusiastic comradeship, coupled with a learning experience.
Second floor Jennings houses two of the most congenial pairs of
roommates. Black students Delores Hillsman, 2UC, and Verona
Mitchell, 3AS, share their rooms with Diane Graefe, 2UC, and Mary
Lou Martin, 4NR, respectively.
I think the main thing is just the initial shock, Delores said. If
they stay a week or so it becomes a real person-to-person relationship.
Its friendly, we talk about anything.
You first look at the roommate and see shes Negro, Verona

The
Florida Alligator

ff**
fiPWF- ~' Jfm/.l
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ROBERT MAUTZ
... asked support
economic position during an
inflationary period,
OConnell pointed out.
The plan would affect
only those career employees
who have reached the top of
their pay bracket, reports
William E. Elmore,
vice-president of business
affairs.
The Brown Report is a
consultants study that was
done for the State Personnel
Board which recommended
the first major upgrading of
state employees salaries in
several years. Individual
increases could amount to as
much as 20 per cent, said
Thomas Bloodworth,
assistant director of
personnel.

University of Florida Gainesville

GRAD-GRAD-GRAD-GRADUATION
UF Senate Proposes
Quarterly Caps / Gowns

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
A proposal for UF to hold
commencement exercises four
times a year was passed by the
University Senate at its meeting
Thursday afternoon.
Discussion ranged from
enthusiastic support to
discouragement because of exam
scheduling difficulties which
could be caused by
commencement exercises.
H.C. Buddy Davis,
chairman of the Ad Hoc
Committee on Commencement,
pointed out that many students
graduating before June do not
return for commencement
ceremonies, missing an
important and meaningful event.
He also cited the added
publicity that would come from
four commencements, and the
advantage of a shortened
ceremony possible with
distribution of degrees over four
commencement exercises.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell said the quarterly

adds, and then color goes out of the picture. We discuss all personal
things.
Delores and Verona laugh about some of the things theyve
learned. Whites have such silly family problems, they said. They
worry too much about telling their children where to go to school,
what to major in, who to date, and who to marry.
We all get along exceptionally well, though.
Ive really enjoyed being roommates with Delores, Diane said.
Ive learned a lot about how black people feel about things. She has
met a number of black students and been to several soul parties.
At first 1 was scared, she confessed, but now were all friends.
Gwyn Francis, lUC, had a happy relationship with her Weaver Hall
roommate until the latter dropped out of school.
We got along fine, she said. They talked about presidential
elections, JOMO, and Alligator articles, along with the usual girl talk.
We never got into any heated arguments, she said. Sometimes we
stayed up late into the night talking.
Having a white roommate was a learning experience for Gwyn.
(SEE MIXED PAGE 3)

fAagic, Religious Art
Showing At Gallery
New Guinea paintings and artifacts will be on view at the
University June 1 through June 29.
New mythologies, have emerged which rationalize the poverty and
isolation of the natives, One mythology, the Cargo Cult, is based on a
belief that the the villagers see overhead occasionally were
sent to them by their ancestors, but have been intercepted by the
Europeans.
They believe the airplanes carry great treasures from their ancestors
which have fallen into the hands of outsiders. A ritual developed to
hire the planes down consists of decoy planes constructed on the tops
of hills and lighted by fires at night.
The exhibit will include displays of paintings, armbands and carved
heads and figures. One tribe produces carved and painted masks for
rituals; for this presentation, the primitive artists have painted mask
motifs with making pens on paper.
The gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5
p.m.; Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. and is closed on Monday.

. many students
graduating before June do
not return for commence commencement
ment commencement ceremonies thereby
missing an important and
meaningful event.
-H. G Buddy Davis

commencement would benefit
the graduating students.
Noting that approximately
the same number of students
graduate each quarter, OConnell
said quarterly commencements
would make it more nearly
possible for each graduate to
attend his graduation.
Opposing the quarterly
commencement, Dr. Richard

Friday, May 30, 1969

1 % ./~S& y|y 1
9 mM
"BUDDY" DAVIS
.. .wants four ceremonies

Hires said the new plan might
necessitate crowding final
examinations for graduating
seniors into three days.
Over the objections, the
proposal was passed by a large
majority of the senate.
In other developments at the
meeting, discussion arose
concerning OConnells
memorandum urging
establishment of a predominance
of four and fivehour courses.
Senate members favoring the
plan stressed that most colleges
on the quarter system have
mostly four and five-hour
courses.
OConnell emphasized that
no one would be forced to
change existing courses, but that
no new threehour courses
would be added without proper
justification.
Opponents of the plan said
that there are other schools
whose quarter systems operate
like UFs; and that having a day
to study between classes, not
possible with fivehour courses,
is desirable for students.
A proposal establishing
Masters and Ph.D. degree
programs in linguistics was
passed unanimously.

America's
Number One
College
Daily



:, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30,1969

Page 2

Benevolent Banlkers Brake Federal oe

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
Students planning to apply for a federal insured
loan can save their time no bank in Gainesville
will sponsor any more student loans.
When the Florida banks first became members of
this plan to give loans at seven per cent (three and
four per cent repaid by per cent repaid by student
and federal, respectively), the philosophy was that
students would receive the funds from their
hometown banks.
Doug Turner, head of Financial Aid, said, banks
in Miami first refused to issue loans, and others
followed suit.
There were only four banks in Miami who were
active participants in Federal Insured Loan program.
Three of these, the United National, the First
National of Miami Beach, and the First National of
Coral Gables members of the banking system,
handled all the loans they could, and then were

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TOM KENNEDY
BURYING THE HATCHET
Florida Blue Key and UF Omicron Delta Kappa will bury the
hatchet and pass the peace-pipe this afternoon at 3 p.m. in the
Rathskeller. Pictured above are FBK President Jack Harkness and
ODK President Harvey Alper practicing for the event Harkness and
Alper said both groups will meet jointly for the first time at the Rat
to drink 10 cent beer, enjoy free popcorn and exchange ideas. Both
presidents urged all FBK and ODK members to attend.
| folkmass f
1 FATHER IAN MITCHELL'S AMERICAN FOLK MASS j i
WILL BE CELEBRATED THIS SUNDAY AT 11:00 AM J
! EPISCOPAL STUDENT CENTER J!
! [ 1522 WEST UNIVERSITY AVE. j!
i; the McFarland street mission !;
j | ROGEfTsIMS |!
; j -.innnnnnjSjumfSLr&m^^
student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
., The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one Incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

BENEFACTORS BALANCE_BAD

forced financially to close out the program-
E. Baumgarden, Loan Officer of United Nation
said We stopped giving out loans in the middle oi
September, 1968. In two weeks time we loaned out
about $350,000 to students, and then we just didn
have any more money to put out.
The Pan American Bank in Miami will still loan
money, but only if the student has an existing
account with them.
Tallahassee and Gainesville banks took over
supplying loans not only to their residents, but to
UF and Florida State University students as well.
The financial strain was too much. One
Gainesville bank loaned over a half-million dollars
in the past year. This is as much as all the banks had
expected to supply in seven or eight year s time.
Robert Booth, assistant vice-president of the
Florida National Bank, explained that a student
comes in and, on the average, receives a SI,OOO
loan, He expects the same amount of money, or
more, for the entire period of his schooling.
The money required by new recipients,

Accent '69s Debts Must
Be Honored, Roll Says

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
The financial difficulties
surrounding Accent 69 now
floundering under a $3,300
debt prompted a policy
statement from the student
body treasurers office
Thursday.
Jim Roll, student body
treasurer, emphasized to the
Alligator that politics involved in
the Accent troubles did not
concern his office.
It is my responsibility to
insure the financial integrity of
Student Government, he said.
The good faith and credit of
SG must be maintained, and
only SGs ability to serve is hurt
by not meeting its debts.
He referred to the growing
number of unpaid bills facing an
Accent 69 account that is now
more than $3,000 in excess.
The Student Senate Tuesday
night refused to pay any of these
bills until a more extensive
investigation is conducted into

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- Hamburger Steak
ft onions
French Fries
Cole Slaw
Rolls & Butter ff T
FREE APPLE PIE A
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We're not a giant chain operation so we try harder

multiplied by the students already possessing loans,
surpassed the allotted budget, and all of the banks
have found themselves unable to finance both
student and business loans.
In order to keep ourselves in the banking
business, we had to stop either student or business
loans-and we are a bank for the city of Gainesville,
not the UF, said Milton Baxley, assistant
vice-president of University City Bank.
Turner complimented the actions of the
Gainesville banks even though none are participating
in the program any longer.
The banks of Gainesville have gone beyond
their responsibility to the UF students. They have
put out so much money that now, not even an
Alachua county resident can successfully apply for a
federally insured loan, Baxley said.
Gainesville bankers insist that even with the loans
continually being repaid, the interest rate is lower
than their usual rate, and the money isnt being
repaid fast enough in order to continue the loan
program.

the misuse of Accent funds for
purchases of liquor and the
checking account taken out by
Accent 69 that is illegal under
student body finance law.
However, he said this was not
sufficient reason to delay
payment of debts which are
owed to local merchants and
others who may legally be paid.
Roll said he was confident
the issue would be resolved
positively and called the

Jolting Jumbled Jams Jilted
SRD Poses Prevention Plan
Traffic jams at University Avenue and S.W. 13th Street will be
lessened in the near future after the State Road Departmenl
completes a project to install a right turn lane on University Avenue
The SRD project includes a widening strip for parking in front of
Tigert Hall as well as making three lanes of southbound traffic on that
end of 13th Street.
Preparation has already been made in front of Tigert for moving
the road over 12 feet.
On University Avenue, the project will involve cutting into 12 feet
of UF property by Bryan Hall (old Law School).
S. M. Wall Construction Company has received the bid for the
project although actual construction will not take place for several
weeks, according to the local SRD office.

situation an excellent
opportunity to strengthen our
financial law.
He promised to work with
the senate this summer to
develop a tighter financial
program.
It has been and shall
continue to be the policy of the
treasurers office to maintain an
effective, enforceable financial
law and to administer the law
fairly and firmly, Roll said.



Mixed Roommates Adjust Quickly

? FROM PAGE ONE
I lived in a black neighborhood and went to black schools and the
only way I knew about how white people felt about me was through
the newspapers. With her roommate, she said there was a natural
relationship and they were able to understand each others feelings.
We were not just roommates, we were the best buddies in the
dormitory, said Paul Snyder, 7AS, of his relationship last year with
Lasun Adigun, 7AS, a black student from Nigeria.
We ate all our meals together and went all over town. Ill probably
visit Nigeria someday because of him.
Lasuns wife has come to the United States to be with him this
year.
Pat Young, 2UC, and Anne Freedman also get along well in then thenthird
third thenthird floor Jennings room. Last year they lived on the same floor in
Graham and requested to room together.
I would have been surprised if I didnt have a black roommate,
said Anne. I thought it would be interesting.
They talk about lots of subjects, but racial issues is not one of
them. There are too many other things to talk about, said Pat.
Were not politically oriented, Anne added. Both agreed, There
havent been any interpersonal problems.
Nellie Brinson, lUC, and her roommate have been together all
year. She has a real friendly attitude, she said. We communicate,
but not on racial questions. It never comes up.
I think neither race can actually understand each other, Nellie
said. White students never lived in a ghetto. You can only trust each
other to a certain extent thats as far as it goes.
Mrs. Corrine Tindal, 3NR, and her roommate also got along well,
but never really knew each other.
I never noticed any unfriendliness, she said. Because they were
both rarely in the room together, it was mostly a superficial
relationship; we never got to know and understand each other.
Her roommate has moved out to become a resident assistant.
A rare off-campus black and white pair is Larry Jordan, 3JM, and
Steve Rakusian, 3AS. They moved in together when both were
working at the same store. Larry needed a roommate and Steve
needed a place to stay.
Steve is Jewish.
We tell each other the dirtiest jokes about our races, Larry said.
We have a frank, open relationship. You cant go around holding
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

SIMPLE ACCEPTANCE COMES WITH TIME

things inside you.
You never know anything as well from the outside looking in
instead of the reverse, said Steve. When youre living with
somebody you forget about stereotypes.
I didnt room with this kid because hes black, but becaiM nsh 1
| m >f p (
crazy idiot. We never argue about anything but the dog.
Most of the roommate pairs that have stayed together this lon|
agree that the racial problem is not with themselves but with other
dormitory residents. Some find that they are snubbed by their
floormates.
You can divide the girls on the floor, said Gwyn. Some are just
nice naturally, a few think theyre doing you a favor by being nice to
you, and others ignore you.
Pat said that she disliked girls who were too nice.
The severest criticism is not for those who are unfriendly, but for
those who are inconsistent.
Cathy Lowe, lUC, said that most everyone on fourth floor Mallory
is friendly to her, but that some wont speak to her in the lobby or on
the street if they are with friends.
I dont even want to know these people who are only nice to you
behind closed doors, Larry said.
I respect those who are consistent, either friendly or unfriendly,
said Cathia Darling, 3ED. I dont like that fake stuff, Gwyn added.
All agreed that black and white roommates going off campus
together really get the looks.
Gwyn has the perfect cure-all for those who stare. She waves and
then gives them one of her favorite lines: Did I date your brother?
or Dont I know you from somewhere?
It works every time.

