Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 144

V2 RSES Bfct
->
v :
* US -"' i 4 JS^^^^FlFl
SUM bi %, i |K
| li : fe
§ if .. ? i.
NICK ARROYO
GREAT TO BE GREEK
Tom Peek, SAE, and Janel Overholt, ADPi, are crowned Greek
God and Goddess at IFC's Spring Frolics Saturday night. For other
awards given during the Frolics ceremonies, see page 2.

Senate Passes Dual Plan
On Student Organizations

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate Thursday
night unanimously approved a
plan which would allow all
university groups to use campus,
facilities without regard for
political philosophy or moral or
religious standards. Contro Controversy
versy Controversy over recognition of student
organizations arose in February
after UF President Stephen C.
OConnell refused to accept the
Southern Students Organizing
Committee (SSOC), as a campus
organization.
The plan approved by the.
Senate was submitted by the
Student Government executive

r' -
.. m $Kj&
NICK ARROYO
STUFF IT
Exactly what the DU's did during the Greek Games portion of
Greek Week. Being stuffed is a Volkswagen and doing the stuffing are
17 DU's. 17?!?

The
Florida Alligator

branch and Student Body
President Charles Shepherd.
It calls for two categories of
organizations: the first, which
presently exists, would be those
organizations recognized by
the university, able to use the
universitys name, and receive
funds from SG.
A new category would be
created for those organizations
whose main purpose is religious
or political advocacy. They
would simply be registered to
use campus facilities. Under the
plan, the only requirements for
this class would be that they
comply with the laws of the
land and agree to be legally

University of Florida, Gainesville

'DISASTROUS . 'NOT THOUGHT OUT
Statewide Attack Meets
Senate No-Tenure Bill

See Editorial, Page 6
" .-T- * £ ~'/ ,-'~£s ' > ~~^-
By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
Reactions, most of them
negative, poured in over the
weekend concerning a bill signed
by about half of Floridas
senators Thursday, which would
do away with tenure on state
campuses.
The bill, drawn up by Sen.
Richard Deeb, RSt. Petersburg,
would revoke the policy of
granting tenure, a privilege
granted to a university professor
after a probationary period.
Leading the dissent was
Robert Mautz, chancellor of the
Board of Regents, who said the
elimination of tenure would be
disastrous.
This would bring to faculty
members a feeling of insecurity
that they would regard as an
attack on their right to deal in
ideas, Mautz said.
The chairman of the house

accountable for the actions or
damages incurred in the use of
university facilities.
Shepherd spoke on the senate
floor in response to questions.
He said the plan would get the
university out of the recognition
for advocacy.
He said he would present the
plan to the Board of Regents of
the State University System at
its meeting in Tampa Friday
morning.
The Regents have appointed a
committee to study the issue on
state university campuses.
Shepherd said an important
aspect of the plan was review of
organizations presently given
funds by SG which may be
advocating certain political
views. Such funding, Shepherd
said, would be in violation of
Florida state law.
President OConnell is not
only excited, hes enraged that
we have been violating state law
in some of our payments,
Shepherd said. He also cited
payments to student
organizations for the purpose of
buying food which are, he said,
questionable expenditures under
state statutes.
If we dont get our financial
house in order, we wont have
one much longer, Shepherd
said.
Associate Dean for Academic
Affairs Roy L. Lassiter Jr.
criticized the Student Senate for
facts contained in resolution it
had passed opposing completely
computerized registration.
The resolution, written by
Bruce Boudreau and
(SEE 'ORGANIZATION' PAGE 2)

Higher Education Committee,
Rep. William Conway,
D-Ormond Beach, also, voiced
disapproval of the bill.
To remove tenure would put
the universities in Florida at a
great disadvantage with other
universities in recruiting (faculty
members), he said.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell also voiced his
opposition to the bill, calling it
not very well thought out.
The abolition of tenure for
faculty in the state university
system of Florida would be a
mistake certain to bring tragic
consequences to the universities
and their students, he said.
One immediate and
far-reaching result, the
president said, would be loss of
accreditation of our
institutions.
OConnell said he was
opposed to the bill, but said he
did believe there is a need for a
way to provide protection of the
institution.
The bill proposed to be
' ; wHw9owjw''''
. V.
PflflflPpnO RICHARD DEEB
... drew up bill

Kirk, Legislators
OK Gas Tax Hike
By RICHARD McCULLOCH
Alligator Staff Writer
Gov. Claude Kirk, State Road Board Chairman Michael ONeal and
legislators informally agreed last week to a one cent per gallon tax
increase on gasoline and deisel fuel.
There is already a seven cent per gallon state tax and a four cent
federal tax, designed to finance state and federal road building.
The burden of this tax will be placed on the consumer, but the
proposal is unpopular with service station operators and gasoline
distributors as well, if a sampling of Gainesville dealers and agents is
revealing.
We are opposed to the increase, especially if it is to support
deficit financing of road building. The present tax is more than
sufficient for road building, but the funds keep getting diverted to
other purposes, said George Davis, Gainesville agent for Humble Oil
Company.
The effect of the tax will be to increase the pump price of gas one
cent per gallon. Gainesville gasoline prices are already among the
highest in the state, with regular selling for about 34.9 cents per gallon
and premium 38.9 cents. Major dealers attribute this comparatively
high price to the cost of trucking in the gas from coastal terminal
cities to inland areas, and to the large number of service stations in
town which prohibits volume sales.
The tanker price for gas to area dealers is 17.5 cents per gallon for
regular and 18.9 cents for premium, to which the present 11 cent tax
must be added before sale.

Monday, May 26, 1969

introduced in the Florida Senate
emphasizes the necessity to find
a proper means for
accomplishing the above
objective, he said.
Dr. Kenneth A. Megill, UF
professor who caused a furor
several months ago because of
his statement that faculty
(SEE 'NO-TENURE' PAGE 2)
fjS .A.
JSM
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
"tragic consequences"
ROBERT MAUTZ
... "would bring insecurity"

America's
Number One
College
Daily r



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 26, 1969

Flavets Due For Slowdown

By LES SLITER
Alligator Correspondent
Motorists who speed through
Flavet or Corry villages next
quarter may Fmd their cars
reduced to a bowl full of rattles.
Freeman L. Goff, UF
manager of married housing, said
this week the State Road

Organization Bill Passed

FROM PAGE ONE
then-Senator Charles Harris had
stated the administration was
seeking to force upon the
students such a no-student no-studentchoice
choice no-studentchoice plan.-
Lassiter told the senate the
Council of Academic Deans had
emphatically rejected an early
implementation of the plan. At
that time the Council formed an
ad hoc committee with student
representation to study the
problem.
To bridge the communica communications
tions communications gap in the realm of
academics Lassiter proposed the
formation of a Council of
Academic Affairs with
administrative and student
representation.
In other senate action:
A straw vote approval was
given to a $15,000 expenditure
for a two-week festival of the
arts next spring, Celebration,
sponsored by Omicron Delta

No-Tenure Bill Hit

f FROM PA6E ONE
members should band together
to form a strong union, also
voiced disapproval of the bill,
but added he was not surprised.
The question is whether the
faculty can organize into a
strong union as other people do,
and recognize that they are
workers, as other people have,
;%V.V.V.V.VAV.V/.V//.V.V.V. I .V.V.V.V
| Child Injured
| At Ball Game |
The 10-year-old son of a
$ UF student was hit in the left ;j:
$ cheek Saturday by a foul ball jjj
in the first game of a :|:
$ doubleheader with Florida >
§ State at Perry Field. :
x Alan Braun, the son of :j
Mrs. Jane Braun, 7ED, was :
§ treated at the game by UF :
!*: Trainer Brady Greathouse :
\ and taken to Alachua General :
i: Hospital for x-rays.
§ The J. J. Finley fifth
I I grader was sitting in the i|
stands at the time of the :
injury.
Braun was released with a >:
badly bruised cheek bone. :j:
The Gator baseball team
sent Braun an autographed
baseball and baseball bat after
the games. :
.V.%\VA%VAV.%%VAVAW.V.V.V/WjA6#
VETERANS
Be a commercial pilotl
NEW G. I. Bill pay* for
Flight Training Call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Area's only approved hool

Department (SRD) has given
approval to install eight speed
bumps in the village roadways.
Goff noted that SRD permission
was needed since obstructions in
state-owned roads are otherwise
a violation of Florida statutes.
Goff said the speed bumps
will be 2Vz inches high and
oval-shaped, spread over a

Kappa. Although the vote is not
binding on the Senate when the
budget comes up for approval, it
indicates their willingness to give
SG funds to the project.
Absent Senators
The following senators were
absent from the Student Senate
Thursday night:
Joe Bartasius (education), Bill
Black (2UC), Jeff Estes (lUC),
Brenda Gevertz (Hume-Graham),
Ronna Goldstein (education),
Dave Jackson (Tolbert), Betty
Jo Padron (Towers), Adrienne
Roy (health related professions),
Still (off-campus), Kathy
Waldman (Jennings), Benton
Murphy (Corry Village), Tom
Hayes (off-campus), and Noel
Nation (Diamond Village).
Mark Gage, former chairman
of the Investigation and
Information Committee,
resigned, and Larry Green was
replaced in his off-campus seat.

