Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
. 38
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THE AMOEBA PH,LCOPE
That's the name given to this modern "dance" being performed by
the UF Modem Dance Group 8 p.m. Friday night at P. K. Yonge
School. The group will perform several dances to Rennaissance and
electronic music.

Accents Debts, Berrins
Problems Still Growing

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ACCENT '69 CREW
... not home free
UF Open
On Holiday
The UF will be open as usual
Friday, while some Gainesville
businesses and institutions will
declare a holiday in observance
of Memorial Day.
Also operating on normal
schedules will be all elementary
and secondary schools and Santa
Fe Junior College.
Banks will close for Memorial
Day, as will all federal, state and
local government offices.
Government services with the
exception of special delivery
mail service will be halted for
the day. The post office will also
not be open.
Businessmen are deciding on
an individual basis whether to
open or close. Most bars,
theaters, and other places of
entertainment will be open,
however.
iiiiiiiiiiininiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiHiiimiinimiiiii
INSIDE
Black Roommates p. 3
Century Tower Emptied .. .p. 5
Equal Opportunity
(Editorial) p. 8
Four Seasons (Review) .. .p. 16
UF Gym: Tinderbox p. 18
MMmWfIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIHUIIIIIIIIIIIIIUU

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last in a series of articles on
Accent 69 and the question of
possible legal action on larceny
charges.)
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
The Accent 69 debt,
originally set at $ 1,600 and now
possibly mounting to upwards of
$3,300, brought angry demands
for legal action against Accent
69 Chairman Larry Berrin from
the Student Senate Tuesday
night.
Questions of whether Berrin
should be held responsible for
the debt and whether he is guilty
of negligence, malfeasance, or
out and out larceny were flung
around for an hour among
senators who vigorously
objected to paying the growing
stack of Accent bills.
The discussion led to a
motion that Larry Berrin be
sent a bill for all expenditures
that cannot be covered under
the laws of the student body and
the State of Florida.
However, after a heated floor
debate, this motion was defeated
pending further senate
investigation.
Student Body Treasurer Jim
Roll said none of the bills
outstanding were for food or
liquor and therefore there
would be no legal reason why
the senate could not pay the
debt if it wanted to.
But the senate balked, and in
the words of Senate
President-elect Robert S. Blount,
Its going to take a great deal of
arm twisting for me to sign any
of these bills.
The senate was asked to pay
$1,500 worth of the Accent 69
bills from their miscellaneous
account, leaving Berrin
responsible for collecting the
balance.
Were tired of being asked to
cover debts from these
organizations that blatantly go
over their budgets and expect us
to pick up the tabs for them,
Blount said.
A wave of verbal agreement
swept across the Senate floor.
Senator Betty Jo Padron,
reviewing the eight reasons
Berrin listed for the budget

The
j '.,
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol 61, No. 147

OConnell OKs Study
Os Quarter Troubles

UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has approved an
Action Conference proposal
calling for a re-evaluation of the
quarter system. He has
recommended that more
departments offer four and
five-hour courses so that
students could take fewer
courses for an average of 16
hours of credit.

excesses, called the you get
what you pay for reason the
most asinine I have ever heard.
She demanded that the senate
be given a detailed account of
exactly what the bills are for.
Berrins financial report listed
the unpaid bills under broad
categories, not a line-item
accounting that several senators
desired.
Senate President Jack
Vaughn, presiding over his last
meeting of the year, drew a line
between the question of Berrins
liability and the responsibility of
the senate to see that the Accent
creditors be paid.
I havent got any money and
I cant pay any bills and it will
stay that way until I get some
money, Roll said.
He urged the senate to pay
part of the debt now and take
up the question of legal action
against Berrin later because its
putting the UF student body in
a bad light.
Right now its not a
question of what youre going to
do with Berrin, Roll said, but
(SEE 'ACCENT' PAGE 21

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~*~"~ TOM KENNEDY
WATCH YOUR STEP

Man eating animal? Not yet. This five-foot long
alligator from the pond behind Hume Hall caught a
beagle puppy by the foot and pulled him into the

University of Florida, Gainesville

OConnell said the quarter
system has not been fixed on us
forever and that the advantage
of the variety in a greater
number of courses is more than
offest by the pressure and lack
of time to delve more deeply
into the courses taken.
When the switch was made
from the trimester to quarter
system there was not enough
time to fully consider changes in
course content, but in the two
years since then the need for
adjustments has become
apparent, OConnell said.
The University Curriculum
Committee studied the proposal
and gave OConnell its
recommendation that:
Each department
re-examine its curriculum and
organize it so that most course
offerings Will provide a typical
student program of 34 courses
and 15-16 credit hours.
Each college re-examine
and reduce its credit-hour
requirements for graduation if
possible.
The committee also said it
would not approve new courses
with less than four credit hours
unless considerable
justification was provided or
the department already had
most courses with four or five
hours of credit.
OConnell has approved of
and urged compliance with these

SDS Forum Tonight
A Students for a Democratic Society educational forum will :j:
be held tonight at the Reitz Union. The forum, sponsored by :$
UF Student Government, will feature the films, 'The Black :£
X Panther Party" and "The Revolutionary Black Liberation :$
Struggle In America." In addition, JOMO Minister of ;j:j
Information Charles Fulwood will be speaking. For details on
£ the forum and SG's sponsorship, see page 2.
- ...... ...

water. The alligator ate the animal before the owner
could save the dog.

Thursday, May 29, 1969

HH
.
4
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... system can be changed
recommendations.
Other Action Conference
proposals on establishment of
faculty-student lounges and
planning of a University
Activities Center building have
also been approved.
Deans and department
chairmen have been asked to
review their facilities to see if
they can provide a place for
faculty and students to meet
informally.
Walter Matherly, director of
planning, is studying the
feasibility of the activities
center. A steering committee,
under the chairmanship of Prof.
James G. Richardson, has been
appointed for the planning
phase.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

SG To Sponsor SDS Educational Forum

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writtr
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd took issue
with Wednesday's Alligator story
stating SG is sponsoring a
Students for a Democratic
Society chapter meeting.
The report ... is
erroneous/' Shepherd said in a
statement released Wednesday.
We have agreed to sponsor only
public, educational forums
presented by student members
of SDS

Four-Year Race-Unpopular
Stepchild Os Quarter System

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last in a series of articles
probing into the reasons why UF
students, in increasing numbers,
are failing to graduate on
schedule.)
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Who is to say why students
are unable to complete college in
four years, or even if the
four-year concept is completely
dead?
Many persons have pointed
up faults in the present structure
which might help alleviate the
problem, but perhaps it was best
summed up by Asst. Dean J.R.
Dunkle of University College,
who said, Our primary task is
to provide a college education
for our students, not to just give
them four years of college.
To be sure, some students
will still graduate after twelve
quarters, but how many? It will
take an analysis of the first crop
of students graduating under the
new system to find out if the
quarter is one factor involved.
If the fault lies in the
University College, Dunkle also
offered a possible solution.
It may be true that the
student is taxed when he is
taking so many lower division
courses, he said, but this
doesn't mean it will always be
that way.
A student learns to study,
he said. It might be that a
student can take only 14 hours
per quarter in his freshman year,
but he might be able to take 17

Clique Bill Defeated
In its last meeting of the quarter, the Student Senate Tuesday night
quarreled with Student Body President Charles Shepherd and defeated
his bill that would have eliminated self-perpetuating cliques in SG.
The Equal Opportunity for a Better Student Government Law,
introduced by Senator Stewart Hershey, would have prevented an SG
cabinet officer from appointing a departmental assistant who might
also be affiliated socially with the official.
However, a cabinet officer could have appointed a fraternity
brother or sorority sister if no other person was qualified.
The bill as originally introduced was in the form of an addition to
student body statutes and would have been binding unless repealed.
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Honda, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per yekr or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
tfanes. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

SDS is showing two films
tonight at 8 pm. in the Reitz
Union auditorium under SG
sponsorship. The Black Panther
Party, a film deemed
obscene by the Hernando
County Sheriffs Office two
months ago, deals with the
founding of the party in
Oakland, Calif., and features
interviews with Black Panthers
Eldrige Cleaver, Huey Newton
and Bobby Seale.
The second film, produced in
Cuba, is called The
Revolutionary Black Liberation

or 18 during his senior year.
You never can be sure what
will happen to a student once he
becomes a part of the
educational system, Dunkle
said.
And what of the student who
falls behind? Director of
Records L.V. Voyles had
comments on that point.
Up to now, he said, weve
had good response from draft
boards around the state. Both
graduate students and
undergraduates who are a few
hours behind have been
bothered little by most boards.
Even in cases where a
student is re-classified 1-A, he
said, we have been able to
successfully intercede in their
behalf if notified in time.
If there are too many courses
to take in the University College,
relief might be in the offing with
an Action Conference proposal
which would spread the
requirements for completion of
the University College out over
four years, instead of the present
two.
This, and other UC proposals
are currently awaiting the report
of a university committee
evaluating the college.
But for the most part, it
would seem that the four year,
12 quarter education is
becoming obsolete. >.
The cultural lag involved isnt
so great, however. Draft boards
seem more willing to accept the
idea of a student taking longer
than four years to complete his
education.
Many factors are involved,

NOT RE PORTED CHAPTER MEETING

Struggle in America.
JOMO Minister of
Information Charles Fulwood
will speak at the program.
Admission is 50 cents, and the
general public is invited.
According to Shepherd, funds
collected from ticket sales will
be deposited in SG Production
accounts. A SIOO lecture fee will
be alloted to Fulwood, and SIOO
will go to cover the cost of the
films.
SDS leader Ed Freeman said
Fulwood will use the money to

but the most important one
seems to be the explosion of
knowledge which has pushed
what a student must learn to
double and triple what his
instructors studied as
undergraduates.
*
Three of every five tourists in
Haiti are Canadians.

Accent Probe Continues

f FROM PAGE ONE
I have been advised by President
O'Connell that we should pay
our unpaid bills.
But the bills remain unpaid,
and will stay that way for at
least another month, as the
senate voted to table any action
until every shred of evidence
we can possibly find in the case
is turned up and we know what
were talking about, Blount
said.
There need to be laws that
the Student Senate and the
Student Government executive
branch are protected and this is
prevented from happening
again, he said.
Student Senator Charles
Murphy agreed and asked the
senate to request legal assistance
to help determine if Berrin can
be prosecuted for misuse of
funds.
If we can bum Berrin, the
next guy is going to be a little
hesitant to do anything like this
again, Murphy said.
Craig Lawrence, chancellor of
the UF Honor Court, told the
Alligator that the question of
jurisdiction in the Accent
finance case was sticky as far
as the student court was
concerned.
He felt any legal action,
whether for malfeasance,

pay for appeal bonds and
attorneys fees stemming from
the arrest of five JOMO
members in Brooksvie two
months ago.
The five, carrying the film
The Black Panther Party, were
charged by s Hernando County
sheriffs officers with
transporting obscene literature.
Shepherd, ih agreeing to
sponsor the films and speaker,
took note of the Student Body
Constitutions charge for SG to
provide a forum for the
expression of student views and
interests.
He is carrying out a pledge to
sponsor SDS forums made by
former Student Body President
Clyde Taylor, last quarter, when
the radical group was denied
recognition and the right to use
university facilities.
We intend to stand by that
promise, Shepherd said.
When SDS charter bid was
denied, several student leaders
worked out a plan to be
submitted to the Board of
Regents whereby political or
religious groups could use

misfeasance, or larceny would
have to be taken to the civil
courts by the state.
Student Government, until
it is incorporated, the Student
Senate, or an individual senator
could not themselves bring
action against Berrin, I dont
think, he said.
Lawrence also questioned if
there was really any wrong-doing
other than poor judgment on
Benins part.
However, an SG official held
that the checking account
Accent 69 took out in the
Citizens Bank was a felony in
itself.
This was the account that
Berrin said Accent 69 used to
purchase items necessary for the
program during the week of
Accent. Cancelled checks made
out to local liquor stores were
found in the Accent *69 files,
and the Student Body
Treasurers office said the
receipts from the high school
delegates, from which money
was put into the account, do not
balance.
Berrin listed these receipts at
$1,442.50. Totals added in the
treasurers office amount to only
$1,094.64, leaving a discrepancy
of $347.86.
Berrin said $207.24 of this
money was put in the checking
account, which leaves $142.62

GIRLS! JOIN THE
SELECT (?) COMPANY
OF
VESTIGIAL VIBGIKS
. ..ITS VIRGIN'S NIGHT
BPM 'TIL BOYS

university facilities simply by
registering the name of the
organization. These groups
would not have to seek official
recognition.
... Student Government
sponsorship of the SDS public
forum demonstrates how this
proposal will work, if
implemented,** Shepherd said.
He called the forum a kind of
test case for SDS.
(1t)... will afford both the
university community and the
people of this state the
opportunity to evaluate the
manner in which SDS takes
advantage of the privilege of
using university facilities... I
SG sponsorship of the SDS
forum in no way expresses
agreement or disagreement with
the opinions and ideas to be
presented tonight, Shepherd
added.
... the free and unfettered
exchange of ideas...is the
essence of true educa education
tion education ... SDS is entitled to the
same opportunities to
participate in such a dialogue as
is the Young Americans for
Freedom or any other group.

still unaccounted for, according
to the treasurers office.
I would hesitate to say that
anything could be done
Lawrence said. There is no time
for a full trial remaining this
quarter.
Berrin is scheduled to
graduate in June, in which case
the Honor Court could take no
action regardless of its
jurisdiction, the chancellor said.
One of the main faults is
that there are no guidelines set
forth on this anywhere,
Lawrence said.
This consensus was reached at
the Student Senate meeting
before they took action to table
the matter.
As things stand now, the
senate is sitting on the sticky
question that has been in their
hands since April; the treasurer
is sorting and totaling unpaid
bills; and OConnell is reportedly
watching the issue with concern,
as is the state legislature while
they mull over requests for more
money and more responsibility
for the student body.
How can we ask for more
money and fiscal responsibility
when we cant even keep our
house in order now, Roll said.
This is what the legislature and
President OConnell are looking
at.