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Friday, May 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

[ ~&L*Ck
awd

Page 3



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30, 1969

Page 4

Peace Talks Degenerate
Into Sharpest Verbal Battle

PARIS (UPI) The Vietnam peace talks
degenerated Thursday into the sharpest verbal battle
to date. Each side denounced the others pfc|ce
proposals in the strongest terms iftly Imp u&tl
since the talks began. ai &O F
' Ambassador Henry Cabot Lodge said the
% unilateral American troop demanded by
§ the Communists was in<%rs|t, treasonable and
f illogical. He said Hanois to exclude the
South government was prolonging the
war.
Deputy North Vietnamese Negotiator Ha Van
Lau resolutely rejected Lodges suggestion they
discuss mutual troop withdrawals and attacked
President Nixons eight-point peace plan as
proposals which basically seek to carry on the war
of aggression and neocolonialism ~ 7 in South
Vietnam.
The talks at todays 19th session got nowhere
and political observers doubted if they would until
chief Hanoi negotiator Xuan Thuy returns from
North Vietnam where he has gone for consultations.
Lodges warning against Communist attempts to
exclude Saigon from the negotiations apparently
was in response to a statement last week by Thuy
that South Vietnam had no right to discuss the U.S.
troop withdrawal demanded by the COMMUNISTS.
To try to exclude that government only delays
peace and prolongs war, Lodge said. He reminded

REPORT DISCREDITS EXPENSES

Kirk Calls Audit Fairy Tale

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) An
audit report disclosing dozens of
questionable expenditures in the
governors office was blasted by
Gov. Claude Kirk Thursday as a
political fairy tale and piece
of political tripe.
Kirk held a news conference
in which Ik charged the audit by
legislative auditor Ernest Ellison
was an attempt by Democrats to
embarass him.
Press secretary Russell
Stratton said Kirk would have
no comment on the specific
preliminary findings of the
auditor
Ellison denied political
Senate Passes
Anti-Crime Bill
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) A
major anticrime bill, making it
a penalty to carry a concealed
firearm and imposing a
mandatory minimum sentence
for a second conviction of using
a weapon in the commission of a
crime, cleared the legislature
Thursday.
The Senate sent the measure
to the governors desk after
agreeing to House amendment to
the omnibus bill that makes it a
felony to carry a firearm and a
misdemeanor for any other
weapon except half-ounce tear
gas items carried in a mans
pocket or womans picketbook.
Another House change omits
a minimum sentence for a first
offence for using a weapon in
commission of a serious crime,
but imposes it for a second and
all subsequent offenses.
Fast Stuff
Weasels are the quickest of all
mammals.

motivation in this second audit
ever made of a Florida
governors office. The only other
audit was made of former Gov.
Haydon Bums after he left
office.
Theres nothing to that,
Ellison said of Kirks blast.
Read the report. It has facts.
Thats what we deal in.
The findings included;
Twentyeight employees
of the Industrial Commission,
Road Department, Development
Commission and Turnpike
Authority were borrowed for
work in the governors office by
the end of 1968.
9 Long distance calls costing
$18,788 were made by the
governors office although a
toll-free line was availabe.
9 Car rentals and 120 airline
tickets cost a total of $6,627
without being supported by
travel vouchers.
9 Personal expenses and
travel overpayments totaling
$2,834 were repaid to the state
treasury after the close of the
audit period. Airline tickets.

attention ffJ
graduating
seniors jp||£
Announcements and Convocation Invitations have
arrived at the CAMPUS SHOP & BOOKSTORE.
The supply is limited so hurry!!! BOTH ARE
ONLY 25c EACH.
V 5

them* your side agreed that the government of the
of South Vietnam should participate in the
Paris meetings.
Then Lodge sharply questioned the Communist
delegates about their intentions.
We have clearly stated our willingness to
withdraw from South Vietnam, he said.
We have heard no clear statement from your
side regarding the withdrawal of North Vietnamese
forces. We have stated clearly our willingness to
withdraw on a specified timetable. Where is your
timetable?
Instead of raising misleading criticisms of
President Nixons major contribution to these
negotiations, why do you not respond positively to
the offer of the President of the Republic of
Vietnam, made now over two months ago, todiscuss
a political solution with the Viet Congs National
Liberation Front? Lodge demanded.
Lau reiterated Hanois position that the Nixon
offer of a mutual withdrawal of American and
North Vietnamese troops was a most ridiculous
and absurd demand.
He further denied Lodges assertion of last week
that enough common ground existed to allow
productive negotiations. He said the United States
pretended there was common ground in the rival
peace proposals while really they were
fundamentally different.

boat storage, flowers, invitation
cards, dog food, cufflink and
stud sets and personal telegrams
were included.
0 No bids were taken on
$114,947 in furniture, carpeting
and drapes for the governors
suite and suditors were unable to
determine if low bids were
accepted on $129,254 worth of
construction design and
miscellaneous costs.
0 Telegrams costing $9,618
were sent between January 1967
and February 1968 without
being supported by copies.
9 The governors Christmas
cards in 1968 cost $2,245 plus
postage, reportedly paid from
public funds.
9 A total of $217,576,
including $25,000 authorized by
the Cabinet, was paid to the
Wackenhut detective agency in
the governors war on crime. The
remainder was paid from private
contributions.
Kirk said Democrats in the
legislature sought revenge for his
action in vetoing the $12,000
salary scale.

WHATS HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writer
TIME IS RUNNING OUT: Professors and students had better
scurrv today Its the last chance to give class tests and assignments.
for GRADUATING STUDENTS: The Union Movie feature
tonight and tomorrow is the Great Escape at 6 and 9 in the Union
Auditorium.
DANCE TO THE MUSIC: Gene Middleton and his gang bring on
the soul tonight and tomorrow in the Rat. Suds and Sissy reign from
9 30 til 1:30.
CHECKING OUT THE POT SITUATION? The Army and Air
Force will hold a Joint Review tomorrow at 2:30 on the ROTC Drill
Field.
FORTY DAYS OF RAIN MAKES FOR A WET CLIMATE: The
Tropics and Noahs Ark get together for a dance in the Union
Ballroom at 9 tomorrow night. Tolbert Area sponsors the dance.
PRECIOUS PICKINGS: The Treasure of Sierra Madre will be
shown Sunday night in the Union Auditorium at 7 and 9:15.

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Work Puts Class
Ideas To Practice

Mike Woodham listens
intently to professors theories
on entomology, then goes out
and practices the theory on local
lawns and houses.
And Stuart Bentler goes from
architectural classes to a
downtown architects office to
put the finishing touches on
drawings for a local high school
now being designed.
These youths, students at UF,
have found as they progress
towards college degrees, their
classroom theories can be put to
practice to earn funds and
further their education.
Not only that, but their
practical experience puts them
far ahead of their fellow
students in developing
on-the-job skills they will need
in the pursuit of their careers.
Woodham has been applying
his classroom theories on
entomology to pest control
work for a local firm for the past
year. Salary has been
satisfactory and the Fort Walton
Beach senior finds bug spraying
good medicine for sick budgets.
Bentler, through assisting a
professor in grading papers,
secured a draftsman job with a
local architectural firm. Now the
Tampa student arranges classes
so he can work a 40-hour week.
His experience in making
schematic, preliminary and
working drawings on
architectural designs has
exempted him from two courses
in the architectural college and
put him in position for a higher
starting salary upon graduation.
David W. Rynders, a
Clearwater junior in law, finds

New Editors Chosen
For Summer Alligator
Five additional editors have been appointed for the summer
Alligator, four of them women.
Assignments editor will be Margo Cox, a junior from St.
Augustine. She has worked as a staff writer for the Alligator for
two years and has also worked for the St. Augustine Record and
the St. Augustine Chamber of Commerce.
Mary Toomey, presently editorial assistant, will continue in
the position through the summer quarter. She is a sophomore
minoring in English As editorial assistant, she will have the
responsibility for the editorial pages.
Marcia Baker, currently Alligator research editor, will serve as
copy editor. She is a senior in education from St. Petersburg.
Campus Living Editor will be Darcy Meeker, a senior in
English from Gainesville. She has served as a junior editor of a
department store magazine, and a reporter and feature writer
for Indianapolis Today.
News editor will be AI Jensen, a senior in journalism. He has
worked in the Alligator sports department this year.
Editor Dave Reddick and Managing Editor Dave Osier,
elected by the Board of Student Publications earlier this
quarter, have announced they are still looking for a sports editor
for the summer.
All interested persons should contact Reddick or Osier at the
Alligator office, third floor of the Reitz Union.

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ACE Ol)T WITH ALLIGATOR ADS

working as a part-time clerk for
a local firm gives him the
opportunity to pry into legal
cases he might never study in
college.
His experience will open
more doors to desirable law
firms, with higher salaries after
graduation next year.
Pat Hayes of Miami, although
she earned a degree in nursing,
found a new postgraduate
program offered further
opportunity for refinement of
skills at the local Veterans
Administration Hospital while
drawing a salary.
The opportunities, she finds,
are in abundance. She can
accompany nurses on their
rounds, participate in seminars,
conferences and workshops;
observe open-heart surgery, and
learn first-hand about the
psychological aspects of
rehabilitation and health care.
Woodhams, Bentlers, Rynders
and Pat Hayes are in abundance
on the UF campus, taking
advantage of new-found skills to
finance completion of their
education.
But, silent and industrious,
their presence often is
overlooked and overshadowed
by the vocal minority whose
shouts and demands are heard
across the nation.
Im constantly doing legal
research in the office so Im
becoming much more familiar
with cases, statutes, opinions
'and other bits of information
that I never would have had
occasion to use or learn about in
class, he noted;

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Friday, May 30,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30.1969

Page UF Rep
On JC Council
Dr. Ralph E. Page, assistant
dean of academic affairs, will
represent UF on the newly
formed Council for Junior
College Affairs to coordinate
university and junior college
activities. The first meeting was
Thursday at F lo.rida 1
Technological Universityr'feoariT
of Regents Vice thancelior
Charles E-. .Perry is chairman J of J
: XsiOf TjW fro si:v
the haSon group.
.''imoqqrT ns Ins sn r *
)?0 r s 'x fiil Sf

OConnell OKs Grade Appeals Board

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has approved
several more Action Conference proposals, including
one for the establishment of a Grade Appeals Board
which will now be considered by the faculty in the
various academic colleges.
Other proposals are concerned with the
utilization of air-conditioned buildings summer
quarter, the inclusion of students in the curriculum
decision-making process and rotating topic courses.
The proposal for a Grade Appeals Board had
been sent to the Council of Deans for study, and
OConnell interpreted its recommendation as being
neither favorable nor unfavorable action, but
expressing the view that it should be left to each
college to determine the wisdom and the best
methods of implementing the proposal.
The idea behind the proposal was to give

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3 OTHER AC PROPOSAIS ALSO GET NOD

students a clear channel through which they can be
heard. OConnell said an informal procedure exists
in many departments where the students complaint
is heard by the instructor and department chairman
or dean.
OConnell felt that since the faculty would be so
involved in the Grade Appeals Board if it were
established that they ought to have a chance to
review the proposal.
He has asked the deans and faculty of the
separate colleges to consider the proposal as one
means of providing for review of contested grades.
Any decision on procedure is to be publicized to the
students and reported to Fredrick W. Conner, vice
president of academic affairs.
In action on another proposal, Registrar R. H.
Whitehead will be working with the deans and
department heads to utilize all available
air-conditioned classrooms during the summer
quarter.
After the quarter has begun, a check will be

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made of any classrooms not being used because of
cancelled classes and give the colleges this
information. It will then be their decision whether
or not to re-arrange classes.
OConnell has also recommended that deans
should take the necessary action to include
students in the curriculum decision-making process.
Where no council exists on this question, he
suggests that one be formed so that the experience,
views and recommendations of students be
included.
In some colleges, courses are offered under the
number 430 or 630 which enables students to
pick a topic they want to pursue. OConnell had
recommended that these courses be more widely
publicized and expanded in the future.
Another proposal, concerned with giving credit
for one hour per quarter of required physical
education, has been approved by OConnell but will
be referred to the Curriculum Committee for
consideration.