Megill said.
Across the state, presidents of
other institutions added their
names to the long list of those
who were against the bill: J.
Stanley Marshall, president of
Florida State University; Dr.
David Delo, president of the
University of Tampa; and Dr.
John Allen, University of South
Florida president all said passage
of the bill would be a mistake.
The faculty is like the
student body, Allen said. Less
than one-half of one per cent are
activists. The other 99 and a half
are quietly doing their jobs. You
wouldnt want to throw the
baby out with the bath would
you?
Although half of the senators
said they agreed with the bill, a
two-thirds vote is necessary to
bring it on the floor.
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THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
luly and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

15-inch width. He added the
bumps will be constructed of
asphalt and will stretch the
entire 20-foot width of the
roads. This will discourage
motorists from dodging them,
Goff assured. Residents have
always worried about speeders
endangering children playing in
the streets.

The Senate also gave
unanimous approval to a
proposal for bi-partite
government of the university.
Under the plan, the Senate
would acquireconcurrent
jurisdiction with the University
Senate on matters of curriculum
changes, recognition of
organizations, the university
calendar, public functions and
lectures, and academic freedom.
Legislation in these areas
would have to be passed by both
bodies.
The Student Senate would
govern all business in the realm
of: distribution of student
activity fees, student
publications, and student
conduct.
Charles Harris, Vice President
of the Student Body and author
of the proposal said he expects
unfavorable reaction from the
University Senate on the plan.
A resolution was passed
calling for 24-hour open house
in the Towers dormitory.
The report on Accent 69
expenditures was accepted by
the Senate but no action was
taken on the report.
A bill was passed prohiting
two persons from the same
fraternity or sorority to work in
the same office of Student
Government.
A resolution was passed
condemning a move by State
Senator Bob Saunders of
Gainesville to require the
University of Florida to pay it s
water bill to the City of
Gainesville.
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The decision to install speed
bumps came as a result of earlier
attempts of the 644 village
families to protect their children
from speeders, Goff explained.
Goff said that the villagers
have resorted to such
unorthodox methods as making
an obstacle course of their roads.
This was done by putting empty
oil drums in the middle of the
roads. Theyve even posted
gigantic 4x6, 10-mile-per-hour
speed limit signs, painted in
international orange and black,
Goff added.
Campus police have tried to
help the situation by ticketing
speeders.
Some tickets have been
given out, but not enough, UF
Director of Security Audie I.
Shuler said. But there is very
little patrolling done in the
villages because of a shortage of
personnel.
Goff feels the speed bumps
will have no effect.
Once people are accustomed
to the obstacles, theyll speed
from one bump to another, he
said.
J. David Glassbum, mayor of
Flavet, is certain that the speed
bumps will ultimately fail.
i The speed bumps themselves
will be Successful, but I feel they
will have to be removed because
of the residents, he said.
Five speed bumps will be
installed in Corry and three at
Flavet, according to Goff, but
on a trial basis of one quarter.
Gdff said that the cost would
probably exceed S6OO, but that
it depends on the outcome of
the competitive bidding by local
contractors. The bidding is being
handled by the University
Purchasing Division. The
contract will be awarded to the
lowest bidder as soon as the bids
are opened.

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Top Frats
Honored
At Frolics
Tom Peek and Janel Overholt
were crowned Greek God and
Goddess Saturday night
beginning the IFC Spring
Frolics.
Peek, an SAE, was sponsored
in the Greek Week contest by
Kappa Alpha Theta. Miss
Overholt, an ADPi, Was
sponsored by ATO.
Overall Greek Week winners
were ATO In the Orange League
Division and Delta Upsilon in
the Blue League. Overall sosority
winner was AWL
Lambda Chi Alpha walked
off with the winners trophy in
the DU Debates, beating out
second-place Alpha Epsilon Pi
for the top spot.
Other award winners
announced at Frolics included
the winners of the Dan McCarty
Service awards, won by AEPi in
the Orange League and Delta Chi
in the Blue League. Orange
League runner-up was Phi Delta
Theta and Blue League runner
up was Tau Kappa Epsilon.
Chi Phi fraternity won the
top scholarship banner, followed
by Alpha Gamma Rho. DU,
ATO and TEP.
Recognized for leading the
IFC Blood Drive were the Phi
Delts in the Orange League and
Delta Chi in the Blue League.
The Phi Delts also won the
Pre-Camigras Gator Loan Fund
Trophy for the most sales of
advance tickets.
TEP was recognized for
donating SI,OOO to Project
SCAT, as was AEPi for donating
S4OO to the Gator Loan Fund.



Astronauts Ready For Splashdown
And Dancing Girls On Pago Pago

SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) Apollo 10s lunar
pathfinders scored a first by
shaving in space Sunday while
rocketing toward a splashdown
from mans most hazardous and
profitable space mission to date.

WHATS

STILL SEARCHING?: Gamma Beta Phi presents Introduction to
Upper Division for searching UC students and for upperclassmen that
still havent found themselves. An informal social follows the program
scheduled for 7:30 tonight in room 361 of the Reitz Union.
FOOD FOR THOUGHT: MENSA minds meet in the Rathskeller
for a luncheon at noon today.
ORGANIZATIONS PLUS: All officers and advisors of individual
Dames Groups will hold an orientation in room 122 of the Union.
Time is for 7:30 tonight.
STRINGING ALONG: The Music Department presents a Faculty
Concert in University Auditorium tomorrow night at 8:15.
PICTURE PICKING: Here at last, the Union Print Sale is scheduled
for Tuesday through Thursday, from 10 a.m.9 p.m. daily in room
235 of the Union.
IF IT HAD ONLY RAINED PENNIES: Order of Omega Project
SCAT will meet in rooms 150 F & G of the Reitz Union Tuesday at
7:30 p.m.
DEANS, GROUPS AND EDITORS GET TOGETHER: An
orientation sponsored by the editors of the Alligator will be held in
room 349 of the Union at 8 tonight.
SG Officials To Get
Fresh Air, Problems
Campus politicos, instead of cooling their heels after an election as
in the past, will continue to stomp the dorms to listen to student
problems, according to a press release Wednesday from Student
Government.
Student Body Vice President Charles Harris, the administrative
cliief of the SG cabinet, has ordered all cabinet officers and other
appointed and elected leaders to get out of their Reitz Union offices
and out on campus to talk to students.
In a memorandum issued Wednesday, Harris directed that all
cabinet officers... spend a portion of their working hours in campus
areas other than the union. Each cabinet officer is encouraged to set
up meetings with dorm area councils, college honoraries and social
organizations to hear student opinion.
Harris said legislation will be introduced to the. Student Senate
providing the same regulations for officials and elected representatives
under the direct control of the executive branch.
Rental Rates for Summer Quarter
Two Bedroom
$315.00 Summer Quarter
Oufdeft^,
Two Bedroom
$365.00 Summer Quarter
Come by or call
1001 S.W. 16th Ave.

HAPPENING

By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writer

Their spaceship passed the
halfway point in the 251,000
mile return flight to earth at
4:40 p.m. EDT, Sunday.
You can pass on to the
governor of Pago Pago were
ready to kick up our heels, said

Eugene A. Ceman after he and
fellow astronauts John W.
Young and Thomas P. Stafford
succeeded in lathering up and
whisking off their beards. It had
never been tried in space before,
at least by Americans, because
scientists feared the whiskers
would float around.
The space fliers will
splashdown at 12:52 p.m. today
in the South Pacific about 400
miles east of Pago Pago, capital
of the American Samoas. It will
be 23 minutes before sunrise,
Samoan time, but 40 minutes
after civil twilight time starts.
Civil twilight time was described
as a period when you would use
your parking lights, rather than
headlights, if driving a car.
Cer nans comment about
being clean shaven and kicking
up his heels on Pago Pago was
prompted by the fact the space
heroes are to be greeted by
dancing girls when they step
ashore on the >vely island.
A Space Agency spokesman
later explained the astronauts
used a regular razor and later in
shaving, but captured the used
lather with wet towels and
stowed it in waste bags. While the
Apollo crew was heading home,
the families of Ceman and
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Young attended church to pray
for their safe return.

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INTRODUCTION TO UPPER DIVISION
SECOND PROGRAM
College Os Health Related
Professions
MAY 26 7:30 pm
Room 362 RBTZ UNION

Monday, May 26. 1969, The Florida Alligato

Just a walk away
from U.F. campus &
1620 W. UNIV. I
UNIVERSITY PLAZA If
Bettes I
, 375-2244

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florid* Allvwtor, Monday, May 26, 1969

Print Sale
Opens Soon
Posters, paintings and prints
from the mod to the ancient will
go on sale Tuesday when the
spring Union Print Sale c opens in
Room 235, Reitz Union.
The sale will run through
Thursday and offers the student
a chance to dabble in dormitory
and apartment interior
decorating.