Rooming With A UF Black,
Not The 'Great White Hope

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LARRY JORDAN
... white's off-campus roommate
vyjV/yvtfwwAv.v.v/rtvw;w/.w;v
I was really shocked,
said Diane Graefe, 2UC. I
almost cried. Its the last
thing you expect.
She didn't move out. 7
rea//p wanted to stick it
out. She's just as much a
human being as lam.
You can't make people
stay with you if they don't
want to."
My first roommate
moved out in about 60
seconds," said Larry
Jordan, 3JM. He almost
broke his neck trying to get
out the door.
W;VWrtV. .WAV. .V.%V.%V.VAV.V.V.V
Its hard to help white
students understand the
problems of blackness.
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DELORES HILLSMAN WITH DIANE GRAEFE
... helping with an architecture project

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the first of a two-part series on
black and white students living
together in UF dormitories.)
By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
When the average UF student
packs his bags for Gainesville for
the first time, he may wonder
whether his roommate will be
studious, noisy, neat, messy,
friendly, or quiet; but seldom
does he imagine that his new
roommate might be black.
How does he feel when he
enters his assigned room and
finds one of UFs 98 black
students unpacking?
I was really shocked, said
Diane Graefe, 2UC. I almost
cried. Its the last thing you
expect..
Diane didnt move out. I
really wanted to stick it out,
she said. Shes just as much a
human being as I am.
Bt many other white students
do leave.
My first roommate moved
out in about 60 seconds, said
Larry Jordan, 3JM. He almost
broke his neck trying to get out
the door.
For Gwyn Francis, lUC;
Willie Rawls, 4JM; Pat Young,
2UC; Carolyn Pope, 3JM; Cathia
Darling, 3ED; and many other
blacks the experience was similar
their first roommates were
gone by the end of their first
week.
Why?
Counselors and students who
have moved give three main
reasons:
Prejudice on the part of
the white student
Pressure from parents and
friends
Normal roommate
personality conflicts
But the answer still puzzles
many of UFs 42 blacks who live
in dorms where they are
sometimes confronted with
racial bigotry.
I cant understand how they

can feel this way when weve
never met, said Delores
Hillsman, 2UC. I wish I could
talk to somebody whos really
prejudiced so I could know how
they feel.
I cant see why they think
that way, said Carolyn. You
cant make people stay with
you if they dont want to. Its
just the idea that somebodys so
narrow-minded.
Murphree Area counselor
Steve Haulman said the only
move-out he was aware of was
one by a graduate student who
said he was a segregationist.
Rose Raskin, a resident
assistant in Weaver Hall, denied
that most of the moves were for
racial reasons. Its just as
possible for a white and black
roommate not to get along as it
is for two white ones.
She did report one set of
parents who came up here and
made a big scene when they
found their daughter rooming
with a black girl.
Mallory resident Cathy Lowe,
1 UC, knows what thats like.
Her roommates mother called
one day and Cathy answered the
phone. I knew she could tell
from my voice that I was
Negro, Cathy said. Within a few
hours the mother had driven to
UF and demanded her daughter
be given a single room.
Parental pressure was the
reason Patti Street, lUC, left her
black roommate. It didnt
bother me, she said*, but my
parents went down to the
counselor and asked that I be
moved. My mother didnt want
to write to all my relatives that I
had a colored roommate.
My first thought was what
my parents would think, said
Peggy Brown, 2UC. She too said
she would not have minded
rooming with a black girl, but I
cant go against my parents. I
have to live with them and they
are paying my way through
college.
She criticized present

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VERONA MITCHELL AND ROOMMATE
... Mary Lou Martin outside Jennings Hall

methods of roommate
assignments as inconsiderate of
both white and black students.
One girls parents didnt want
her to move out.
My mom thought it would
be a good experience for me,
said Kathy Coffey, lUC. She
had a black roommate for two
quarters until she moved to live
with a girlfriend.
She was pressured by friends,
she added. My friends were
always asking questions, always
curious about how I felt about
the situation, but they didnt

Thuraday, May 29,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

want to be involved.
When I first moved in, I was
told I had to stay or drop out.
There was no other alternative,
said Peggy Mullen, 2UC, who
roomed with a black girl for a
quarter.
We got along very well, she
said. I thought moving would
be better for both of us,
though. Their friends, she
explained didnt feel at ease; the
atmosphere was too
restrictive.
When we would all go places
together, people would make
snide remarks. My girlfriends
resented that. So she moved in
with a girlfriend. My parents
left the decision up to me, she
added.
UF housing makes no
attempt to segregate blacks.
Eleven black students live in
Murphree Area, nine in Tolbert
Area, seven in Yulee Area, four
in Jennings, Broward and
Towers, and one in Hume.
Because of the small number
of blacks spread over the
campus, most black students
expect and are assigned to white
roommates. The white
roommates, however, do not
expect them. Most black
students live alone or have
moved in with other blacks.
I only know of four
black-white roommate pairs who
have stayed together all year,
said Carolyn. There are a few
more", but the number is not
high.
It is a real tragic situation,
said David DeCoster,
administrative assistant in
housing, a sad interpersonal
difficulty. Its hard to help white
students understand the
problems of blackness.
(Next: Black and white
roommates who have found
friendship.)

Page 3



Page 4

1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

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SABER PRESENTATION

Long a treasured memento of the college days of
UF President Stephen C. O'Connell, this saber now
becomes a prize of the Department of Military
Science. O'Connell presents the saber to Air Force
ROTC Cadet Col. Mickey R. Dansby and Army
Cadet Col. John McPhail for permanent

Nuclear Engineers
Trying To Recruit
Crowded conditions in the nations colleges, threatening to limit
enrollment in some academic pursuits, do not apply in some very
glamorous and up-to-the-minute applications of nuclear engineering at
the UF.
Dr. John A. Wethington Jr., professor of nuclear engineering
sciences, says his department looks to an undergraduate student body
of 130 and a graduate program for a like number of higher degree
aspirants.
At present, both areas are producing about a third ot those figures
and employers are snapping up every available nuclear engineering
graduate.
We want to recruit students, he said, both graduate and
undergraduates. There are nearly 30 junior colleges in the state and
many four-year colleges and we have the only nuclear engineering
department in Florida.
Uniquely, the most direct route to nuclear engineering is through a
local junior college pre-engineering course of study. This, followed by
two years at the College of Engineering, gives high school graduates a
straight four-year path to a bachelors degree.
Graduate students coming to the college must have majors in
mathematics or one of the natural sciences to undertake graduate
study.
Money-wise its a good deal, he says. Starting pay ranges from
$7,000 to $15,000, dependent upon degrees obtained. The areas of
activity are wide and widening, Wethington adds.
Wethington and his associates term the nuclear engineer an
applied scientist who can work in basic research as well as bringing
the theories of pure scientific research into physical form.
He observes that nuclear energy shortly will power most of our
elelctric power-producing plants. Sterilization of foods is now a reality
and Canadians are using the bacteria radiation successfully in many
applications. Refrigeration requirements ai materially lessened after
radiation, or completely unnecessary, Wethington adds.
Manufacturers of nuclear equipment have open doors. Government
agencies such as NASA and the Atomic Energy Commission, people in
biological and medical fields, consulting firms and giants of industry
such as General Motors, all are willing to talk to men of nuclear
know-how.
New avenues are opening almost daily. The first nuclear powered
weather satellite was orbited recently. When man makes his first visit
to the moon, possibly in July, he will leave behind instruments
powered by isotopes developing power over a long period of time.
Cardiac pacemakers and even mechanical hearts may be powered
by isotopes in the near future and nuclear power in some form may
move the family car, and without pollution, the UF nuclear engineer
predicts.
NEW ARRIVALS FOR GRADUATION
OLYMPIA PORTABLE TYPEWRITERS
THE BEST only $114.50
or $19.08 DOWN PAYMENT & $lO Per Month
THIS DEAL CAN NOT BE BEAT
OLYMPIA IS RATED EXCELLENT TOO
KISERS 604 N, MAIN

p
enshrinement in the Military Building. Each year
replicas will be awarded to the top cadet in each
ROTC unit and their names will be inscribed on a
permanent plaque. O'Connell was a cadet colonel in
the Army ROTC here in the late 1930'5.

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Graham To Speak

State Rep. Robert Graham of
Miami will speak at the annual
Phi Kappa Phi banquet at 6:30
pm. on June 5 in the Reitz
Union following initiation
ceremonies at 4 p.m.
The scholastic fraternity
generally limits its membership
- to the upper 10 per cent of the
graduating class.
Rep. Graham, a graduate of
the UF who received his law
degree from Harvard University,
is chairman for the Legislative
Councils Interim Committee on
Higher Education.
He is one of seven members
on the Education Commission of
the States, an interstate
association to foster joint state
efforts to improve education,
and chairman of the Southern
Regional Education Board s task
force on the financial needs of
predominantly Negro colleges.
Dr. Archie F. Carr, graduate
research professor in the
Department of Zoology and
world authority on turtles, will
give the 1969 Faculty Lecture at

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'Trantym-BECKUM OPTICIANS
22 Wit UnivKity Avt,, Gaiitoville,

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§Mk.
REP. ROBERT GR AH AM
.. .a UF graduate
8 p.m., Monday in the Reitz
Union Auditorium. He was
selected by his colleagues as the
person who brought greatest
distinction to himself and the
University by means of academic
and scholarly contributions
during the preceding 10 or 20
years.



Century Tower Losing Paper Population

By SUNNY BARLOW
Alligator Correspondent
Century Tower may be losing some if its occupants this summer.
Presently, the tower is used as a major storage area for old books
and journals by the different UF college libraries.
The library materials are now being transferred to the law building
and college library stacks.
The old law building was made available for storage when law
library material was transferred to the new law building.
Dr. Gustave A. Harrer, director of libraries, described the material
in Century Tower as old, very uninteresting back sets of books and
scientific and technical journals.
Roger V. Krumm, engineering and physical sciences librarian, is
presently supervising the shift of books out of the tower to the
engineering library, starting an effort to eventually evacuate the
tower.
Harrer said the overall move must be gradual because of the
difficulty of moving books up and down the eight levels of wooden
stacks in Century Tower.
We hope, however, to complete the move this summer, Harrer
said. Century Tower was chosen as a last resort storage area he said.
In Harrers opinion the tower is a terrible place to store books.
It is crowded and dark like your attic at home just a mess.

Coecf Os Year
To Isenberg
Nancy Isenberg was named
the fourth recipient of the
Mama Brady Woman of the
Year Award, Tuesday at the
annual AWS Womans Honor
Day Banquet held in the
Rathskeller.
Miss Isenberg served on the
Student Senate as a member of
Budget and finance, Senate
representative to Accent 69,
vice president of Womans
Interhall and president of
Jennings Hall for two years.
Joan Schaffel, past AWS
president conducted the
installation of the 1969-1970
officers. They are Kathy
Waldman, president; Kathy
Spellman, Ist vice president;
Linda Strauss, 2nd vice
president; Martha Johnston,
recording secretary; Barbara
Bohn, corresponding secretary;
and Susan Shapiro, treasurer.
Class representatives are:
Margaret Montgomery,
sophomore; Lynn Koloff, junior
and Robin Steinbrecher, senior.
a ;v; i% i*iv .v. .*.v.*.v. .v.v.v.v.r.v.r.v
> K
I New Home I
| For Housing f
Housing is moving to a
new home.
Both the on- and -j;
off-campus divisions will soon
be located in the Towers £
Complex, a one-story office
building at the comer of $
Radio Road and 13th Street, jj
The off-campus division S
completed its move £
Wednesday. The old quarters |j
jj on West University Avenue jfc
if are closed as of today and the j:
5 new ones in the complex will j:
J be open for partial operation £
s by Thursday. :
The on-campus division :j
\ should be relocated by the £
| end of the quarter. |
fKEEP IN
step with
gator ads

OLD BOOKS, JOURNALS LEAVING THIS SUMMER

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Books have been damaged by insects and mildew resulting from
dampness and leakage after rain.
William B. Weaver, research librarian in Hume Library, described
the attempts to protect the books from insect damage.
Books are periodically sprayed with Captan, a chemical solution
which protects the books and is harmless to persons handling the
material.
Attempts to prevent mildew have been made by putting a
greenhouse covering inside the top of the tower to keen out the
rain, Weaver said.
Barbara L. Collier, circulation librarian, feels that a major
drawback to tower storage is the inconvenience in getting requested
material.
Mike Halton, stack supervisor for the graduate library, said that
often he goes up into the tower several times a week after material
dating back to the year one.
The library was forced To use the tower as a s|orage warehouse
because of inadequate library storage facilities in relation to the
librarys growth, Harrer explained.
The growth of the UF library collection increases at a rate of
approximately 60,000 new volumes a year, causing UF a real storage
problem.
Harrer said he hopes the space made available in the old law
building will help solve the pressing problem.