Study Shows Students Satisfied

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of three articles
summarizing the findings of a
survey conducted for the
Standard Oil Co. by Roper
Research Associates.)
Demands by fist-shaking,
militant students for major
changes in the American system
of higher education are not
shared by the great majority of
undergraduates. Most students
approve of the present system,
according to a nationwide study
of student attitudes made for
Standard Oil Company.
The survey covered all types
of colleges and universities, large
and small, public, private and
religious. It was conducted by
Roper Research Associates and
commissioned by Jersey
Standard as a public service.
The study focused on male
seniors but also included for
comparative purposes, smaller
surveys of freshmen and alumni
of the Class of 1964. The three
groups freshmen, seniors and
alumni showed a similarity of
views.
The students were asked to
appraise the system of higher
education as a whole.
Seventy-five per cent of all
seniors called it basically sound.
There was widespread agreement
that it needs some improvement,
but only 19 per cent called for
many improvements and just
four per cent thought drastic
changes are needed. Freshmen
were even less critical than
seniors.
Not surprisingly, the most
outspoken criticism came from
those who are very active in
political student movements.
Within this group itself a small
minority of all students 35 per
cent desire many improvements
or radical changes.
Many specific points of
criticism of the educational
system were made, although no
single grievance was cited by a
majority of the students. The
most frequent criticism offered
was that the curriculum is too
rigid and not sufficiently related
to modern life.
About a fourth of the seniors
expressed dissatisfaction with
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faculty members as not
qualified, not enough interested
in students or addicted to
outmoded teaching methods. A
surprisingly small number
only 17 per cent thought that
students should have more
voice in college affairs.
Apparently, the much-publicized
demands by some students for a
greater share in college
administration are not of
pressing concern to most of then thenclassmates.
classmates. thenclassmates.
Despite the criticism of some
aspects of the educational
system, the overwhelming
majority of seniors, 88 per cent,
described their college
experience as satisfactory. Only
2 per cent expressed serious
dissatisfaction. Alumni, looking
back almost five years after
graduation, were just as
enthusiastic about their college
experience.
This generally favorable view
of the educational system carries
over to students opinions of
their teachers and
administrators. When asked to
rank educational, business and
political leaders in terms of the
ability to make important
contributions to society, seniors
placed educational leaders first

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WITH HIGHER EDUCATION

followed by business men and
political figures.
Educators also came off best
in personal attributes.
Substantial majorities of the
students characterized them as
highly intelligent,
forward-looking and progressive,
able and competent, and
interested in solving social
problems. At the same time,
aobut a fourth of the seniors
said they considered educators
to be behind the times.
What does it take to become
an outstanding educator? The
chief requirements, according to
seniors, are intelligence, creative
ability and, to a lesser degree,
hard work. Such leadership
qualities as idealism or the
courage to stand up for your
beliefs were answered by only a
small minority of the
respondents.
Although only nine per cent
of seniors have been very active
in student movements and
another 25 per cent have been
moderately active, a clear
majority do think that student
activity on the whole has had a
salutary effect both on colleges
and on the national political
scene. But an even larger number
think such activity has gotten

out of hand in some instances,
Mixed opinions were
expressed about Students for a
Democratic Society, the radical
organization that has played a
prominent role in campus
disorders. A majority of
freshmen and seniors said they
agreed with some of the SDS
goals. But an even larger
majority also disagreed with the
methods used to attain these
goals.
Only four per cent gave
unqualified support to the SDS.
These responses suggest that
campus activity will strike a
responsive chord among students
as long as it is considered a
constructive force, but it will
produce a reaction when it
becomes extremist.
Todays seniors have a good idea
of where they want to go after
finishing school or military
service. A little more than a
fourth plan a career in
education. Harried college
administrators may not be
overjoyed to learn that careers in
education expecially appeal to
students who are most critical of
American society and who have
been most active in politics.
By and large, those who
prefer a career in education are

Friday, May 30, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

intellectuals and individualists.
They want, above all, mentally
stimulating work.
Next in order of importance
to the future educators is a job
where they will not be a cog in
a machine and an opportunity
to be creative. Half of those bent
on educational careers are
concerned about job security
and, indeed, that applies to all
seniors regardless of their choice
of career.
The Roper study, which
sampled 1,000 seniors, 500
freshmen and 673 alumni from a
random selection of 96 colleges
and universities in all parts of
the country, was initiated in the
spring of 1968 when cmapus
unrest was attracting increasing
attention. A great deal was being
written and said about students
attitudes, beliefs and grievances,
but little was really known.
(Next: Marijuana and LSD)
Just a walk away
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UNIVERS,TY PLAZA I
Bettes J


Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30,1969

Page 8

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom
y is the exercise of responsibility
Dave Doucette i ie rr £JJJ
Editor ; i ?;i9
j antfdfkd sill
an ns W ( |9ffl' rez
PtuMiktv fcanii! MgFjiagipg Editor
.jjf .ikii nc abooo zso?
AW Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
.iMAmKMM gftpJtive Editor News Editors
{1 HO 9Xl§Oloq£ Mlir
m
Cubans Invaded
MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Engiess letter which appeared in May 13th issue pointed out
that the U.S. is the most aggressive nation in the world, and to prove
his point he mentioned that the U.S. invaded Cuba in the 1960 s. If he
is referring to the Bay of Pigs invasion, there is a fact that he, who
claims to be a student of history, overlooked.
The Bay of Pigs invasion was carried out by the 2506 Brigade,
which was totally composed of CUBANS. Furthermore, the U.S.
showed its non agressive policy during the Cuban Missile Crisis even
though at the time atomic weapons in Cuban soil jeopardized the
safety of the United States.

Greeks Build As Others Break

MR. EDITOR:
I received this copy of the Houston, Texas, City
Panhellenic Association Newsletter, and thought it
was a fitting answer to John Parker s attack on
Greeks:
As sorority members we become concerned when
we read unfair and biased articles downgrading the
college fraternity system.
The Greeks (members of sororities and
fraternities) have a history of obedience and
cooperation with college administration rules and
regulations. Greeks never storm the presidents
office or barricade campus buildings demanding to
be given the authority of administrators. Why, then,
is the fraternity system attacked while other student
groups (some bearded and barefooted) are allowed
to disrupt classes, set policies, and force the
resignation of college presidents?
To those who march, voice obscenities, and
degrade the United States, many of the activities
and antics of the Greeks may seem childish.
Unfortunately, they are often derided by the press.
Too often it is not reported that money raised by
these activities support nonsensical projects such
as: schools for the blind, deaf, or retarded; the USS
Hope; and scholarships that are available to
qualified students.
While some students destroy university property,
the Greeks paint recreation centers, collect food
and clothing for the needy families, and tutor

Speaking Out
University College Is UFs Disaster
By Robert Sistrunk

In regard to an article, University College, An
Absurd Institution that appeared in the Alligator, I
would say well said.
The question is asked, Why is it Junior College
transfers, who could not make it through the UFs
UC College, are permitted to enter Upper Division
as equals to those who ran the rigors of Dotys
disaster? This is a relevant question and demands
an answer because of its relevance v
I believe I know one of the reasons the Gourman
Report rated our UC disaster a D: the
incompetence of some of the UC professors.
I expected that when I came to the UF I would
be taught by the scholarly type of professor. (By
.scholarly I mean one who would give me a wealth of
background along with answering my questions.)
God, was I surprised. Some of them could not
even answer the questions we were assigned to do in
class. (My physical science professor, Mr. T-, for
instance.)
To the question, Is the goal of UC to weed out,
flunk out, or at least lower the academic averages of

29 CUBAN STUDENTS AT UF

underprivileged children. While some students bum
draft cards, the Greeks donate blood to the Red
Cross. While participating in these trivial
activities, the sororities maintain the highest
scholarship on campus.
The fraternity system is nearly 200 years old.
The Whos Who of the fraternity world reads like
the Whos Who of American history. Over 80 per
cent of our industrialists, political leaders,
humanitarians, and other professionals are fraternity
members.
Today membership in fraternities totals over
seven million. In the last six years, 400 campuses
asked that the Greek system be established on
their campuses. Reasons given for these requests
were: the fraternity system improves scholarship,
promotes leadership and good citizenship, and
creates a loyalty to the college or university.
It is a matter of record that 75 per cent of the
individual funds contributed to colleges and
universities is from fraternity and sorority members.
We think that the facts should be reported fairly
and completely. We are proud of our collegiate
Greeks who consistently maintain high
scholarship standing, and who encourage high moral
and ethical standards. We are proud they are
learning to be the leaders of tomorrow.
BARBARA SIVILS
President, Zeta Tau
Alpha Sorority

students?, I think that the thousands of victims of
the UC screw machine have the right to an
answer.
If ever I felt like carrying a sign, it was after
getting screwed by the CBS 262 (Biology) final.
I wrote a letter to the Alligator which never
was printed. I told the head of the Biology
Department that the final I took for CBS 262 was
the dirtiest test I ever took.
I felt like I had been kicked in the groin! The
test was filled with so much trivia it made my
stomach ill.
I would have been taken for an idiot had I
studied such great detail that was required to even
pull a C in this exam.
Going into the final I had a C. My final grade was
aD.
By the way, what I learned in CBS 262,1 learned
on my own. Class contributed only to add
confusion. My professor, Mr. M, could easily have
passed for a high school physical education teacher

EDITQgI&L .
University City? Hah

Gainesville banks are no longer loaning
money to university students under a federal
plan which helps pay the interest. T
reason they give is that th ere 1S T yp
enough money to go around, and so
student suffers.
In order to keep ourselves in the
banking business, a vice president of a local
bank said, We have to stop either student
or business loansand" we are a bank fore
City of Gainesville, not the UF.
Milton Baxley was explaining why his
bank and every other bank in the city has
stopped issuing federally backed loans to
students because the banks simply don t
have the funds. More than a half million
dollars was loaned to UF students in the last
year. The area banks had expected that
amount to last for seven or eight years.
Baxley had a good argument when he said
the banks just couldnt afford to loan any
more money, except for one factor, he
seems to have forgotten the name of his
back, the University City Bank.
Thats right, the University City Thats
what Gainesville is, the University City.
Even if university expenditures were not
considered, the merchants, and thus the

v-'-
F-JHCT^ 41
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We//, / Gwess Tow Could Call This A Troop Withdrawal

citizens of the University uity benefit from
the presence of this institution.
In fact, much of the money deposited in
the Gainesville banks by Gainesville
merchants comes not from the Gainesville
citizen, but from the almost 20,000
students, who frequent the restaurants, food
and department stores. Many of whom, in
fact, pay rent to Gainesville businessman.
And so we question Baxleys logic.
Any bank which loans a student a cent
under the present plan, is guaranteed
repayment by the government if the student
defaults. Therefore, the bank is not taking
any chance.
The bank doesnt have to worry about a
student skipping town with several thousand
dollars he has just borrowed.
The Student is a better risk.
Os course we couldnt ask the banks of
Gainesville to make loans to all students, and
cut off all loans to area sinesses, but since
monies will be coming in from other
business loans, we suggest this money, or a
portion of it go to students.
Since the university is the lifeblood of the
city, it seems the city could provide a little
plasma.

who learned all he knew from a correspondence
course.
When I received my AA degree from UC College
I was oveijoyed. Why not? I had been treading
water in quicksand from the first day of UC classes.
When some employer compares my records with
that of anothers and accepts me for the job because
I have this degree and the other applicant doesn t,
I think I am going to have a hard time keeping from
laughing in my employers face. I will know one
thing about this employer: he never graduated from
the UFs UC College.
I think that it is time that something is done
about this UC cesspool. If you disagree, dig out a
copy of a CBS 262 final or sit in one of the UC class
rooms.
I played a large role in persuading my sister not
to enroll in UFs UC College. She is enrolled in
Junior College this year instead of the UF.
Its a shame that I have to be a traitor to my own
university but my conscience demands this. An
until this UC College rises from the gutter, I will
recommend it to no one.



Grand Old Frat
MR. EDITOR:
K4!k^ Ut i ime T th Problem concerning the so-called disgraced
V m ?T 11 has gotten ,0 point where it seems to be in
vogue to print the most slanderous nonsense possible concerning the
KA s i was shocked to frnd the most recent bit of protest written by
a southerner who thinks he can teU the KAs who the heU they are
As a Northerner of 17 years it is sad for me to think that a
ou d conde n>n a grand old southern fraternity for
wavmg the Confederate (lag and exploding a few cherrybombs and
pushing food carts down University Avenue What fraternity hasnt?
Oh and you must forgive their cleverest use of loud obscenities
when they yell 1 ... 2 .. .3 Who the hell are we as fraternities
have been displaying their fraternal spirit in these cheers for quite
some time now.
Sure we northerners won the war but I didnt think wed beaten all
of the spirit out of yog rebels, as the KAs have been trying to show
you. Also, for your information, you can find chenybombers,
arsonists, dirt assailants of innocent girls, and panty-raiders anywhere
on this campus any day of the week.
When you are educated to these facts then you will realize that
underneath the wild rambunctious nature of the KA fraternity is that
true ol south spirit and respect for the Confederates who faught and
died for a cause they belived in.
I suggest, Mister Southerner, you take this to heart, and you will
see that the kindergarten residence on this campus exists not in the
KA house but rather across the street from the KAs, and if you live
there a little longer, you may someday graduate.
A YANKEE

KENNETH MEGILL
... Tenure Not A Guarantee

-w WWW w.w wwwwww.wwww.wwwwwwwvvavv m wtrw !
Black capitalism, or rather integration of Black
people into the American free enterprise system is
one way of easing the nations racial conflict. It is a
way to stimulate Black economic development. It is
a building force unlike Black Power which seeks to
liberate by destroying.
Black Power advocates can help their fellow
black Americans more by working with a cash
register instead of a gun. Riots and civil disruption
have some good points in that white people are
made more aware of the Black equality problem.
But if continued they can only serve to divide our
country.
Some Negro leaders say that jobs are the answer,
but they are only looking at the economic side of
the problem. The more difficult problem is that of
building pride. A leading Black minister and
entrepeneur, the Reverend Leon H. Sullivan, says
Ultimately 1 think the Black man will acquire a fair
share of ownership in the American economy, and
that will come in large part through his own efforts.
Thus he will gain self respect through self help. A
man is not free until he owns something and has self
pride.
According to Reverend Sullivan, his first step was
to find job opportunities for Negroes in white
owned enterprises. But when these jobs were
opened, there werent enough trained Black people
to fill them. So in 1964, Reverend Sullivan created
Opportunities Industrialization Center, or, 0.1. C.
with funds from his church, the Black community,
and an anonymous donor. He also got the support
of private businesses which provided machines and a
training curriculum.
The training program is directed at the hard-core
unemployed. More than one third are on relief,
while 90 per cent of the graduates have been placed

New Right

MR. EDITOR:
The protest against a move by a majority of State Senate to take
away tenure from all professors has been widespread. It is interesting
to note that the most vocal of the protestors have been
administrators, rather than professors. The president appointed to be
in charge of our university, at a dinner sponsored by the AAUP, said
that he was in favor of doing away with tenure. It is all right if he has
changed his mind since then, but one should be aware that he has
changed his mind, at least in public.
But the question remains, why do administrators want tenure
continued? At the University of Florida, I think the answer is fairly
clear since it has been shown in several cases that they, and not the
professors and students, are the final judges in tenure cases. By
definding the rights of professors, they are defending their own
right to pass judgment on members of the faculty and to screen out
undesirable and disruptive faculty members. Tenure does not
protect the faculty, but gives a legitimate way to eliminate undesirable
elements in the university.
Unemployment and threat of unemployment functions to keep-

Black PowerWithout A Gun

4 'There
is
no
hope
for
the
complacent
man.

