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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
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v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
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Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 143

IN LEGISLATIVE REQUEST
OConnell Seeks Funds
For Gym, Water Bills

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Wiftar
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell has issued to the
Florida Legislature additional
funds requests for the
Engineering and Industrial
Experiment Station (EIES),
Florida Gym renovation and city
water payments.
Noting the EIES budget has
remained a constant $500,000
for the last six years, OConnell
called on the legislature to add
$75,000 SIOO,OOO to its
budget.
The station has not been
able to maintain its level of
service and scope of operation
but gone backward, he said.
The Florida Budget
Commission recommended
$684,000 for EIES but this
figure was reduced to $500,000
by appropriation committees of
both the Florida House of
Representatives and the Florida
Senate.
OConnell also asked the
legislature to establish by law a
$250,000 devolving fund for
EI F C, which would cover
operating expenses when
payments of clients bills have
not been received.
OConnell addressed the
requests to members of a joint
house-senate conference
committee which is ironing out
differences in appropriation bills
of the house and senate. Among
the members of the committee
are House Appropriations
Committee Chairman Ralph
Turlington and Senate
Appropriations Committee
Chairman Lawton Chiles.
The committee is expected to
make a final decision on
appropriations this weekend and
present to the legislature a bill
next week.
OConnell also asked for
student activity fee allocations

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America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville

I would repeat that we are the only major
institution in Florida that does not have an air
conditioned facility for large gatherings on campus.
Stephen C. OConnell

to be altered so that $2 more
goes to student health services
and $2 more to the operation of
the Reitz Union.
With undergraduate tuition
being increased from $125 to
$l5O, the present $30.50
activity fee allocation will be
raised to $39.50. The houses
proposed allocation of the fee
would allot $2 more to student
health but rib more money to
the union.
If we continue to allocate to
the union only the same $8.50
per student per quarter as at
present, we will suffer a loss of
at least $90,000 in the coming
year, OConnell said.
Since we are unable to
operate at a loss, we would be
forced to curtail services at the
union at a time when the
services are already at a
4 minimum.
STEPHEN C O'CONNELL <
... calls for increase 1

Friday, May 23, 1969

The house and senate have
earmarked $250,000 for Florida
Gym renovations for updating
safety standards. However,
OConnell is also requesting a
minimum of $450,000 to begin
air conditioning of the building;
the cost of air conditioning the
building completely is $910,000.
I would repeat that we are
the only major institution in
Florida that does not have an air
conditioned facility for large
gatherings on campus,
OConnell said.
Pending in the house is a bill
which would permit the levying
of property taxes on non-profit
organizations, including
fraternities and sororities.
OConnell told the committee
( SEE "O'CONNELL" PAGE 2 )

Programmed Registration
Still In Planning Stage

' (EDITORS NOTE: This the last of a series on
computer registration at UF, and its chances for
replacing the student- scheduling system now being
used.)
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Could a computer registration be placed totally
in effect at UF?
Certainly not at present, or even when the new
IBM 36050 computer is delivered in July.
The mechanics of this system dictate that there
will be a considerable length of time before a
suitable program could be written, and a
determination is made if the 360 is a sophisticated
enough computer for our needs, Registrar Richard
Whitehead said.
Whitehead is now talking in terms of a shorter

UF Needs Funds
Urges AAUP
By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
In a 22-page, strongly-worded documented pamphlet sent to each
member of the state legislature, the UF American Association of
University Professors (AAUP) has called for funds to save the
university from sinking into the morass of mediocrity.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell in the pamphlet told the
legislators: The UF is within leaping distance of greatness, sinking
distance of mediocrity. This legislature could raise its first university
into the company of the nations dozen great ones, dynamos of
wealth and culture ...
Without their help, he said, this university will surely sink into the
morass of mediocrity, where aspiration and inspiration have no
meaning, where nothing may be very bad and nothing is very good.
The pamphlet says UF is not a state supported institution but
rather a state assisted one. Less than half of its operating expenses
are paid from state funds, the rest coming from federal government
grants and aids.
And the portion that the state does provide is not adequate for
turning the school into a first-class university or even maintaining it as
a good one, the association says.
Although Florida is growing rapidly economically first in per
capita income in the South and first in the nation in employment
growth the state is ranked eighth from the bottom in the nation in
per capita expenditures for higher education.
Dr. Ray Fahien, president of the UF chapter of AAUP told the
legislators that while the State of Florida' has done a fine job of
establishing new universities at various locations within the state, it
has not developed even one of its state universities to that top-rated
status which attracts and holds the most brilliant professors.^
The legislature does not seem to realize that it costs money to
build new schools and that ones that already exist must be
maintained, Fahien said.
The problem of faculty compensation is central to developing a
great university. The reputation of a school is as important as the
salary a new recruit will receive in making him decide to come to UF,
according to Fahien.
Salary levels will determine the quality of the faculty, which in
turn will determine the reputation of the university. Other schools
nationwide have increased their salaries at an average of 7 1/2 per cent
a year. UF salaries have increased at half that amount over the last
eight years.
The expense of increasing salaries, Fahien said, would be more than
paid back over the years as industries are attracted to the state
(SEE LEGISLATURE" PAGE 2 )
m

range project, and the ad hoc committee on
registration procedures is listening.
A feasibility study has indicated that computer
sectioning of students registering in the wrap-up
registration period, the one just before classes begin,
could be handled by computer with as great an
efficiency as at present.
I feel that a trial run of the computer sectioning
system during wrap-up registration would be fair,
Whitehead said, and would still agree with the
student body.
However, such a system could not be put into
effect until spring quarter of next year at the
earliest.
Thats the minimal time, he said. It could
(SEE "TOTALLY COMPUTERIZED" PAGE 2)

Why It's Great
To Be Greek
Greek Week festivities
took a somewhat
sentimental turn Tuesday
night when fraternities went
from house to house
serenading their sometimes
sweethearts.
The girls of A Ipha Delta
Pi here return a sweetheart
song, with lighted candles
in hand.
At times like this, any
girl or guy is sure to
agree, its great to be greek!



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23, 1969

Totally Computerized Registration Far In Future

FROM PA6E ONE j
well take longer.
The computer sectioning system, as originally
envisioned would have students register for courses
only. No sections would be provided for initial
registration.
Students would then be issued a copy of their
schedule. All students would be guaranteed that all
courses required for registration would be provided
for.
Such a system has in fact, been in operation for
two years. Entering freshmen are nearly all
registered by computer, with the number last year
passing 2,200.
The advantages to the system are mostly in terms
of the most advantageous usage of space in the
university.
As listed by Whitehead in an Oct. 30, 1968
memo, the chief reason for changing to computer
registration would be a better allocation of
resources.
The main disadvantage would be the problem of
scheduling students with special problems.

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378-2646
Till-: I LORI HA ALLIGATOR is the official stuJvnl ncwsp.ipi r i.l the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the I Alligator. Reit/ Union
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entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or 53.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
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notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (I) one day after the
advertisement appears. The florid a Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

REGISTRAR WHITEHEAD PREDICTS

Another' would be complete acceptance by
students of the concepts for developing schedules.
It is this last disadvantage which has held up
implementation of the system which was orginally
scheduled to go into effect for this falls
registration.
Everything, at this point, revolves around the
idea of student choice being eliminated. It is over
this single point that students are not willing to
accept computer registration.
Whitehead sees the problem as one of facing
reality.
Everyone wants student choice to remain in the
system, he said. This is fine for the people at the
front.
However, sections close out, and time schedules
begin to shut down. What disturbs me is when the
courses begin to close out entirely. If youre a
student in that predicament, it is a very serious
inadequacy.
Use of a computer registration system might
remove the wide latitude of choice now available,
Whitehead said, but we can guarantee every
student a schedule either through registration or
drop and add.

OConnell Wants Money

FROM PAGE ONE
he would not contest the
decision if all religious,
charitable, fraternal and
educational property would be
taxed.
However, if distinction is to
be made in those properties by
use or function which are to be
taxed and those that are not, it
is my position, firmly stated,
that fraternities and sororities
should not be taxed because
they are a vital part of the
educational system, as much as
are dormitories and married
housing facilities provided on
this campus.
He also asked the legislature
to include in UFs budget an
iron-clad provision for city
water payments, if Sen. Robert
Frolics Tickets
Still On Sale
Only 100" tickets remain for
Saturdays Four Seasons show,
Miles Wilkin, IFC treasurer said
Thursday.
Couples tickets are on sale at
the Reitz Union box office for
$5.

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CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY

So, the ad hoc committee has deliberated
through more than a quarter, with an end barely in
sight.
Student reaction to that end will determine the
future of registration at UF.
Last month, .Bruce Bordreau, a committee
member and student senator, introduced a bill into
the senate condemning complete and total removal
of student choice from registration.
Bordreau based his resolution, which was passed
unanimously, upon the direction of the committee
to that point.
Two weeks later, when word of the resolution
reached the committee, one member, an
administrator, called for Bordreaus removal from
the committee, and for him to be tried before the
honor court for breach of trust.
Whiteheads opinion is that students will have a
choice under any computer system, but so far, no
indication has come on how this system will be
achieved.
Whatever the committee decides will probably
become law as soon as a workable system can be
devised. Right now it is with the future of countless
students on its agenda.