Thursday, May 29,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

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Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday. May 29,1969

ROTC Parade
Set Saturday
The joint Army-Air Force
annual pass-in-review full dress
parade will be held Saturday,
10:30 a.m.
More than 20 awards will be
presented to outstanding cadets
by local and national groups.
Brig. Gen. Robert B. Mautz,
U.S. Air Force Reserve, will be
the reviewing officer.

COMING TO UF JUNE 15
NASA Official Graduation Speaker

George M. Low, manager of the Apollo Spacecraft Program for the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), will be
principal speaker for UF commencement exercises June 15.
Ceremonies begin at 4:30 p.m. with the academic processional at
Florida Field.
A native of Vienna, Austria, Low received the bachelors and
masters degress in aeronautical engineering from Rensselaer
Polytechnic Institute in 1948 and 1950, respectively.
From 1949 to 1958, Low was with the National Advisory
Committee for Aeronautics (NACA) at the Lewis Research Center in
Cleveland, Ohio. He followed this with a stint at NASA in
Washington, D.C.
He moved from the Washington headquarters to the Houston space
center in 1964 when he became deputy director of NASA with
responsibility for the Manned Spacecraft Center. He was named
manager of the Apollo Spacecraft Program in 1967.
In his present position, Low plans and directs the design,
development and operation of the Apollo spacecraft. He is responsible
Union Plans Patio
For Office Staff
By LES SLITER
Alligator Correspondent
William E. Rion, director of the Reitz Union, has 50,000 pounds of
cement stone on his hands, and hes anxious to get rid of it.
The stone, he says, will be used to build a patio in a weed-infested
courtyard on the north side of the Union. By beaufitying the narrow
enclosure, Rion hopes to transform the eyesore into usable space.
He noted that two offices adjacent to the courtyard would find the
patio suitable to their needs.
The Placement Center will use it, in good weather, for interview
space, Rion said. The Alumni Services office may use it to entertain
special groups that come up for an informal get-together.
Rions biggest headache is finding labor to set the patios 1,000
2-foot-square flagstones in place.
We are hoping to get volunteer help, he said.
Rion explained that the UF Plants and Grounds Division, because
of labor shortage, could not supply its own men for the project,
although it will prepare the courtyard for the patio. He said that the
division will furnish cleaning and grading equipment.
Volunteer help is also being sought, Rion said, to save money.
But he noted, A lot of students are looking for service projects.
Rion added that students could take pride in this project, since it is
a part of their campus.
The patio will not be open to students or the general public, Rion
emphasized, because it will be so close to offices.
But we can open it up one evening and have an outdoor dance,
he pointed out.
Rion hopes that the project will begin during the summer quarter,
depending on when Plants and Grounds can prepare the site.
It wont be done this quarter since the site hasnt been cleaned
out or graded, Rion said. x
He also realizes that students wont want to work during the last
weeks of classes.
Rion could not estimate the cost of the patio since the labor will
be donated, and the site preparation and materials provided by Plants
and Grounds. But one Gainesville firm sells the flagstones for $1.50
each.
Rion says the project can be completed in one week if he can get
100 students to work for about three hours a day.
Students, service organizations, or fraternal groups interested in
giving their time for the project may contact Rion at Reitz Union
Administrative Offices, or by calling him at 392-1643.
OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
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Mon. thru Fri
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for the supervision of government, university and industrial
contractors associated with the program. He participate in the
planning of all Apollo missions and in the evaluation of mission
As the senior NASA officer responsible for spacecraft design and
operation, Low takes all necessary actions required to carry out the
Apollo Spacecraft Program in a timely, economical and safe fashion-
Low has been the recipient of several awards, including the 1962
NASA Outstanding Leadership Award (for Project Mercury), 1963
Arthur S. Fleming Award (one of 10 outstanding young men in
government) and 1969 NASA Distinguished Service Medal (for
contributions to Apollo 8). He is a fellow in the American Institute of
Aeronautics and Astronautics and the American Astronautical
Society.

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... Apollo director



The graduation car.
Any questions?
% m
* 7 ., ~ 7 -7! , -I, ... . M
, H rejjja ^ll > '-

Q. Why did we make it this size?
A. Maverick pinches pennies, not people. We gave
Maverick more leg room. More shoulder room. More
luggage room. Mavericks front seat offers nine
inches more shoulder room than the front seat of
the leading economy import.
Q. What do I get for the price?
A. You get your moneys worth. A complete,
built-for-Americans kind of car. Room. Hot styling.
Color-keyed interiors.
Q. What kind of gas mileage can I get?
A. That depends on you as well as the car. You can get
as much as 25 or 26 miles per gallon if you have
an educated toe and the right road conditions. If you
have a lead foot, or do a lot of city driving, you
will get a lot less. In tests by professional drivers at
our tracks, where we do our best to duplicate actual
driving conditions, Maverick averaged 22.5 mpg.
Q. What kind of power does Maverick have?
A. Mavericks Six lets loose 105 galloping horses. Thats
52 more than you get in the VW 1500. Maverick
can cover 417 feet in ten seconds from a standing
start. When you enter a 70-mph turnpike, you
wont feel like a retired bookkeeper thrust into the
middle of a pro football game.

FORD
The place youve got to go to see whats going on-your Ford Dealer!

Q. If it has an eight-inch longer wheelbase than the
import, does it still handle and park easily?
A. Mavericks turning circle is 35.6 feet (vs. 36 feet for
its leading import rival). Maverick can slant through
traffic like a halfback. It makes you a better driver
because of the nimble way it handles in traffic, goes
around corners and slides into tight parking spots.
*
Q. Can a small car be safe? And how safe is safe?
A. This small car incorporates all the latest advances
in engineering. Its brakes are as big as a standard
compact'sdesigned to stop cars weighing hundreds
of pounds more. Maverick gives you weight. .
power. . stability . designed for greater peace
of mind on high-speed turnpikes where so many
Americans spend so much of their time at 70
miles per hour.
For an authentic 1/25 scale
model of the new Ford Mav Maverick,
erick, Maverick, send SI.OO to Maverick, X UraLpfo jj*. m.
P.O. Box 5397, Department
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Manufacturer* suggested retail ,T S THE GOING THING!
price for the car. Price does not In Include:
clude: Include: white sidewall tires, $32.00;
dealer preparation charge, If any;
transportation charges, state and
local taxes.

Thursday, May 29.1969. Tha Florida Alligator.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Fwravfiii Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Piufetlwv Managing Editor
Alt
k Carol Sanger Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
Executive Editor News Editors
New Fence Needed
MR. EDITOR:
In the May 26 issue of the Alligator is a story about a 10-year old
boy who was injured at the baseball game.
Having attended most of the home games this year I think a serious
problem exists concerning the fences before the stands. More than
once I have seen people narrowly escape injury from a foul ball or a
broken bat.
I believe the athletic department should put in higher fences fefore
someone is seriously injured. It would be a lot easier to build a new
fence than to replace someones teeth.
LELANDM. WALLACE

Skinner's Box

tAn interesting and important
dialogue has emerged in our
daily newspaper. One of the
participating factions, including
students Hollis and Bailey, could
be characterized as well meaning
and devoted, though perhaps a
trifle misinformed.
The other general grouping,
into which Mr. Straight and Mr.
Hilliker could be placed, is also
devoted in spirit, displaying the
best of intentions. It is not my purpose to interject
any personal opinion here, but rather, to commend
both sides for the active roles they have played in
bringing relevant issues to the printed page.
For it appears that one of the unforeseen
products of the American way of life" has been
the development of a refined facility, on the part of
American citizens, to encapsulate themselves within
their environments. Yes, this mode of existence,
which prompts one to build a trinket filled world at
a time when potential treasures could be had by all,
definitely presides over life in our day.
It is reflected individually when scholars silently
vegetate while their colleagues are manhandled by
administrative businessmen. On the national level, it
appears with the initiation of conservative funding
policies after a point has been reached where many
problems can only be solved through federal
assistance.

Scientists Must Take Part In Politics

EDITORIAL
Lets Reconsider
J A |

Wonderful and noble promises. Thats
what a campaign for UF Student Body
President is run on. But one has come to
really doubt the promises will ever come
true.
Most of the time they are given and
accepted as political whitewash.
This time they may have been for real
and apparently the whole idea of something
good, something necessary, coming from the
president just blew the Student Senate s
collective mind.
Charles Shepherd brought his Equal
Opportunity for a Better Student
Government bill before the senate Tuesday
o
night.
What the bill asked for in essence was the
executive power to open SG to all
students... to end the self-perpetuating
fraternity and sorority-controlled
administrative agencies.
The senate gasped.,
They seemed to think it was a political
trick Shepherd was trying to pass over on
them.
They voted it down.
This is one of the most thoughtless and
blind actions taken in a long time by our
legislative body.
The bill would have given Shepherd the

MR. EDITOR:
The brief and insufficiently
critical report by Kathie Keim
in todays Alligator (May 23,
Intelligence is Inherited)
touches upon a vitally important
issue with great scientific and
social implications. Brevity does
not do the issue justice, and
may, in fact, do serious harm
unless the magnitude of doubt
and debate by the professionals
involved is emphasized.
Dr. Jensens hypothesis of
genetic based differences in
intellectual development is
certainly not original. In this
particular moment in time,
however, the resurgence of a
genetic inferiority view with

Yet there is a group that must stay particularly
attuned to the times, one which could manufacture
no excuse for being inactive in public affairs. This
group is the scientific community.
Many will remember that the man chosen to
serve as national intellectual liason for Lyndon
Baines Johnson, was compelled to resign because of
the seemingly unalterable void that existed between
men of knowledge and the past president. In this
light, a large number of researchers are distressed by
the fact that the cost of scientific research has risen
so drastically in the recent past.
The potency of private funding sources in
meeting research demands has decreased and the
role of government grants has correspondingly
expanded. If the trend of governmental
determination of the thrust of research (through
selective subsidization) continues, as it most
assuredly will, scientists must be allotted a far
greater share in determining appropriations.
Todays social and political realities can no
longer permit researchers to divorce themselves
from environmental, and ultimately ethical,
considerations. For example, with the spectre of
atomic weaponry daily around us, it becomes vital
that scientists realize the total significance of
defense research.
Perhaps it is in the area of psychology, the
science of behavior, that men and women involved
in scientific endeavor find the most direct
provocation to become active in public affairs. As
clinical psychologist Alan M. Rockway noted in last
Sundays Miami Herald:

Debatable Intelligence

regard to black-white
comparisons seems to fit well
the swinging socio-political
pendulum.
Let me note, however, that
1. Geneticists by no means
agree that a totally genetic
interpretation of intelligence
is tenable.
2. The research which Jensen
cites in support of his hypothesis
is open to interpretation.
3. Intelligence testing itself is
a 'Variable and not an objective
criterion in assessing this issue.
4. Until the cognitive, social,
and emotional effects of severe
deprivation and disadvantage can
be separated and controlled
completely, the debate is

The destruction and unhappiness foisted upon
the inhabitants of our ghettoes... by our own
racist practices is real psychological damage whose
cure must be political.
The glorification of violence encouraged by our
own military aggression abroad undermines the
emotional stability of our children. Our duty to
oppose these behaviors comes to us as human beings
and citizens. Mental health workers, too, have a
deep responsibility to exert political pressure against
militarism and racism, because only political actions
and not psychotherapy can prevent the
consequent psychological disasters. It is not
anarchy, but rather sanity which is the goal.
An honest attack on the roots of sickness in our
society is reflective of the healthiest and highest
level of functioning any of us can reach.
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683^
r
Opinions express in the Florida Alligator are those <">
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida. ,

power to end discrimination by race or sex
in considering an application for any
position. It would have forced all presidents
who follow to comply.
The power would have extendedfromthe
cabinet to all other chartered organizations
like Accent, the Rathskeller and Course and
Teacher Evaluation.
It would have set up guidelines for the
qualifications necessary to hold any position
in SG agencies and subdivisions ... guide guidelines
lines guidelines that are long over-due.
And it would have called for campus-wide
advertising of the availability of the position
and placed a ten-day waiting period on any
appointment.
A fair chance for all students. ~~
Obviously the senate did not fully
understand the bill. We would like to think
that is the reason they voted like they did
A similar bill will be introduced this
summer and we hope the senate will
reconsider.
We urge them to investigate the merits of
this bill and to act in the best interests of the
student body by opening SG to the students.
It is not often that there is an
opportunity to do so much with one vote.,
The senate had this chance Tuesday night
and blew it.