Faculty Must Organize Control

in jobs, me students are not paid to attend. People
stay because they know we train tor jobs, noi
diplomas. The costs are SI,OOO per trainee. Half
the program is on attitudinal development, the
other on development of actual skills. Comparable
government programs average at $3600 per trainee.
Think of the progress that could be made if
Black Power groups would devote
themselves to the integration of Black
People into the free enterprise system
instead of using violent methods and some
of the ideology of communism to help their
fellow Americans.
0.1. C. has spread through 70 cities, and now
operates on 5 million dollars from private sectors
with federal support at 18 million. In Philadelphia
alone the 0.1. C. has put 7,000 people into jobs
earning more than 25 million dollars in new
purchasing power and doing away with 4 million
dollars in relief that these people would have cost
the community otherwise. The self respect which
these people have gained from supporting
themselves cannot be measured.
Reverend Sullivan realized that in addition to
training people for jobs in white-owned businesses,
he could train people for businesses created by the
0.1. C. One plan was built on the contributions of
650 of his churchs members and includes Progress
Plaza, a group of stores managed primarily by
Blacks. Other enterprises include an entrepreneour
training school, Progress Aero-Space Enterprises,
and Progress Garment Manufacturing Company.
Cooperative supermarkets can also greatly

- No Honor Left

' MR. EDITOR:
It has been suggested that
Gregg Mathews talks to himself
and occasionally babbles
decadence debate team
bull sessions. Wait thats only
during debates. His babbling
continues in his ps istic defense of frats. Ddefe'ttte v
frat concept of service projects
include defying the honor,
system and blackballing pledges
(as was done to me) for
supporting it?
Too, it seems the frats are so
involved in the status quo and
nonsense of keeping student
government alive (for frat boys
at the expense of all) that they
blithely ignore the substandard
coursework here that is an insult
to those who care to be
educated.
Are frats really an aid to
development of life careers?
Why of course. With all those
brothers running around there
cant help but be some good
old-fashioned nepotism.

professors, like all other workers, in line. A professor, particularly a
young professor who is on trial for tenure, is constantly faced with
the threat of removal or with the threat of less office space, no
promotion, heavy teaching loads, etc. It seems to me that professors
are no better than other people and have no more right to job security
than anv other group in our country.
Although professors have no special claim to job security, I would
think that all workers in this country have a right to employment and
a right to exercise both their minds and bodies freely. This right will
not be granted by the capitalist system, nor by administrators who are
appointed by the capitalists. It can only be fought for and won. When
administrators defend tenure, it is a good indication that it works
for them, rather than for the faculty.
True security and true freedom (academic and otherwise) can only
be achieved when faculty members recognize that they are workers,
recognize that they are treated no better than other workers in a
capitalist system, and organize to take control of their own working
situation.
KENNETH A. MEGILL

oenelit the Black community it they tollow good
business practices. Done correctly, results are
phenomenal. Manahattens Momingside Heights
Consumers Cooperative has been in operation for
10 years. A 4.8% cash rebate and 12% dividend on
their 25.00 dollar a share stock.
With Reverend Sullivans program % million
dollars were raised from 650 people with which
about 4 million dollars worth of properties had been
acquired. That is a phenomenal groth rate of
1600%: Think of the progress that could be made if
Black Power groups would devote themselves to the
integration of Black people into the free enterprise
system instead of using the violent methods and
some of the ideology of communism to help their
fellow Americans. Free enterprise can be
color-blind!!!
Charles Fulwood of JOMO says the white man
has no business defining the methods Black folks
should use to gain power over themselves. I dont
agree because I feel that all people can help to
answer the problem. But this time I will let Rev.
Sullivan define his methods. When asked how Black
power militants feel about his work, he said, Im a
Black man and proud of it. I think of myself and
what Im doing as Black Power itself it is Black
Power, it is capitalism, it is American.
I will never be satisfied until every Black adult
in America owns a piece of this country individually
or mutually, even if it is no more than 2 square feet
of earth or a share of stock. ;
But I dont have time to get into arguments.
Ive got 5,000 more days to work and those days
have to be used as God, I. think, wants me to use
them in building self-respect and self-dependence
among my people so we can make America work for
us as it works for any other American.

Friday, May 30, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Joseph M. Wehby

Perhaps lota Ditcha pledges
dont get gang banged
regularly at least in the frat
houses. But there is a heck of a
lot of prostitution of the Tri
lota brand here that substitutes
getting a pin, getting engaged, or
just getting a cool date for
getting money for the favors
granted. of UF
coeds on thjs f account is
..I too feemhartAMr. Parker
should apologize but only to
the prostitute
themselves to the frat boys (or
the independent? for that
matter). So Ill gladly give him
both of their names.
Now for our other defender
of the faith. Mr. Bellows you
please tell us how many GDls
would try to save Walker Hall
from burning down. Probably
none and maybe only a few of
the more retarded frat boys?
Why should they? They dont
live there only the roaches do.
JOHN BROECK

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30, 1969

Orange 1 a d

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC
OFFICE, J. WAYWEjBgjifZ mm
t noi") noenq zzsm £ isorL
< 0 WHUQ32 mumixsrn c ,qmD nrr

Administrative Notices

FINAL EXAM SCHEDULES:
Widespread scheduling of final
examinations prior to the time
provided in the published
Schedule of Courses results in
disruption of the final week of
classes and hardships to the
students involved. Therefore, the
following policy is in effect:
-No examinations, class
quizzes, special projects or term
papers shall be given or assigned
during the final five class days of
a regular term. Take home
examinations shall not be due
prior to the regularly scheduled
examination period.
All changes in the
published examination schedule
must be approved by the
Sub-Committee on Variations
from the Published Schedule of
Courses of the Schedule and
Calendar Committee. Requests
submitted to the sub-committee
for changes in the examination
time must be justified and
include a soecific statement of
the effects on the students of
such a change.
lt shall be the
responsibility of department
chairmen and deans to enforce
this policy.
Laboratory sections of many
courses may be exempt from the
above policy provided such
exemption has been approved by
the Sub-Committee on
Variations. In the case of
laboratory sections, such
requests shall specify: 1) that
the laboratory final examination
requires use of laboratory
equipment; 2) that the final
laboratory examination has
traditionally been given at the
last meeting of the lab, and
3) that the laboratory final is
not a substitute for the final
examination in the course.
In the case of laboratory-type
courses, the request shall state
that traditionally no provision
has been in the final
examination schedule for such
courses.
In some cases a policy of
continuing exemption may be
established with respect to
laboratory sections and
laboratory type courses.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION f * 1
a f ***
*. v oU*' se f \ fM,
9gu j Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From X r\
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it...
7 Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, yj, ' -^7
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole & X, /
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! ...

NATIONAL DEFENSE
BORROWERS who are leaving
the university at the end of the
spring quarter are urged to have
an exit interview with a loan
officer at the Student
Depository at the Hub.
REGISTRATION FEES: In
order to avoid long lines and late
penalties, registration fees
should be paid early. The
Student Depository will not be
open Saturday, June 21. A
convenient "drop" is provided
on the east wall of the
depository. Do not "drop" or
send cash through the mail.
AMERICAN PROFESSORS
interested in Fulbright lecturing
and advanced research awards
overseas for the 1970-71
academic year are invited to
check the countries and subjects
at the International Center
located on Stadium Road south
of Walker Auditorium.
Opportunities exist in literature,
law, economics, American
studies, civilization and
government, education, teaching
English as a foriegn language,
history, philosophy, political
science, business administration,
agricultural economics and
computer science. Please note,
there has been a sharp decline in
the number of awards given.
BLOC SEATING:
Organizations and societies
which are interested in
participating in bloc seating for
the 1969 football season and
which did not participate this
year should obtain applications
at the Student Activities Desk,
Room 305 Reitz Union.
Completed applications must be
returned by Thursday, June 5.

BLUE BULLETIN

BANKERS SCHOLARSHIP:
The Board of Trustees of the
Florida Bankers Educational
Foundation will meet on July 9
to review scholarship/loan
applications for the coming
term/quarter. All applications
and supporting papers must be
returned to the Florida Bankers
Educational Foundation Office
by June 30 to be considered at
the July meeting. Apple ations
can be obtained in the Office of
Finance and Insurance, Room
204, Matherly Hall, College of
Business Administration.
STATE TEACHERS General
Loan Scholarship money has
arrived. It may be received in the
Student Depository from Mrs.
Robinson or Mrs. Hunt
STUDENT GOVERNMENT
PROJECT DIRECTORS
NEEDED: Applications for the
following positions are available
in Room 305, Reitz Union:
outdoor amphitheatre, campus
grocery-book store cooperative
project, Gentle Monday,
computerized campus opinion
poll, student government public
relations agency and junior
college affairs. No previous
student government experience
is necessary, although applicants
must be enrolled for the summer
quarter. For additional
information, contact Charles
Harris at 392-1665 from 3 to 5
p.m.
ORANGE AND BLUE
NOTICES: June 6 will be the
last issue of the Alligator and the
Orange & Blue Bulletin for the
spring quarter. Summer quarter
publication will resume Tuesday,
June 24.

address all administrative notices and general
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

FRIDAY
Friday, May 30
Union Movie, "The Great
Escape", Union Aud., 6:00 &
9:00 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, "Funeral
in Berlin", W. Wing Main
Cafeteria, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Vest Pocket Players Musical,
"The Fantasticks", Santa Fe
Junior College Aud., 8:00
p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Modern Dance
Group Lecture and
Demonstration, P.K. Yonge
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
Saturday, May 31
Air Force ROTC Graduation
Parade, Drill Field, 10:30
a.m.
Beta Theta Pi Pie Eating
Contest, Across from Beta
House, 1:00 p.m.
Army/Air Firce Joint Review,
ROTC Drill Field, 2:30 p.m.
Union Movie, 'The Great
Escape", Union Aud., 6:00 &
9:00 p.m.
Murphree Movie, "Funeral in
Berlin, W. Wing Main
Cafeteria, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
India Club Movies: Three Award
Winning Documentary Movies
on India and Indian Music on
the Veena, 349 Union, 7:30
p.m. Admission Free.
Vest Pocket Players Musical:
'The Fantasticks", Santa Fe
Junior College Aud., 8:00
p.m.

SUNDAY
Sunday, June 1
Athletic Department Picnic,
Camp Wauburg, 1:00 p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Modem Dance
Group Lecture and
Demonstration, Santa Fe
Junior College Aud., 4:00
p.m.
University Film Series,
'Treasure of Sierra Madre",
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:15
p.m.
MONDAY
Monday, June 2
English in Action, Baptist
Student Center, 4:00 8:00
p.m.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 246 8t 254
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Faculty Lecture and Reception,
Dr. Archie Carr, Jr., Union
Aud., "Alligator Country",
9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
Tuesday, June 3
Intramurals Banquets, Union
Ballroom, 6:00 p.m.
Bridge Lessons, 150 C Union,
7:00 p.m.
Student Senate Meeting, 361
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Robert F. Kennedy Memorial
Movies: "Robert Kennedy
Remembered" plus "In the
Company of Men", Union
Aud., 7:30 & 9:00 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, 355 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Music Dept: University
Symphoney Orchestra,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.