Saunders bill requiring UF to
pay the city for its water is
passed by the Legislature.
The provision would amount
to $130,000 per year, the cost
of the water UF has been getting
free as a result of a come-on
issued by the city in 1906.
The appropriations about to
be granted to UF by the
legislature are drastically
reduced from what UF
requested and the Florida

More Funds Urged
rFROM PAGE ONE
because of its support of education.
Fahien says the state should also have one strong graduate
program. These students and professors spend long hours on research
projects and would draw federal funds.
Other aspects of faculty compensation, such as fringe benefits,
make it hard to attact good professors, Fahien said. The only benefit
professors get is a retirement plan which does not follow him if he
transfers away.
Most other schools use the program of the Teachers Insurance
Annuity Association. Those under it at another institution could not
carry over their policy if they were to transfer here.
UF professors also are not under social security and get no special
benefits on health problems.
Fahien has received written responses from several members of the
local legislative delegation. Senator Bob Saunders said Let me assure
you that no one will be any more active than I in supporting our
arcd in particular tbeIJF/^^_

Budget Commission formulated.
The senate appropriations bill
was $2,736 million less than the
amount recommended and one
result is 446 less faculty
positions than originally
requested.
Budget limitations are also
restricting the graduate program
to a nine per cent increase rather
than the 15 per cent
recomhiended by the budget
commission.



PSYCHOLOGIST SAYS
Intelligence Is Inherited

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Intelligence, says psychologist
Arthur R. Jensen, is
predominantly an inherited
quality and environmental
conditions ruled out as primarily
responsible for differences in
intelligence.
Furthermore, says the
professor of educational
psychology from the University
of California, environmental
conditions occur as a result of
differences in inherited genetic
patterns.

Shepherd Seeks Aid
To Keep Frats Exempt
Student Body President Charles Shepherd has asked UF
President Stephen C. OConnell to help resist the removal of ad
valorem tax exemption for fraternities and sororities.
In a letter to OConnell, Shepherd called the proposal a
blatant and unfair imposition of taxation upon many students
who can least afford it and asked OConnell to help students
fight it.
The student president pointed out that although the original
proposal in the House of Representatives would have removed
tax exempt status for greek houses, the bill was later amended,
allowing the County Commission to decide whether the houses
perform an educational function and whether the exempt status
should be continued.
As the County Commission is presently constituted, I am
confident that the exemptions, or most of them, could be
continued, Shepherd said. However, I am concerned that
through the years these exemptions will gradually disappear,
until finally they cease to exist in any form.
Shepherd said he agreed with the original intent of the
bill to stop excessive abuse of the property tax exemption by
some benevolent societies and religious groups.
But, he noted, UF fraternities and sororities have not abused
the exemption. For example, the Alpha Tau Omega house does
not rent its parking lot, nor do frat houses rent their rooms to
non-members, Shepherd pointed out.

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These are two of the chief
points to be found in the Jensen
study, a controversial report first
published in the Harvard
Educational Review that
touched off a barrage of
criticism by nationally
prominent psychologists.
Wednesday night Virgil S.
Ward, professor of education at
the University of Virginia and
expert on thinking processes,
told an audience of 250 at a
program sponsored by the
College of Educations
Department of Foundations that

he felt Jensen was substantially
correct in his findings.
Even environmental
conditions occur in part because
of genetic differences, Ward
said.
This is a denial of the
environmentalist position that
an attack on socio-economic
conditions is enough to attain
human equality in measured
traits.
Although the Jensen report
touches on the question of race
and suggests that the
Afro-American is intellectually
inferior to the American white
due to genetic differences, Ward
declined to deal with this
question.
Ward supported Jensens
contention that such
compensatory education
programs as Operation Head
Start have not been completely
successful and will not be
successful unless they are
reformed.
However, he (Jensen) does
not say that stimulating
enriching education has no
effect. No man says that. He
says it is worthwhile to some
extent. He says we should
redirect education into
worthwhile paths.
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Friday, May 23,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23, 1969

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NEW BLUE KEY MEMBERS

Florida Blue Key, men's leadership fraternity has
tapped these men into the organization. Left to
right, they are, Jamie Pressly, Mike Katz, Cliff

#* r v r
Honorary Conferred
On UF Professor
s
Dr. Raymond E. Crist, distingushed graduate research professor of
geography at the UF, will be awarded an honoary doctor of science
degree at the University of Cincinnatis sesquincentennial
commencement exercises June 15.
Crist graduated from Cincinnati in 1925, receiving the McKibbin
Medal, given annually in recognition of high character and attainment.
After working as a geologist in Mexico and Venezuela, he
continued his graduate work at the Universities of Zurich, Bonn and
Grenoble, earning the degree of Docteur es Lettres at the Universite
de Grenoble in 1937.
Crist came to the UF in 1951 as research professor, after teaching
at the Universities of Illinois, Puerto Rico and Maryland.
In 1968, he was named Faculty Lecturer at the university, an
honor given annually for great academic and scholarly distinction over
an extended period. In 1960, he received the Florida Blue Key
Distinguished Faculty Award.
Known for decades of intensive investigation of cultural geography
in the West Indies, South American and the Mediterranean, Crist is the
author of approximately 100 scientific papers, three monographs and
four books.
He holds the Fermat Medal of the Academie des Sciences,
Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres of Toulouse, the oldest learned academy
in France, founded in 1640.
He is a member of the Education Advisory Board of the John
Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation and of the Editorial Board
of the American Journal of Economics and Sociology.
Dr. Harry H. Sisler, dean of the universitys College of Arts and
Sciences, commented he is particularly proud of Dr. Crists latest
honor because The- University of Cincinnati has, in general, chosen
men from the non-academic world to receive this honorary degree.
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Davis, John Englehart, Bill Dorsey, Dave Shull, Mike
Wittmen and Gary Martin. Not pictured, Howard
Rosenblatt.

D PHI E
SAYS
ITS GREAT
TO BE
GREEK

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UFs Enrollment
17,752 This Term

A total of 17,752 students
are enrolled for 1969 spring
quarter classes on the University
of Florida campus.
According to Registrar
Richard Whitehead, an
additional 262 are enrolled in
off-campus GENES YS
(Graduate Engineering
Education System) courses,
Dringing to 18,014 the number
attending the current term.
Freshmen and sophomores
enrolled in the University
College total 5,517 making that
the .largest academic unit. Others
with high enrollments are arts
and sciences with 3,167,
education with 2,272,
engineering with 1,451 and
business administration with
1,245.
A total of 14,177 are
undergraduate students with
2,668 enrolled in Graduate
School. The professional colleges
of law with 606 and medicine
with 240, plus an additional 61

OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru Frl
Jte "'DeLKcUfUa*'
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave

in graduate medical studies,
complete the totals.
Although women are enrolled
in all colleges and schools, the
men outnumber them 11,472 to
6,280.
The colleges of law and
medicine each has 16 women in
beginning professional programs
and the College of Medicine has
12 women taking graduate work.
Two men are enrolled in the
College of Nursing (the only unit
where women outnumber men)
and one woman is registered in
the School of Forestry.
Women in other colleges
often considered male domain
include 11 in engineering, 58 in
the College of Agriculture, 92 in
business administration, and 174
in the College of Architecture
and Fine Arts.
The on-campus totals are
1,152 higher than the 1968
spring quarter and 1,097 less
than the number attending the
winter term ending in March.



Education Offers
Guidance Clinic
An integral part of the educational process, most educators agree,
is proper guidance and counseling the ability to recognize and help
with the needs and problems of students.
In line with the concept, UFs College of Education is currently
offering its 10th annual Guidance and Counseling Institute.
The College of Education, reports Dr. E.L. Tolbert, guidance
institute director, has had more programs of this type than any other
college in the nation.
Purpose of the Guidance and Counseling Institutes is to improve
the professional qualifications of secondary school, junior college or
technical institute personnel who are counselors or who will be
assigned counseling duties.
The current institute is preparing consultants to be counselors. This
is a relatively new speciality in the pupil personnel profession.
Emphasis in the current program centers around the idea of
consultants who will help counselors in providing more skillful
assistance to high school students. Examples of such help are the
solving of personal problems, planning courses and doing more
effective school work.
In addition to the regularly scheduled classes and seminars, there
are opportunities to observe and participate in guidance and
counseling practices under supervision. Also, outstanding authorities
in personality theory, guidance and junior college student personnel
work are used as consultants throughout the year.
Under the terms of the National Defense Education Act of 1958,
the U.S. Office of Education has contracted with the College of
Education every year since 1959 to conduct the program.
Since the first year, 314 educators from around the nation have
come to the College of Education to better their counseling and
guidance techniques.
Upon completing the year-long program, the enrollees are prepared
for certification in their particular level of counseling or supervision.
Enrollees in the program also receive stipends of $75 a week, an
extra sls a week for each dependent and funds to cover their tuition.
Os the Guidance and Counseling Institutes, Tolbert said: Because
of rapidly changing conditions, the increasing number of youth to be
served and the shortage of qualified counselors, the future definitely
will put heavier demands on professional workers in this occupation.
The institutes offered by the university, Tolbert said, have helped
upgrade the skills of those on the job and have prepared new
counselors to fill, at least, some of the shortages.
He said the end-product of the institutes is a counselor who has
learned to understand himself and his profession and who can be
maximally effective in helping youth become the best that they are
capable of in todays complex and dynamic society.
UPD Adds 5 Officers

The University Police
Department added 5 new
officers this week through
monies allocated in the Other
Peoples Services funds.
J.O. Sanders, M.N. Smith, C.
J. Ferguson, J. F. Warren and
Ulysses Richardson were hired as
temporary personnel and will
work in the five UF checkpoints
relieving the full-time permanent
police officers for night patrol
and building security duty.
UPD Chief A.I. Shuler
expects to be able to make these
new officers full time employees
on July 1 when the UPD budget
allocation becomes effective. At
the present time, the UPD has a
force of 44 officers. The ideal
number of officers for proper
police security on campus is 54.
In February, the State Budget
Commission turned down the
UFs request for 15 additional
officers because the situation on

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campus was not an emergency
situation/ according to the
commission.
Less than three weeks later, a
rash of 13 incidents involving
serious injury to several students
occurred on or near campus.
Lack of police manpower was
cited as a major reason for the
problem.
Earlier this month, the
Division of Physical Plants
underwhich the UPD operates
informed Shuler there was extra
money available for nine extra
officers through the OPS fund.
Lots Os Cars
Retail sales of new cars in the
United States for the first two
months of the 1969 model year
totaled 1,835,000.
The United States has about
27 motor vehicles per mile of
road, compared with about 11
1/2 vehicles in 1916.