By Richard M. Krieg

potentially endless.
Finally, the failures, where
they exist, in projects like Head
Start are often due to program
inadequacies and many other
complex factors. Individual
Head Start programs have
produced some meaningful
successes. The overriding point I
wish to make is that we are still
scratching the surface and more
data will be necessary prior to
conclusions.
ALEX KRONSTADT, PhD.
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
OF PSYCHIATRY
AND PSYCHOLOGY
CHIEF PSYCHOLOGIST
CHILDRENS MENTAL
HEALTH UNIT



Extreme Views
MR. EDITOR:
I would like to congratulate the Alligator for giving wide exposure
in recent weeks to the far right and far left points of view. I personally
believe that this will do more towards convincing the vast majority of
students that they want no part of either group than any form of
censorship possibly could.
With respect to JOMO, there appears to be a wide discrepancy
between the image JOMO tries to project in the black community, as
typified by the tone of articles in Black Boices, and the somewhat
more non-violent tone of the articles in the Alligator by Mr. Fulwood
designed for university student consumption.
The claim has been that I can make no judgments here because I
dont have and hence cannot understand the black mind. Yet I feel I
have a pretty good idea what bum, take, kill, and destroy mean. When
these words are used in reference to me and the society I live in, I
believe I can draw at least some tentative conclusions about what the
speaker means.
Im not sure what Mr. Sugg tells his closest followers at SDS
meetings, but what he tells us in the Alligator should be enough to
raise serious questions in the minds of us all.
Can you really expect us to believe you Mr. Sugg when you
condemn everything American and expound on the virtues of
Mainland China, North Vietnam, and North Korea? Can it really be
that we are all bad and they are all good? With respect to these
countries, when were the last free elections held? How often are
public forums held in which all sides of a political question are
discusses? How much criticism of the existing political system and
political leaders is allowed?
In short, Mr. Sugg, how about personal freedoms in the existing
communist utopias you praise? With this complete lack of
objectiveness and fairness in your outlook, I hope you will pardon me
if I consider you irrelevant.
For most of us who consider ourselves a part of, and are willing to
work even towards the goal of a new south, the Mr. Bailey types on
the far right need little comment. We have known these types and
have seen the tragic results of their efforts all or our natural lives.
Their only hope of survival is, oddly enough, in the radical left. The
two extremes, feeding on each other.
For educations sake dear Alligator Editor, continue to make public
all you know aWut these extremes. Tell us particularly what they
preach to their few followers and then leave the decision to us.
JIM SULLIVAN, 7EG

All But Cats Are Equal

MR. EDITOR:
When I first came to this
school, last September, I was
told that we were not allowed to
have pets, and that the only
animals we were allowed to keep
in the dorms were to be limited
to fish and turtles. Knowing full
well this regulation, I came by a
cat (kitten) about four weeks

ago. Thanks to a friendly counselor, I was able to
keep it until now, without any repercussions.
I have just been told that housing was getting
upset with the amount of dogs and cats that dorm
residents were keeping, they are too well aware of
the illegality of it, and that Housing was going
around checking giving a twenty-four hour notice to
all students so engaged in keeping pets.
Naturally, I was told to get rid of my kitten, as I
have been before, but without serious effort of
enforcing it. This time the warning was given to get
rid of the cat or it will be removed by the counselor.
Reluctantly, I will get rid of the cat, where I do not
know, but would like to find a place for it to stay
till school ends this June (I am aware that I will get
no sympathy from the Housing Office on my
LETTERS
In order to appear fn th£
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

of

problem).
My complaint at this time is that there seems to
be some juggling of the rules at the types of pets
allowed. Since only fish and turtles are allowed, I
took it for granted that all other pets would get the
same warning as my cat, and would be removed. But
apparently this is not the case, for the counselor,
who let me keep the cat, and who is now making me
get rid of it, is rationalizing by permitting other pets
to stay, pets thai are as illegal as the cat.
I should assume that birds, hamsters, and other
pets are illegal since no stipulation was made for
them in the housing rules, but pets like these seem
to be overlooked. Where do you draw the line? Is
there something that says that cats and birds are
illegal, but that cats are more illegal than birds, so
only cats have to go? This is similar to many
arguments used in race relations, saying that all men
are equal, but white men are more equal.
I feel, in the first place that certain pets aside
from fish and turtles should be allowed if proof is
given that they are kept clean, but lets not
rationalize and change the documents just so a few
suffer.
I say if my cat goes, so must every other pet not
listed in the housing regulations. I could report
these students that have pets, but I am not the type,
and I feel that that is no way to handle my own, as
well as the others who have pets, problems. We
students are supposed to have an honor system, but
where is the facultys and administrators.
To keep others from getting hurt by this letter,
especially my hall counselor (for an unknown
reason), I am withholding my name.
*
NO NAME

- v ~~

New Victim: Black Studies

It finally happened. The Civil Rights movement
gained so great a momentum that it turned in on
itself. For the latest casualty of government-forced
integration was not a southern school district, or a
lily-white suburban classroom. No, the victim is
Black Black Studies, to be exact.
The Department of Health, Education and
Welfare has announced that Black facilities
facilities from which whites are excluded are
against federal law. HEW went even further and
dictated that it is illegal for a university to specify
that only a Black teacher can teach a certain course
- such as, say, Black Studies.
When HEW speaks, academia had better listen.
Because when a school doesnt toe the governments
line, it will lose federal aid. (The situation should
put many a college president in a quandary. If he
meets the Black students demands, the Federal
Government will cut off his life-sustaining funds. If
he obeys the governments order, the militants will
imprison him in his office and toss bombs around
inside campus buildings.)
Os course, the colleges can attempt to resolve the
dilemma by making Black Studies open to white
students. But what if few (token integration!) or no
whites apply? Whould that not be de facto

There
is
no
hope
for
the
complacent
man.

Aftermath'

Look Closer, Parker

This criticism is written in response to John Parkers recent article,
A Parcel of Inane Greek Baffoonery. In the editorial, lack of
brotherhood (or rather insincere brotherhood), obsession with
trivialities, and excessive need for belonging, inordinate egotism, and
sundry other vices are confined only to U of F Greeks.
Mr. Parkers firm belief in this line of thinking clearly outlines his
unjustified prejudice toward Gator Greeks. This prejudice visibly
stems from his ignorance of the Greek system and unacquaintance
with a representative numbers of individuals belonging to the
fraternity system.
There exists no group consciousness of the GDI. Therefore, as an
individual he is less conspicuous (accomplishing nothing beyond his
personal goals), and less likely to be on the receiving end of
downgrading accusations (from irresponsible sources such as Mr.
Parker).
Fraternity men actively sing to goats, throw water' balloons, and
ride horses while carrying confederate flags. Simultaneously, a GDI is
drenched in the Graham Area pond, and a panty raid is raging in
Tolbert Area. If Gator Greeks are guilty of trifles unbecoming of a
college student, then the non-fraternity segment of the student body
is equally guilty.
I have heard of the insincere acts of brotherhood rendered by
Greeks, of which there are a great number that go unrecognized.
However, I cannot recall a single instance in which independents made
the slightest effort to aid the distressed Nus. How many GDls fed
these victims at their own expense or offered clothing and other
necessities? Did you Mr. Parker?
U of F Greeks are not more dependent on belonging than GDls,
nor are they more egotistical. They see merit in the fraternity system
and take pride in their respective fraternities.
Mr. Parker places much emphasis on the Gator Greek Monthly, for
whose detestable existence he ostracizes all Greeks. The Monthly is
edited by a handful of Greeks who are not representative of the entire
Greek system. However, the function they perform is well intended,
and the contents of the magazine do not deviate as far from the truth
as Mr. Parker would have us believe.
The purpose of this article has not been to criticize the GDI or
defend the Greek system. I have merely tried to tell it like it is. In
closing, I have two suggestions for Mr. Parker. First, that he take a
closer look into the fraternity system. Secondly, that as a Journalism
major, he hang it up.

Thursday, May 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

segregation? The Civil Rights office of HEW
recently scored the state colleges in five states
because the institutions werent integrated. It
doesnt matter, said Civil Rights, if the colleges had
non-discriminatory admission policies, open to
blacks and whites alike. What does matter is de
facto. What will this line of thinking do to Black
Studies?
The universities could admit white students to
Black dormitories, which would amount to a
freedom-of-choice plan. But the Supreme Court
has said that freedom-of-choice arrangements in
southern school districts are not in accordance with
the law. Clearly, the only way to be in accordance
with the law is to mix black and white together.
What will the campus militants who fought for
and obtained Black dormitories think of that?
And as for insisting upon a white professors
right to teach Black Studies one shudders at the
thought of how campus rioters will react. Maybe
they will all go to Washington and imprison HEW
Secretary Robert Finch in his office, and throw
bombs around the buildings in the Capital. Then at
least the rest of the kids on our beleaguered
campuses could go to school in peace.

By Randy Silverberg

lIH 1 |II I I

Page 9



i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

Page 10

YOU Get the
SURPRISE PACKAGES

1; j|
m redeem your[o]Pi?| Ff£>% j|
fei !^^^M
fi'|:: Good only through June 4 for nwllHj||F jjpp
1| FREE MASTERPIECE 111
||i;; Don't miss a chance to collect your FREE Vy f Jr S&M
reproductions of famous paintings! y n':|:
|Fllij|.B|
fpUBUxI
IV MARKETS S^k
PRICES EFFECTIVE
THRU WEDNESDAY
OON, JUNE 4, 1969
" 1
Rath's Clack Hawk Boneless
Smoked Dainties T 89 c
Swift's Premium Sausage
Brown 'N Serve V*Y 59 e
Herman's Orange Rand Perk
Roll Sausage ease pkg. 39*
Colonel Copeland Presents
Copeland Franks e # e pkg. 39*
Tarnaw's Tasty So*. 10 a*. 16 o*.
Sliced Bologna .. 25* 45* 59*
Swift's Premium Assorted Sliced
Cold Cuts X 49*
(Pickle A Pimento or Olive A Pimento)
Swift's Premium Tru-Tender Sliced
Beef Liver " 59*
Swift's Premium Stick-Style
Braunschweiger S' 49*
I green!
Seafood Treat, Fresh
Red Grouper Fillet
is. 79*
Seafood Treat! Quick-Frozen Peeled A Oavained
Florida Shrimp *1 1V

c 'l
Little Brownie Vanilla, Duplex or Chocolate
Cookies %V, 39*
\
Our Sftatry ODept.
Dairi-Fresh Delicious
Cottage Cheese VJS 59 c
Wisconsin Chooso Oar Sliced
Big-Eye Swiss 5£ 39 c
Alps Brand flavorful Slicod
Imported Swiss X' 39 c
Kraft's Individually Wrapped
Sliced American X* 39 c
Broakfast Club (Limit 3 Please)
Margarine 3 .'it: 39 c
PuMis Delicious Corn Oil
Margarine 39 c
Pillsbwry Poppin' Fresh Crescent
Dinner Rolls *,*"' 39 c
Pillsbury Tasty Orange
Danish Rolls tT 39 c
(Our frozen o)epf.
Minute Maid Frosen Cone. Florida
Orange Juice 4 X $ l
Stauffer's Tasty Frosen
Spinach Souffle J2M9 C
Stauffer's Delicious Frusan
Noodles Romanoff X* 49 c
Thomas' Moist Light
English Muffins 2 ,V.V 49'
Pictsweet Tender Taste-Tempting
Cauliflower JJ* 29 c
Pictsweet Tender
Green Peas 6VS^ $ l
Booth's Seafood Treat.
Perch Fillets X 39 £
Mrs. Ppul's Family Sise
Fish Sticks '££ 69 c
Delicious Convenient Bangoet Frnxen
Assorted Dinners X. 39 c
(Corn Beet Hash, Haddock, Meet Leaf, Chicken,
Beef, Turkey, Salisbury Steak, Macaroni A Cheese, Hem)

OUR 39th BIRTHDAY*-and my. how we've grown! We've just open opened
ed opened our 151st store in Tallahassee (with more on the way) ... all
in Florida, all designed to make shopping part of the pleasure of
Florida Living. So we have much to celebrate on our 39th birthday
... and what's a better way than lots of Birthday Party Specials
for our customers whose patronage keeps us growing. Our Sur Surprise
prise Surprise Packages are not gift-wrapped, but theyre exciting values
i... party favors for you and all our friends!
(Our Shept.
Flavorful Sliced German Style
Bologna V 39*
Tasty Kitchen-Fresh
Potato Salad >" 39*
Old Fashion Flavor
Baked Beans £39*
Always A Family Favorite,
Cuban Sandwiches each 39*
heavy western beef sale__
Swift's Premium Tender 'N Tasty
Chuck Steaks .... 79 c
Swift's Premium Proten Bone-In
Pot Roast >b. 69*
Swift's Premium Boneless
Imperial Roast .b.B9*
Swift's Premium Boneless English Cut
-Bt Roast # it. 99
Swift's Premium Delicious Boneless
Miami Roast.. $ 1 19
Swift's Premium English Cut Beef
Short Ribs ... *.69*