Transplant Preservation
Research Underway Here

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
.5 f
Once upon a time people
whose hearts stopped beating
were proclaimed dead and that
was that.
But in recent years much
work has been done and success
has been achieved in
transplanting hearts from
deceased people into living ones,
giving those with diseased organs
a new chance for life.
Important research is being
done in Gainesville at the
Veterans Administration
Hospital in this new field.
Dr. Emil Mantini and his
staff, William Dean and Polly
Gouck, have, for over a year,
been developing methods for
preserving hearts for use in
transplanting.
There are hundreds of hearts
that die each day, but there is no
means of realizing this vast
potential of human hearts for
purposes of transplantation.
Until there is, there can be no
effective means of transplanting
them on a broad clinical scale,
says Mantini.
Hearts cannot be transported
to remote areas of need unless a
method is found for storing them
over long periods of time.
Mantinis work involves two
methods for preserving the
organs.
The first method, originated
at the University of Minnesota,
consists of putting the heart in
an atmosphere of coldness,
pressurizing it with oxygen and
infusing it with substances which
flow through the arteries and
veins as blood does in a living
organ.
Mantini laughingly calls his
device for doing this, technically

ART
PRINT SALE
TUES A,
WED X?"
THURS
%
MAY 27 MAY 29
10AM to 9PM
0
Room 235 REITZ UNION

DROPOUTS, ,
T / ''i f FINP QUARTERS \
,f / FOR these meiTJ
s j. w .. 1 c 1969 b. U.i'.rt f#9*w9 Sffld.to**. *"( ~ ~

called a hyperbaric, hypothermic
perfusion chamber, the
freezer-squeezer, because it is
just that. It stores the heart in an
airtight tank filled with oxygen,
perfuses the heart with fluids
derived from blood and cools it
to four degrees Centigrade.
The problem with the
freezer-squeezer is that it will
only preserve a heart for t\Vo to
four hours.
This would only be food in
purely local situations, says
Mantini. What is needed is to
be able to store organs for two
to four months.
Not to be stopped by the
limitations of a machine, Martini
has been experimenting with
calves in his search for a method
of preserving hearts.
Instead of storing hearts in a
pressurized, perfused
refrigerator, we have tried to
store them in another animal.
We took the heart out of
one calf and sewed it into the
abdomen of a second calf. We
have had these hearts beat for
eight weeks. Then we transplant
the heart back into the chest of
another calf and it has sustained
the circulation for periods up to
eight hours.
The main problem with these
experiments has been that of
organ rejection. All the calves
with two hearts died most
from pulmonary infections, a
major cause of failure of human
heart transplants. None of the
calves grew properly because of
the stunting effects of the
medication used to suppress
rejection of the heart.
One experiment was
performed by placing a human

heart, given by the donors
family after his death, into the
abdomen of a pre-treated calf.
The experiment was of limited
success because of early, violent
rejection of the heart by the
calf.
In spite of the setbacks, the
work continues, the ultimate
goal being the successful
long-term storage of human
hearts in calves or other
intermediate animal hosts.
Like blood, hearts must be
typed. A person must have a
blood transfusion with blood of
his own type he and the blood
must be compatible. In heart
transplants, donors and
recipients must also be
compatible.
A person needing a new heart
cannot receive any heart, but he
must be matched up with one.
The chance that a person will be
perfectly compatible with a
heart chosen at random is only
five per cent, so the necessity of
having a good supply of hearts
avilable for selection is great.
Mantini believes that organ
transplants will become a real
part of therapy within this
decade. It is work like his that
will make his hopes a reality.
THIBHT
w.c.
FIELDS
STRIKES
AGAIN!
"GREATCHAST
AND
THE GREAT
McGONIGAL
TONIGHT
FROM
9PM ON*

BY HOWARD POST
r ARE You SURE WE'RE POINUSTHE
// ) I RI6HT *THIM
What have YOU
done today to
improve the
image of YOUR
Country.

WONDER HOUSE
14 SW Ist STREET
K.C. STEAK <1 Cfi
BK. POT, SALAD I.JV
BAKED LASAGNA <1 O C
W/ MEAT SAUCE,SALAD
FREE DESSERT
OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru Fii
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave
ft JgkJAft*
I mA.I Drop your dry cloon cloon
cloon InilH any of our plant*,
B on your way to work .
up on
way
MONDAY, MAY 26 TUESDAY, MAY 27 WED*"3DAY, MAY 28
RIPS ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING
& MARTINIZING PLANTS
7 COMPLETE PLANTS
TO SERVE YOU
204 N.W. 13th Street 130 N.W. 10th Avenue
319 N.W. 13th Street 316 North Main Street
1603 S.W. 13th Street 3444 West University Avenue
N E. 16th Avenue

READ THE FLORIDA
QUARTERLY
cr 3 cjo



f ? >
Gainesville's
center,
Kp j;* s formerly the
g^{||^|5 S Ramada Inn,
KSN*- S P^iiimji>^w^L~
imniUlP"
;^^^^^^^^^BB||^^::::: : *X:$;:S ; : : : : : ; : ; : ; : ; :-x ; : : :>-x : ::S::::::>f:S:: ; : : >: ; : : : : :;: : : : : : : ; x-: : >x::Vx-: : ::: ; : : : : : ; : : : : : : x ; :^: : x:x::::::::::;:::::::i: ; : ; : : : : : ; : ; : ; : : : ; x : : ;: : :
I | I
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mb jm I
MB
I I I i b i ! l i
Ib

II B B
BBBM Bill BBHBHBBBBbbK
.-- ... BBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBf
yv; *< g
, '/'''' 1 i m m ill 1 Ilf| i M

Our former Wolfies Restaurant
will be renamed
THE
FLAG
RESTAURANT
featuring finer food, better service
at popular prices.

West University at Main Entrance to University Campus Free parking for 250 cars

Our former Velvet Lounge will be
THE
FLAG
*' LOUNGE
<7
featuring King Size Cocktails. Hot roast beef sandwiches
from 11:30 a. m. until 2:30 p. m. Cocktail Party 5 to 7 p. m.
with healthy discount on all drinks and free hot and cold
hors doeuvres. Nightly entertainment. Dancing nook.

Monday, May 26,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 26,1969

The Florida Alligator

V M
P*U*M
>w

Vietnam? No, Just Home From College

Fluted Columns

Fraternities and sororities on this campus have
always tended to be just a trifle more than odious,
but a least their tedious attempts at playing the cool
college role and their slavish attentions to the latest
whos-pinned-to-who gossips have been
bearable like being bitten by a rattlesnake with
blunt fangs.
But now they refuse to keep their inane
buffoonery amongst themselves and are attempting
to parcel out the more delectable of their many
attractive traits and accomplishments to the eagerly
awaiting student at large (GDI) in the form of an
innocuos slick PR organ titled unpromisingly The
Gator Greek Monthly.
Three young stalwarts of THE SYSTEM adorn
the front cover, smilingly spraying tons of water on
the rapidly burning Sigma Nu house. Symbolically,
each one is a member of a different fratty-club, and
it is obvious that they are united in a COMMON
CAUSE.
The inside article Gator Greeks Under Fire is
unparalleled in its hearty praises of the manner in
which all the houses on campus sprang to the rescue
of the hapless Nus who suddenly found themselves
without benefit of toilet articles, button down
shirts, beer and other necessities of life.
IMMEDIATELY the SAEs sprang into action,
gathering needed clothing. How enchanting.
The magazine neglected to give a comprehensive
account of the various rumbles that the two houses
have engaged in from time to time over the last few
years. (All in fun, might the editors claim. After all,
whats zonking a few frat boys with Mace compared
to all the strife on this nations campuses?)
But then the Monthly goes on to ennumerate the
various services rendered by the other houses as
proof that THE SYSTEM lives undaunted by dear
dunking in Gainesville. But one thing doesnt ring
true. Os course, everyone did pitch in. They went
scurrying about gathering shaving cream and ham
sandwiches, but the thing that sounds strange is that
the writer seemed SURPRISED. It was as if the
cooperation from the other houses was a kind of
windfall!
On and on the list goes; Herb Lepp of Gamma
Gamma donated a grandfather clock, Rip Claud
offered a pair of TJ water-walkers, the sisters of lota
Ditcha pledged one of their more boxom pledges for
three nights, etc., etc.

"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Oave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor

Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

A Parcel Os Inane Greek Buffoonery

Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors

EDITORIAL

Keep Em In Their Place

The ill-conceived, ill-advised and
ill-researched move by 24 state senators to
take tenure rights away from every professor
in the state strikes us as being just another
deplorable chapter in the story of the
current legislative session.
Senator Richard Deebs bill would mean
the loss of accreditation to state educational
institutions.
But its effects would go much further.
The bill would strip all professors in the
state of their only defense against
trigger-happy legislators reacting to campus
violence in other parts of the country.
Their job security gone, state educators
would most likely initiate an exodus from a
state where ideas would no longer be
intellectually debated but tramped upon,
crushed and pulverized by anyone in a
position of political power.
This would result in the disintegration of
higher education in a state practically
untouched by the wave of student unrest
and violence sweeping the nation.
We could go on enumerating the
detrimental effects that such a bill would
have in the state university system.
But that is not necessary. After the