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PHOTO BY ERIC LITTLEJOHN

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Friday, May 23, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

S Kinda Cool
Kathy Is In Her
Lace Pants Outfit
From Lemer Shops.
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Choose Yours
From Our Sets
Or Separates

Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23,1969

AAUP Backs
U. S. Riot Rule
The FSU campus was the
scene of the meeting of the
executive committee of the
Florida Conference of the
American Association of
University Professors last week.
The committee endorsed the
national AAUP resolution on
campus disorders.
According to the national
meeting, regular academic
procedures can provide
sufficient sanctions. This would
include repressive legislation,
punitive reduction of public or
private financing of higher
education that will penalize all
students alike, or the
withdrawal, on outside initiative,
of grants from students alleged
to have taken part in riots.
The national meeting also
said that whenever possible the
maintenance of essential
academic order should be the
responsibility of the institutions
themselves. However, should this
maintenance prove to be a task
beyond the power of the regular
institutions and should it prove
necessary to resort to the civil
power, decisions as to its use
should be made in the first
instance by responsible
administrative officers and
faculty members.
The state executive
committee noted that college
students in Florida have not
engaged in the extreme behavior
that has given noteriety to some
students in other parts of the
nation.

Buildings Tumbling Down
For Temporary Car Lot

Temporary means a long tiipe
at the UF. Twenty-two years in
the case of seven cesmesto board
buildings constructed as
dormitories on the campus for
the post World War II influx of
students.
As students moved into more
permenent facilities over the
years the buildings continued to
serve in a number of useful
capacities. Now their walls are
tumbling down with the help
of paid professional wreckers.
But the space they occupy
will still fit into the temporary
category for parking
vehicles.
Sealed bids were received for
the demolition of the buildings
earlier this year with J.P.
Thompson of Gainesville
submitting the low bid of
$4,500. His contract calls for
complete removal of the
materials by June. At last use
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UF MYSTERY BUILDING
While wandering about campus the other day Alligator
photographer Tom Kennedy found this rather innocuous looking
nondescript structure, located in the dense wooded area between the
J. Hillis Miller Health Center and the new life sciences building,
Bartram Hall. The sign on the front describes what's on the inside:
poison. Its original purpose was storage of dangerous pesticides
ownded by the College of Agriculture, but no one contacted knows if
any of these potent chemicals are still there, a plants and grounds
spokesman told the Alligator. The building is due to be torn down
once the poisons can be dumped out at sea by a federal agency, since
burying them near a populated area might pollute the water table.
Anyway, although there may be poisons on the inside, that's poison
ivy covering the ground on the outside.

the buildings housed various
agricultural offices whose
occupants now have more
permanent quarters with the
completion of an addition to
McCarty Hall located in the
same area. In addition to offices
for the 4-H Club work and some
departments of statistics and

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Reservations accepted ou
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fruit crops, the buildings were
used for storage by the
Universitys Division of Housing.
And once again temporary is
temporized.
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from U.F. campus j
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Great Challenging Moments
For Samson Vista Volunteers

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
Ferdinand, Isabella, and Bartram came over on
a boat from Africa and discovered America long
before Columbus, the little girl blurted out as she
confronted Kim McCarthy, a volunteer.
Kim spoke low, as if she still couldnt believe the
girls challenging words and daring looks.
I asked her where she got her information,
sophomore Miss McCarthy said. She said her
teacher read it to her, and then stood there defying
me to question her.
Miss McCarthy refers to the 11 year old girl as an
already black militant.
At another time the same girl boldly confronted
Miss McCarthy and declared how much she hated
white people.^
When I asked if she hated me, she replied just a
little.
She said that 1 was fast because 1 smoke,
Miss McCarthy said bewilderedly.
Samsen volunteers arent miracle workers,
humanitarians, or professional teachers.
They are students of all ages and backgrounds
who are willing to spend an hour or two of time
each week with underprivileged black students,
ranging from first through ninth grade.
Beverly Ross, lUC, admits she works not to help
mankind, but herself.
Maybe this sounds selfish, but I tutor to help
myself. I really do get a kind of self reward out of
it. Too many of the tutors are phony or idealistic
when they say theyre doing it for humanitarian
purposes.
Samson is challenging. We were told the most
important thing is to improve the kids self-concept,
not just to improve his math or his reading.
Miss McCarthy agrees and further clarifies the
purpose of Samson tutors.
The idea is to develop a strong friendship with
the student give him the foundation to trust you
completely. We want to let them know a white
person on a personal basis.
One of the most common problems affecting the
Samson program is the rapid turn-over of tutors.
Too many of them begin tutoring with the idea that
theyll miraculously bring up their students grades
from Fs to As in a remarkably short time; and
when they dont, they get discouraged and quit.
Vista volunteers work in coordination with the

UF Employes May Set Pace

UF regulations concerning
the Board of Regents policy
allowing special enrollment for
university employes could be
extended to include all state
universities.
The regents will consider the
change at its next meetmp

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Regents policy allows University
System employes and their
spouses to enroll for up to six
credit hours of university course
work each quarter without
charge.
Current UF policy provides
that, If any employe enrolls

Samson tutors. In fact, the Vista personnel organize
the tutoring program. Students need not be
academically ignorant in order to become a part of
the Samson plan.
Jack Edwards, Vista volunteer and supervisor of
the Samson tutors, said We try to get them away
from the concepts of school as much as possible.
We try to build up a relationship between tutor and
student and give each kid the chance to feel he can
be successful.
The worst thing a tutor can do to a student is to
begin teaching, establish a bond, and then quit
without notice, Mark and Linda McGrath, also
Vista volunteers, agreed.
They also said for the most part the tutors are
dedicated.
As an example, girls from Hume Hall walked to'
the southwest section of Gainesville twice a week.
The tools used by each tutor to inspire his
student varies, as do the results.
One tutor had her 11-year-old student write a
poem every week. Now the boy is getting the hang
of it and writes poetry on his own time.
Another tutor taught her two teenage pupils
mathematics through card games.
Edwards mentioned that Dr. Suess and the
Golden books are very effective as teaching aids for
the younger pupils. Some of the tutors try to teach
their pupils how to tell time or practice the
multiplication tables with them.
He reemphisized that Samson is not merely an
academic program, and how well the pupil
progresses depends largely on how much he thinks
the tutor cares for him.
Chris Schauseil is a 49, long brown-haired
freshman. She describes herself as wishy-washy
but with an avid interest in the Samson program and
the individual students.
Her pupil is a bright ten-year-old, and taller than
Miss Schauseil. She tends to be dominating, a
characteristic she finds not prevalent in some of the
older kids.
It seems the older they are, the more reserved
and defensive they are, Miss Schauseil said.
She grinned, giggled, and spoke of the smaller
children who love to finger and comb her long hair.
The kids also like to draw and some of the tutors
provide crayons and paper.
Carol Buchholz, 2UC, dislikes sounding corny
about it, but she cant describe the feeling she gets
from being a Samson tutor except great!

for a course during working
hours, all time taken during that
period, including time taken to
and from classes, will be charged
to compensatory or annual leave
unless the course work is
required by the employes
department or division head

WHATS
HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writer
SPOUTING SPOKEN WORDS OF WISDOM: Delta Upsilon hosts
debates in the Union Auditorium today from 2-5.
ROUNDING THE CORNERS: UF vs FSU in baseball here at 2
today and tomorrow.
FOR FRIENDS OF ZORBA (THE GREEK, THAT IS): UF Greeks
will dance it up in the Florida Gym tonight, starting at 8.
IN EXHAUSTING THE WORLDS NATURAL RESOURCES: The
International Club will have a Talent Show in the University
Auditorium. Showtime is 8 p.m.
MUTINY ON THE BOUNTY: The Faculty Club will have a
Shipwreck Party Saturday night. Whos rocking the boat?
FROLICKING FUNFAIR: The IFC presents the Four Seasons in
the Florida Gym at 8 p.m. Saturday. Remember its summer almost.
ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN: The University Choir and University
Chamber Orchestra will present a Mozart Requium in the University
Auditorium at 8:15 p.m. Sunday.
ONE A PENNY, TWO A PENNY: The Final performance of The
Three Penny Opera can be seen this weekend in the Constans
Theatre. Curtain rises at 8 on Friday and Saturday nights and also at 2
Saturday afternoon.