Former Child Prodigy
Performs For Concert
Ruth Slenczynska, who has been called by some critics the
worlds greatest woman pianist, will be in Gainesville next week to
appear as a soloist with the University of Florida Symphony Orchestra
in a concert Tuesday evening, June 3, at 8:15 in University
Auditorium.
Miss Slenczynska will play the Mozart Concerto in A Major and the
Robert Schumann Piano Concerto. & Rounding out the program,
Conductor Edward Troupin has chosed the Overture to Colas
Breugnon by Kabalevsky and the Overture Fantasy, Romeo and
Juliet, by Tchaikovsky.
There is no charge for the concert, and the public is cordially
invited to attend.
Miss Sleczynska is universally remembered as the fabulous child
prodigy of some three decades ago. Bom in Sacramento, California,
she gave her first recital at the age of four. Two years later she played
in Berlin; at seven she made her Paris debut with the Orchestre
Symphonique de Paris, and at eight made her first concert tour of the
United States after a Town Hall debut described by the New York
Times critic as an electrifying experience.
What is more important, however, is that Miss Slenczynska made
the rare transition from child prodigy to mature artist, fulfilling her
early promises and highest hopes of her teachers and her own musical
destiny.
Her playing and her great knowledge of piano and piano literature
comes from an incredibly rich background of study and observation
with some of the great names among the post-Romantic pianists and
composers. Among her teachers were Rachmaninoff, Cortot,
Schnabel, Petri, and Nadia Boulanger.
Miss Slenczynska was on the University of Florida campus for a
period of four days in May of 1967, during which time she presented
a solo concert and gave three days of piano workshops through the
cooperation of the Gainesville Music Teachers Association and the
Department of Music.
Miss Slenczynska has recorded over 100 compositions. She
recorded for Decca Records all twenty-four of Chopins Etudes plus
the four Impromptus, an assignment in keyboard virtuosity so
formidable that less than half-dozen pianist have ever dared to tackle
it on discs.
'Oh Dad Coming

The Gainesville Little
Theatre, 4039 NW 16th Blvd.,
will present its sixth and final
play of the season June 5,6, 7,
and 12,13,14.
The show is Oh Dad, Poor
Dad, Mammas Hung You in the
Closet and Im Feelin So Sad,
written by Arthur L. Kopit and
acclaimed as the best off
Broadway production of 1962.
The New York Mirror aptly
described it as deliriously
daffy.
Yvonne Dell, 7AS, stars as
Madame Rosepettle and is ably
supported by Chad Reed as her

Student Art Displayed
The Annual Student Art Exhibition is now on display in the
Teaching Gallery of the Department of Art.
The presentation includes paintings, drawings, prints, photography,
sculpture and ceramics and will be on view through Wednesday, June
10, at which time it will be replaced with works in various media from
the graduate program in the Department of Art.
The student art on exhibit represents a cross section of the entire
studio art program. The exhibit is open to the public and the Teaching
Gallery hours are from 9 a.m. to 12 pjn. and from 1:30 until 5 p.m.
weekdays. The Teaching Gallery is closed Saturday and Sunday.
SALE
1/4 to 1/3 OFF
MENS A LADIES
CLOTHING
j DONIGANS''

weakling son, Jonathan; Janice
Tesh as his would be girl-friend,
Rosalie; Ralph Thompson, UF
Professor of Marketing, as the
lecherous Commodore
Roseabove, and Joseph Stewart,
Micheal Tesh 4AS, Peter Trimer
and Billy Williams as The
Bellboys.
The play is directed by
Eleanor Roberts, UF Public
Functions Manager, who urges
early reservations by telephoning
the theatre. Student tickets are
SI.OO on Thursdays and $1.25
on Fridays and Saturdays.

Soc ietyb Shows Twer

The Florida Cinema Society is offering variety .in
their filmatic presentations this weekend.
FRIDAY
A collection of pictures, events, and rare
photographic talent will be brought to the on
picture serene Friday night when Cinema Society
presents Mondo Cane, a travelog of out-of-the-way
places and unstaged sights.
Produced and conceived in full color, the film
stars no regular Hollywood actors or actresses but
people in their natural surroundings doing their only
thing. Mondo Cane is brutality, lovemaking, and

VETERANS
Be a commercial pilot!
NEW G. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Area's only approver! school

COUCHS
DIVIDEND WEEK-END
BLACK AND
WHITE T.V.
BiG 172 S Q. IN.
eWEEEWEE HOE WEE
rnrr >is
Mitt V LUE
STAND

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SUPPLY LIMITED
OFFER GOOD MAY 30-31st & JUNE 2
... > V
|" OF COURSE PERFORMANCE GUARANTEED 1
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FOR GRADUATION GIFTS
OF DISTINCTION GIVE ZENITH
608 n. main st.
tUULn O OPEN TO 9 FRIDAY P.M.
SERVICE TO YOU IS OUR MOST IMPORTANT PRODUCT

WONDER HOUSE:
14 SW Ist STREET
K.C. STEAK ca
BK. POT, SALAD
BAKED LASAGNA (ior
W/ MEAT SAUCE,SALAD
FREE DESSERT

Friday, May 30,1969, The Floffep Alligator,

£ pure human emotion all wrapped up into one.
Ff you go see *Morido Cane, you may very well
be shocked by its frankness in dealing with segments
of the worlds population.
A policy of no escape is turned into a 76-man
break for freedom when the Cinema Society brings
The *Es9ape to the J.Wayne Reitz
fright.
Steve Bronson and James-
Coburn engineer a mass prison break from a World
War II Nazi prison camp, a maximum security area,
called Stalag 111.

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

;.%svx\vXvX*xs*xnv.v.%<-x-x*xvv;vx-:y;
I EOR SALE I
$ .8
SSrWi4*WrWS*W,W,;K*M;iKCi*M,,M,>M*>K*V SSrWi4*WrWS*W,W,;K*M;iKCi*M,,M,>M*>K*V-8
-8 SSrWi4*WrWS*W,W,;K*M;iKCi*M,,M,>M*>K*V-8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for ~
$189.00. These machines eervwbe as
purchased for storage and frefaht c
charges for $69.00 andqcavuteftfld
for $5.00 per -month. See at
unciaimed NCnftxAv*. £
H2IHAB2
T9flJbyi iilfw aybOUiibr- wsifz
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing ntacfu to
be .nseM fore storage andu freight
$35.00. Tijese pcartbe Inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Galoeedliet. (Aoai-ttK)
Trailor Bx3o 1 bedroom. Air con.
carpet TV & Ant. New wireing 850
cash or 800 without T.V. Phone
376-1544. 3620 S.W. Archer Rd.
Gainesville. (A-10t-141-p)
x a
Honda S9O recently overhauled. Tool
kit included. $135. Call Kathie
anytime 392-9796. (A-3t-147-p)
Triumph Tiger Cub motorcycle. Just
inspected, dependable, SIOO. Call
376-1437. (A-2t-147-p)
BASENJI puppy. Male, top quality, 4
months old, AKC, no bark or odor,
short hair, small appetite, loves
children. Requires loving home with
adequate facilities. Terms to suit.
Phone 376-4103. (A-10t,139-p)
GUNS GUNSGUNS. Inventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, .no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-18M36-C)
GUITAR Framus classical practically
new, will include case, capos, SIOO or
best offer. Call Lois 378-3747.
(A-st-144-p)
1968 Van Dyke 12x52
airconditioning. Located in Varsity
Villa. 395 down. $81.92 monthly.
Call 376-6555. (A-st-144-p)
' Rickenbacker guitar and case $135.
Gibbon amp. 2 12 inch speakers
60 watt output plus premier reverb
unit $235. 392-6059. (A-st-144-p)
HONDA 305C.C. DREAM, excellent
condition, 8200 miles, 2 Helmets and
Tools included, Call 392-8940. Must
sell. (A-st-144-p)
Home beautiful 44x8 Elcar 2 br 36
awning KLH stereo unit. Located in
wooded area near Micanopy. To
appreciate calf" 378-8320 or
466-3423. (A-5M44-P)
62 International Travelall station
wagon. Excellent condition,
378-6470. Small TV, small desk,
solid mahogany bookcase, mens
bicycle, Schwln, new. (A-st-144-P)
1969 Honda 65 + extras under 600
miles, $275, call 378-4041 after
5:00. (A-4M45-P)
END OF MARRIAGE SALE blk &
crome metal desk; $75, new
Magnovox stereo; SIOO, Norelco
Cassette tape-recorder; S6O,
378-0226 after 10. (A-5M45-P)
HONDA 1965 150c.c. Excellent
condition. Electric start. Helmet
included. $225. Must sell. Ph.
376-8980. (A-st-144-p)
r
Zeiss binocular microscope; mech
stage, light source, many extras,
excellent specifications, never used.
SBOO. 376-9551. (A-3M46-P)
1967 Lotus Cortina, Elan engine,
new perillis. Perfect throughout.
372-3216 after 6 p.m. (A-3M46-P)
beloved 9*6" custom surfboard,
no dings Norelco portable tape
recorder best offers. Call Ira
376-6628 or 372-5962 evenings to
see. (A-4M46-P)
Wedding dress: Beautiful! S2OO new.
Veil and train. Size 8. S9O. 378-7672
after 5. (A-3M46-P)
Home for sale, $14,500, perfect
location for university people. Walk
to Univ., Med. Center, PK Yonge.
Small 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
pleasant neighborhood. Aircond.,
fenced back yard, screened porch.
5*4% FHA mortgage, $94.87 monthly
includes principal, interest, taxes,
insurance. Flexible terms on equity.
Can take S4OO-SSOO down. 1227 SW
11th Ave. Call 372-1744 for appt.
(A-8M46-P)
1968 Honda supperhawk 305 cc.
Excellent condition fast and
dependable, extras included. Must see
for $430. Dont miss this one. Call
378-0223. (A-3M46-P)
H nm
'l'lifl

I FOR SALE 1
B r
Siamese tfiiDilsJLb/weeks old. Male
and female. Leaving town Saturday.
it X nil?*
ilTaay Bobdle pups white males, AKC
& pedigree 6 wks old June 14.
392-0930 after 6:30 p.m. 475-1329.
3{A-st-148-P)
15 ft. boat 25 hp Johnson. 2 pr skis,
all for $250. Can be seen at Arts
Gulf Station 707 NW 13th.
(A-3M48-P)
Fisher AMP AM-FM radio 55 watt
with case, year old, new S3OO now
yours for $195. Call 376-0285 after
5. (A-3M48-P)
THE RANCHER, Inc. WHOLESELE,
ammunition by the case hunting or
sporting guns Gainesville's largest
new gul selection. LAYAWAY now
with small down payment and NO
carrying charges. 4821 NW 6th St.
376-4595. (A-6M44-C)
66 Triumph Spitfire, conv. top &
tanau cover, r&h; new tires; good
condition, 27,500 miles, 1195 or best
offer. Call Dee after 4. 376-8991.
(A-5M48-P)
Tennis racket, Wilson, Jack Kramer
autograph, superb gut little wear
(cost $11) 4-5/8 grip, press and
cover included, only sl3. Bob,
378-6347. (A-lt-148-P)
GARAGE SALE, Books, dishes, hifi,
furn, tools, and much more. Cant
take it with me. 1731 NW 55 Terr,
Sat, May 31, 9-5. (A-IM4B-P)
General Electric table model
refrigerator 2V2 cu. ft. ice tray
compartment, 4 mo old. Ideal for
dorm living S9O. Call Mike 372-9317
between 8 and 9 p.m. A-st-148-P)
Leaving school must sacrifice! 1969
Honda 90 mint condition, 900 mi.,
S2OO also beautiful Honda 160
chrome fenders and side panels,
$350. 392-8775 evenings.
(A-2t-148-P)
FISHER XP 55 spkrs S7O/pr. Bogen
65 watt stereo amp S7O, Notorola
reverb sls. 387-3120. (A-3M48-P)
WOLLENSAKT-1500 tape recorder
very good condition $55.00. Call
378-8168. (A-2M48-P)
;v;.X*>X*X.;.X*S"V.V"N' ; 'W: WS*;*i X*X X X X' 1
FOR RENT 1
''.ns xs ; :*x x X":X*x*x*xc*x-x*x*x*x > x*X4
Economical living for male students 1
blk from campus S6O/m. Room & 3
meals/day. 5 houses dining hall, rec
room & work shop. Pro cook
members summer & fall. Vacancies.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
College liv org. (B-10M45-P)
One bedroom apt to sublet June 15.
AC, large patio, 4 blocks from
campus. Pets welcome. Call 378-9058
any time. (B-1M46-P)
Coed roommate desired for summer
quarter. $38.75 plus utilities. Call
378-3238 after 7:00 p.m.
(B-5M46-P)
Air conditioned, 2-bedroom, carport,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. 6/16/69. (B-5M46-P)



IMISS HONEY .MISS GALORE
jfy HAVE
JAMES
L BOND
v X BACK FOR 34
i MORE! \ \j lf

*IAN FLEMING S 'Mr
1 6ERT FROBE coio'iNCE
HONOR BLACKMAN p-jssvioe

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30, 1969

Page 12

1 FOR RENT
tXX*XiSrX*XC*X<*X*XX-SSS?WS*X*X*X-X*XX:
Three bedroom furnished house
for summer qtr. Only $l2O/mo. from
June 15. Adjacent to new law school.
Call 378-7748 or see at 120 S.W. 25
St. (B-st-147-p)
Sublease 1 br. poolside apt. Village
Park N. 35. Available June 13 for
summer or longer. June paid for. Call
Shary or Dave 378-9169.
(B-3t-147-p)
TWO bedroom apartment furnished.
Reduced summer rates. $77.50 per
month. Airconditioned. Very near
campus. No car needed. Call Mr. or
Mrs. Jones. Phone 376-5636.
(B-10t-145-P)
To rent 1 bedroom apt. Wall to wall
carpet, central air conditioning,
heating, large kitchen area, very
quiet, 3532 NW 21 Street. Call
378-8704. (B-5M46-P)
French Quarter Poolside No. 39,
sublease for Summer SIOO a month.
378-5213. (B-3M46-P)
New 12x60 trailer for summer. 2
bdrm, nice lot & furnishings. Call
376-5401 Andrews & Connell trailer
park. (B-3t-146 P)
LUXURIOUS LANDMARK 2 bdr, 2
bth, ac, disposal, dshwsher, cable tv,
2 pools, health club, sauna, maid.
Sblet 4/share 2 for summer.
378-0727. (B-st-146-P)
Sublet summer quarter, 2 bedroom
poolside French Quarter apt. Must
rent soon. Will take best offer. Call
378-7988 apt 103. (B-3M46-P)
Two 2-bedroom apts. one block from
University on NW Ist Ave. sllO
upstairs, $l2O downstairs, or terms
arranged for summer. Phone
372-9719 May 30, 31, June 1.
(B-3M46-P)
Near campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior men.
For summer AND/OR 1969-70.
378-8122. 376-6652. (B-TF-138-p)
Two bedroom a/c apt. dishwasher
bath & V 2. Families and children
welcome. Summer quarter w. option
for fall. Call 378-6193 Reas.
(B-2t-147-p)
Beautiful, three bedroom, two bath
house. Located in fine neighborhood
near Law complex. Air cond. $165
per month. Call 378-9383.
(B-st-147-p)
One bedroom Landmark apt. will
pay June rent and damage deposit
good location inside area directly
behind pool. Call 378-5508.
(B-4t-147-p)
Last half of June free sublease for
summer a/c disposal pool one bed
room. Married couple or one person
only. slOl per month. 376-2791.
(B-st-147-p)
Sublet 2 bdr apt for summer 1 blk
from campus, $125 mo. Call Sharon
378-9898. (B-5M45-P)
Camelot apt. No. 107. One
roommate leavin only $65 per
month. I will pay you S2O per month
Just to take my place inc. saunas, &
pool, no way Im staying in this big
city. Cant take fast life. Call
378-0879 after six. (B-lt-148-P)

BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:15
SHOWTIME 8:45

ALBERT R.BBOCCOU** HARRY SAITZMAN I
IAN FuTmIM6 s' I)R NO I
SEAN CONNERYasIAMES BOND
and URSULA ANDRESS JOSEPH WISEMAN I
JACK LORO ibc sw-*; BERNARD LEE

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
1 private bedroom for
jf each student. one
/ a block behind norman
Jf{ Ift l-all
Cw
[| ly APARTMENTS
1 914 SW Bth AVE
NOWJEASINC^O^EPT^CALL372-2662^
1
iH K 1 SPECIAL m
|g| A I Lunch and Dinner
frito I
I shrimp I
H WITH FRENCH FRIES, §|
m SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES g|
I sl-09 I
I MORRISON'S 1
I CAFETERIAS 1
f|L OAtllSyiUi MALL M
I Dewtiewn MeetvHle I
Meet the President of the
(111!
< w Pfefer
rwn. w.sl fList fMcEn^
TODAY JfcWjfiM "Wetter a
InCHNICOLOR* :
V, a&S Ffiiwrw
11M W ilfOlwlt i If:\m fiil!lK&
7A If ;< (D lu fAMfI ftH la| RI vt H {f;VI >3 gTI
. f ,i.-, j,; #

Use our handy
mail in order
form.