One point is not quite so cleverly hidden. OF
COURSE, everyone helped. What the hell else
would they do? You spend half your life
expounding lofty ideals of brotherhood and
cooperation and love (and maybe at time you catch
yourself believing it) and what in Gods name do
you do when members of your professed
brotherhood need beds for the night or a touch
of spray deodorant?
The true theme of the story is not how great
everyone was in helping, BUT THAT THEY DID
ANYTHING AT ALL. The writer indeed seemed
surprised. So are we. Except for the fact that the
burning of the Nu house seemed to be taken in by
the Greeks as just one more social event on their
already busy calendar. What we suggest is that
everyone enjoyed the show, and that had the
occasion chanced upon a rainy day or a busy
weekend, none of the Greeks would have bothered
to show, except for the Greek Politicos, a strange
animal which has the knack of being everywhere at
once.
The rest of the magazine is harmless enough,
suggesting, as Greeks are fond of doing, that all
now-great men are great because they were at one
time a member of the old Kicka Delta house back
in 09.
The real curious thing is the intent of the whole
farce. The magazine is obviously meant for the
outsider. It is a well-polished, silly mirage-image of
what the Greek thinks of as the All American
fraternity system. It is a public relations gimmick,
designed to be distributed in the same manner as the
rest of the endless stream of screaming, hard sell
pamphlets and flyers which are disgorged every
other day or so on the weary student body.
What we wonder is why the editors dont have
the gumption to call spade a spade (if such a grossly
designed analogy may be permitted in reference to
our lily-white all southern fratty system). Why not
say: Here it is ladies and gentlemen, the Gator
Grade Monthy, a magazine designed to show you
exactly what wed like you to think the Greeks are
like.
Or, on the other hand, they could put out a
magazine truly designed for the Greek mentality. To
wit, how about a romance column for the
always-female minded boys of the Greek World.
You could call it very simply Dijatapper? in

unfavorable reaction the bill has received
from state newspapers, educators and even
administrators, the Deeb document will
probably meet a quiet death in a dusty
legislative file.
But the sad trend it represents will remain
with us more pressing than ever.
The Deeb bill symbolizes the mood of
angry legislators concerned by events both in
and out of the state.
It is a reactionary mood, generated not
by thoughtful consideration of the issues,
but by revolting emanations from
panic-stricken intestines.
This gut-level reaction has been evidenced
throughout the entire legislative session, as
proposal after proposal to curb non-existent
violence in state campuses and keep the
academic community in its place have
flourished.
i
While we share the repugnance of many
citizens at the outbursts of extremists in
some campuses, we see with no less concern
the hysteric reaction on the part of
numerous legislators.
A reaction that if continued can only
lead this state and its educational system
down the path of self-destruction.

reference to the inevitable bull session which
follows most Greek dates in the secrecy of THE
HOUSE after hours.
We might read little tidbits such as: Larry
Ludlow, an Alpha Turn, is going out with some slut
of late. No score as yet. Or how about: Sleaze
Dunnely, president of Lambda Chopa, has been
working on Susan Realbody of Tri-lota for three
weeks. But Susan Smiles Sweetly: Dont get Pin,
Dont get In.
Such honesty we could live with.
The latest outrage of these members of the
middle-class nobility is in the institution of the
GREEK WEEK. One day they wear their little
jerseys, the next day they play little games, etc., etc.
The thing is that they are ALWAYS wearing their
little jerseys, ALWAYS playing their little games.
Why do they have to inflict themselves further on
the already long-past amused campus?
One can understand such things as fulfilling
belongingness needs, the self deceitful ego-flattering
of being SELECTED over others, of wearing little
symbols of these accomplishments, and of reveling
in the whole thing as a kind of self-contained
life-system. But to parcel the whole thing up in a
neatly-worded, see-no-evil periodical and try to sell
the whole silly bill of fare to the student body as
the GREEK IDEAL goes a little beyond effective
public relations.
Singing to goats, throwing water balloons, and
riding horses around carrying the confederate flag
are activities insidious enough for college students.
But to ADVERTISE the whole gaudy scene,
smacks of the death wish.
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
Opinions express in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

By John Parker



Speaking Out

In response to various black voices that have
recently been raised complaining about this
university and demanding change, I would like to
offer a few comments.
1. The Brown v. Board of Education decision in
1954 demanded only that educational institutions
desist from denying admission to qualified
applicants on the basis of race. It is not open to
question that the University of Florida has complied
with this decision. By the criteria laid down in that
case, the University of Florida is not a segregated
institution.
2. The fact that this institution is less than 1%
Black is attacked by the AASA as failing to achieve
par at 6,000 black students. Besides the physical
impossibility of locating 6,000 qualified black
students, I must question the motivation of such a
demand. The 98 or so black students who are here,

Force Is White Too
MR. EDITOR:
-. 1
In reading a few editions of the Alligator and also reading Ronnie
Clarks article, Prejudiced Against the Use of Force, May 15,1
cant help but find my blackism coming out. Personally, I know
nothing about Ronnie Clark or the person he wrote about, Charles
Fulwood. I am not a black militant nor do I go along with the liberals.
Ronnie Clark, let me find out a few things about you. Have you
ever sat down with a black friend to eat? Have you ever had a black
friend over to your parents home for a visit or have you ever visited a
black friends home? Have you ever dated a black woman or had a
black man kiss your sister? If not, then my friend there is a whole hell
of a lot you yet need to learn. You and your other white friends who
are prejudiced against the use of force.
First of all, force is a word that should be very common to you.
Because you whites have been using it ever since coming to this
country. The Indians knew you as uncivilized human beings, fierce,
brutal, cruel, rude, boorish persons white savages they called you.
You people took their land by force and then you felt bad about it
and put them on reservations. If you had your way, you would put all
blacks on reservations likewise, wouldnt you?
I guess that blacks on the plantations came here willingly. I think it
was by force, what about you? The involuntary subjection of a
person slavery was the word they knew. And after making them
slaves you slaughtered them like you would cattle. There are written
records of brutal and violent killing of black slaves. Things you keep
out of history books. It was recently that I learned the blacks had
outstanding rolls in Americas makings, besides with the peanut.
Thank you, Ronnie Clark for agreeing that the black race has been
discriminated against for a long time. Now how about doing
something about it. And as for something being drastically changed in
the last half century. The only thing I see is that if I walk down the
street holding a white womans hand, youll try to find a taller tree
and use a stronger rope.
TERRICE STEVENS

Souths Symbols Not Racist

MR. EDITOR:
We would appreciate the chance to comment on
the letter written by Mr. Ronald Sachs and
published in the Open Forum column on May 20.
Since we live in the same dorm (Reid) and the
Kappa Alphas display did not last in excess of ten
minutes, it is obvious that the disturbance caused by
the KAs was not great enough to warrant Mr.
Sachs letter. Therefore, it is evident that his true
reason for writting the letter was a distaste for the
Southern Heritage which the KAs take as their
theme.
Being members of neither KA nor any other
fraternity, our purpose is not to defend the KAs but
to comment on Mr. Sachs bigotted concept of the
Southern Heritage.
Mr. Sachs said of the KAs,To repeatedly feel
pride for a cause that was defeated 104 years ago is
to show an extreme lack of insight and
intelligence. He also referred to their actions as a
seemingly racist demonstration. In the first place,
the cause over which the Civil War was fought was
not slavery or racism but the preservation of the
South as a cultural entity. Slavery was the North s
excuse for and not the cause of the war. The war
was caused by the Souths insistence on succession
for political and economic reasons rather than social

UF Is Not A Segregated Institution

FORUM:
C Adviu mi ViiAttt /)
presumably came here to acquire an education. Can
they really deny that the same education remains
open to them whether or not every third face they
see is black?
I would suggest that the real reason for
demanding a broad numerical base of black students
is that the threat of violence can often cause
capitulation to outrageous demands. This type of
intimidation, along with violence and massive
destruction of property, has often been the case
where universities have found themselves with
substantial black student populations.

ones.
There is a relative historical morality in slavery.
Many people in the 1850s considered slavery
completely moral. In fact, the idea of the white
mans burden was accepted by many in both the
North and the South. We are certainly not
condoning slavery; we are just showing its morality
in a historical perspective.
The subjection of the Negroes in 1850 was for
economic rather than racial reasons. Therefore, one
cannot equate slavery in the 1850s to modern-day
racism. For these reasons, we respectively reply to
Mr. Sachs that the symbols of the Confederate
South- Confederate flags, uniforms, and so
forth do not connote racism as he so obstinately
suggests.
The KAs were not celebrating racism they did
not drag any pledges with lampblackened faces
behind their horses! They were celebrating the
memory of young Southern belles, the taste of rare
old Southern sour mash bourbon, the smell of
magnolia blossoms, and the yearly destruction of
the Holiday Inn in Ocala.
RUSSELL LITTLE 3EG
CLIFF CONRAD 2UC
KEVIN COLLINS 2UC
JACKLURTON 3AS

IV |. t
1 I
0
UF BLACK STUDENTS
... Confronted On All Sides

No Roommate
MR. EDITOR:
Recently I read in the Alligator about the dissatisfaction that some
Black students felt because of repeated changing of roommates. I
personally feel that the opportunity to live and to become friends
with a person from a different race and background than my own
would be an enriching experience. Therefore, I proceeded to take the
necessary steps in order to room with a Black student for the summer
quarter.
This was the results of my efforts: I was told at three different
housing areas that requests for room changes had ended May 15. This
I could comprehend. But when I specifically asked to room with a
Negro student I was told that I had made an UNJUST request. Why?
Because requesting a roommate on the basis of skin color was
discriminating. Discriminating? Maybe so.
I then asked if I would be discriminating if I requested a white
roommate. I was told yes. At this point 1 began to consider myself the
lucky student of a single.
I now quote Carolyn Pope, 3JM, who recently said in the Alligator,
The biggest problem is getting roommates wholl stay with you. Ive
had that problem and so has everyone else I know.
It looks as if the Division of Housing has fallen a little short of
appropriate roommate selection. Maybe its about time that they
stepped back and took a better look at the system.
So now I say to you Carolyn Pope, My biggest problem is finding
a Black rommate. Ive had this problem and Im sure some other
whites on this campus have also.
ALICE NAZZARO 3ED