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Friday, May 23, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 7



Page 8

'The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23,1969

The Florida Alligator

PiofcaJtAV
M

f Stoff Writing s }j
I No CIA Photos I
> $
ft ft
By Randy Bassett f
On the evening of May 19 SDS held a fund raising rally in the Plaza
of the Americas. One of the people who spoke was Mr. Charles
Fulwood. As a photographer for the Florida Alligator, I was assigned
to take pictures of the event. Upon being photographed Mr. Fulwood
turned to me and said that the CIA has enough pictures of me
already.
I personally was under the impression that the rally was held to
gain support and raise money for the bail of Ed Freeman, and to build
up a reserve fund to bail out any other radicals who may be busted
in the future.
If this is the case then perhaps Ed Freeman or Steve Fahrer or any
of the other SDS members who know me and have seen and spoken
with me at many SDS sponsored activities should point out to Mr.
Fulwood that to gain support and publicity and press coverage, it is
not very encouraging to members of the press present to be insulted in
the eyes of the people present by being refered to as a part of an
organization that Mr. Fulwood has expressed so much contempt for.
I am a photographer for the Florida Alligator and have never
worked for or sold, given, or lent pictures to the CIA, FBI, or campus
police, and I would like Mr. Fulwood or anyone else who so desires to
produce any evidence whatsoever that I have done so. I do not sell
p^tures' to any individual or organization that are not of that person
oi "organization, or an event so sponsored. This includes the CIA, FBI,
cmapus police, SDS, student government, and even Mr. Charles
Fulwood.
Os course if he would like an 8xl0 glossy of himself....

Control ROTC Here

MR. EDITOR:
Quite a few people are getting up-tight over
ROTC. Well, I must concede that I too have become
concerned (HURRAH, apathy loses out again!). My
purpose for this letter is to convince everyone (Ill
set my goals idealistically high) that ROTC should
remain on Campus.
Now for the difficulty part the convincing.
First of all, lets leave ROTC here where we can
easily watch it, criticize it, and control it. I dont
think anyone would want the military to isolate its
training completely from civilian surveilance. We
would be throwing away one of the checks and
balances we have with the military.
Secondly, we would be foolish to believe that by
eliminating ROTC we would reduce the military
establishment by any significant amount. If ROTC
is expelled from the University, the Department of
Defense would find another way to get its

Opinionated Freaks

MR. EDITOR:
I have finally figured out the
reason why the Muckraker
continually has such a high
concentration of spaced-out nuts
dominating its opinion columns.
The answer can only be that the
Alligator ceaselessly recruits
The
Florida
Alligator
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial. Business. Advertising offices
in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
Ext. 2832.

"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Ch ref
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor

Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors

freaks to amaze and astonish its
readers of a morning, the
quantity of which commodity
has recently been nothing, if not
barely credible.
The earliest in the current
series of weird-os seems to have
been that cute, freaky, and
wholeheartedly paranoid Kenny
Megill. One could visualize the
shrieking fogs of hysteria that
must have rolled across the poor
boys mind at the very thought
that the police didnt like his
darkly beautiful, if not illogical
and idiotic pet, the JOMO.
The other freaks who have
contributed so powerfully to
this series of ding-a-ling articles
include such notables as John
Slugg (sic), Charles Curls
Fullwood, Larry Jordan, and
lastly, but most assurdely not
least of all, David Miller, the

personnel; possibly by increasing the number of
non-civilian (i.e. military) universities.. Hence,
eliminating ROTC will not stop any military
endeavors.
For these two reasons, 1) to keep military
training with civilian scrutiny and 2) the nebulous
results achieved by discontinuing ROTC at the
universities, I feel that we should keep ROTC on
Campus. Now, I am not saying that ROTC can not
be improved to better meet university objectives.
What I am trying to achieve is a better relationship
between an institution (i.e. the military) and the
people it serves (i.e. you and me and everyone else
in the United States).
This, not name calling and throwing temper
tantrums, will do more to control the military
establishment and add some needed strength to our
sagging society.
BRUCE KONIGSBURG, SEG

EDITORIAL
Saunders Breaks The Faith

State Senator Robert Saunders of
Gainesville wants the UF to start paying
more than $ 138,000 in water bills because it
is an unjust situation when every other
state institution, universities and junior
colleges, pay for their utilities and the UF
does not.
He says the bill would not take present
operating funds away from the university for
this purpose, but expresses the intent of the
legislature to have something done about it.
The free water contract with Gainesville
is legal, but not morally right, Saunders says.
We strongly disagree with him.
The UF is not in the position of being
able to afford this amound of money to be
taken out of the budget. There are too many
other important areas that need the funds.
The free water contract was first offered
in 1905 by the city to have the university
located here. Saunders seems to have an
attitude of weve got you here and you
cant leave because youre too big, so well
try to make more money off of you.
The university is the lifeblood of this
community, regardless of what the
Gainesville Chamber of Commerce or any
other city group may say. The services for
students, faculty and staff provided by the
local merchants make up a large portion of

NY A Vs. The Conspiracy

MR. EDITOR:
In his letter defending the
National Youth Alliance and its
goals, which he claims were
grossly misrepresented by Mr.

Raven. These happy space cadets
have ranted and raved,
respectively, about: A truly
democratic society (China? OH,
give me a break), racism
(arguments unintelligible),
racism (arguments mediocre)
and you-name-it (totally
nonsensical).
The only slight word of
encouragement regarding the
literary state of affairs is the
appearance of a new sun on the
journalistic horizon, said
newcomer being the Murphree
Orgasm, published spasmodically
in the same housing area.
If the Alligator doesnt watch
out, it might soon have to cease
subsidizing the local freaks and
get down to serious reporting.
Pray for it!
ALLEN R. FRYE 3AS

Spivey, Mr. Lee failed to
provede one iota of evidence to
show that Mr. Spivey did in fact
quote the NY A literature out of
context. We must assume then,
that having read the same
literature, Mr. Lees
interpretation of it and not Mr.
Spiveys misrepresentation is
responsible for the discrepancy.
Mr. Lee would have us believe
that the NY A and ist followers
are simply true Americans
dedicated to prevent our society
from selling out to what he calls
the SDS-black power-commun power-communist
ist power-communist conspiracy, a convenient
catchall which may be extended

the city business area.
In addition to the services directly related
to the UF there are many other businesses
that are as large as they are, or even here in
the first place, because of the university.
The cost of living in Gainesville is far
from being one of the lowest in the state,
and now they want to soak the university
for more money.
The argument that other state institutions
are paying for their water is not valid in this
case. Most of the other state institutions are
located in communities that ,are not
dependent on the university. Take the
University of South Florida in Tampa and
Florida State University in Tallahassee, for
example. USF is by no means the major
economic force in Tampa, and the state
government buildings in Tallahassee are
more beneficial to the city financially than
FSU.
In 1968 the Gainesville Utilities
Department transferred over $1 million
dollars to the to the General Government
fund to help finance city government. If the
city utilities are making this money each,
why should they need the money from the
UFs water supply?
The city of Gainesville owes much to the
university, but trying to take away free
water doesnt give us that idea.

to include any group lie
disagrees with. What precisely
then will Mr. Lee and his fellow
patriots DO to prevent this
sell-out whenever or wherever
they preceive it? Will they
counter it with a reasoned
attempt to educate the
American people to the error of
their ways or will the ends
justify a far more lethal means?
For those of you who are
interested in knowing more
aobut the acitivities and aims of
the para-military right, I suggest
you read an article concerning
that stmject in the June Playboy.
RUSS TAYLOR, 2UC