GATOR CLA SSI FI EDS*
V m t %. . ".

FOR RENT I
ftxxxwrx*x*xcw>>>i£s?XflN?x*x*x*>>:.:.:.:.j!:
Sublet 1 bedroom ac, furnished
including wash machine and other
extras. Only three blocks from
campus. Available June 15th. Call
378-8384. (B-3M48-P)
TO Sublet. Two bedroom poolside
French Quarter apt. for summer
quarter. Call 378-8564. (B-5M48-P)
SUBLET leaving town. Must rent for
sum qtr. UG 1-bed. linens, kit. sup.
pic. & sprds. incl. TV too if gone by
June 1. Call 378-9877. (B-6M48-P)
Room in private home for mature
male student. Air conditioning,
separate entrance linen and maid
service. Available June 14. Call
376-5360. (B-3M43-P)
Special summer rate 2 bedroom,
poolside Landmark apt. with
dishwasher. Must sublet $l5O mo. (or
best offer) Apt. No. 51. Call
378-4924. (B-5M46-P)
GUYS & GALS economical living
CLO was gone co-ed for the summer
S6O/mon. Room & meals, peace love
and freedom 1 blk. from campus.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
(B-10t-145-P)
8x37 trailer, 1 bdroom, close to
campus and Med Center. Mobiler Tr.
Park. 30.00 plus lot. Call R. Schmidt
376-0285 or write. Box 356 JHM
Health Ctr. (B-st-145-P)
Sublet poolside French Quarter Apt.
for summer. One or two male
roommates needed. $125. Call Chuck
at 378-8756. (B-3t-147-p)
Spacious 2 bedroom apt. Vz block
from Tigert. Air conditioned $250
for the summer quarter. Call
376-0126 anytime. (B-st-144-p)
Poolside 2 bedroom furnished from
June 16 to August 31 at special
summer rate. Contact FREDERICK
GARDENS. (B-10t-144-C)
Sublet Landmark apt. for summer. 4
people. Only S9O per person for the
entire quarter. Many extras left in
apt. for summer. Call 372-5041.
(B-st-147-p)
|j
2 female roommates for summer
quarter. June rent free $45/mo. a/c.
Dishwasher, disposal, carpeting, IV2
baths. Phase 2 Landmark no. 82.
378-6339. (C-st-144-p)
Roommate needed tor summer. 1
bdrm AC, tv, pool, 3 blks campus.
Univ. Apts. SBS pays for entire
Quarter. No utility bill. Bob
*''37B-6347. (C-4M45-P)
Traveling companion wanted for 6-8
weeks, leaving middle of June:
Western states. No fixed route. Lets
talk it over! Call 376-1455!
(C-4M45-P)
2 male roommates needed to share 2
bedroom Williamsburg Apt during
summer months. 2 baths and one
light machine. Call 376-5689.
(C-5M45-P)
Management trainee in fast growing
company. No experience necessary.
Part time or full time. Must be 21.
Apply in person at 1723 S.W. 13th
St. (C-st-144-p)
Ill pay for your gas if you will tow
(not drive) my Triumph to (or near)
Lawrence, Kansas, sometime between
June 6 and June 20. Call 372-3870.
(C-st-144-p)
THRU 3.5
SAT
JEAN-LUC GODARDS
weekend
REAL FINE M
SUNDAY
ONE OF THE YEAR'S
10 BEST ! New York Times
mm 1
IHE ACCLAIMED MOTION PICTURE
John Cassavetes' "FACES"
2:45.5:00. 7:15 .9:30

WANTED
Lookmg for coed to share spacious
trailer in fall, rent and utilities app.
$l5O per quarter. Able to survive
7c -st-145.S) Z rna 392 7480
1 female roommate starting fall. Own
bedroom. Walk to campus. Call
392-9302 or 392-9304. (C-st-147-p)
LANDMARK Phase 11. Need 1 or 2
coeds to share 2-bdrm. apt. Half of
first mo. paid. Move in summer, stay
thru next yr. Call BJ, 378-9489.
(C-3t-147-p)
1 male wanted to share poolside Fr.
Quarter Apt. $95.00 for entire
summer. Available June 11th. Please
stop by no. 77 Fr. Quarter or call
378-7968. (C-st-147-p)
One or two male roommates for
summer quarter. French Quarter Apt.
on pool. Call 376-1437. (C-2t-147-p)
Raise a little hell this summer. Live in
Village Park. 2 or 3 roommates for
the summer term. Reduced rent
378-4035 after 7:00 p.m.
(C-5M45-P)
Male roommate to share trailer
50xl2\ two bedrooms, full bath,
airconditioning. Very reasonable. Cail
392-8551. (C-3M46-P)
Male roommate for summer term. 2
bdrm. apt. 1 block behind Norman.
$33 a month + 1/3 utilities. Call
378-5673. (C-5M46-P)
RIDERS (1 or 2) TO San
Francisco Leave anytime but Must
Arrive by June 16. Share Driving.
376-1730. (C-3M46-P)
1 male roommate needed for summer
and/or fall quarter. 4 bedroom, 2
bath, air conditioned apartment, 1
block behind Norman Hall, sll2 plus
utilities for summer. Call 372-1272.
(C-lt-148-P)
1 fern roommate needed to share
Frederick Gardens apt. next yr. Call
Melissa 392-9442. (C-3M48-P)
WANTED female roommate sum.
qtr. to share 2 br trailer Vz mi from
campus. $25 a month + utilities,
close to med center ideal!!
Interested, call Jo 2-9273.
(C-5M48-P)
2 male roommates for house this
summer. Own bedroom, ac, near
campus. SSO mo. + utilities,
392-7600. (C-5M48-P)
One male roommate needed for
summer qtr. Live all summer for
100.00 at French Quarter apts. Call
Nelson, 378-5026 if not there leave
message. (C-2t-148-P)
Male roommate for fall in La Bonne
Vie apts. Ph. 378-8319. (C-3M47-P)
Female roommate wanted. Share 3
bedroom La Bonne Vie apartment
with 3 other girls fall to spring. Rent
$57.50 plus. 376-8153. (C-5M48-P)

REITZ UNION THEATER 4
'' a CumrruSUc &ck, -Glfo Gdh-"
N V. -TIMES
FRIDAY, MAY 30. 600, 800, KWO PAA
.- M w ff V
SATURDAY, MAY 31. 600 AND 900 PM.

Friday, May 30, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED
v
FEMALE ROOMMATE summer qtr.
to share luxurious Landmark Apt.
only $75 for the entire term! A
STEAL! Call 378-4481. (C-IM4B-P)
Female roommate for summer, fall
renewal option. Landmark No. 169,
gym, cable TV, sauna, 2 pools, etc.
Free damage deposit, call 378-7782.
(C-5M44-P)
Have your own bedroom. Need 2
coed roommates for LaMancha fall
qtr. Call 392-8519 or 392-8513.
(C-3M47-P)
HELP WANTED f
HELP WANTED MALE. Mens
Clothing Salesman. Discount
privileges. Salary commensurate with
experience Apply Wilson Department
Stores, Inc. (E-10t-145-C)
Wanted dancers. Apply at handlebar
lounge in person Fri. 9:30 to 12
noon. Must be attractive over 21
good dancer and be willing to dance
topless. (E-3t-147-p)
WANTED: Energetic, enthusiastic
salesman/manager. Can earn SIOOO,
S2OOO or more during fall quarter
alone. See Mr. Davis in room 330
Reitz Union between 2 and 5 p.m.
(E3t-nc-p)
Listeners wantedwill pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Shirley Bracken,
Univ. ext. 2-2046 between 8-5 only
for appointment. (E-3t-144-C)
AUTOS 1
Pontiac, 1952, 4 door, straight B,
runs well, excellent tires, radio, call
378-5020. $l5O. (G-5M45-P)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen dealer, 4222 NW 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-ts-130-C)
67 convertible Mustang S2OO below
used car retail, $1440, 19,000 miles,
6 cylinder, gas economy, must sell,
beautiful. 120 NW 24 St. 376-8565.
(G-12M42-P)
Must sell English sports car 1965
Sunbeam good tires, seat belts,
power-disc brakes, convertible. Book
value is SIOBO. Will sell 825.
372-7971. (G-10t-141-p)
Station wagon Ford Fairlane 9
passenger 1963 automatic
transmission, air conditioned, new
brakes new tires, very good
condition. $595. 372-3213.
(G-st-144-p)
Pontiac, 1966 Tempest sport coupe
326 with Hurst 4-speed. Excellent
condition, MUST SELL. Come and
see it, then make an offer. Call
372-5688 between 5-7 p.m.
TODAY!. (G-5M49-P)
1965 Volkswagen good condition,
rack, trailer. $700.00 Ph. 378-1187
after 5 p.m. (G-st-148-P)

Page 13

£:-x.:.:.:.nns*;*>x : x*x Xc*:<">-:*h-'VW;j.
| AUTOS |
' -9J .eismet o.:i X
XXS'X'X-X-X-X-X'X-X^X'X^^j^V^^CvA
1962 Porsche Michelin X tires
AM-FM Balaupunck vraTdio.
376-9612. (G-2t-147-p) a A
PO RS C HET 1959, 1600 coupe.
Perfect engine, chassis, interior, new
radials, needs body work. $650,
378-3742 Fri. aft 6, all day Sat., Sun.
(G-lt-148-P)
PERSONAL I
TADFOUCL*
There are damn few Datsuns on used
car lots. To buy one see Godding &
Clark down by the main post office.
(J-ts-143-c)
Rider wanted to So. Wisconsin or
area of Chicago, going to Dells, June
11, 1:00 p.m., arrangements and
price to be discussed, prefer female.
Call Kim 392-9769. (J-st-146-P)
Beta Theta Pie day will be held for
sure on Sat. May 31. Need ride to Miami, June 13. Will
split trip expenses and U-Haul-lt. Call
Sydel 392-9859. (J-4t-148-P)
PSCHEDELIA FOR SALE Dozens of
candles. All kinds. Give away prices.
Professional, quality strobe light. Call
Wes 378-3591. (J-3M48-P)
Good Luck Jay, Steve, John the
hands We support
underdogs Wanda and the Girls.
(J-lt-148-P)
Wanda Watchout please contact Jay,
Steve and Joan the hands
concerning our first aid arrangements
for the game. (J-lt-148-P)
Poodel puppies, silver and black AKC
six weeks. Call after 5 372-6733.
(J-6M48-P)
Good Health Jay, Steve and John the
Hands We are praying for your
safety. Wanda and the Girls.
(J-lt-148-P)

MifiTti £f HS fti s 1., 111 I4sl
fgf 9 t^H
i Heironymus MERKJN il
I: ever c Forfje( j /VtdftCY Humppe |1
mj^^andjindjruejiappiness*}^^^^ l
starts
I N.W. 13th SI. .1 23rd RD f 1 I|| 1 V _____
'1 It takes A FINE PAIR to iloit ]
11i '. its nt\ cr been done l^for^
,v ijy'' jt&f £os: ....
I flfc *:v: y;
mCK HUDSON andCLAI DIACARDINALE
make
A FINE PAIR ll £££*
BUY SUMMER MOVIE CLUB TICKETS NOW