Worthless Tradition

MR. EDITOR:
The letter written by Bruce
Williams turned our stomachs.
He guessed Mr. Sachs was
disturbed while sitting or
standing on campus property.
Right, Mr. Sachs and many other
residents of Reid Hall were
distrubed while sitting in their
rooms studying for tests. We see
no reason to trek to the stacks
every time someone feels like
studying.
In regard to shouting at Black
Students, any action of this type
done once is disgraceful enough
and need not be justified. As for
Blacks doing the same in a
similar situation, we recently
celebrated an event peacefully,
and with no disruptions, thus
virtually killing your point.
The Gasprilla festival is held in
the tourist sections of Tampa
basically as a tourist attraction.
It does not disturb anyone
studying since it passes thru no
residential sections, and occurs
on a holiday.
As for preserving the old
traditions, they really aren't
worth it. The 20th century has
no place for those who think in
the past. If more people were
concerned with uniting this
country than glorifying those

Monday, May 26, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By Roger R. Coffman

3. Lets turn for a moment to the question of
active recruiting of black students. To define this
issue we must first realize that the decision to
recruit or not to recruit is one of POLICY and NOT
an issue of LAW. In no way would this decision
affect the legal rights of anyone. A policymaker in a
democratic society has the obligation to make
policy that reflects the values, opinions, interests
and desires of the majority.
In this case, the relevant constituent community
probably lies somewhere between and including
both the whole University of Florida community
and the people of the state of Florida. If it is their
overall wish, and I believe it is, that those persons in
policymaking positions do not encourage and
promote integrated racial balances, it is incumbent
upon them and entirely proper that they ascede to
those wishes.

who separated it, we would all
be better off. As for White
Womanhood and The Finer Way
of Life, you as well as we
should know what should be
done with these racist attitudes.
Incidentally, Mr. Sachs did
not have his picture in the
Seminole because he was
working in order to remain in
school.
We are neither K.A.s nor fiat
men. We are Blacks. We feel that
Mr. Sachs has been slighted by
someone who wanted nothing
more than to see his letter in
print in the Alligator, because
Mr. Williams reasons are too
HALFASSED to make any real
sense.
FREDERICK REDDY lUC
SAMUEL RANDOLPH lUC
LETTERS
In order to appear in
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers* names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 7



1 FOR SALE |
a y
!K K'M^^WK! !*M*SSW^
35mm Ansco Camera. Good
condition. Shutter: 1/300 to 1 sec.
and bulb lens : f 3.5 to fl 6. $25. Call
Jim 392-8070. (A-3t-143-p)
62 V W Bus Perfect condition
$795.00. Can be seen at 313 SE 38
St. or call 372-8049 after 5 p.m.
(A-143-st-p)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be Inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
GUNS GUNS GUNS. Inventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-18t-136-C)
tS \ % >
1968 Mobile home. 12x60 air cond.,
partly furnished. Dishwasher, nylon
carpet. Available June 15. $4500.
Call 378-9404 weekdays after 6:00
(A-5M40-P)
Trailer Bx3o 1 bedroom. Air con.
carpet TV & Ant. New wireing 850
cash or 800 without T.V. Phone
376-1544. 3620 S.W. Archer Rd.
Gainesville. (A-10t-141-p)
Perfect home for college family 1968
custom built mobile home 12x64 3
bedrooms, wall to wall carpeting
central heat and air, washer, dryer,
storage shed, 10x20 screened porch,
fenced yard, shady lot. Call
378-6983. (A-141-st-p)
BASENJI puppy. Male, top quality, 4
months old, AKC, no bark or odor,
short hair, small appetite, loves
children. Requires loving home with
adequate facilities. Terms to suit.
Phone 376-4103. (A-10t,139-p)
%
Tropical fish and 30 and 10 gallon
aquariums all accessories SBS. Bausch
and Lomb microscope 4x10x45x97x
used in medical school SIBO.
378-5671. (A-st-141-p)
Happiness is a warm puppy! AKC
registered white male poodles. Small
miniature, excellent blood lines, litter
trianed, good with children. Call
372-3489. (A-st-141-p)
Make guests comfortable or squeeze
in an extra roommate on a hardly
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(A-st-142-P)
Now Taking Applications
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GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
£;.;*%v;rx ; x x*x*x x x*x*x xx*x*xx s?;ss*x
Priv. library. Art, Antique sale. Rate
books (9000), many Civil, Rev. War
items collected world wide
Sacrifice prices, Route no.l, Box
361, Kingsley Lake. Starke, Fla. Rte.
301 and 16, 16A, Tele. 533-2381.
Extra Fine Jewelry Collection.
(A-l t-1441 p)
Stereo-Sherwood Amp, Dual
turntable, Wharfdale Spkers, new
Shure cart. Recently purchased at
$525, ask $425, Call 378-4598.
HONDA 305c.c. DREAM, excellent
condition, 8200 miles, 2 Helmets and
Tools included. Call 392-8940. Must
sell. (A-st-144-p)
1968 Yamaha, 305. A-l condition,
only 5000 miles. Leaving the
university, must sell. $47,5. Call Rod
Guise at 372-9343. New tires, black
in color. (A-3t-144-p)
HONDA 1965 150c.c. Excellent
condition. Electric start. Helmet
included. $225. Must sell. Ph.
376-8980. (A-st-144-p)
Home beautiful 44x8 eclar 2 br.
36awntklh stereo unit located in
wooded area near Micanopy. To
appreciate call 378-8320 or
466-3423. (A-st-144-p)
Rickenbacker guitar and case $135.
Gibson amp. 2 12 inch speakers
60 watt output plus premier reverb
unit $235. 392-6059. (A-st-144-p)
GUITAR Framus classical practically
new, will include case, capos, SIOO or
best offer. Call Lois 378-3747.
(A-st-144-p)
1968 V an Dyke 12x52
airconditioning. Located in Varsity
Villa. 395 down. $81.92 monthly.
Call 376-6555. (A-st-144-p)
Yashica 35mm SLR camera
$95.00, Soligor 450 mm telephoto
$55.00, & Soligor light meter
SIO.OO. All for $150.00 . .Suzuki
80, oil inj. $225.00. Ph. 378-5460
after 5:30 pm. (A-3t-144-p)
1966 R6O BMW. $750 cash or make
offer. Call 378-9512. 7-8 p.m.
(A-3t-144-p)
VW 1968 BUG New tires. Just
serviced 27000 miles of good care.
Must sacrifice., 378-3304 evenings.
(A-4t-144-p)
BSR changer, walnut base, dust
cover, empire 888VE cartridge, 3
mos. old. S6O. Call 378-0734.
(A-lt-144-p)
THE RANCHER, Inc. WHOLESALE,
Ammunition by the case hunting
or sporting guns Gainesvilles
largest New gun selection
LAYAWAY now with small down
payment and NO carrying charges.
4821 N.W. 6th St. 376-4595.
(A-6t-144-p)
CLEAN rugs, like new, so easy to do
with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-144-c)
Golf clubs Haig. Ultra half-set with
putter, bag. Al for S6O. Also TV sls
or offer; 3x6 ft block table $5. All
items good cond. & deal. Call Don,
372-3749 Now. (A-3M42-P)
Sony TC-155 tape deck, 4 tr. stereo 3
speed, reel type. Excellent cond.
$85.00 or best Offer. Call Dave at
378-4381. (A-3M42-P)
Matching Green striped chair and
couch (makes a bed) 5 months old,
$75 or best offer. Maple coffee table
$4, 302-18 Diamond Village
evenings. (A-2t-143-p)
1966 BRIDGESTONE 175 CC.
Excellent physical and mechanical
condition. Very reliable. Call Jim
392-8070. (A-3t-143-p)
Be the first to get your choice of art
prints TODAY from 10:00 am
9:00 p.m. in Rm. 235 of the J.
Wayne Reitz Union. (A-3t-143-c)
Dont miss the Union Art Print Sale
Tues. May 27 thru Thur 29th from
10:00 a.m. till 9:00 p.m. in Rm 235
Reitz Union. (A-2t-143-c)

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
a private bedroom hr
F each student one
is* / block behind norman
jn / a *
|| 1J APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT -CALL 372-2662