SJM, RrtySWS
no # BRANDS SP'Biai

F 4 P Cream Style .
Golden Corn ?. $ 1
F 4 P Tender Green
Garden Peas. 6f. $ l
F 4 P Tender Firm Cat
Green Beans 8 Flavorful Regular or Stewed FAR
Tomatoes.... 5f. $ 1
Heat 'N Serve, Heins
Pork & Beans B\ $ 1
F 4 P Flavorful Sartlett
Pear Halves .. 39'
Realemon Reconstituted
Lemon Juice '39
South Shore Bucket
Stuffed Olives. i 39
Hamburger Perfect, Cairo Beauty
I Kosher Dills 39'
airo Beauty Kosher
Dill Sticks ... T39<
orman's Indian, Pickle, Hot Dog, Hamburger
ilelish Sr*l
I New Richer, Thicker, Hunt's Tomato
Catsup 5 'b.r $ 1
Lykes Tasty Flavorful Vienna
. ... S '

PI JBLIX

GAINESVILLE MALL
2830 N.W. 13th Stoat

nmj|MnAmiyy|Mi|lUMl|M3M|h|JliSfl
Autocrat Assorted Flavors (Limit 2 Please)
Ice Cream
half AO*
gallon *9 V
Cherry, Florida Punch, Grape, Orange, Apple
Pineapple-Orange
Hi-C Drinks
4 46-os. $D
cans
Yellow-Cling Halved or Sliced
m F& P Peaches
#2Vs $1
cons I
F it P Flavor Porfect
Fruit Cocktail
5 #303 $a
cans I
FAR Flavorful
Sliced Beets
8 #303 $*
cans
jPjP*' 'liHWuwr Jpf "W.
- *>. jU^Hpopiw iSirtt SL
j 8&
MF JB
Mr Ha

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street

THE FLAVOR MAKERS Smoked ham and bacon are
great treats in their own right. But that marvelous
uilty-sweet, smoky flavor enhances many other
e foods. Here are just a few examples: Biscuits: Add
ground cooked ham or crumpled cooked bacon to the
biscuit mix, stirring well before adding the milk.
Bacon-Horseradish Spread: Crumple 4 slices of crisp
bacon, odd to 8 ounces Noufchatel (or Creamed)
Cheese mashed soft with fork. Add bottled horserad horseradish
ish horseradish to taste. Mom-Macaroni Salad: Cook half o box
(8-oz. size) of elbow macaroni, drain, rinse in cold
water. Combine cooled macaroni with 2 cups of ju julienne
lienne julienne cooked ham (narrow strips), M cup chopped
celery, and 2 tablesp. chopped onion. In small bowl,
ilth. blend Vi cup mayonnaise, / cup milk, 1 teasp. pre-
Vftllm pared horseradish, 1 teasp. salt, dash of pepper
\mmmviin Toss dressing with ham-macaroni mix, chill several
HMffim hours Arrange on lettuce, garnish with tomato slices
Wmm and green pepper ripgs. Bacon Salad: Arrange crisp
Wmm lettuce (Vs head iceberg, small head Boston) in salad
i >RUUP S bowl, sprinkle with salt, pepper, and good pinch of
sugar. Cut two slices of bacon into Vi-inch squares,
fry until brown. Add tablesp. tarragon vinegar, stir
well in pan, pour over lettuce, toss. Ham-Rice Staffed
Peppers: Slice stem ends from green peppers, re- j
move fiber and seeds, drop into boiling salted water
to cover, simmer 5 minute*, drain. Mix ground ham
with boiled rice (more ham than rice!). Moisten with
condensed conned cheddar cheese soup diluted to
sauce consistency, fill peppers. Heat remaining
cheese sauce in double boiler while heating peppers
in oven baking dish. To serve, pour hot cheese sauce
over hot stuffed peppers.
ofkh < o/pectaA
Miss Brock (Unscented, Reg., Super)
Hair Spray !.T 49*
For Headache or Cold Relief, Bayer
Aspirin ...59*
Sl)am (fflbduee SfLam
Htsstsm
Cantaloupes. . 39
Firm Western
Iceberg Lettuce 2 39
Luscious Sated Perfect
Tomatoes 39
Tender Florida. Yellow
Sweet Corn. . 8 39<
Regular All-Purpose
Potatoes 39
Sweet Western Cede Peek
Carrots 3 39<

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Stores hours: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.

Thursday, May 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

SI
W
WITH THIS COVPOH AM# ttfl
Rath's Black Hawk Hickory Smoked 2
Banal***, Need* Na Refrigeration
1. Canned Hama
3 lb. can $2.99
i Explra* Wad., June 4,1969'
KlllUwGrVenStampsPy
Lahdkdl WBTM VNIf COUPON KSSW
i 2 White Paper Plates
100 ct.
Expires Wad., June 4, 1969
[[ilil^Gree'nStanips^
| 3 Gleem Tooth Paste 2
| 6% oz. tube 1
I Expires Wad., June 4, 1969 2
fff '1 EXTRA
M
I 4 Scope Mouthwash I
12 oz. bot. |
Expires Wad:, June 4, 1969 f
M\M reenSta mps ra
WITH THIS COUPON Hfewl
IS. Head A Shoulders Shampoo I
any kind, any size |
' Expires Wad., June 4, 1969 1
jTaaaaaaaasaaaeaeeelkaaaaaaaaaeeeeeaex
[[ilil^GreenStamps^
L Singleton's Family Pack
Breaded Shrimp
IV4 lb. pkg.
Expires Wad., June 4, 1969
M EXTRA
Green Stamps M
WITH THIS COUPON AMO PtfBCHASI OP Ittfli
I 7 Mrs. Smith's Golden
I Deluxe Apple Pie
| 46 oz. pkg.
I Expires Wed., June 4, 1969
EXTRA P pa^|
I" 8. For Deluxe Cheese Pizza |
14 oz. pkg. |
Expires Wad., June 4,1969 1
|TI EXTRA |P m^|
illl^GreenStampsW
with tnii co,row BfadH
L Brack's New 69c Size 1
Candies I
(Starlight Mint*, *uttrotch Disk*. *** Ceeler*. 2
TeHeet, Saar Ball*. Reyel*) 2
Expires Wed., June 4,1969 g
ISSIIRReMIIIMR*SShSM*>*Mt
mm
Where shopping
is a pleasure

Page 11



Tha Florida AMfator, Ttmraday, May 29,1968

Page 12

1
GRANAMsI

I MAXIM FREEZE DRY I
I COFFEE I
79'
I COFFEE 39* I
Limit l of your choice with $5.00 order excluding cigoreettes
26-01. CRACKIN GOOD BIG 60 FAMILY CREMES
COOKIES 39*
16-01. DEEP SOUTH APPLE, APPLE BLACKBERRY OR APPLE CHERRY
JELLY 4/sl.
16-02. DEEP SOUTH APPLE RASPBERRY or APPLE STRAWBERRY
JELLY 4/sl.
ltt-Lb. Loof DIXIE DARLING SANDWICH
BREAD 2/49*
8-Pok DIXIE DARLING HAMBURGER OR WIENER
BUNS 2/39*
12-oz. DIXIE DARLING DANISH RING
COFFEE CAKE 49*
1 Giant Size Deterqent B
WHITE, BLUE or
I COLD WATER
ARROW
I 39 I
I rivi r r T n
flfi AS 89
888 B B
: is:
BUNS BONUS I BONUS BONUS BONUS
lirre lIKTSj | BIFTS 1 OUTS I
:BjiJj
TWO 16-07 JAR? 22-OZ FAULTLESS
Greenwood Beets Mk : --;/i|r Spray Starch
GOOD THOU MAT 28 J COOO THOU MAY 28 \
AT TOOS LOCAL winn Min * t tov HXW w,w
wrVm Lvalue stamps ;\ [ 111 'J stamps ;
WITH Niwtrini COb*OM .NO or (
Bathroom Cleaner Bufc'&Er Cleaner or Sealer
GOOD THRU MAY 28 KCjffPjjlMf GOOD THRU MAY 28

1-Lb. CHIFFON "Soft"
Margarine
39*
22-01. PINK LIQUID VEL
Detergent
63*

1 PRICES GOOD ALL WEEK

No. 303 Con CHUN KING
Chicken Chow Mein 59*
3-01. CHUN KING
Fortune Cookies . 49*
No. 303 Con CHUN KING
Plain Fried Rice . 41*
Fruit Slices 39*
1 :

I CATSUP 6/sl.l
H 2 Roll Pkg. ARROW WHITE. PINK or YELLOW BATHROOM H|
I TISSUE 5/sl. I
SB Jumbo ARROW WHITE A ASSORTED PAPER H|
I TOWELS 4/sl. I
M No. 2 'h Con THRIFTY MAID SLICED A HALVES Ms
I PEACHES 4/sl. I
No. 2 Con THRIFTY MAID SLICED A CRUSHED
PINEAPPLE 4/SI.I
46-02. HAWAIIAN LOW CALORIE, REG.. YELLOW, ORANGE or K
I PUNCH Drink3/sl.l
Wm. t2-oz. THRIFTY MAID &
I CORN BEEF2/sl. I
H No. % Con LYKES VIENNA
I SAUSAGE 5/sl.l
No. % Con STAR-KIST LIGHT MEAT
I TUNA FISH 3/SI.I
H No. 300 Con THRIFTY MAID TOMATO 8H
I SAUCE 5/sl.|
I BEANS 8/SI.I
B No. 300 Con THRIFTY MAID PORK A W
I BEANS 10/Sl.l
H 22-oz. DEEP SOUTH WHOLE or HAMBURGER SLICED DILL MR
I PICKLES"- 3/Sl.|
iontity Rights Reserved Prices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon May 29-Jur
COPYRIGHT WINN-DIXIE STORKS. 1NC.1969
No. 1 Toll Cans CARNATION
I EVAPORATED I
I MILK I
I 7-1 I

PINEBREEZE GRADE "A" FRESH FLA. ALL WHITE
MEDIUM EGGS...3-I
Quart DEEP SOUTH (Limit 1 with $5.00 or more purchase exclud. cigarettes)
MAYONNAISE 39'
4oz. BAN SPRAY 20-INCH ELECTRIC BUY ONE-GET ONE FREEL..ALUMINUM
DEODORANT 49* FANS.... $12.99 BROILER PANS
Personal Sue ULTRA BRITE 32-Qt. COOLER BUY ONEGET ONE FREE!...I2-oz. HALO
TOOTHPASTE 25* CHEST $6.99 HAIR SPRAY
ASSORTED COLOR 4 DESIGN BUY ONE GET ONE FREE! BUY ONE GET ONE FREE!...S-o*. PONDS DUSTING
PANTY HOSE 59* OVEN MITTS POWDER

75-Ft. ALCOA ECON.
Aluminum Foil . 83*
24-oz. SWIFTS
Ham & Lima Beans 63*
No. 303 Con BUSH
Gold Hominy . 2/25*
No. 2Vi Con CHUN KING
Chow Mein Noodles 29*

3-Lb. CANS
I SHORTENING I
I CRISCOI
\iS9\
SOUTHERN BISCUIT SELFRISING of PLAIN
FLOUR.... 5 ~ 39*
4W BEECHNUT STRAINED
BABY F00D.... 9*
4% 02. GERBER STRAINED
BABY FOOD 10*
150-0. FONDA WHITE PAPER
PLATES 99*
20-Lb. BRIQUETTES
CHARCOAL.... 89*
l-Lb. Bog BONOMO MINTS, SOUR BALLS or BUTTERSCOTCH DISC.
CANDY 3/sl.
ie 4
All Flavors CANNED
I CHEK I
I DRINKS I
I H-1 I
| | J | I

1-Lb. MUELLERS
Thin Spaghetti . 29*
8-oz.
Muellers Kbps ... 27*
12-oi. FRENCH'S
Mustard with Pump 33*
4VS-01. LIBBY
Stuffed Olives . 49*



jf i .-wML

bob white
I SLICED I
I bacon I
I 69 I
Vi PORK LOINS SLICED INTO a J
| Pork Chops 79* |
Chuck steak.... 89*
12-or. SUPERBRAND SLICED INDIVIDUALISM^ RAPPED AMERICAN
CHEESE FOOD 65*
TURKEY LEGS 29*
GROUND BEEF 5 $2.49
GROUNDCHUCK $1.99
IrAUNSCHWEIGER 49*
COOKED HAM $1.39
SMOftlD TURKEY 3/sl.
ALL FLAVORS SUPERBRAND
I ICE I
I CREAM I
I HALF I
I * J7 I

POTATOES 10 69*
FRESH DELICIOUS STRAW- Am. A
8ERR1E5....2 ns 79*
ORANGES 5 39*
CABBAGE 2 39*
LETTUCE... 2 ** 49*
ONIONS... 3 39*
LEMONS.iI/39*

U-oi. BROCK on//
Starlight Mints . 39
Rag. Size CASHMERE BOUQUET /r\r\A
Hand Soap .... 4/39*
Both Size CASHMERE BOUQUET a IT~ A A
Bath Soap .... 4/54*
12-oz. keEbler bavarian
Fudge Cookies .49

I Wed. Noon Thru Wed. Noon 11

prfqh PRODUCE and FROZEN FOODS

GRANADA
Bread & Butter PLATE
M j with
' S 3 purchase
mb Each week a piece of distinctive Granada dinnerware
If ,f will be featured for just 29(. For each S 3 in grocery
E y/ purchases, you are entitled to one piece at this low
Kfei-, price. There's no limit . with as 6 purchase you can
get 2 pieces ... and so on.
Eicluding: tobacco, liquor and liquid dairy product!.