PERSONAL 1
W-yWX W-X > >:WWW>>M{Wsd#WWw
**AWe the SENIORS of Phi Sigma Sigma
ts m 2 .fiMoru*_
.Ifthcdhipt ftSfefat *iWfaaiii' at- THE
SPANISH N*Att4{£lSattllwW straw handbags wttti leather handles.
JUtteftl e*dw b*A
w. *Ublv> **VK>J?Opeh **>n.-Sat.
9:30-10*OO.afJ-3tS4*WJIT .00
3SSle**oH
Dial 378-560014EtteM aH'Wtectronic
factorial any.time day or night. LET
FREEDOM RING, 16 NW 7th Ave.
(J-st-146-P)
MARKMINCHIN.BiII and Judy need
to talk to you. Anyone knowing
MARK please ask him to call
376-0275 or stop by 1211 N.W. 30th
Ave. Thanks. (J-3t-147-p)
TRAVEL ABROAD flights only or
vacation seminars 6wks.
Departures June 22 and July 6.
Various itineraries all over Europe.
Call 392-1655 Rm 310 Reitz Union.
(J-5M48-C)
jj* SHvicES |
A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
?-r a jt S v ~e Mach Shop. Call
376-0710. fM-14t.i
1 LOST & FOUND ?
sis v
~ vs&svwwxom-m<*x.nv.%?;nswwik, X -.
Female German Shepherd, black and
grayish tan, 75 pounds, answers to
Mona. Lost near 4204 NW 19 St. Call
378-1793 or 376-9910 after 5.
(L-2M48-P)
FOUND GOLD WATCH near Tigert
Hall a few weeks ago. Call 376-8553
after 5 p.m. and ask for Cyndy.
- (L-3M48-NC)



i, The Floridf Alligator, Friday, May 30, 1969

Page 14

SPEAKER

Educator Nixes Teaching

We are turning out of our
schools children who have lost
confidence in their ability to
learn. =.
This is the belief of Dr. Carl
Bereiter co-author of
Teaching Disadvantaged
Children in the Preschool
and a professor at the Ontario
Institute for Studies in
Education.
Speaking at the UFs College
of Education last Tuesday,
Bereiter commented that the
majority of todays children are
threatened by any new
situation that demands only that
they learn some new rules, some
new procedures, some new
facts.
In his talk sponsored by the
Holiday Stills
Viet Fronts
SAIGON (UPI) Cease-fire
orders honoring Buddhas
birthday stilled most Vietnam
war fronts Friday a few hours
after an 800-man U.S. task force
raided a Communist strategy
conference and reported killing
59 guerrillas in a battle around a
jungle hideout.
Military spokesmen said Viet
Cong officers had assembled in a
bunker complex near Trang
Bang 28 miles northwest of
Saigon to plan a summer
offensive. One American was
killed and four wounded in the
fighting which broke up the
meeting. The U.S. force was
supported by tanks, aircraft and
artillery.
The jungle battle erupted one
hour before Communist forces
started a 48-hour cease-fire at 7
a.m. Thursday to commemorate
the 2,513th anniversary of the
birth of Buddha, a major holiday
in Vietnam. Allied troops were
observing a 24-hour cease-fire
beginning at 6 a.m. Friday.
It was the 13 th truce of the
war.
Ruth Schier
Gets 7 Years
DECATUR, Ga. (UPI)
Ruth Eisemann-Schier, the
alleged accomplice of Gary
Steven Krist in the $500,000
kidnapping of Miami heiress
Barbara Jane Mackle, pleaded
guilty to a simply charge of
kidnapping Thursday and was
sentenced to seven years in
prison.
Dennis Jones, assistant
district attorney, said Miss
Schier, 26, a native of Honduras,
entered the guilty plea before
Superior Court Judge H. 0.
Hubert Jr.
Krist, who was found guilty
Monday of the more serious
charge of kidnapping for
ransom, was sentenced to life in
prison.
Jones said Miss Schier was
advised of her rights by Dist:
A tty. Richard Bell, who asked
her if she understood the charge.
She also was asked whether she
was entering the guilty plea of
her own free will and without
any promises being made by the
state.
Progress
Warren G. Harding was the
first President to ride to his
inauguration in an automobile.

Department of Foundations of
Education, Bereftbr called for a
new approach to education.
My proposal really is for
doing away with education, as
such, said Bereiter.
He suggested supplanting
(education) by two things a
learning program and a living
program.
The learning program,
Bereiter said, concentrates
entirely on things that can be
taught; that can be
demonstrated. It should take no.
more than three hours a day.
The rest of the day, he
continued, would be just living.
Society should provide a richer
cultural life for children by
providing museums, movies and
all kinds of special interest
activities.
In his proposed program,
Bereiter said Never, at any
time would the expectations

I PLUS AT 8:47 I
&£( TECHNICOLOR*

isaHy 1
|fW|n ^ e 7{&to& (jUt e
I humphrey^a^^
'lAmon owuzotf, Owe, 1 so£ 9-30pw
PRESENTED BY UNIVERSITY FILM SERIES |9S9
-

arise that the child would have
to become something.
The objectives of the present
system of education, Dr.
Bereiter believes, are unclear and
thus the chances that the child
will fail are increased.
Half of the children can
think, he said, but the other half
cant think and so all they can
do to survive is to find ways of
getting around it, to cheat on
the teachers.
Children will be destroyed
by this system, Bereiter
contended, as children are
destroyed now when they are
forced day to day to meet
standards and expectations that
they are in no way prepared to
meet.
Summing up his philosophy
of education, he said: In short,
I am for living and I am for
learning, but I think we can do
without education.

SALES-SERVICE-RENTALS
"Authorized "Authorized
Adler Dealer" TJ Smith Corona
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
FORMERLY Hancock Office Equipment
N. Main St 376-5551
Reduced
Summer Rates
University Gardens "fe
HEAR
THE WORLD-FAMED
INDIANAPOLIS
500
TODAY 11:30AM
BROADCAST UVE ON
WIIWU
Presented by
SPRITE,DAYTONA INTERNATIONAL SPEEDWAY,G.C. MURPHY



L
$
CLAUDE PINKSTON

I ... three of the winners at the Florida Players annual awards banquet
Players Win Actina Awards

I Claude Pinkston, 4AS,
received the Constans Award at
the annual Florida Players
banquet Sunday night at
Primrose Inn. The award is given
each year to the graduating
senior who has made the
outstanding contributions to the
theatre over a four year period.
Pinkston is familiar to
campus audiences for having
appeared regularly in Florida
Players productions.
Pinkston began his campus
acting career four years ago by
winning a walk-on role in the
modem comedy Take Her,
Shes Mine. Spotted as a young
man with talent and ability, he
was cast in a variety of roles in
one-act plays and quickly won
leads in such diverse major
productions as the Roman farce
MosteJlaria," the
Shakespearean comedy Twelfth
Night, and the modem drama
Seijeant Musgraves Dance.
Pinkston was most recently seen
in this winters production of

THE BEST BUY
IN MOVING
LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE
SERVICE MAKES THE DIFFERENCE
WHEN ITS TIME TO MOVE CALL
GAIHESVILLE-MAYFLOWER
3500 N.E. WALDO RD.
CALL TODAY FOR FREE ESTIMATE
376-5224
I rig -- GATOR ADS -- |
If MORE POWER THAN THE FLOWER |[
O

WBm- ipr 4 WH/K
mKr
iHHP
t |pg /
\ Warn Jtmm'.sM?.
DAN JESSE

After the Rain.
While Pinkston won the big
award, Dan Jesse copped two
honors in one evening. He was
voted awards for the outstanding
performance of a leading role
(full-length production) for his
portrayal of Jonathan Jeremiah
Peachum in The Threepenny
Opera and for his outstanding
supporting role (full-length) in
the part of Bargee in Sgt.
Musgraves Dance. Both awards
were for an actor.
Best actress awards went to
Melissa Shepherd for her
characterization of Barbara in
the Readers Theatre production
of Telemachus Clay
(full-length award) and to Dana
Preisler as Murial Otterdale in
After the Rain (supporting
award).
Rich Council, who had just
finished the role of Mack the
Knife in The Threepenny
Opera was voted an award for
the outstanding achievement by
a newcomer, while Duane Ford

flK;'
DUANE FORD

took the outstanding Player
award. Although Ford was seen
only once this year, as Hunter in
After the Rain, he has been a
moving force behind the scenes
in all Florida Players
productions for the past two
years.
. Haw "X
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On FLORIDA AIR LINES!
GATOR SPECIALS
SERVICE TO JACKSONVILLE, TAMPA,
SARASOTA, AND FORT MYERS
This exam-week extra schedule of flights from Gainesville
to major cities in Florida will operate daily from June 9 through
June 14. And every flight will be a low-cost, comfortable trip on a
26-passenger, 3-crew (pilot, co-pilot, stewardess) aircraft besides!
SCHEDULE (June 9 through June 14):
Leave Gainesville 11:55 a.m.
Arrive JACKSONVILLE 12:30 p.m.
Leave Gainesville 2:00 p.m. WMBMMB
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Jacksonville $12.00 $ 8.00
Tampa 17.00 11.00
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Fort Myers 27.00 18.00
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FOR GATOR SPECIAL RESERVATIONS CALL 378-1966 (or your local travel agent).
FLORIDA AIR LINES
Gainesville, Florida
i : t

One-Acts Cfosaler^r
The UF theatre going public will have a rare
seven plays in three nights when three bills of one-act playSasyflT fjojsh
out this years season of playgoing. There will be presented ift
Constans Theatre on the 4th, sth, and 6th # of June.
On Wednesday, June 4, two plays The Sandbox and Before
Breakfast will rUf 9 pfgsented along with an Interpretive Reading of
Carl Sandburgs Poetaj^ qg
Thursday night anther two plays staged: Zoo Story and
Improtmptu. r a b ,~ c
And finally on Friday 6, tne last, two plays, Message a
From Cougar and The Day the
will be presented. ~
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SALES
DEPARTMENTS
OPEN TO
7:00 P.M.
5:00 P.M. Saturday, Closed Sunday
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Miller-Brown Motors, Inc.
4222 N.W. 13*~h St.

Friday, May 30,1969, The FT&r*^

Page 15



[ t ne Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30,1969

Page 16

REEK WAF
* 7
By MIKE SIMMONS -
Entertainment Editor

KAPPA ALPHA Kappa
Alpha welcomes thirty o|\f
brothers recently inkiatiii il4;
brotherhood./ 41 ^ 6 *
Outgoing -presidwittfSgfblnfer"
trite iftiSaSkt?
the IFC is cqngratulated on
beirfg Blec inrilrOrfcWf 6f Omega.
New officers for the next
year include, Fred Dobbins,
president; Charlie Wright, vice
president; Banks Simpson,
recording secretary; Ike
Johnston, corresponding
secretary; Gary Winchester,
historian; Bob Suber, treasurer;
Russell Grooms, parliamentar parliamentarian;
ian; parliamentarian; Don Pierce, doorkeeper; and
John Hellrung, sergent at arms.
As an annual event, KA once
again entertained
underprivileged boys from the
Florida Sheriffs Boys Ranch.
On the Saturday of the Orange

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SIGMA KAPPAS SERVE
Sigma Kappa sisters recently participated with members of the 3rd
Special Forces Group, Fort Bragg, N.C. in the development of a

community recreational center.
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and Beta Zeta
fflv&gffii 30 boys over for
mmjjurgers, the game, and a bit
pfrfun and brotherhood.
To add new charm and grace
to their temporary house, the
brothers have initiated a new
program: Little Sisters of the
Crimson Rose. An enthusiastic
rush has placed 24 girls in the
group. These Little Sisters
include Christy Koontz,
president, ADPi; Jamie Sennet,
vice president, ADPi; Marrilyn
Craggs, secretary XO; Diane
Tolbert, treasurer, DG; and
Barbara Pousch, historian, DG.
At KAs annual Plantation
Ball at Jacksonville, the new
Kappa Alpha Rose and her court
were announced. The Court
includes Timmy LentingJCAT;
Lynn Wenig, XO; Karen Smith,
Phi Mu; and Sue Bonace. Their
new rose is Miss Cindy Deerman,

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Gainesville's largest supply of
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See the new Look in Levi's for
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SIG EPS TRAVEL
A fraternity man and his date
relax on the T.S. Flavia during
the Sig Ep's weekend trip to
Nassau. .._.
XO, who is pinned to brother
Paul Dickman.
CHI PHI The fraternity
recently celebrated its weekend.
At the banquet Friday night
their new Sweetheart, Deena
Dunford (DG) was named.
Chi Phi also announces its
Spring and Summer Quarter
officers. They are: Alpha, Rick
Supinski; Beta, Lynn Johnson;
Gamma, Dave Allemeier; Delta,
Norm Noblet; Epsilon, Ron
Widner; and Zeta, Pete
Caterina.
Brother Bob Wattles was
lately elected Chief Justice of
the Traffic Court and IFC
District President. Loften
Westmoreland has been tapped
into Phi Beta Kappa.
Construction has finally
begun on the fraternitys new
house on Number 1, Fraternity
Row. The men should be living
in it by second quarter next
year.
TAU SIGMA DELTA-The
Omega Chapter of Tau Sigma
Delta, National Honorary
Society of College of
Architecture and Fine Arts,
announces the initiation of 14
new members on Friday, May
30, 1969 6 to 8 p.m. in room
118 J.W. Reitz Student Union.
The new members include
Vaughn B. Bomberger, chapter
master elect; John R. Clees,
chapter scribe elect; and Richard
D. Peattie, chapter recorder
elect.