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 26, 1969

Page 8

| FOR RENT
:x.:.v.:.wx : x-x x-x-x-x-w.s-x x-x x x-xx:*
Sublet Landmark Phase II apt. 1,2,
or 3 male roommates. 2 bdrm, a.c.,
pool, TV, bookcase, stereo, and
refrig. Call 376-5694. (B-5M42-P)
SUBLET leaving town. Must rent for
sum qtr. UG 1-bed. linens, kit. sup.
pic. & sprds. incl. TV too if gone by
June 1. Call 378-9877. (B-3M42-P)
S
Sublet 2 bedroom, 2 bath
Williamsburg Apt. Available June 15,
S2OO month. Option for next yr.
A/C, pool, etc. 378-7469.
(B-3M42-P)
SUMMER SUBLET efficiency apt,
air cond., quiet, 8 blocks from
campus. I pay $225, you pay SIOO
for the whole summer! Call
392-0138, days. (B-5M42-P)
Sublease 2 br. turn Summit House
aptr-AC and pool $31.50 a mo. per
person. Call 372-2607. (B-3t-143-p)
Sublease For Summer. Groovy 2
bdrm. furn house. AC, Fla room, kids
and pets. SBO mo. Call Mrs. Mandel
day 392-2007, nite 376-2944.
(B-st-14;-p)
Stamp out mediocrity! One male
roommate for the summer and next
year. Ranch house with pool and
fireplace. Call 378-4877 after 5 p.m.
(B-st-135-p)
Married students only. Sublet one
bedroom, air-conditioned aparkfrrent.
Pool. Available June 17. Call
378-0972 after 5:30. slOl/mo.
(B-st-143-p)
Landmark 2 bdrm Wow! Running
water, electricity and all that good
stuff. Poolside (Status!) Sublet
summer Qtr. $125 (12500 cents) Dial
378-6587. (B-st-143-p)
DUPLEX Across street from Theta
Sorority house, 2 bedrm, furn,
SIOO/mo. Sept-June 1970. Choice
location. Call 378-3943. (B-2t-143-p)
One bedroom apt. 5 blocks afrom
Matherly Hall. Quiet, air cond, pool.
Perfect for two people $47.50 each.
Will give damage deposit. Available
June 15 376-4962. (B-2t-143-p)
Room in private home for mature
ma e student. Air conditioning,
separate entrance, linen and maid
service. Available June 14. Call
376-5360. (B-3t-143-p)
Spacious 2 bedroom apt. Vz block
from Tigert. Air conditioned $250
for the summer quarter. Call
376-0126 anytime. (B-st-144-p)
Poolside 2 bedroom furnished from
June 16 to August 31 at special
summer rate. Contact FREDERICK
GARDENS. (B-10t-144-c)
1 br. furnished apt. 4 blocks from
campus, available mid-June. $96 mo.
Call 378-1253 after 5:00 p.m.
(B-2t-144-p)
Sublet spacious, 3 bedroom furn shed
house. Large yard, quiet, private,
S.W. section. $lO5 month. 378-8319.
(B-4t-141-p)
Air conditioned, 2-bedroom, carport,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. 6/16/69. (B-5M40-P)
Near campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior men.
For summer AND/OR 1969-70.
378-8122. 376-6652. (B-TF-138-p)
Mu;t sublet one bd Tanglewood
rent paid thru June after June 16.
376-8991 after 4. (B-5M42-P)
Village Park Apt. No. 80 to Sublet
for Summer. 2 bedroom, poolside,
A/C. Call 378-0864. Best Offer.
(B-st-142-P)
FOR RENT: 3-room furnished
apartment Avialable June 15, Married
couples only S9O mo. plus utilities, 1
years lease. For info call Mrs. Taylor
372-0175 NO pets. (B-141-st-p)
WANTED
!'TjawwtHtON e'resaw
2 coeds for summer, 1 for fat i qtr.
Split rent-utilities 3 ways. Call
378-6427. (C-3t-144-p)

ysvsv.v.\NN*;-;-x*x*x->^X'>>x-x*>v-vx->>>X|
WANTED
Two roommates needed to share
large house with two 4EG. Private
room and semi-private bath. $37.50 3
month and l /* utilities. Call 376-0703
anytime. (C-st-143-p)
Mate roommate for summer Cameiot
poolside apt. Sauna. Private BBQ. 2
bedroom 2 bath air conditioned S6O
mo. Call 376-4104. (C-st-141-p)
2 female roommates for French
Quarter apartment for summer
quarter. Only SIOO each for entire
summer. Call 392-7600. (C-st-140-P)
Male roommate to share Fr. Quarter
apt with 3 others for fall. SSO per
month. Call 392-8263 evenings.
(C-st-140-P)
Two to share 2 bdrm. Village Park
for summer or more. Low rent or will
sublet for $l4O per month. Desirable
location. 376-7439: (C-st-140-P)
1 male roommate for nice air cond. 1
br apt, 1 block from Norman. SIOO
plus /2 utilities. Call 376-5842 after
6. (C-5M40-P)
Roommates needed for summer. AC,
TV, pool, 41.25 per mo. June rent
free. Call 376-6087 after \5:00.
(C-st-142-P)
3 MALE ROOMMATES to share
Tanglewood townhouse with grad
student. $l2O for summer. Move in
June 14. Call 372-1625. (C-4t-143-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE Now or for
summer quarter. Airconditioned,
carpet, private room. $55 per month.
Adjustments for May. Call 378-5088.
{C-10t 138 p)
Male roommate wanted for quiet one
bedroom apt. $55 per month plus
utilities for summer only. Call John
378-4110- (C-st-141-p)
POWER
IS IN CONTROL AM IKK
IS NOTHING YOU UNN<_
SHOWTIME
I 8:35 mra I
M PLUS B "i s
I EaOTWOOD I
.rcooGarrs BWfr

Reduced
6 .
Summer Rates
University Gardens Tm.
\ 1 Lunch and Dinner
Monday Spodal ||l
If BAKED MACARONI Alf
% MEAT SAUCE M
m ALL YOU CARE TO EAT M
I 79< I
P| Tuosday Spodal |||
1 *. FRIED CHICKEN f|
lAU YOU CARE TO EAT gs
I 99< I
I MORRISON'S i
1 CAFETERIAS |
||k GAINESVILLE MALL Jm

WANTED
Female roommate for summer, fall
renewal option. Landmark no. 169,
gym, cable TV, sauna, 2 pools, etc.
Free damage deposit, call 378-7782.
(C-st-144-p)
2 female roommates for summer
quarter. June rent free $45/mo. a/c.
Dishwasher, disposal, carpeting, Vh
baths. Phase 2 Landmark no. 82.
378-6339. (C-st-144-p)
Happiness is living in 110 Landmark
summer quarter on the pool. Need 2
female roommates. Call Linda
378-9604. (C-4t-144-p)
'liliijH
i
IM NOW!
THIS IS THE FILM ON WHICH
PLAYBOY
jjPRAN TEN WELL-STACKED PACES C
f w&y ]
I Heironvnius MERKIN
9 ever
1 mm Humppe
and find true happinen*
b Persons under IS no! admitted. This age restriction may
be higher in certain areas Check theatre or advertising
HIM NOW!
|MI
I [r] COLOR United Artists |



CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED |
>i.s?:*:.>>x.x.x*xx:wx>>>>>x*x*x;ss:?c'>s*
one needed for two person garage
apartment l'/z blocks from campus.
SSO for the entire summer.
Airconditioning. 915A S.W. 6th Ave.
Come evenings. (C-2t-143-p)
Female roommate. Share two
bedroom house summer term or
longer. Carpet air cond. Walk to
campus. S6O mo. plus /z utilities.
378-9748. (C-st-143-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
beautiful airconditioned apt. for
summer qtr. T.V. and stereo. Call
9.30 11 am or after 3:3opm
372-2666. (C-4t-143-p)
Male roommate needed! SBO for
summer quarter. Air cond. house,
private bedroom, no lease, quiet
location. 702 N.W. 11th Ave. Ph.
378-0426. (C-3t-144-p)
"Female roorftimSte to share 2 tir.
poolside, French Qtr. Apt. with 2
nurses. Private bedroom. sllO for
June 15 Aug. 30. For info, call Bob
378-6178. (C-3t-144-p)
Management trainee in fast growing
company. No experience necessary.
Part time or full time. Must be 21.
Apply in person at 1723 S.W. 13th
St. (C-st-144-pX
Ill pay for your gas if you will tow
(not drive) my Triumph to (or near)
Lawrence, Kansas, sometime between
June 6 and June 20. Call 372-3870.
(C-st-144-p)
f WANTED §
8 >8 B 8 S
WANTED: Energetic, enthusiastic
salesman/manager. Can earn SIOOO,
S2OOO or more during fall quarter
alone. See Mr. Davis in room 330
Reitz Union between 2 and 5 p.m.
(E3t-nc-p)
Waitress needed Good pay, better
tips, pick your own hours. Must be
over 21. See Ernest in person after 4
pm at Thirsty Gator £33 N.W. 13th
St. (E-2M43-P)
Wanted Student Look after
Gardens Kingsley summer.
I furnish riding mowers, tools,
must be dependable have own
transportation Can use services
daily, week-ends, all-free time Rt.
no.l, Box 361, Starke, Fla. Tele.
533-2381. (E-3t-144-c)
Listeners wanted Will pay $1.50
for one hour session. Must be native
English speaking and have normal
hearing. Please call Shirley, Univ. ext.
2-2046 between 8-5 only for
appointment. (E-3t-144-c)
AUTOS I
For Sale: 1966 Triumph Spitfire 4
new top and tires, 32000 miles. Book
Price sllsO, make offer. Call B.H.
Bennett 392-2187. (G-3t-144-p)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen dealer, 4222 NW 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-ts-130-C)
66 Triumph Spitfire MKZ, con.,
tanau cover, r&h, good condition;
1200 or best offer 376-2816 after
4. (G-5M42-P)
67 convertible Mustang S2OO below
used car retail, $1440, 19,000 miles,
6 cylinder, gas economy, must sell,
beautiful. 120 NW 24 St. 376-8565.
(G-12M42-P)
Station wagon Ford Fairlane 9
passenger 1 963 automatic
transmission, air conditioned, new
brakes new tires, very good
condition. $595. 372-3213.
(G-st-144-p)
1966 SAAB Rally special fully
equipped pirelli tires koni
shocks. Good condition, low mileage.
$995. Call 466-3213 (No toll) or
392-0220. (G-3t-143-p)
Bugeye Sprite new top & tires. Needs
transmission work otherwise
mechanically perfect $225. Call
378-5227. (G-st-143-p)
64 vw radio, rack, good condition,
55000 miles, $650. Call 376-4324
jtter 5;3q p m (G-3t-144-p)