Accent Befouled
MR. EDITOR:
We just finished reading the first of a series of articles by Carol
Sanger on the Controversy surrounding ACCENT 69. It seems that
the Alligator is continuing its one-sided coverage to stir up a
controversy or play the game- make an issue.
Perhaps you should remember (it seems you have a short memory)
what type of program ACCENT 69 presented. It was made possible
by a year of sincere dedication to an idea which we all believed in.
Our goal was to make ACCENT the best student sponsored
symposium in the country.
When such prominent Americans as Senator Wayne Morse, Louis
Harris and Michael Harrington praised ACCENT 69 Symposium as
the best theyve ever attended, we felt this was a strong foundation
for our desired goal.
Now everyones upset about what happened after the programs
over. Well since youve heard the other side its about time for the
truth.
As long as everything was all and well everyone was our friend.
Weeks before ACCENT Week we knew we would be $1,500 to $1,700
over our budget (if we didnt drop a speaker, i.e. Julian Bond). But
because of promises for additional funds to cover the expenses
(because of the outstanding promise of the program) we exceeded our
budget. The promises came for such sources as President of the
Student Body, Administrative Assistant to the Student Body
President, and the University of Florida Alumni Association.
Then one week after the program was over Manny James (Florida
Blue Key) was ready to throw ACCENT out of our office so they
could pull the FBK second 100 Television Series into the political 1
realm of the third floor. After all the program was over and there
was nothing more to be done. We only had to prepare our files, final
reports, secure additional funds, pay bills, write hundreds of
thank-you letters, and generally wrap up Accent 69 and prepare for
ACCENT 7O.
Then the trouble started. First came James attempting to take over
the ACCENT office. Then came the rumors, which were proven
untrue, by the high minded students who sought to make a name
for the upcoming Student Government elections at Accents expense.
In the same motion the former administration, under the
leadership of Clyde Taylor, Marc Glick, and James worked a deal to
make Joe Hillard General Chairman of ACCENT 7O.
This was effectively done at a 20 minute meeting of the Public
Functions Authority (Taylor-Glick Authority).
Three members of the ACCENT 69 Executive Committee were
practically laughed at when they applied for positions in ACCENT
7O. They were given interviews before the Authority. They lasted
dose to fortyfive seconds each.
In fact there was no real reason for the meeting. The deals had
already been made and ACCENT was once again back into the
political arena; just where those who had any real interest in the
program didnt want to see it land.
Now Mr. Hillard seems to think he has no responsibility to
ACCENT 69 as the Chairman of ACCENT 7O. This is the most
absurd idea a person of his position could ever assume. When we took
over ACCENT 69 we worked in the shadows of ACCENT 6B which
was a disaster as far as the students were concerned. Accent 7O is a
part of a continuous program to be presented to UF students
annually.
By not mixing ACCENT 69 with petty politics, we were able to
formulate a most successful program. Now that ACCENT 7O has
jumped into the filth of the campus political arena, the students of the
UF can never hope to benefit from what could have been the most
outstanding student sponsored symposium in the nation.
r-
JEFF WEIL
Speakers Chairman ACCENT 69
RONNIE BLOOM
P.R. Chairman ACCENT 69
*
r rMp
MR. EDITOR:
Greek Week is for the weak Greeks.
PERRY KOSIENIAK 2UC

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Speaking Out
Wiped Out By Utilities
By Bruce Boals

I ran into my old friend, Joe Fudge, the other
day. Joe is a meter checker and ad hoc committee
member for the electric utility.
For openers, Hey, Joe, wasnt that an
enlightening ad the papers ran concerning rates?
Sure wuz! After all the people own the utility
and should be kept informed.
But Joe, did the papers donate the space or was
taxpayers money used for it?
Oh, no! We paid for that space right out of our
profits. I was relieved, but then thought
Now, Joe, is it proper for a municiple utility to
be in the profit-making business?
Not really, he said, irritated at my naivety,
thats why we turn all the gravy over to the city
general revenue every year. That way, people dont
have to pay much taxes.
Oh, I sighed, always being in favor of a tax
break. Then I remembered some calculations I had
done from the ad. In fact, I pulled the card out and
showed it to Joe. Look at what a student would
have to pay to provide lights and play his record
player at 200KW per month:
Florida Power Gainesville Utility
Base Rate $71.01 80.10
Sales Tax 2.84 8.20
Hook-up 3.00
City Tax 7.01 6.01 (7H per cent)*
Total $80.86 $97.31
"No city Tax outside city limits for Florida
Power, extra charge by Gainesville utilities
Yeah, Joe responded, like the ad said, draw
your own conclusions. We didnt want to

Spineless Before Militant Forces

MR. EDITOR:
Nowadays it is fashionable to be tolerant of
damn near everything. The raving militant, black or
white, lets fly with a stream of abrasive invective,
impugning his opponents integrity, ancestory,
motives, intellect and manhood; and the
enlightened receipient remains passive, assuaging
his hurt by convincing himself that he is beings
intellectually tolerant when in good conscience he
should make a determined effort to dislodge the
militants teeth.
The militant marches into a church with
henchmen, seizes the altar and issues a demand for a
stated sum of money and a portion of all money
collected by the church for reparations to the
Blacks. The church has one week to comply, or else.
How do the church leaders respond to this
extortion? With payment of course (in the name of
enlightenment and tolerance).
The militant martials forces, marches into an
administration building, physically expels the
occupants, destroys the contents of the budding and
issues non-negotiable demands on subjects
fanging from the banishment of ROTC to the
liberation so Biafra. The response? Compromise,
concilliation and amnesty in the of enlightenment
and tolerance.
Unless there is something intellectual about

Money To Pot?

MR. EDITOR:
The Students for a
Democratic Society were moved
by the arrest of one of its
members for possession of
marijuana to sponsor a musical
rally in order to raise funds for
his bond and defense.
I can see why SDS couldnt
let one of its most ardent
members down. As a fellow
class-mate of Mr. Freeman, I
have noticed he doenst waste
the most insignificant
circumstance to bring up the
wrongs of our society, or the
injustices done to
underprivileged groups in it -
during a Child Psychology
lecture.
It is my suggestion, then, to
SDS, that whatever funds, if
any, are left over after Mr.
Freemans expenses are taken

Friday, May 23,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

complicate the ad with all the extra data. But the
rate you show is for the bums and poor people who
cant afford much electricity. Costs more to fool
with them billing, collectiing, and such.
Doesnt the $25 interest-free deposit cover you
here?
Yes, he said, nearly exasperated at my
ignorance, but we must get money for the city like
the ad said, to relieve other sources of revenue, like
the municiple court.
Im all for that, I said, trying to get back on
his good side.
Again, I put my foot in my mouth, Joe, if
revenue is raised for the city in this way isnt it the
same thing as a degressive tax rate which causes
high-income large-users to pay both a lower
percentage and less amount? I mean, take ten low
income families with a combined income of
$30,000 who use a total of 400 KW per month.
Wouldnt they have to pay more tax than the one
family with the same income and usage?
I really didnt follow all that, he responded,
but Im sure Mr. Kelly can explain it to you.
Besides, we need some money to try to hold down
all the smoke our plant puts out. Thats really a
problem.
Sure is! again trying to be amicable.
Was certainly glad to run into you, especially
since I could straighten your thinking, Joe added,
Sometimes, though, I think its just not economical
to produce electricity for a small city.
I dont know about that, I said waving
goodbye, maybe Mr. Kelly could fill you in.

complacency in the face of outrage; something
enlightened about acquiescence in the face of
extortion; or something noble about passiveness in
response to crime, the rubrics of enlightenment,
tolerance encompass too much.
Haven't we been lackeys to the prose of the
enlightened long enough. Must we continue to
equate passiveness with intellectualism;
enlightenment with inactivity; and tolerance with
indecision. The invidious name calling will cease
when those who feel compelled by their political
philosophy to label, brand and excoriate realize that
they must answer to fists.
The mob will not take up clubs to enforce their
non-negotiable demands if it knows we will not
passively watch or withdraw to ponder the merits of
their demands.
If it is the province of the intellectual to form
carefully considered beliefs, but never act on those
beliefs, then God forbid we should become a nation
of intellectuals, placed by out indecision and
inactivity at the mercy of the fanatical demands of
the New Left.
Maybe theres merit in the biblical admonition to
turn the other cheek, but one things for damn sure
a nation of citizens doing it is too spineless to
preserve its freedom.

care of, be used to alleviate the
needs of some of the local
underprivileged families; and
that SDS, or any other campus
organization for that matter,
sponsored similar activities to
raise funds to help more
underprivileged people in our
city, or for starving Biafrans, or
for Vietnamese war orphans and
refugees.
When all these people are
helped, Im sure Mr. Freeman
will be very happy, and I might
even get a chance to listen to a
whole lecture in Psychology
without being reminded that
experimental subjects do not
represent the total U.S.
population because those of
underprivileged status are never
considered, etc., etc.
LUIS A. ALVAREZ, 3AS

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23, 1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

STATE TEACHERS General
Loan Scholarship money has
arrived. It may be received in the
Student Depository from Mrs.
Robinson or Mrs. Hunt.
* SPACE SCIENCES
SEMINAR, sponsored by the
National Aeronautics and Space
Administration, will be held
Thursday, May 29, at 4 p.m. in
the Engineering Auditorium. Dr.
Elliot W. Montroll, Einstein
professor of physics at the
University of Rochester, will
speak on "Quantitative Aspects
of Modern Social Problems:
Examples of Socio-Physics."
NATIONAL DEFENSE
BORROWERS who are leaving
the university at the end of the
spring quarter are urged to have
an exit interview with a loan
officer at the Student
Depository at the Hub.
REGISTRATION FEES: In
order to avoid long lines and late
penalties, registration fees
should be paid early. The
Student Depository will not be
open Saturday, June 21. A
convenient "drop" is provided
on the east wall of the
depository. Do not "drop" or
send cash through the mail.
ARCHIVAL COLLECTION
LECTURE: Dr. Albert
Leissinger, director of exhibits
and public division of the
National Archives, will speak
Friday, May 23, at 3 p.m. in the
lecture room on the research
Library. He will talk about the
archival collection in the
university.
INTRODUCTION TO
UPPER DIVISION: The Gamma
Beta Phi Society, a
coeducational honorary service
organization, will present an
introduction to the upper
division College of Health Related
Professions, Monday, May 26,
from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in Room
362, Reitz Union. Students will
be able to gain valuable
information that can help them
make the choice among upper
division colleges more
intelligently. The dean,
department chairmen and
placement personnel have been
invited to speak. An informal
social will follow the speakers.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION u I _-=^3
ur selT 3 \ f \J\ &
Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From \
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... A
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, 7/
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your c 9-cr\ /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole jl, y V /
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! cV