Climb aboard
/The S.S. Winnjammer
Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. w)
*j Dinners to 12:00 P.M. ji
\ Bernie Sher at the organ
on \ /\
Thursday, Friday & Saturday 'V
Oysters & Clams on the half shell f
Michelob on draft
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty t ( \
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. V
Reservations accepted
Harry M. Lanton, Manager ml/
Closed Sundays
Want action? $
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Standard equipment also includes an electric tach tachometer,
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and snug easy-folding top. Escape from the driving
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today at O ilW^lk
CRANE IMPORTS (fjLj)
506 E. UNIVERSITY AVE. mas^k



I Activity Center Needs Communications To '<£o)

H By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
I Plans for UFs multimillion
I dollar Activity Center are
I bogging down according to
I Project Student Center Action
I Team General Chairman Joe
Scafuti.
B We realize that the Activity
I Center must be carefully
1 planned, the former Gator
I swimming captain said. But it
1 should also be carefully and
I speedily planned.
i The main problem at this
time is a lack of communication
I between the UF administration,
the Athletic Department,
students and state officials.
| No one knows what anyone
I else is doing, Scafuti said. It
1 seems to me that they should all
j being consulting each other
i before thay make a move.
1 Another problem is slowness
j with which the feasibility is
I being done bv Director of

I Taylor, Doucette To Resolve
I Differences In Drag Race

Former UF Student Body President Clyde G.T.W. Taylor has
challenged Dyno Dave L.A.E. Doucette editor of the Florida Alligator
to a special match race Saturday night at the Gainesville Dragway.
The archrivals will meet in a headsup no handicap bash at the
wheels of the two Gainesville Dragway Station Wagons.
Event Director Terry Earwood says the cars have been super
de tuned for this match go and has been billed as leadsledsa pair.
Taylor still has the taste of victory in his mouth, among various and
sundry other things, from defeating Bob Redlite White during the
UF Gator Speed Weekend.
Nobody are perfect, quipped White when asked of Taylors
capabilities on the Drag Strip. This should prove quite a show as both
of Doucettes fans have volunteered to come jeer him on.
In addition to the afore mentioned spectacular thrill show, a full
racing program is also slated featuring an invasion of Jacksonville
troops with their record holding race cars. Time trials are from 5 until
8 pm with races at 8:30.
Gainesville Dragway is located 3 1/2 miles North of the Municipal
Airport on State Road 225, and is sanctioned and insured by the
National Hot Rod Association.
SPECIAL MATCH
RACE
ALUGATOR EDITOR
DAVE Mi.) DOUCETTE
vs.
FORMER UF BODY PRES.
CLYDE (G.T.W.) TAYLOR
BEST 3 OUT OF 5 RACES
THRILLS!!!
EXCITEMENT!!!
COME OUT AND JEER YOUR HERO
THIS SAT NITE
MAY 31
PLUS A GIGANTIC RACING PROGRAM
TIME TRIALS 5-8 RACES 8:30
3% Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225
:ar£s

Planning Walter Matherly. The
study has been going on since
February.
Until this study is
completed the Coliseum
Committee cannot meet and
start planning the structure
Scafuti said.
The committee is supposed to
determine what the Activity
Center will house. The
committee members are
Chairman Jim Richardson,
Matherly, Assistant Director of
Planning Ellis Jones, Director of
Music Reed Poole, Physical
Education Dean D.K. Stanley,
Florida Foundation Dean
Cantrell, a Student Government
representative and a
representative from SCAT.
One shortcoming of this
committee may be that no
planning consultant has been
included, Scafuti said.
The next phase of the
Activity Center planning is going

FOR COORDINATION OF PLANS

r
Bernados
Are Here!
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to cost approximately SB3OO,
according to Scafuti.
We have approximately
$4,700 in our account that we
would be willing to turn over
but not unless it is going to be
used, the SCAT General
Chairman said.
We can keep this money in
our savings account and have it
earn interest there.
Since its inception SCAT has
conducted a Quarter drive,
alerted the student body as to
the need for an Activity Center
and gathered information on
where the project stands.
SCAT has also helped
coordinate the Tau Epsilon
PhiGator All-Star football
game, the Greek Week God and
Goddess contest and the Council
of International Organizations
Dance.
This summer we are
planning to work with Florida
Blue Key and hope to help out

DARYL
WAYNE
IS COMING
SATURDAY

flQTflAu.
Li e. MARC CW/ttJM&SI + TRACK

during homecoming, Scafuti
said. We would like to see the
homecoming slogan pertain to

mUsr

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OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

Friday, May 30,1969, Tha F 10...

2i 311 arl.t
the Activity Cent# and ,w are
urging people to j slogans
based on this

UFs REPRESENTATIVES

Jim Bartlett
George Corl
Dan Sapp

Page 17

Tom Stewart
Mel Ward
Arlie Watkineon



MV 30.1969

Page 18

m m Sk r* AM
W W'
w
lasmaisH ""SB
* jW
REHUNG HONORED
Conrad Rehling, pro at UF's golf course, is given a tape recorder by
UF Golf Association members Jay R. Gebhart, secretarytreasures
and Ken Small, membership chairman. The gift is a going away
present for Tehling, also a UF golf team coach, who is leaving during
June.
FSU Baseball
Year Ends Early

The 1969 season ended a
little earlier than Florida States
baseball team hoped, but the
national sixthranked Senimoles
figure it was a good year
anyway.
The Tribe closed its regular
schedule with a 38-13 mark,
but a hoped for fifth straight bid
to the NCAA District 111
tournament in Gastonia, N.C.
got away.
We were disappointed,
naturally, said Coach Jack
Stallings. This was a veteran
ball club and going to Gastonia
was almost a regular part of the
season for them.
But even though we didnt
get the bid and were not playing
real good ball at the end, it was a
good season.
The Seminoles, among other
things, had a 21 game winning
streak for the second straight
year. Their 38 wins were just
one away from tying a school
record.
For the first twothirds of
the season this team played ball
like the FSU teams I remember
playing all those years I was
coaching at Wake Forest, said
Stallings who just completed his
first season at the Seminole
helm.
I thought this club had just
reached its stride when we won
those four games at Clemson and
Georgia, and that they were
really on the way. But then
something happened and we
tailed off to .500 ball the last
third of the year.
There is no easy explanation
for the Tribes slump, but
Stallings feels a let-down in the
defense played a big part. After

making just 58 errors in 36
games, the Seminoles committed
30 over the last 16 contests.

jjj S NECKWEAR.
I /ffatu BmtAeu I

Chi Phis Slip By DU s, 9-8,
Win Blue League Softball

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
The Chi Phis are the Blue
League softball champions of a
come from behind 9B win over
the DUs Thursday at Hume
Area field.
The DUs were coasting with
a so lead after three innings of
play primarily on the strength of
Henry Adornos long three run
homer.
But in the top of the fourth
inning the Chi Phis hitting
attack broke lose to score three
runs to cut the DUs lead to just
two runs.
The DUs in their half of the
fourth scored one run and added
another run in the bottom of the
fifth after holding the Chi Phis
scoreless.
In the top of the sixth the
Chi Phis exploded for four more
big runs added by several DU
errors to tie the game up at 77.
The DUs failed to score in
the bottom of the sixth and the
Chi Phis went ahead to stay on
the strength of clean-up hitter

Steve Kauffmans tworun
homer to the opposite field.
The DUs tried to pull the
game out in the bottom of the
seventh but could only score one
run.
The DUs hitting attack was
paced by Adornos homer and
George Smiths double and two
singles.

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The Chi Phis hitting was lead
by Harvey Priors three singles
and Kauffmans homer, double
and two singles.
APARTMENT HUNTING
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS
GET RESULTS



By BETH GRAVES
Alligator Feature Writer
The clue to the successful football
or basketball season has been
uncovered.
After looking at all aspects of the
key competitive sports, and their
characteristics of past seasons, it
appears that the squads with the
most married players have compiled
the best records.
Since 1960, the football squads
that were the most tied down
travelled to the Sugar Bowl and the
Gator Bowl. Not to be denied were
the 66 Orange Bowl team and the
64 squad that rallied in the end for a
7-3 season.
Greats such as Larry Travis, Tom
Kelley, Tom Batten, and Bob Hoover
managed to handle the home
situation, as well 4s shine on the
field, and lead the 62 Gator team to
a 17-7 victory over Penn State in
the Gator Bowl.
The Gators compiled 7-3 and
.........

Heinz Signs
With Dolphins
MIAMI (UPI) Bob Heinz,
six-foot-six, 2 70-pound
defensive tackle from Pacific
University, has signed a contract
with the Miami Dolphins of the
American Football League.
When he reports to the
Dolphin training camp, a second
round draft choice, will face a
battle with three veterans and
four other rookies for the two
defensive tackle spots.
Heinz played football for
three years for Pacific
University, where he also was
captain of the track team, and
for a year for San Joaquin Delta
Junior College.
The Dolphins now have
signed all five of their top draft
choices. The others are Bill
Stanfill, defensive end from
Georgia and the first choice;
running back Mercury Morris of
West Texas State, third choice;
linebacker Norman Mcride,
Utah, fourth, and defensive back
Willie Pearson, North Carolina
I A&T.
I Rode To Victory
Mickey Lolich, who sparked
the Detroit Tigers to the 1968
World Series conquest over St.
Louis by pitching three victories,
rode a motorcycle to each home
game during the season.
The quarterback on Walter
1 ; Camps first All-America
football team in 1889 was Edgar
Allen Poe of Princeton.
Now Taking Applications
at
I Summit House
I 1700 S. W. 16th Ct.
I for
September
(9-10 fc 12 month Luni
rates start
1 BRsl2l
2 BR sl47
Summer Term
I Special Rates
I 1 376-9668

Wedding Bells Ring In Yon Hall

7-4 records in 64 and 65
respectively and the married players
were among the stars. Larry Dupree,

More football players on the 62 squad were married than almost any
others. . the Gators dumped Penn State 177 in the Gator Bowl that
year.

All-American fullback, Larry
Beckman, All-Southeastern
Conference guard, Randy Jackson,
and Brian Jetter kept up the routine
of married life and Gator Greats
simultaneously.
The results speak for themselves.
Also to be looked at is the factor
that Steve Spurrier quarterbacked
the 64, 65, and 66 seasons taking
SEC honors his junior year.
Prior to his third year of
eligibility, he got married and went
on to lead the Gators to a 92
season, defeating Georgia Tech in the
Orange Bowl, 2712. Along with

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SEC honors, Spurrier received
All-American and the 1966 Heisman
Trophy. Coincidence? Maybe, but

the evidence continues.
The 1967 season brought a drop
in the number of married players and
accordingly, the record was 6-4. Not
that a winning season is considered
bad, just that it might have been
more of a winning season had the
marital statuses been a little
different.
Going into the 69 season, four of
the varsity team will be married and
their future remains to be seen.
Possibly with such a small percentage
the boat will rock the other way,
offering unending success.
But, looking at the basketball

Friday, May 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

statistics over the past three years,
the theory is again confirmed. Coach
Tommy Bartlett recalled that Ed
Poore and Skip Higley were the only
married players his first year;
thinking back to his second season,
he realized that none of the squad had
been married.
With a roll of his eyes he
commented, That was also the
worst season since Ive been here.
This past season, Ed Lukco, Mike
McGinnis and Richard Vasquez were
married. Lukco was married before
coming to the UF; McGinnis and
Vasquez both got married the
summer of 6B.
Its in the books; the 6B69
Gator Basketball team attended the
National Invitational Tournament in
New York for the first time.
Take heed, residents of Yon Hall,
and weigh the worth of freedom for
success and nation-wide recognition
for the UF.
Is it so very much to ask?

Page 19



I, Tb* Florida Alligator, Friday, May 30,1969

Page 20

IlfiFgyM / 9 f CREPE BELLS
T BODY SHIRTS y /WJI
1 // EVENING-WEAR &[|
An Arby's Never Goes To Waist 1
PANT ~ suns U\\M L -' \BIIB
(FAMOUS NAMES)
INFORMAL MODELING \
PLAYER of the WEEK I \
I I SUMME^SPORTSWEAR
Creators of by's st Bef Sandwich 1968, iy's c I ? : I
1405 S.W. 13th Street *DaMtl \ Check Our List
Rod Wrigh. 1 ILT N ~
Rod Wright closed out the finest season of his kIE\AI Akin iircn
baseball career last weekend against FSU, winding up NfcW AINU UOCI^
with a batting average of .316 and the honor of being A Bf MITFf TUP AI
named Alligator Player of the Week. MRV.niIEV.I VKAk
Wright, who has been known previously for his EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
excellent fielding and strong throwing arm, turned into
a standout hitter this season. ART SU PPLIES
His three hits against the Seminoles enabled him to
wind up as the second-leading Gator hitter for the year STUDY LAMPS
and he also finished second in total bases with 65, third
in hits with 37 and runs scored with 20. He was also f*VAA OIITEITC
second in home runs with three. \9im Win 13
Other top contenders for Alligator honors this week C\A/E ATCI-IIDTC
were pitcher Jim Courier, who halted the Seminoles 8-0 DWE AI jnlKI)
and wound up the season with an 11-2 record, pitcher i c/*E DETC
Mike Jacobs, who also stopped them with both his arm VmwLLEVJE i Cl D
and his bat and relief man Glenn Pickren, who came in i Cf*E CE AI
to bail Jacobs out of trouble and retire five straight men VwLLEwE AL
t 0 RrJou^da^ZJohn Morton powered the Gator MASCOT STATIONERY
track team to the Southeastern USTFF Title in Atlanta
and drew mention for this effort. FILM AND DEVELOPING
I SERVICE
To Their New Home
I University Gardens e Thm 'BOOKSTORE
170. S.W. 161. A,.. 376-6720 |