NEW .1
Hawaiian jm
Village |&*
Now leasing for Sept.
34(j 1 S. V,. Sc in d Av (
PHONE 378-5905
Next to We .'gat*
Shopping Ci nti i
Townhciiise & f i.its
-> wi mm mg i mo l
Recr eat an i tal
Wan to Wan Ca>uet
if Condi t n* *'
Dishwa't.e* & Disoo'.eis
Privat* Pat. *s
Mast o' l T\ A i term
Laii'itn y t ac.i* tie 1 .1
1&2OR 1, ,? I' tlv I
MODELS OPEN DAILY 10 5. I
Hot pond / *p' tnr < s ]

AUTOS I
V. v
NXXr:-:-xx:x:xXX-x-x-x-:.:-x.:.-.s-:-:-:-:>v.-.*
Must sell English sports car 1965-
Sunbeam good tires, seat belts,
power-disc brakes, convertible. Book
value is SIOBO. Will sell 825.
372-7971. (G-10t-141-p)
I PERSONAL f
X s
xwv;x:*wixxx<.xxs*xxx.x Beta Theta Pie day will be held for
sure on Sat. May 31. (J-st-144-p)
Congratulations to the great new
Kappa Sigma Brothers. Love, your
little sisters of the Star and Crescent
(J-lt-144-p)
Want to work someplace new and
exciting? Lets go to work in Atlanta
this summer. Call Betty 378-0609
(J-lt-144-p)
Getting Married Soon? Bridallure
Wedding Gown & Veil. Beautiful.
. Size 9. $50.00: Call 376-9707 after 6
p.m. for information. (J-st-140-P)
ITS GREAT to be GREEK! Come
find out why by signing up for fall
rush anyday 1-4 p.m. at the JWRU
Rm 315 Panhellenic office.
(J-st-140-P)
Math tutor needed: Think you can
bail me out of D E? Pay plus S6O
bonus if I make a C. Prefer someone
familiar with MS 305 378-3166.
(J-2t-145-p)
Cessna 150. $9 per hr. Flight
instructor wanted. 495-2124 after 7
p.m. (J-10t-136-p)

- MOM
- " sA,N sv,u -' mall
Tape Recorder Sale!
i ..

Ambassador 2-speed
tape recorder
regularlv 59.00
sale! 35.40 MR6O
Monaural cabinet style recorder. 5" reel reelto-reel,
to-reel, reelto-reel, capstan drive, remote control mike.

Maas Cameras

I "pemonal" I
Splitting school and need breaa.
Selling everything. 48 black light,
incense burner, albums: Hendrix, etc.
Even beer mugs. Call 378-4507.
(J-3M42-P)
INTERESTED TO TRAVEL TO
SOUTH AMERICA?! I am organizing
a trip in a private bus. If seriously
interested call 372-7039 between 5-7.
(J-4t-141-p)
TADFOUCL*
There are damn few Datsuns on used
car lots. To buy one see Godding &
Clark down by the main post office.
(J-ts-143-c)
| GATOR ADS SELL!! |
INCOMPLETE XEROX|
| OFFSET FACILITES 1
Specializing in
::! Thesis and Dissertations
$ Reductions and :$
% r ,v
Enlargements
| Open Til 11 P.M.
|j Highest Quality
ft We Guarantee it!
! 7 days £
| QUIK-SAVE |
| University Plaza
11620 W. University |
| 378-1001
: x-x-x-x-x-xx-x.xx.v.x.;-:.;.v.;.:.;.;.^

| LOST & FOUND |
Please help find Tely-LumpLump
small-orange & white spotted
ringtaled tomcat at 1824 NW 3rd PI.
378-3022 substantial reward.
(L-st-141-p)
H "sERvicES ]|
TYPING IN MY HOME 5 YEAR
EXPERIENCE IBM ELECTRIC
STANDARD TYPEWRITER. CALL
376-7809.^M-st-141-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. fiyi-tf-132-C)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Cal)
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)

I ROBBIE'S I
The Best In
Meals.&Lj Q
rCOLOR TV & BILLIARDS
7lB W. University Ave.
1 'OnThe Gold Coast*

Ambassador
6-transistor tape
-jt * ~ ~
regularly 34.95
sale! 29.97atr 5
i
Capstan drive assures constant tape speed.
Reel-to-reel, 2 speeds, level indicator.

Monday, May 26,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

AJinmiimmiineitnnnnnnnnnnnnnTi-iiioieMjt
I SERVICES I
Sowwswwwtwwwwim 88 tror
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible, but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
526 S.W. 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station 378-4480.
(M-lt-106-c)
Tennis racket restringing satisfaction
guaranteed free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19t-107-p)
Fly to Miami $36 R/Trip. Lve
Gainesville 5:30 p.m. May 29. Lve
Miami 8:30 p.m. J. Ist. Nonstop 2
hrs. Exp. pilot, Twin Bonanza plane.
Call Shirley Patrick 378-2443 or
378-8145 after 5. Must have res. by
27th. 4 more passngrs only!
(M-3t-142-P)

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 26, 1969

UT Edges By UF To Win
SEC All-Sports Crown

UF missed its chance for the
sixth straight All-Sports
Southeastern Conference
Championship by a half-a-point
for the 1968-69 season to
Tennessee.
Last year the Gators won the
crown by one point over the
Vols.
Tennessee edged UF,

GOLF* MARC DUNN, EDITOR TRACK
SEC Officio s See
Year Os Rebels
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. Southeastern Conference athletic officials
have predicted the 1969 football season will be The Year of the
Rebels.
The verdict in The Birmingham News annual poll of athletic
directors and publicists at the 10 schools was overwhelmingly in favor
of the Rebels of Ole Miss to win the SEC crown.
The Rebs collected 69 points in the voting, rated on the basis of
nine for a first-place ballot, and so on. A team could not rate itself.
Ole Miss took four first place votes. Other top ballots went to
Georgia (3), Alabama, Auburn and Louisiana State.
Defending champion Georgia came in second with the poll with 64
points. Alabama edged promising Auburn for third, 6259. LSU
rounded out the first diviision with 57.
Tennessee led the second five with 51, followed by Florida at 31,
Vanderbilt 21, Kentucky 19 and Mississippi State 17.
UF Basketball Schedule
Adds Louisville, Harvard
A formidable 18-game Southeastern Conference schedule, an
appearance in the Gator Bowl Classic and three new opponents
headline the 1969-70 UF basketball schedule.
UF will play a 26-game schedule with 11 games in Gainesville, four
tournament games in Jacksonville and 11 games on the road.
The Gators open the season Dec. 1 in the 2nd annual Sunshine
Classic in Jacksonville and close March 7 against Alabama in
Tuscaloosa. UF has added powerful Louisville, Northwestern and
Harvard to its 1969-70 schedule.
Louisville, which played in the post season NIT with the Gators,
was runner-up to Drake in the Missouri Valley Conference.
Northwestern, a Big Ten power, was Gator Bowl Champions in 1969.
UFs home and home schedule with Southeastern Conference
opponents include Alabama, Auburn, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU, Ole
Miss, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Vanderbilt.
The 1969-70 Schedule: Dec. 1-2, Sunshine Classic, Jacksonville; Dec. 6,
Northwestern, Evanston; Dec. 20, Louisville, Gainesville; Dec. 23, Harvard,
Gainesville; Dec. 29-30, Gator Bowl, Jacksonville; Jan. 3, Auburn, Auburn; Jan.
5, Vanderbilt, Nashville; Jan. 7, Alabama, Gainesville; Jan. 10, Kentucky,
Gainesville; Jan. 12, Tennessee, Gainesville; Jan. 17, West Virginia, Morgantown;
Jan. 24, Mississippi State, State College; Jan. 26, Ole Miss. Oxford; Jan. 31,
Georgia, Gainesville; Feb. 4, LSU, Gainesville; Feb. 7, Auburn, Gainesville; Feb.
9, Vanderbilt, Gainesville; Feb. 11, LSU, Baton Rouge; Feb. 14, Kentucky.
Lexington; Feb. 16, Tennessee, Knoxville; Feb. 21, Mississippi State,
Gainesville; Feb. 23, Ole Miss, Gainesville; Feb. 28, Georgia, Athens; March 7,
Alabama, Tuscaloosa.
Climb aboard |
/The S.S. Winnjammer
y* Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M. Wj
Dinners to 12:00 P.M. JI
\ Bernie Sher at the Organ A\
/ on | r
Thursday, Friday & Saturday 'll
Oysters & Clams on the half shell m
Michelob on draft I*7
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty (Cl
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. Vp*.
Reservations accepted W
| | Harry M. Lanton, Manager m /
Closed Sundays

5958#, to claim the honor.
The Volunteers won the
crowns in swimming and track,
were runners-up in football and
basketball, finished third in
baseball, fourth in golf and fifth
in tennis.
UF won the SEC tennis title,
was runner-up in swimming,
golf, baseball and track, third in

basketball and tied for sixth in
football with Ole Miss.
The commissioners office
used a point system for judging
the schools all-around
program lO points for a first
place finish, and so on down the
line.
The SEC will add an eighth
league event next year with the
championship wrestling
tournament set for next March
at Auburn.
Georgia moved in third place
on 49# points by placing first in
football and golf, second in
tennis, fifth in swimming and
baseball, tying for fifth in
basketball with Vanderbilt and
eighth in track.
Louisiana State nipped
Kentucky for fourth, 37#-37.
LSU was in seventh place in
1968.
Alabama dropped from third
to sixth with 34# points,
Auburn had 30# for seventh,
followed by Ole Miss with 27#
and Mississippi State and Vandy
ha^2^ach^^^^^^^^^^
I Miller-Brown I
I ONE MILE I
NORTH OF I
THE MALL NH
I 376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER
N Open til 8 p.m. nightly M
Have r
Your Generator \
OVERHAULED Soecial
s£so |
INC LABOR
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
so* nw atfc Avr. gainisviiu
MON -Ml. a AM-MM SAT. Til 5 PM
37*4011

L?