FINAL EXAM SCHEDULES:
Widespread schdeuling of final
examinations prior to the time
provided in the published
Schedule of Courses results in
disruption of the final week of
classes and hardships to the
students involved. Therefore, the
following policy is in effect:
No examinations, class
quizzes, special projects or term
papers shall be given or assigned
during the final five class days of
a regular term. Take home
examinations shall not be due
prior to the regularly scheduled
examination period.
All changes in the
published examination schedule
must be approved by the
Sub-Committee on Variations
from the Published Schedule of
Courses of the Schedule and
Calendar Committee. Requests
submitted to the sub-committee
for changes in the examination
time must be justified and
include a specific statment of
the effects on the students of
such a change.
lt shall be the

THERE ARE A
j LIMITED
number of
EXTRA BOOKS
AVAILABLE
PURCHASE
GET YOURS
BEFORE ITS
TOO LATE

BLUE BULLETIN

responsibility of department
chairmen and deans to enforce
this policy.
Laboratory sections of many
courses may be exempt from the
above policy provided such
exemption has been approved by
the Sub-Committee on
Variations. In the case of
laboratory sections, such
requests shall specify: 1) that
the laboratory final examination
requires use of laboratory
equipment; 2) that the final
laboratory examination has
traditionally been given at the
last meeting of the lab, and
3) that the laboratory final is
not a substitute for the final
examination in the course.
In the case of laboratory-type
courses, the request shall state
that traditionally no provision
has been in the final
examination schedule for such
courses.
In some cases a policy of
continuing exemption may be
established with respect to
laboratory sections and
laboratory type courses.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

FRIDAY Mav 23
Scabbard & Blade Picnic, Camp
Blanding, 12:30 p.m.
Baseball: Univ. of Fla. vs. FSU,
Home, 2:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Fitzwilly",
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:00 &
10:00 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, "We're
No Angels," W. Wing Main
Cafeteria, 7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Greek Dance, Florida Gym, 8:00
p.m.
Florida Players: "The
Threepenny Opera,"
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY
Baseball: Univ. of FSU,
Home, 2:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Fitzwilly,"
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:00 &
10:00 p.m.
Faculty Club: "Shipwreck
Party," Dinner Dance,
Arredondo Room & Union
Ballroom, Social Hour, 6:30;
Dinner, 7:30 & Dancing 8:30
p.m.
Murphree Movie, "We're No
Angels," W. Wing Main
Cafeteria, 7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
IFC: Frolics, "FOUR
SEASONS," Florida Gym,
8:00 p.m.
Hillel Bar-3-Q and Dance, Hillel
Foundation, 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players: "The
Threepenny Opera,"
Constans Theatre, Mat. 2:00
p.m.. Eve, 8:00 p.m.
SUNDAY
University Film Series, "Long
Day's Journey Into Night,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:15
p.m.
Hillel Installation Buffet, Hillel
Foundation, 12:00 p.m.
Mozart Requium, University
Choir and University
Chamber Orchestra,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.

MONDAY
MENSA Luncheon, Rathskeller,
12:00 noon.
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:00 p.m.
English In Action, Baptist
Student Center, 4:00-8:00
p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 246 & 254
Union, 6:30 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Society,
Introduction to Upper
Division 362 Union, 7:30
p.m.
U. of F. General Dames
Orientation, all officers of
individual Dames groups &
advisors, 122 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Beginning Bridge, 118 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Gator Amateur Radio Meeting,
525 E & I Bldg., 8:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
Print Sale, Union Ballroom,
10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
Student Senate Meeting, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Music Dept: Faculty Concert,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
m



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE 1
R yj
8 New 1969 zig-zag sawing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-tf<)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be Inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-tf<)
GUNS GUNS GUNS. Inventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, micanopy,
466-3340. (A-18t-136-C)
1968 Mobile home. 12x60 air cond.,
partly furnished. Dishwasher, nylon
carpet. Available June 15. $4500.
Call 378-9404 weekdays after 6:00
(A-5M40-P)
Trailor B*x3o 1 bedroom. Air con.
carpet TV & Ant. New wireing 850
cash or 800 without T.V. Phone
376-1544. 3620 S.W. Archer Rd.
Gainesville. (A-10t-141-p)
Perfect home for college family 1968
custom built mobile home 12x64 3
bedrooms, wall to wall carpeting
central heat and air, washer, dryer,
storage shed, 10x20 screened porch,
fenced yard, shady lot. Call
378-6983. (A-141-st-p)
For Sale BX3I trailer and BXIB
cabana. Airconditioned next to
campus in Glynwood Park. Good
condition 1495. Call 372-2673.
(A-st-134-p)
BASENJI puppy. Male, top quality, 4
months old, AKC, no bark or odor,
short hair, small appetite, loves
children. Requires loving home with
adequate facilities. Terms to suit.
Phone 376-4103. (A-10t,139-p)
Engagement ring l/3 carat'brilliant
cut diamond yellow
solitaire modern twist mounting with
matching wedding band Call
376-3731. (A-3t-141-p)
Tropical fish and 30 and 10 gallon
aquariums all accessories SBS. Bausch
and Lomb microscope 4x10x45x97x
used in medical school SIBO.
378-5671. (A-st-141-p)
Happiness is a warm puppy! AKC
registered white male poodles. Small
miniature, excellent blood lines, litter
trianed, good with children. Call
372-3489. (A-st-141-p)
Friend for sale! 1964 Vespa scooter
(and helmet) S9O. Will sell only to
scooter loving people. Call John at
392-1946 or 372-7194. (A-6t-138-p)
Golf clubs Haig. Ultra half-set with
putter, bag. Al for S6O. Also TV sls
or offer; 3x6 ft block table $5. All
items good cond. & deal. Call Don,
372-3749 Now. (A-3M42-P)
Sony TC-155 tape deck, 4 tr. stereo 3
speed, reel type. Excellent cond.
$85.00 or best offer. Call Dave at
378-4381. (A-3M42-P)
Everyting goes stereo SBO, couch
S2O, buffet S2O, books, tapes,
barbells, tables, lamps, stereo
speakers, much more, 20 NW 8 St.
upper North Sat. 9-5. (A-2M42-P)
Make guests comfortable or squeeze
in an extra roommate on a hardly
used deluxe Simmons roll away bed,
$35.00. Call Phyllis 378-8151.
(A-5M42-P)
11,000 BTU Sears Coldspot air
conditioner. Excellent condition. 3
year guarantee $l5O. Call 372-5974.
(A-2M42-P)
1967 Suzuki 80cc, oil injection, good
condition, rarely useds22s. Ph.
378-5460 after 5:30 p.m. or before
8:30 a.m. (A-1M42-P)
1968 Honda 565. Like new, low
mileage s369new, yours for S2OO.
Call Bobby at 378-5274.
(A-2M42-P)
Matching Green striped chair and
couch (makes a bed) 5 months old,
$75 or best offer. Maple coffee table
$4, 302-18 Diamond Village
evenings. (A-2t-143-p)
1966 BRIDGESTONE 175 CC.
Excellent physical and mechanical
condition. Very reliable. Call Jim
392-8070. (A-3t-143-p)
j mm*]
I IMRMBN I
SHOWTIME
I 3S wjfonap I
| Ea§TwSoO I
-cooGarTS Btjjrr

I FOR SALE |
35mm Ansco Camera. Good
condition. Shutter: 1/300 to 1 sec.
and bulb lens : f 3.5 to f 16. $25. Call
Jim 392-8070. (A-3t-143-p)
62 VW Bus Perfect condition
$795.00. Can be seen at 313 SE 38
St. or call 372-8049 after 5 p.m.
(A-143-st-p)
1965 Austin Healey Sprite with good
top for S7OO. call 372-4151. Would
like to buy a used aluminum canoe to
replace car will trade. (A-lt-143-p)
Be the first to get your choice of art
prints TODAY from 10:00 am
9:00 p.m. in Rm. 235 of the J.
Wayne Reitz Union. (A-3t-143-c)
Dont miss the Union Art Print Sale
Tues. May 27 thru Thur 29th from
10:00 a.m. till 9:00 p.m. in Rm 235
Reitz Union. (A-2t-143-c)
j.j-.swo>:.:.w.v.v.VW<*X£'iX*X?W!W*X*X*\;
I FOR RENT
$ ft
, t<<.XM*rX*X X X*X*X*XWX?X : X*>>X*X"X>}:< 1
Sublet for summer 2 bdr. apt. ac one
block from campus 376-7693. 117
S.W. 12 St. no. 2. SBS/mo.
(B-3t-143-p)
Sublease 2 br. furn Summit House
apt. AC and pool $31.50 a mo. per
person. Call 372-2607. (B-3t-143-p)
Sublease For Summer. Groovy 2
bdrm. furn house. AC, Fla room, kids
and pets. SBO mo. Call Mrs. Mandel
day 392-2007, nite 376-2944.
(B-st-143-p)
Stamp out mediocrity! One male
roommate for the summer and next
year. Ranch house with pool and
fireplace. Call 378-4877 after 5 p.m.
(B-st-135-p)
Married students only. Sublet one
bedroom, air-conditioned apartment.
Pool. Available June 17. Call
3 7 8-0972 after 5:30. slOl/mo.
(B-st-143-p)
Landmark 2 bdrm Wow! Running
water, electricity and all that good
stuff. Poolside (Status!) Sublet
summer Qtr. $125 (12500 cents) Dial
378-6587. (B-st-143-p)
DUPLEX Across street from Theta
Sorority house, 2 bedrm, furn,
$ 100/mo. Sept-June 1970. Choice
location. Call 378-3943. (B-2t-143-p)
One bedroom apt. 5 blocks from
Matherly Hall. Quiet, air cond, pool.
Perfect for two people $47.50 each.
Will give damage deposit. Available
June 15 376-4962. (B-2t-143-p)
Room in private home for mature
male student. Air conditioning,
separate entrance, linen and maid
service. Available June 14. Call
376-5360. (B-3t-143-p)
Nice 1 bedroom duplex apt. with
* patio. S9O a month. Sublet summer
quarter. 4 blocks from campus. 1624
N.W. 4 Ave. Apt. 2. 378-9058.
(B-st-139-p)
Sublease Available for summer
quarter from June 15, one bedroom
apt., air conditioned. Olympia
Apartments. Call 376-1727.
(B-st-139-p)