GR f FRUIT 5 59*
RHUBARB 2 49*
DRINK... 2/79*
TASTE O' SEA PERCH Ai
DINNERS 29*
MINUTE MAID (12-oi. Can-.2/Sl.>4-o*. ORANGE
JUICE 4/sl.
BABY OKRA 4/sl.
16-oz. ASTOR FROZEN FRENCH FRY /A|
POTATOES...4/sl.

12-oz. SUNSHINE rsr\A
Vanilla Wafers . 39*
2-oz. FRENCH'S
Vanilla Extract . 49<
ALL VEGETABLE .. 1 -Lb. 37c 3-Lb.
Crisco Shortening 89tf
IVORY Liquid . 12-oz. 35c . 22-oz. 63c King size .
Detergent . . 85^

HORMEL CANNED
HAMS I
I I
I 3-Lb. M
I CAN JL I
I USDA CHOICE I
SPRING LAMB |
I LEG-0-LAMB . 99' I
USDA CHOICE LAMB
I LOIN CHOPS T I
USDA CHOICE LAMB RIB CHOPS OR fl|
I SIRLOIN CHOPS ! I
mm usda choice lamb S
I SHLD. ROAST 69* I
H USDA CHOICE LAMB
I SHLD. CHOPS 79* I
USDA CHOICE LAMB _
I PAniES 39* I
USDA CHOICE LAMB _ H|

Quantity Rights Reserved Prices Good AH Week M. Noon thru Wed. Noon May 29-Jur.e
COPYHICHT-WIWH.QIXIK TORC. __

RED RIPE
I WATER- I
I MELONS I
I99j

This schedule will be repeated three times
I during the next 15 weeks
I ** dinner plate & OOr With every
I week 0 DESSERT DISH & OOf'-'v-
65c Aye S 3 purchase*
I THI0 ~
week COFFEE CUP & OQr c, with
I S9C dfc w S 3 purchete*
1 fourth
I wtt i SAUCE 6c 29c s r he ~*>
"" f c c Maw* 53 purchase*
I wee!! 1 Bread Butter Re
I I PLATE & 29c S*purcha*t*
I T i*. *"eveite m s will be sold at these special
I prices only in the weeks they are featured.
liquor and liquid dairy product*.

10-oz. FRESH FROZEN SLICED STRAW
BERRIES 3/99*
MINUTE MAID (12-0z....4/VI.J6-OZ
LEMONADE 8/sl.
FRUIT PiES 3/sl.
CHEESE 4/88*
ROLLS 3/sl.
Pta. OF 4 MORTON HONEY
Buns 3/87*
Regular Size MORTON ALL VARIETY MEAT
DINNERS 2/89*

Thursday, May 20, 1960, Thu Florida Alligator,


I BREASTI
(WITH RIBS)
59
S' OK. * FRESH ERYER S
I BACKS -10 I
|WING^39j
OiN BISCUITS 2/41*
ONION DIP 49*
CAN BISCUITS 4/41*
COTTAGE CHEESE.... 2 & 59*
6-oz. SUNNYLAND VAC PACK SPICED SALAMKJR HAM 4 CHEESE a pi
LUNCHEON MEAT 45*
FRANKS *7s*
TASTE O' SEA BONELESS PERCH #|Ai
FISH FILLETS 39*

Giont FOR AUTOMATIC DISHWASHERS
Dish All ... 77*
17-oz. NU-SOFT
Fabric Softener 45^

Giant COLD WATER (15c OFF) 1-Lb. MAZOLA (Qtrs.)
Surf Detergent ... 71* Margarine
SAFEGUARD .. Regular 2/33c . Bath ... O Otf
Deodorant Soap . 2/4511 zZ

WINN
DIXIE

OUARTS I
I DIXIE WHIP I
I Topping I
fancy golden bantam
CORN ....10 69*

- T **j
TOP VALUE STAMPS
WITH Ml COW*M AMO nzACMAH M
TWO IS-OZ. PKC.
TROPHY
Spanish Peanuts
GOOD THRU MAY 28
TO VALW STMIW
with Ni>u>ni cownOH am* urtCH.ii o
THREE LB OR MOPE
USD A CHOICE BONELESS
Beef Roast
GOOD THRU MAY 2*
at row tacAt wieewgimii
- C ean gee mmmmmmmmm+mm
EXTR/1
I EjJl TOP VALUE STAMPS
18 POLL HF-AVV DUTY
1 Aluminum Foil
* Kr GOOD THRU MAY 28
i ii

Page 13

i
| [III V TOP VALUE STAMPS \
VTJ. ecu**. md *AU o.
TWO PKG'i ESKIMO
' mmM Sandwiches
6000 wu MAV 2
ITITIWw valoTSmm ;
witw coweow ruecMAU o
two pkgs
UVjjSjS artic circle
Qr^ I*mT 1 *mT White Acre Peas
GOOD THRU 28
#3
AT tOO LOCAt WtMM-MKM
TOP VALUE STAMPS \
with MMttfH caurOM an* mmcmah (
i-L> PKO W O MtNO |
Ground Beef J
GOOD THRU MAV U
TOT VALUE STAMPS |
VS uwIWP (OWO *" *CUA m J
TWO FLA. 08. A
WHOLE OR CUT UP
Fresh Fryer*
GOOD thru MAV tl J



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I "foTsalT I
$ j
New 1969 zig-zag sawing machines.
Thaaa art nationally advertised
brands which are advartlsad for
$169.00. Thasa machlnas can ba
purchasad for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can ba paid
for $5.00 par month. Sea at
unclaimed Freight. 122$ NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
$ New 1969 zig-zag sawing mach. to
ba sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can ba inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
Traitor Bx3o 1 bedroom. Air con.
carpet TV & Ant. New wireing 850
cash or 800 without T.V. Phone
376-1544. 3620 S.W. Archer Rd.
Gainesville. (A-10t-141-p)
Honda S9O recently overhauled. Tool
kit included. $135. Call Kathie
anytime 392-9796. (A-3t-147-p)
Triumph Tiger Cub motorcycle. Just
inspected, dependable, SIOO. Call
376-1437. (A-2t-147-p)
35mm Single Lense Reflex Kowa ser.
Leather case built in light meter 8
months old. Need money. Best offer.
Call Al 372-0242 or Cindy 378-3747.
(A-lt-147-p)
BASENJI puppy. Male, top Quality, 4
months old, AKC, no bark or odor,
short hair, small appetite, loves
children. Requires loving home with
adequate facilities. Terms to suit.
Phone 376-4103. (A-10t-139-p)
Suns GUNS GUNS. I nventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-18M36-C)
GUITAR Framus classical practically
new, will include case, capos, SIOO or
best offer. Call Lois 378-3747.
(A-st-144-p)
1968 Van Dyke 12x52
airconditioning. Located in Varsity
Villa. 395 down. $81.92 monthly.
Call 376-6555. (A-st-144-p)
VW 1968 BUG New tires. Just
serviced 27000 miles of good care.
Must sacrifice. 378-3304 evenings.
(A-4t-144-p)
Rickenbacker guitar and case $135.
Gibbon amp. 2 12 inch speakers
60 watt output plus premier reverb
unit $235. 392-6059. (A-st-144-p)
HONDA 305c.c. DREAM, excellent
condition, 8200 miles, 2 Helmets and
Tools included, Call 392-8940. Must
sell. (A-st-144-p)
Home beautiful 44x8 Elcar 2 br 36
awning KLH stereo unit. Located in
wooded area near Micanopy. To
appreciate call 378-8320 or
466-3423. (A-st-144-P)
HONDA 1965 150c.c. Excellent
condition. Electric start. Helmet
included. $225. Must sell. Ph.
376-8980. (A-st-144-p)
62 International Travelall station
wagon. Excellent condition,
378-6470. Small TV, small desk,
solid mahogany bookcase, mens
bicycle, Schwln, new. (A-st-144-P)
1969 Honda 65 + extras under 600
miles, $275, call 378-4041 after
5:00. (A-4M45-P)
END OF MARRIAGE SALE blk &
crome metal desk; $75, new
Magnovox stereo; SIOO, Norelco
Cassette tape-recorder; S6O,
378-0226 after 10. (A-5M45-P)
1967 2 bedroom 12x60 mobile
home. Unfurnished, screened-in
cabana. Immaculate condition.
$3350. Terms available. Phone
462-2670. (A-3M45-P)
BSA 350, mechanically perfect.
Inspected, dependable. Owners
manual, extras. 372-7253 after 5.
(A-3M45-P)
Zeiss binocular microscope; mech
stage, light source, many extras,
excellent specifications, never used.
SBOO. 376-9551. (A-3M46-P)
1967 Lotus Cortina, Elan engine,
new perillis. Perfect throughout.
372-3216 after 6 p.m. (A-3M46-P)
beloved 96 custom surfboard,
no dings ,Norelco portable tape
recorder best offers. Call Ira
376-6628 or 372-5962 evenings to
see. (A-4t-146-P)

FOR SALE |
Wedding dress: Beautiful! S2OO new.
Veil and train. Size 8. S9O. 378-7672
after 5. (A-3M46-P)
White German Shepherd puppies, 7
weeks old, very healthy, no papers,
make excellent watch dogs-pets, 2
females left. $45. Call 376-4096 after
5:00. (A-2t-146-P)
Home for sale, $14,500, perfect
location for university people. Walk
to Univ., Med. Center, PK Yonge.
Small 3 bedroom, 2 bath home in
pleasant neighborhood. Aircond.,
fenced back yard, screened porch.
5V% FHA mortgage, $94.87 monthly
includes principal, interest, taxes,
insurance. Flexible terms on equity.
Can take S4OO-SSOO down. 1227 SW
11th Ave. Call 372-1744 for appt.
(A-8M46-P)
1968 Honda supperhawk 305 cc.
Excellent condition fast and
dependable, extras included. Must see
for $430. Dont miss this one. Call
378-0223. (A-3M46-P)
1968 Honda 565, like new, low
mileage, bought for $369, make an
offer! Its not a big motorcycle, just a
groovy little motorbike! Call
378-5274. (A-2M46-P)
FOR RENT
8 jijj
Economical living for male students 1
blk from campus S6O/m. Room & 3
meals/day. 5 houses dining hall, rec
room & work shop. Pro cook
members summer & fall. Vacancies.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
College liv org. (B-10t-145-P)
Room for summer a/c private drive
and entrance. Cable T.V. cooking,
carpet $43/month. Call 372-0257. (I
keep weird hours.) (B-2t-147-p)
Three bedroom furnished house
for summer qtr. Only $l2O/mo. from
June 15. Adjacent to new law school.
Call 378-7748 or see at 120 S.W. 25
St. (B-st-147-p)
Sublease 1 br. poolside apt. Village
Park N. 35. Available June 13 for
summer or longer. June paid for. Call
Shary or Dave 378-9169.
(B-3t-147-p)
Two bedroom a/c apt. dishwasher
bath & V 2. Families and children
welcome. Summer quarter w. option
for fall. Call 378-6193 Reas.
(B-2t-147-p)
Beautiful, three bedroom, two bath
house. Located in fine neighborhood
near Law complex. Air cond. $165
per month. Call 378-9383.
(B-st-147-p)
One bedroom Landmark apt. will
pay June rent and damage deposit
good location inside area directly
behind pool. Call 378-5508.
(B-4t-147-p)
Last half of June free sublease for
summer a/c disposal pool one bed
room. Married couple or one person
only. slOl per month. 376-2791.
(B-st-147-p)
Male roommate for fall in La Bonne
Vie Apts. Ph. 378-8319. (B-3t-147-p)

I

MISS HONEILMISS GALORE
HAVE
rff JAMES
, ( BOND
\ BACK FOR 'Si
)JU, I MORE! \\m :

ALBERT R BROCCOLI i PC AW POWMCDV
ro HARRY SALTZMAN £ oLATI UHiIIIKi
nSaaf, " FLEMIW S-'GOIOFINffR
USSSM:J GERT FROBE OIFWCH
HONOR BLACKMAN JSSV*G*LORE
' 1 1^ 1