%
*

mrn
I New this year.. .the most exciting car of any year.. .dual over- I
I head cams on high performance engine 4-wheel disc brakes I
I ... 5-speed synchromesh stick shift... full instrumentation ... I
I contour bucket seats... 2+2 ... Gran Turismo styling. I
I Fiat 124 Sport Coupe *3050 I
HOW DOES P.O.E. I
FIAT DO IT
'*> FOR THE PRICE?
I FIAT FACTORY AIR I
I AVAILABLE I
iS' \-
ll
Ja ;iifti^§iiiiiy-y 4 WSM : #f : : v -' ;; f "t

SALES-SERVICE-RENT ALS
Authorized Authorized
Adler Dealer" W Smith Corona
* /
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
B FORMERLY Hancock OffiC* Equipment
582 N. Main St. 376-5551

Car Need Repair?
Tune-ups Srake Repair Overhauls
We work on all makes and Models of cars.
10% discount to Students and FREE ESTIMATES
ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
Corva/r Specialist
1031 So. Wain 376-7771

U
for any 10 pizza
Mon-Thur
11: 30 p.m.- 2:00p.m.
Call ahead for
faster Service 378-5761



Gators Drub Seminoles Two Os Three

By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
The Gators rode the strong
left arms of Jim Courier and
Mike Jacobs to two victories
over arch-rival Florida State last
weekend and came within an
eyelash of sweeping the
season-ending three-game set.
UF captured Fridays contest
behind Couriers masterful four
hitter and a barrage of 10 Gator
singles, 8-0. Jacobs, with relief
help from Glen Pickren, gained a
3-1 victory in the opener of
Saturdays twin bill.
The night cap, like the
preceding game a seven inning
affair, was tied 1-1 after
regulation play when the Gators
almost won it in the bottom of
the eighth.
Guy McTheny opened the
threat with a two-out single into
left center, a hit that gave him
the unofficial UF batting title.
The fleet-footed sophomore
then stole second to set up a
Gator bid for victory.
Leon Blood worth, in the hole
with an 1-2 count, caught a Greg
Skok fast ball and lined it into
center. Walt Sumner played the
ball on one hop as McTheny

Cindermen Win USTFF Meet

The luck of the Irish was with
the Gators as they swept to
victory in the United States
Track and Field Federation
Southeastern Region meet
Saturday in Atlanta, Ga.
Led by Irishman Eamonn
OKeefees record breaking
880-yard run, the Gators
amassed 47Vi points to runner
up Georgia Techs 29 points.
Florida State University was
third with 26 points.
OKeefee, a native of Dublin,
Ireland and only a Gator
freshman, covered the 880
course in 1:50.1 for one of two
records set at the 17-team meet.
The other record was in the
3-mile run.
Ron Jourdan, John Morton
and the mile relay team also
captured firsts for the Gators.
Jourdan, the United States
premier high jumper, did not
have his best night, but he still
managed a leap. UF
teammate Jim York finished
second behind Jourdan with a
6-6 !4 jump.
UFs Morton won his

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GATOR MVP
rounded third and threw a
letter-high strike to Seminole
catcher Jack Keith. The diving
McTheny was tagged out just
inches from victory.
FSU bounced back to score
two in the top of the ninth to
capture the seasons finale for
both teams.
A leadoff single by Mike
Easom and a walk to Dick
Nichols chased UF starter David

speciality, the discus, with a
170-2 toss, but lost out in a
close battle with Tennessees
Chip Kell in the shot put.
UFs team of OKeefee, Jerry
Fannin, Jim Dyson and Bob
Lang swept home in 3:15.2 to
win the mile relay.
Mike Burton collected two
seconds for the Gators with
efforts in the long jump and the
javelin.
Fannin was second in the
440-yard hurdles with a time of
53.1 and the UFs John Parkers
4:12.1 time was second to UTs
Dave Squire in the mile run.
Squire ran a 4:11.5 to win.
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
(VOLVO)
Good Service Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

COURIER NAMED GATOR MVP

Kahn, a senior right-hander who
fanned nine Seminoles and gave
up but four hits in pitching one
of the best games of his career.
Larry Sheffield relieved and
struck out pinchhitter Greg
Schnute before Keith singled
into rightfield for the go-ahead
run. Skok gave himself some
insurance with a squeeze bunt
that upped the score to its final
margin, 3-1.
Jim Courier, voted Most
Valuable member of the 1969
Gator squad by his teammates
shortly after the doubleheader,
was in complete command-of
Fridays game.
The senior from Oviedo
allowed only one Seminole as far
as second base as he extended
his UF career record to 21-6 and
this seasons mark to 11-2.
Courier didnt walk a man in
recording his second shutout of
the campaign and his seventh
complete game, and he struck
out six. The blanking lowered
his earned run average to 1.89.
The Gators gave Courier
plenty of cushion in the fifth
inning when they exploded sor
six runs.
Defensive star of the series
who made at least

Next stop for the Gators
track team in the National
Collegiate Athletic Association
outdoor track championships in
Knoxville, Tenn., on June 19-21.

THIS
to.
KINGS FOOD HOST
o
Sundaes 25C
Banana Splits 39<;
(no go orders please)
f Kings Food Host
Two locations
1802 W. University 372-6820
1430 S.W. 13th Street 378-1656

four sterling catches from his
centerfield position.
The weekends games left the
UF a 3-2 series advantage over

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Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

Monday, May 26,1969, The Florida Alligator,

FSU this season and 23-20 lead
overall. The Gators finished the
season with a 28-16 mark while
the Seminoles ended at 38-JJL__

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 26, 1969

_
IHjT SENATE MEETING TOMORROW
KU M- HI jU U j 3 il v l 27, 1969. All Senators not going to be here for the summer
\ quarter must have their replacement nominees in by 5:00
\ § L SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT Jodav
STUDENT ACTIVITIES M
WANT YOU!! (X&
project directors needed
Project Directors and Cabinet Undersecretaries are needed immediately in the mM,
OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATRE PROJECT PUBLIC RELATIONS AGENCY
CAMPUS CO-OPERATIVE GROCERY-BOOK STORE MINORITY GROUP AFFAIRS
CAMPUS COMPUTER DATING SERVICE EDITOR OF INTER-ORGANIZATIONAL HANDBOOK
STUDENT COMMITTEE ON REORGANIZING EDUCATION (SCORE) MARRIED STUDENT AFFAIRS
SELECTIVE SERVICE INFORMATION BOOTH STUDENT GOVERNMENT BABY SITTING LISTING SERVICE
GENTLE MONDAY r DIRECTOR OF JUNIOR COLLEGE AFFAIRS
COMPUTERIZED CAMPUS OPINION POLL PROJECT (PULSE) FALL WELCOME WEEK CHAIRMAN
Applications for the above positions are available in Room 305 of
the Reitz Union. No previous student Government experience is
necessary. However, applicants must be attending the UF this
summer. Interested students may contact Student Body Vice
President Charles Harris at 392-1665 from 2 to 5 p.m. for further
details.
- - - -

teacher evaluation
Applications are now being accepted for staff personnel in Course and Teacher
Evaluation. The following positions are still open: (1) Research Director (design &
validate evaluation questionnaire and computer programs; improve program
effectiveness); (2) Operations Director (enlist faculty participation; supervise
administration of evaluation); (3) Publications Editor (edit, produce, and distribute the
Evaluation Booklet); (4) Public Relations Director (prepare press releases; explain
program to the academic community; handle special correspondence); (5) Executive
Secretary (coordinate and supervise the office activities); (6) Office secretaries (type, file,
and maintain orderly activity of the office).
Aplications may be picked up at the Activities Dest on the 3rd floor of the Reitz
Union.

S.G.P.
Applications are now being taken for
executive positions on Student Government
Productions. The Chairmanships for Finance,
Booking, and Production are available and a
ticket manager is needed.
SGP Chairman Alan Howes has asked all
interested students to pick up an application at
the Student Activities Desk as soon as possible.
Appointments will be made on the basis of job
qualifications and an interview.

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND AT THE
-sf*- &atj)SkeUer
GENE MIDDLETON
THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY
MAY 29.30 and 31

OFFICE OF MINORITY
AFFAIRS
Office of the Secretary of Minority Affairs
Needs personnel to fill staff And clerical
positions. Staff will work on:
Black student recruitment program
Black-White education
Fla. A& M UF student exchange

HOMECOMING
Applications for
Homecoming Positions are available at Student
Activities Desk
Gator Growl (world's largest std. production)
Parade
Alumni Events
Speical Functions
Barbeque
Technical

ACCENT
If you would like to work indecent '7O
and meet and work with some of the
important speakers who come to accent
the honored guests committee could
use your help Please leave your name
and phone number with the secretary in
room 305 of the J.W.R.U.