Ifi \y \ SPECIAL II
A 1 Lunch and Dinner
1 rsiED I
I SHRIMP |
H WITH FRENCH FRIES, §§
I SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES ||
I MORRISON'S 1
I CAFETERIAS S
IjL QAINiSMIJUEMALL^^^^^^

Friday, May 23,1969, The Florida Alligator,

FOR RENT |
!vX.:.V.Sv; X-X*>X X*X*X*WSX* X X X*X"X X*v
Air conditioned, 2-bedroom, carport,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. 6/16/69. (B-5M40-P)
1 Bdrm Apt. must sublease. Quiet
and in SW section. Private patio.
378-0632 or 372-8855. (B-st-139-p)
Sublet spacious, 3 bedroom furnished
house. Large yard, quiet, private,
S.W. section. $lO5 month. 378-8319.
(B-4t-141-p)
Lease 3 br country home unfurnished
Fla. Rm, built in bar, 4mi from Univ.
Near small lake. Avialable June 15
$135 monthly. Call 378-8361.
(3t-B-141-p)
SUBLET need 1 male roommate 1
br. furn apt 4 blocks from campus.
Air cond. cable T.V. $42.50 month.
Aviailable June. Phone 376-7692.
(B-3t-141-p)
Sublet Landmark 2 bedroom apt. for
summer. Reduced to $125 per person
for entire qtr. Many extras left in
apartment for summer. Call
372-5041. (B-32t-141-p)
SUMMER SUBLET efficiency apt,
air cond., quiet, 8 blocks from
campus. I pay $225, you pay SIOO
for the whole summer! Call
392-0138, days. (B-st-142-P)
Village Park Apt. No. 80 to Sublet
for Summer. 2 bedroom, poolside,
A/C. Call 378-0864. Best Offer.
(B-5M42-P)
Sublet Landmark Phase II apt. 1,2,
or 3 male roommates. 2 bdrm, a.c.,
pool, TV, bookcase, stereo, and
refrig. Call 376-5694. (B-5M42-P)
SUBLET leaving town. Must rent for
sum qtr. UG 1-bed. linens, kit. sup.
pic. & sprds. incl. TV too if gone by
June 1. Call 378-9877. (B-3M42-P)
Sublet 2 bedroom, 2 bath
Williamsburg Apt. Available June 15,
S2OO month. Option for next yr.
A/C, pool, etc. 378-7469.
(B-3M42-P)
sublet 2 bedroom upstairs apt. Ac, 1
block behind Norman. Special
summer rate slOO per month. S.W.
7 Ave. 376-5509. (B-st-139-p)
Sublet poolside apt. Landmark 59.
Available June. 2 bedroom good
location SIBO mo. 376-3771
anytime. (B-139-p)
2 br., apt. available for sublease June
1 $ 110/mo., 1 block from Tigert, air
cond. Call 372-2769 or 376-7534.
(B-139-st-p)
Near campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior men.
For summer AND/OR 1969-70.
378-8122. 376-6652. (B-TF-138-p)
Muit sublet one bd Tanglewood
rent paid thru June after June 16.
376-8991 after 4. (B-5M42-P)
Summer Sublet 1 bedroom furn. ac.
apt. Quiet only 3 blocks from
campus! Cheap from June 15. Call
378-8384 also wash machine etc.
(B-st-139-p)

Page 11

FOR RENT ||
vxs x*x x x*x c x*>>x x<*x x"x FOR RENT: 3-room furnished
apartment Avialable June 15, Married
couples only S9O mo. plus utilities, 1
year's lease. For info call Mrs. Taylor
372-0175 NO pets. (B-141-st-p)
Summer sublet one bedroom
airconditioned apt. $lO7. Call
378-4607 evenings. (B-st-139-p)

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MiBORAH KERR
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ticicocm f fmm MMKI MCS-srai UTS A KAHN-HARPER PRODUCTION Color by De Luxe
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Use our handy
mail in order
* form.

| WANTED j
Roommates needed for summer. AC,
TV, pool, 41.25 per mo. June rent
free. Call 376-6087 after 5:00.
(C-st-142-P)
2 girls need ride out west week of
June 16. Will share expenses. Call
Paula or Jill 372-1664.
(C-2M42-P)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED |
3 MALE ROOMMATES to share
Tanglewood townhouse with grad
student. $l2O for summer. Move in
June 14. Call 372-1625. (C-4t-143-p)
Male roommate for 2 bdrm apt at
Summit House. Immediate or
summer occupancy, pool, air
conditioned 's3s month. Call
378-9909 7:30-B:3oam 4-6 pm
12-2 am nite. (C-4t-132-p)
Female roommate. Summer term.
Landmark Apts. June rent free. Will
accept offer. Call Sue after 5:30
378-4481. Apt. 85. (C-lt-143-p)
One needed for two person garage
apartment IV2 blocks from campus.
SSO for the entire summer.
Airconditioning. 915A S.W. 6th Ave.
Come evenings. (C-2t-143-p)
Female roommate. Share two
bedroom house summer term or
longer. Carpet air cond. Walk to
campus. S6O mo. plus >/z utilities.
378-9748. (C-st-143-p)
Female roommate wanted to share
beautiful airconditioned apt. for
summer qtr. T.V. and stereo. Call
9:30 -11 am or after 3:3opm
372-2666. (C-4t-143-p)
Two roommates needed to share
large house with two 4EG. Private
room and semi-private bath. $37.50 a
month and V utilities. Call 376-0703
vtime. (C-st-143-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE Now or for
summer quarter. Airconditioned,
carpet, private room. $55 per month.
Adjustments for May. Call 378-5088.
(C-10t-138-p)
RIDER to San Francisco, leaving Ist
week in June, share expenses and
driving (approx. SSO) Lets Talk It
Over 376-1730 (C-st-139-p)
WANTED Attractive, ambitious,
hard working, industrious mature
young lady to help take care of three
boys this summer. Ages five, six and
eight. Primary activities will be
swimming, sailing, motor boating.
Some trivel through New York and
Western part of the United States.
Will be in Western part of U.S. about
one week) Time: June 15th to
August Ist. Salary: $75.00 a week
plus room and board. P.O. Box
16213. Jacksonville, Florida 32216
(C-st-139-p)
Girl roommate wanted for summer
term. June rent free. Own bedroom.
V 2 block behind Norman. Call Kay
3 78-7638. $45 per month.
(C-st-139-p)
1 female roommate needed for Sept,
in lovely poolside Village Park Apt.
9V2 month lease. Such a Deal! Call
392-9403 or 392-9262. (C-st-139-p)
Male roommate wanted for quiet one
bedroom apt. $55 per month plus
utilities for summer only. Call John
378-4110- (C-st-141-p)
2 female roommates for Village Park
apt. for summer and/or fall quarter.
Call 378-5950. (C-3t-141-p)

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Page 12

WANTED I
2 female roommates for French
Quarter apartment for summer
quarter. Only SIOO each for entire
summer. Call 392-7600. (C-st-140-P)
Male roommate to share Fr. Quarter
apt with 3 others for fall. SSO per
month. Call 392-8263 evenings.
(C-st-140-P)
Two to share 2 bdrm. linage Park
for summer or more. Low rent or will
sublet for $l4O per month. Desirable
location. 376-7439. (C-5M40-P)
1 male roommate for nice air cond. 1
br apt, 1 block from Norman. SIOO
phis V? utilities. Call 376-5842 after
6. (C-5M40-P)
Q
Male roommate for summer Camelot
poolside apt. Sauna. Private BBQ. 2
bedroom 2 bath air conditioned S6O
mo. Call 376-4104. (C-st-141-p)
HELP WANTED 1
WANTED: Energetic, enthusiastic
salesman/manager. Can earn SIOOO,
S2OOO or more during fall quarter
alone. Davis in room 330 Reitz
Union between 2 and 5 p.m.
(E-nc-3t-p)
Waitress needed Good pay, better
tips, pick your own hours. Must be
over 21. See Ernest in person after 4
pm at Thirsty Gator 633 N.W. 13th
St. (E-2M43-P)
j^.xW:XX*x*x*x-!-x*x-x*xxxx*x-x< x x x
AUTOS |
w. &
I-N-XtX'X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-X-V.vXX-X-Xv
Bugeye Sprite new top & tires. Needs
transmission work otherwise
mechanically perfect $225. Call
378-5227. (G-st-143-p)
Rare opportunity: Must sell my 1964
Triumph Spitfire now; has roll bar,
twin exhausts, runs perfectly 5995.
Call Steve at 392-8878 after 9:00
p.m. (G-lt-143-P)
1966 SAAB Rally special fully
equipped pirelli tires koni
shocks. Good condition, low mileage.
$995. Call 466-3213 (No toll) or
392-0220. (G-3t-143-p)
Chevrolet, 1958, 4 door, 6 cylinder,
runs well, S2OO, will bargain. Call
376-9683. (G-3t-141-p)
BMW 1600, 1967: White and black.
One owner, driven 16000 miles.
Extras including radial tires. SI6OO.
Call 376-9647. (G-2M40-P)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen dealer, 4222 NW 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-ts-130-C)
Must sell English sports car 1965
Sunbeam good tires, seat belts,
power-disc brakes, convertible. Book
value is SIOBO. Will sell 825.
372-7971. (G-10t-141-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23, 1969