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

Page 14

FOR RENT
Near campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior men.
For summer AND/OR 1969-70.
Two 2-bedroom apts. one block from
University on NW Ist Ave. sllO
upstairs, $l2O downstairs, or terms
arranged for summer. Phone
372-9719 May 30, 31, June 1.
(B-3M46-P)
HELP! Wte need to sublet French Qtr.
apt. summer qtr. Please call
376-9807. Will accept best offer.
(B-3t-145-P)
Sublet 2 bdr apt for summer 1 blk
from campus, $125 mo. Call Sharon
378-9898. (B-st-l 45-P)
1 bedroom apt. French Qt. Lease for
summer or more. Quiet and pleasant.
Furnished. Call 378-4097, Apt 3.
(B-3M45-P)
TWO bedroom apartment furnished.
Reduced summer rates. $77.50 per
month. Airconditioned. Very near
campus. No car needed. Call Mr. or
Mrs. Jones. Phone 376-5636.
(B-10t-145-P)
One bedroom apt to sublet June 15.
AC, large patio, 4 blocks from
campus. Pets welcome. Call 378-9058
any time. (B-lt-146-P)
Coed roommate desired for summer
quarter. $38.75 plus utilities. Call
378-3238 after 7:00 p.m.
(B-5M46-P)
Sublet summer quarter, 2 bedroom
poolside French Quarter apt. Must
rent soon. Will take best offer. Call
378-7988 apt 103. (B-3M46-P)
Spacious, quiet one bedroom apt, 5
blks from Matherly Hall. Air cond.,
pool, patio, $95/mo. Will leave
damage deposit. 1533 NW sth Ave.
376-4962. Avail. June 15.
(B-2M46-P)
Air conditioned, 2-bedroom, carport,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. 6/16/69. (B-5M46-P)
To rent 1 bedroom apt. Wall to wall
carpet, central air conditioning,
heating, large kitchen area, very
quiet, 3532 NW 21 Street. Call
378-8704. (B-5M46-P)
French Quarter Poolside No. 39,
sublease for Summer SIOO a month.
378-5213. (B-3M46-P)
New 12x60 trailer for summer. 2
bdrm, nice lot & furnishings. Call
376-5401 Andrews & Connell trailer
park. (B-3t-146 P)
LUXURIOUS LANDMARK 2 bdr, 2
bth, ac, disposal, dshwsher, cable tv,
2 pools, health club, sauna, maid.
Sblet 4/share 2 for summer.
378-0727. (B-5M46-P)
Stamp out mediocrity! One male
roommate for the summer and next
year. Ranch house with pool and
fireplace. Call 378-4877 after 5 p.m.
(B-st-135-p)
Married students only. Sublet one
bedroom, air-conditioned apartment.
Pool. Available June 17. Call
3 7 8-0972 after 5:30. slOl/mo.
(B-st-l/V3-p)

BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:15
SHOWTIME 8:45

ALBERT R. BROCCOLI w HARRY SALTZMAN
pintti iinn iin I
IAN FLEMING S UK. HU L I
SEANCONNERY.JAMESBONO
and URSULA ANDRESS JOSEPH WISEMAN I
JACK LORD use w.--; BERNARD LEE I

i'B'iswg
FOR RENT I
Landmark 2 bdrm Wow! Running
water, electricity and all that good
stuff. Poolside (Status!) Sublet
summer Qtr. $125 (12500 cents) Dial
378-6587. (B-st-143-p)

fs/leet the President of the
bw4 tun
Wriia rarlwlfkZlsi, IV iisi ( McEneis
***' £S3p *% Widow",

.*&*!&;
leekhti Cheir /Tml\r ''"
1 | TOO AY BWlijp
i w, w. wit s. yiyl J1
Bijyr
IrawriJ 1 CAN heironymous I
HBH MERKIN EVER FORGET
| Tol#r>* j< |
l MERCY HUMPPE
AND FIND TRUE HAPPINESS
11 I
It takes A FINE PAIR to do it
like its never been done before
p?< .7
ROCK HUDSON and CLAUDIA CARDINALE
make
A FINE PAIR M^.ir.ag.igr^
SUMMER MOVIE CLUB TICKETS NOW J
ON SALE AT OUR BOX OFFICE!

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

H Amp jfl m Technicolor
I PIUS AT 8:47 r L, col ,l
I^^Bil
*



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

v.'v.v.
Xvviv.-.aaaassswsaaflsww-w omoowcm
f FOR RENT
c n pcial summer rate 2 bedroom,
noolside Landmark apt. with
dishwasher. Must sublet $l5O mo. (or
Jestoffer) Apt. No. 51. Call
378-4924. (B-st-146-P)
guys & GALS economical living
CLO was gone co-ed for the summer
S6O/mon. Room & meals, peace love
and freedom 1 blk. from campus.
376-9420 or come by 117 NW 15 St.
(B-10t-145-P)
Sublet poolside French Quarter Apt.
for summer. One or two male
roommates needed. $125. Call Chuck
at 378-8756. (B-3t-147-p)
8x37 trailer, 1 bdroom, close to
campus and Med Center. Mobiler Tr.
Park. 30.00 plus lot. Call R. Schmidt
376-0285 or write. Box 356 JHM
Health Ctr. (B-5M45-P)
Spacious 2 bedroom apt. V 2 block
from Tigert. Air conditioned $250
for the summer quarter. Call
376-0126 anytime. (B-st-144-p)
Poolside 2 bedroom furnished from
June 16 to August 31 at special
summer rate. Contact FREDERICK.
GARDENS. (B-10t-144-c)
Sublet Landmark apt. for summer. 4
people. Only S9O per person for the
entire quarter. Many extras left in
apt. for summer. Call 372-5041.
(B-st-147-p)
NEAR CAMPUS Clean, three-room
apartment with private bath and
entrance. Water furnished. $65.00
month. Contact Mrs. Flanigan at
376-2828 or 372-0139, if interested.
(B-2M46-P)
WANTED
Need 1-3 coeds to share Landmark
apt. with me. Move in mid-June thru
Aug for $75. Kit. uten- incl., by front
poolA bargain! Call 392-7532 5-7
p.m. (C-5M45-P)
Happiness is living in 110 Landmark
summer quarter on the pool. Need 2
female roommates. Call Linda
378-9604. fC-4t-144-P)
2 female roommates for summer
quarter. June rent free $45/mo. a/c.
Dishwasher, disposal, carpeting, IV2
baths. Phase 2 Landmark no. 82.
378-6339. (C-st-144-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE Now or for
summer quarter. Airconditioned,
carpet, private room. $55 per month.
Adjustments for May. Call 378-5088.
(C-10t-138-p)
Two roommates needed to share
large house with two 4EG. Private
room and semi-private bath. $37.50 a
month and ¥ utilities. Call 376-0703
anytime. (C-st-143-p)
Roommate needed for summer,
bdrm AC, tv, pool, 3 blks campus.
Untv. Apts. SBS pays for entire
quarter. No utility bill. Bob
378-6347. (C-4M45-P)
Traveling companion wanted for 6-8
weeks, leaving middle of June:
Western states. No fixed route. Lets
talk it over! Call 376-1455!
(C-4M45-P)
2 male roommates needed to share 2
bedroom Williamsburg Apt during
summer months. 2 baths and one
light machine. Call 376-5689.
(C-5M45-P)
Management trainee in fast growing
company. ?No experience necessary.
Part time or full time. Must be 21.
Apply in person at 1723 S.W. 13th
St. (C-st-144-p)
Ill pay for your gas if you will tow
(not drive) my Triumph to (or near)
Lawrence, Kansas, sometime between
June 6 and June 20. Call 372-3870.
(C-st-144-p)
Looking for coed to share spacious
trailer in fall, rent and utilities app.
$l5O per quarter. Able to survive
with klutz. Orna 392-7480.
(C-5M45-P)
COMPLETE XEROX!
V .%
I OFFSET FACILITES I
Specializing in Sj
Thesis and Dissertation
Reductions and £
$ Enlargements $
§ Open Til 11 P.M. I
f Highest Quality
We Guarantee it!
7 days
f QUIK-SAVE
University Plaza
|1620 W. University |:
378-1001

! W ANTED
1 female roommate starting fall. Own
bedroom. Walk to campus. Call
392-9302 or 392-9304. (C-st-147-p)
LANDMARK Phase 11. Need 1 or 2
coeds to share 2-bdrm. apt. Half of
first mo. paid. Move in summer, stay
thru next yr. Call BJ, 378-9489.
(C-3t-147-p)
1 male wanted to share poolside Fr.
Quarter Apt. $95.00 for entire
summer. Available June 11th. Please
stop by no. 77 Fr. Quarter or call
378-7968. (C-st-147-p)
Have your own bedroom. Need 2
coed roommates for LaMancha fall
qtr. Call 372-8519 or 392-8519.
(C-3t-147-p)
One or two male roommates for
summer quarter. French Quarter Apt.
on pool. Call 376-1437. (C-2t-147-p)
Rider to San Diego to share expenses
in '69 V.W. Leaving third week in
June. Call 376-1437. (C-lt-147-p)
Female Roommate for summer. 2
blocks from campus. $37 per month.
Call Mary 392-8982. (C-2t-147-p)
Raise a little hell this summer. Live in
Village Park. 2 or 3 roommates for
the summer term. Reduced rent
378-4035 after 7:00 p.m.
(C-5M45-P)
Female roommate. Share two
bedroom house summer term or
longer. Carpet air cond. Walk to
campus. S6O mo. plus V 2 utilities.
378-9748. (C-st-143-p)
Male roommate to share trailer
50xl2\ two bedrooms, full bath,
airconditioning. Very reasonable. Call
392-8551. (C-3M46-P)
Male roommate for summer term. 2
bdrm. apt. 1 block behind Norman.
$33 a month + 1/3 utilities. Call ~
378-5673. (C-5M46-P)
RIDERS (1 or 2) TO San
Francisco Leave anytime but Must
Arrive by June 16. Share Driving.
376-1730. (C-3M46-P)
| HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED MALE. Mens
Clothing Salesman. Discount
privileges. Salary commensurate with
experience Apply Wilson Department
Stores, Inc. (E-10t-145-C)

Reduced
Summer Rates
University Gardens Ite
j|
If \ \ SPECIALS HI
\ 1 Lunch and Dinner gigs
Thursday Spatial
1 BROILED CALVES LIVER jj
I & ONIONS 1
H fried SHRIMP WITH H
m FRENCH FRIES, HOT 11
1 SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES §j
1 $lO9 1
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS I
||L OAlNESVll^^^^^^^^g

Thursday, May 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I HELP WANTED f
WANTED: Energetic, enthusiastic
salesman/manager. Can earn SIOOO,
S2OOO or more during fall quarter
alone. See Mr. Davis in room 330
Reitz Union between 2 and 5 p.m.
(E3t-nc-p)
Wanted dancers. Apply at handlebar
lounge in person Fri. 9:30 to 12
noon. Must be attractive over 21
good dancer and be willing to dance
topless. (E-3t-147-p)
AUTOS j
Pontiac, 1952, 4 door, straight 8,
runs well, excellent tires, radio, call
378-5020. $l5O. (G-5M45-P)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen dealer, 4222 NW 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-ts-130-C)
67 convertible Mustang S2OO below
used car retail, $1440, 19,000 miles,
6 cylinder, gas economy, must sell,
beautiful. 120 NW 24 St. 376-8565.
(G-12M42-P)
Must sell English sports car 1965
Sunbeam good tires, seat belts,
power-disc brakes, convertible. Book
value is SIOBO. Will sell 825.
372-7971. (G-10t-141-p)
Station wagon Ford Fairlane 9
passenger 1963 automatic
transmission, air conditioned, new
brakes new tires, very good
condition. $595. 372-3213.
(G-st-144-p)
Bugeye Sprite new top & tires. Needs
transmission work otherwise
mechanically perfect $225. Call
378-5227. (G-st-143-p)
1962 Porsche Michelin X tires
AM-FM Balaupunckt radio.
376-9612. (G-2t-147-p)
| 44M^k pERSONAL
TADFOUCL*
There are damn few Datsuns on used
car lots. To buy one see Godding &
Clark down by the main post office.
(J-ts-143-c)
Mentally retarded 2 year old fixed
female dog. Affectionate, loving, free
to good home. Excellent health.
Tony or Bob 2-0791 days. 378-6577
eves. (J-3t-145-P)

Page 15

| PERSONAL |
s.v.: < x*XsX*x-:-x.:;xx*x-x-x-x-x;xw x*x£.
Rider wanted to So. Wisconsin or
area of Chicago, going to Dells, June
11, 1:00 p.m., arrangements and
price to be discussed, prefer female.
Call Kim 392-9769. (J-5M46-P)
Hung-up Heads: Hang on call
392-9288 Tues., Thurs., Sun., 7
p.m.-midnight. After 12, call
378-8138. (J-2M45-P)
Beta Theta Pie day will be held for
sure on Sat. May 31. (J-st-144-p)
MARK MINCHIN.BiII and Judy need
to talk to you. Anyone knowing
MARK please ask him to call
376-0275 or stop by 1211 N.W. 30th
Ave. Thanks. (J-3t-147-p)
Siamese kittens, 7 weeks old. Male
and female. Leaving town Saturday,
call 372-4750. (J-2t-147-p)

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
4 4 private bedroom for
I each student one
I i* block behind norman
jm [ a mi
mmk
|J II APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AWE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT CALL 372-2662
I
maybe
you think
you can do
a better job!
.jjt 4
G
t* X
By all means, try 77?e Florida Alligator needs people
who aren't satisfied with second best. Apply room 330
Reitz Union. Positions open for Summer and Fall.

|
wswmi 1 8 m sse s e
Jennings, Murphree, and Yon present
The Nation Rocking Shadows.
Friday, May 30, 9-la.m. Jennings
Rec. Room. Free admission.
(J-lt-147-p)
H Slvi'cET |
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-Cl
Volkswagen 'parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
Tennis racket restringing satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19t-107-p)



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

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JOE LONG

Review. Interview: Seasons Merit Applause

/
By CAROLYN HERRINGTON
Alligator Reviewer
The Four Seasons brought
the Florida Gym to life last
Saturday evening at the IFC
Spring Frolics. The enthusiastic
response of the audience proved
that in an age of music
experimentalism the appeal of a
standard harmony pop combo is
still strong even on college
campuses.
Their success is undoubtedly
attributable to their long list of
hits they have had since they
originally formed the group in
1960. The memories brought
back by songs such as Sherrie
and Candy Girl coupled with
their personal appearance on
stage, produced an immediate

Don't miss Arby's
M SPRING
tey N
Constantly growing Coast to Coast i m

... three of the Four Seasons minus their writer. Bob Gaudio, in an interview after Saturday's well-received performance

affinity between the performers
and the audience. This was
readily visible in the flood of
applause which accompanied
song after song.
In a medley of three of their
hits, Walk Like A Man, Big
Girls Dont Cry and Bye,
Baby, Bye, the applause rang
continuous throughout.
Frankie Valli, the lead singer,
leaning his body forward and
then straining his neck
backwards, sang out tune after
tune in his inimitable falsetto.
His voice, proceeding from a
rather small Italian figure,
pervaded every corner of the
gym. Despite the high pitch that
he is famous for, he keeps
perfect control of the volume
and intensity of his voice with

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TOMMY DE VITO

an amazing ease.
In one of the strongest
appeals from the audience that a
Frolics performance has received
in the last few years, the Four
Seasons were brought back for
three consecutive encores.
Though only one had been
arranged previous to the show,
the Four Seasons voluntarily
kept returning. They seemed to
be enjoying themselves as much
as anyone else.
In an interview directly after
the show, Frankie Valli was
questioned about the recent
trends in music among the
young. He feels that the
underground music is a fad
resulting from the disgruntled
young people and will pass with
college riots and the war in

Vietnam.
He calls his own style a type
of pop that is good, melodic
sound and feels that it will
never become outdated. The
group considers themselves
middle-of-the-roaders along
the same line as Frank Sinatra.

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Only
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Wednesday & Thursday
May 28-29
Arby's
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When asked about any
possible changes in their style in
the near future, Bob Gaudio,
their electric organist and song
writer replied that their style
was never thought out or
planned but they had always
sung the music that they
enjoyed.
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Ski Club Future Depends
On Financial Assistance

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
- f f
UFs National Water Ski Champions, due to a difference in opinion
over financial matters, may not be able to retain their crown at the
national meet in July at Cypress Gardens.
UFs Water Ski Club has been the National Water Ski Champions
for the last two years, according to the American Water Ski
Associations national magazine, The Water Skier.
The purpose of the nationally prominent club, according to the
clubs sponsor Jack Eckdahl Sr., is to give students interested in skiing
a chance to participate in the sport.
Were strictly on a club basis, said Eckdahl. Were not a
collegiate team.
This last statement represents a critical difference of opinion
between the Intramural Department and members of the ski club on
the purpose of the club.
Club members, represented by captain Derek Honour, want the
club to continue as it presently does, as a fun and recreation type
club.
But more importantly, Honour says, the also want the club to
continue as national water ski champions.
To win the title the UF skiers have had to compete against other
teams who have one or two nationally known skiers on scholarship.
The University of Tampa has world trick champion Alan Kempton,
and has hired world-renowned skiing competition judge Stu
MacDonald as their coach.
Three years ago pressure by Tampas ski team on the university
resulted in a prominent alumnus getting behind them and offering the
university the money to sponsor the ski team.
Tampas coach MacDonald was quoted by Honour as saying that
the UF will be sorry if it doesnt develop a competitive ski program
attracting top talent.
As a sport, skiing is developing rapidly and has great potential of
becoming a National Collegiate Athletic Association sport.
Honour said he has been met continually with negative answers
from the UFs Intramural Department and Student Government. His
next stop appears to be with UFs Athletic Director Ray Graves.
We are only trying to secure enough financial help to offer to one
top notch skier, said Honour.
MacDonald said the UF, because of its size and geographic location
in the nation, has the greatest potential of developing water skiing,
seeing as how they are presently national champions.
So far, the UF has shown no interest, said Honour, we have a
nationally known team now, but without financial help from the
university we will be nothing in a few years.
GaddumCloses In
On Softball Title
Gaddum section of Hume Hall won two games last week in its bid
for the all-campus dormitory softball championship.
Gaddum defeated Jennings 11, 64, in a game which was tied 44
until the bottom of the fifth inning. A single by Gaddum s Sam
Hawkins scored two runs to break the tie and win the game.
Don Gorenberg was the only player on either team collecting two
hits as he collected a pair for Gaddum.
Jennings II team scored first on singles by Warren King, Jeff
Austin, and Jim Ledbetter.
Gaddum then went on to storm over Newins as John Kessler hit a
triple and a homerun to lead a 10-run attack. Mark Rosenberg had a
single and a double for Gaddum.
Bart Block socked a homerun for Newins but it was not enough as
the final score ended 10-5 in favor of Gaddum.
Jennings II suffered their second loss as Thomas E doubled them
up 12-6. Mike Estes smashed a single, double and a homerun to pave
the way for Thomas. Bob Fessler and Bill Phillips each had a pair of
singles for Thomas.
Thomas couldnt outdo Tolbert 11, however, as Tolbert hung on or
an 8-7 win. Steve Alford cracked three singles and a homerun in
leading the victory.
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Thursday, May 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

DARRY L.
WAYNE
IS COMING
SATURDAY

Page 17



l, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

Page 18

jr DUNN
/ Alligator Sports Editor
/ A/ crowd gathered at Florida Gym last
f nigfit. It was one of the biggest events ever
f ijkld at the UEt over 7,000 students and
towns peoplejtimended.
f As the amlmnce watched Jntently a short
I circuit developed in thejjiring under the
gym flo/r. Tme wire ovefimated and burned
I througf the \ighly c/mOustible gym floor
which/burst into flamjes. I
THe crowai quietly moved towards the
mairj entranc\to lesc ip\ the enveloping
flanks. SomebOdyl re idled a phone and
telephoned the cairmus police.
i All units of\thk university Police
{ \ Department were dibtfatchid to the gym and
\ \ the \ Ga inesvUle Fit* Department was
\ TheSiPlice uhits arriveilignjhejcene^rst
'
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inside fCcJrida gym

TOMORROW TOO LATE
The Gym Burned? \

and moved swiftly to get the crowd away
from the building and keep the people
moving out the exits.
Inside the gym a panic situation had
developed.
The inadequacy of the exits in handling
large numbers of people attempting to leave
suddenly had caused the panic. The steep
vomitory stairways, which could handle
only 90 people at a time, was the scene of
pushing, shoving and falling as several people
were trampled in the rush.
Hundreds of people in the crowd feeling
that they were trapped tried to get to the
windows on the second floor to escape the
flames. Others went to the basement to
crawl out the office windows and still others
tried to go through the locker room to the
exit to the pool.
Meanwhile the fire department had
sounded a general alarm and was on the
scene with all their engine companies, ladder
companies emergency rescue squads.
Firemen entered the building to rescue
stranded victims.
All available ambulances in the area had
been summoned and the Alachua General
and Med Center emergency rooms were
packed with burned and heat exposure
victims of the tragedy.
The roof and sides of the Florida Gym
had started caving in trapping some people
in the debris.
Hundreds of screaming students, faculty,
children and towns people were rescued
from the buring structure but many more
werent...
This tragedy hasnt taken place yet.
A report prepared by George Ryad Fisher, an
architect, states:

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Tom / / /
Kennedy/



Her Majesty Golfers Rule The Atlantic Open

By DAVID MOFFIT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA Australian
Bruce Devlin wasnt the least
bit surprised that British
Commonwealth golfers did so
well in the Atlanta Classic.
This looks more like the
British Open to me than a
regular U.S. tournament
both on the leader board and
r>ut on the course, Devlin
bad said as he lounged around
the locker room before teeing
[)ff in the final round.
A few hours later, five of
the top eight finishers in the
"lassie including Devlin
U Jo Jo Jl oft* J. Jo

Gator Ski Club Wins UT
Intercollegiate Tourney

The National Champion
Gator Skiers won the overall
title at the University of Tampa
Intercollegiate Ski Tournament.
The tournament was held in
Tampa Bay and was witnessed
by over 2000 spectators who
came to see such internationally
known skiers as Joker Osborn,
Polk Jr. College, who won the
jumping event; Alan Kempton,
Tampa, who won the slalom
event and Jimmie Flea
Jackson, Florida Atlantic, who
won the tricks event.

UF Doctor Charted
Med Group Member

Dr. George 0. Thomasson,
chief of the Division of Athletic
Medicine, Student Health
Service, has been accepted as a
charter member of the Society
for Adolescent Medicine,
according to Dr. Dale C. Garrell,
executive secretary of the
organization headquartered in
Los Angeles.
The new society is composed
of allied health professions who
are actively involved in
adolescent medicine. The group
includes psychologists, social
workers, public health nurses
and related specialists.
The societys goals are to
improve the quality of medical
care and to stimulate creation of
medical services for adolescents;
to increase communication

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1/4 to 1/3 OFF
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MENS & LADIES
CLOTHING
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1123 W. UNIVERSITY AVE ; 372-0472

himself who lost top money
to Americas Bert Yancey in a
birdie-packed playoff were
from the Commonwealth.
South Africas Gary
Player and Devlins fellow
Aussie Bruce Crampton were
3-4 and Canadas George
Knudson and New Zealands
Bob Charles, a lefthander
who won the 67 Classic, were
close behind.
Youve got to realize that
the course here is similar to
the ones we played back
home, Devlin explained. Its
tight fairways put a premium
on accuracy rather than, like

The only Gator who managed
to place in the top three in
mens competition was Bill
Halback who took third in
jumping.
The mens overall title was
won by Polk Jr. College with
496 points, followed by the UF
with 472 points which was only
four points ahead of third place
finisher University of Tampa.
These results marked the first
time the Gators have lost in
mens competition in three
years.

between physicians and other
professionals in adolescent care;
to encourage research in normal
growth, medical conditions and
diseases that affect the youthful,
and to foster and improve the
training of persons providing
such care.
Fete Tickets
Available
All dormitory, fraternity, and
independent intramural
managers must pick up their
banquet tickets by 5:00 pjn.
today in room 227 Florida Gym.
Sport Os Swing
Golf is now played by 15
million enthusiasts around the
world.

so many of the other courses
here in the states, giving a big
edge to the power hitters.
The results certainly
seemed to bear him out. The
American power boys didnt
fare wefl at all. Jack Nicklaus
wound up IS strokes back
and U.S. Open champ Lee
Trevino and Masters champ
George Archer didnt even
make the cut. v
Check around, said
Devlin. Youll always find
the foreign golfers scoring
better when they are playing
on courses where they can
concentrate on finesse instead

In the womens competition,
the Gator skiers swept all events
to take the womens overall title
and help the team to win the
overall team trophy.
A Pat Boutchyard won slalom
and jumping while Kim Anton
took second in jumping and
Linda Aust placed third in
slalom.
DU Sisters
Beat Phi Tau
Due to an error reported by a
previously reliable source the
Alligator Sports Department
reported that the Phi Tau Little
Sisters defeated the DU Little
Sisters.
We apologize. DU won the
softball game 16-15.

COME TO
BURGER CHEF
8 Buy One Big Shes
9 t
Get the 2nd One Free
OFFER GOOD:
THURS MAY 29
OFFER GOOD AT BOTH I
LOCATIONS
715 N.W. 13TH ST. vcS^TF
1412 N. MAIN ST j sawHfe; LL

ot worrying about distance.
This has been a good year
for Commonwealth golfers in
the states. Player, although he
has played in only eight
tournaments, has already won
more money, $71,720, than
he ever won before; and
Devlin, with $65,574, is only
a couple of grand shy of his
previous best season in 1965.
Crampton is half way to
the record-foreigner
SIOO,OOO he won last year
and Charles has topped
$43,000 with a lot of
big-money tournaments still
ahead.
The same cant be said for
Great Britain. Tony Jacklin,
Englands lone hope these
days, is down in 47th place
on the PGA money list and
the way things are goind, it
looks like itll be a long time
before the British Open title,
won by Player last year,
returns home.
Theres a certain amount
of prestige in winning in
other countries, said Devlin.
But, except for the British
Open, the foreign
tournaments dont draw the
fields you get over here.
Miller-Brown
NORTH OF JOk
THE MALL Mfl
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER
Open til 7 p.m. nightly

Thursday, May 29,1968. Ths Florida Alligator,

enough money. Its a &
matter of mathematics, the?
best golfers are going to go?
where they can make the?
most money.
Thats why those of us?
from the Commonwealth?
countries who are doing well?
came to the
Crampton injected. This iso,
where the best golf is. Playing?
on the PGA tour is like?
playing in the Superbowl?
every week. I dont know of?
any other sport where you?
have to face the very best?
week after week.
Devlin pointed out that
American golfers dont fare as p
well in foreign countries as?
they do in the states because?
of the differences in playing'
conditions. 8
A lot of them come up?
with various reasons why ?
they dont enter the British?
Open, Devlin continued.?
But mainly they skip it?
because they dont feel?
theyll play well. ?
If, as Devlin says, the'
British Open is similar to the ?
Atlanta Classic, its easy to?
see why the American golfers?
prefer to stay on this side of?
No# Taking Applications
at
Summit House
1700 S. W. 16th ct
for
September
(-10 a 12 month Lum
rates start
1 BRsl2l
2 BR sl47
Summer Term
Special Rates
376-9668

Page 19



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 29,1969

Page 20

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