l AUTOS |
18 9 X-X-.X-M-X-X.XX:>:
66 Triumph Spitfire MKZ, con.,
tanau cover, r&h, good condition;
1200 or best offer 376-2816 after
4. (G-5M42-P)
67 convertible Mustang S2OO below
used car retail, $1440, 19,000 miles,
6 cylinder, gas economy, must sell,
beautiful. 120 NW 24 St. 376-8565.
(G-12M42-P)
SO*XXNX JiWX-X-r-XXSSXXX-X-X<;:
1 PERSONAL l
X
y.x.vx-x*>xM*x-x-x.xx-x-x-x-x-x-x->;x
INTERESTED TO TRAVEL TO
SOUTH AMERTCArt t am organizing
a trip in a private bus. If seriously
interested call 372-7039 between 5-7.
(J-4t-141-p)
Would you like to be a member of
Maas Brothers 1969-1970 College
Board? Apply now any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15t-129-c)
Splitting school and need breaa.
Selling everything. 48 black light,
incense burner, albums: Hendrix, etc.
Even beer mugs. Call 378-4507.
(J-3M42-P)
Meet Miami-Dade chapter of Atid at
Hillel services, Friday night. Special
guest speaker guaranteed to please.
16 NW 18 Street. (J-2M42-P)
Getting Married Soon? Bridallure
Wedding Gown & Veil. Beautiful.
Size 9. $50.00. Call 376-9707 after 6
p.m. for information. (J-st-140-P)
ITS GREAT to be GREEK! Come
find out why by signing up for fall
rush anyday 1-4 p.m. at the JWRU
Rm 315 Panhellenic office.
(J-st-140-P)
Miss r.l.b. Hope this weekend has
much to hold for you. Welcome here.
It was a long time coming. May it be
one of the best ever. Keep that pretty
smile on. Turn around! One more
thing many surprises so keep an
eye open Dont forget
T.A.L.A.M. Love as always b.m.n
(J-lt-143-P)
Thanks, Greeks, for naming WUWU
radio your official Greek Week
information station. Dial 1390 and
well keep you posted on the point
totals. (J-143-lt-c)
Math tutor needed: Think you can
bail me out of D E? Pay plus S6O
bonus rs I make a C. Prefer someone
familiar with MS 305 378-3166.
(J-2t-145-p)
TADFOUCL*
There are damn few Datsuns on used
car lots. To buy one see Godding &
Clark down by the main post office.
(J-ts-143-c)
Cessna 150. $9 per hr. Flight
instructor wanted. 495-2124 after 7
p.m. (J-10t-136-p)

| LOST & FOUND |
Av.vAv. .v.VAV.\v. .v.v. , .v.y,v.v.v.v: ;v
Lost: Brown alligator billfold. Keep
cash but would like IDs. Contact
Edward H. Scroggin 372-9410
Georgia Seagle Hall 1002 W. Univ.
Ave. (L-3t-141-p)
Please help find "Tely-LumpLump
small-orange & white spotted
ringtaled tomcat at 1824 NW 3rd PI.
378-3022 substantial reward.
(L-st-141-p)

msui ci nowh
PLAYBOY ran ten well-stacked pages on this film!
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MERCY Humppe
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Anthony Hewley loan Collins Milton Berle.
Can Heironymus Merkin ever forget Mercy Humppe and find true happiness?"
Bruce Forsyth Stubby Kaye *George Jessel. - iw p iL s
nun tn wKit iner mnai m wmi n iiwnCQ
KHUN RAM! ANTHONY NtWIEY ANIHONY NEWUY HERBUT KETZMEt ANTHONY NEMEY v 7 NOT
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SERVICES
i%!XSS4<-:*WS*:*X44C446VA 9 9 B<<'
Fly to Miami $36 R/Trip. Lve
Gainesville 5:30 p.m. May 29. Lve
Miami 8:30 p.m. J. Ist. Nonstop 2
hrs. Exp. pilot, Twin Bonanza plane.
Call Shirley Patrick 378-2443 or
378-8145 after 5. Must have re-L by
27th. 4 more passngrs oWly!
(M-3M42-P)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-123-p)
~w _______________
TYPING IN MY HOME 5 YEAR
EXPERIENCE IBM ELECTRIC
STANDARD TYPEWRITER. CALL
376-7809- A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)



TROUBLE IN SNOOPY*
Apollo Pilots Fix UpSnoopys Problems

SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) -An unexplained wild
gyration rocked the Apollo 10
lunar ' lander while it was
preparing to pull out of the
second of two low passes over
the moon late Thursday. But
astronauts Thomas P. Stafford
and Eugene A. Ceman overcame
the difficulty.
The difficulty developed
when Stafford and Cernan,
flying the lunar lander called
Snoopy attempted to jettison
the landing stage of their
spaceship.
Eight minutes later, the
astronauts successfully fired
their ships takeoff engine to
start their return to a rendezvous
with the safety of the command
ship, manned by John W.
Young.
Rendezvous was necessary to
get the two lunar module pilots
in the command ship the only

Ten UF Schools Will Offer
Pass-Fail Courses In Fall

By LORETTA TENNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Ten of UFs 13
undergraduate schools and
colleges are definitely offering
the pass-fail, or satisfactory satisfactoryunsatisfactory
unsatisfactory satisfactoryunsatisfactory grade option as
it is officially called, beginning
in the fall quarter.
Students in participating
colleges may register for one
elective course each quarter
provided they are
undergraduates in good standing,
are not on any type of probation
and have the approval of peoper
university officials, usually the
dean of their own college and
the college in which the course is
being offered.
Participation in the program
has varied widely, according to
spokesmen in the various
colleges. Although the
University Senate passed the
regulation earlier this year, and
the regulation is printed in the
new 1969 1970 University
Record Undergraduate Catalog,
evidently many students and
advisers are unaware of its
existence or are confused about
its provisions.
According to the catalog, the
option is designed to allow
students to take courses in
disciplines in may
not have the proper
background in order to allow
students to receive as broad an
I. A
education as possible.
The general procedure is for
the student to have his advisor
fill out a special computer card
indicating the course is being
taken on the S-U grade
option and the registrars
computer than makes a note on

spacecraft able to blast out of
lunar orbit and return to the
earths atmosphere.
During the landing stage was
the first critical maneuver
leading up to the rendezvous.
Son of a bitch, Cernan said
in the first report that something
went wrong.
The wild gyration delayed
the jettison maneuver but it was

the instructors official class roll
to that effect. Hours for grades
of S and U are not
computed in the students grade
point average, but do become a
part of his academic record.
Not all courses in a students
curriculum are eligible to be
taken under this option. Courses
required for graduation generally
do not qualify. So called free
electives or courses in which
the student is interested but
which are not required for his
major course of study do qualify
for the option in most cases.
The three schools and
colleges possibly not
participating in the program in
the fall are Physical Education
and Health, Forestry and
Nursing.

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carried out successfully.
The pilots fired their ships
takeoff engine at 7:45 p.m.
EDT.
Baby, that makes me feel
better, Cernan said.
It was not immediately
determined what caused the
gyration.
I dont know what the Hell
that was, babe, Cernan said.

Director of the School of
Forestry J.L. Gray said his
faculty will meet this summer
and decide at that time whether
it will offer the option in the
fall. He said he favors the
proposal, but the decision will
be made after the meeting in
which the faculty will also
consider curriculum changes.
Prof. W. T. Sandefur,
chairman of the Department of
Professional Curriculum in the
College of Physical Education
and Health was not on campus
Thursday afternoon and was
unavailable for comment.
The unofficial word from the
College of Nursing is that the
option will not be offered in the
fall, but Dean Dorothy M. Smith
was unavailable for comment.

That was something weve
never seen before, said
Stafford, the commander of the
eight-day trial run for a manned
lunar landing in July.
Oh, beautiful, beautiful,
beautiful, Ceman said after the
firing of the ships takeoff
engine went off all right.
The lunar modules first
sweep down close to the moon
earlier went off without a hitch.
Were down among Charlie,

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Friday, May 23,1969, The Florida Alligator,

said excited Cernan to
communicator Charles Duke at
the Houston control center.
Asked for a fuller report,
Cernan said, Yeah, as soon as I
get my breath. Young relayed
some of the astronauts reports
from his perch in a 69 mile high
orbit. t>
It looks like were getting so
close that all we have to do is
put the tail hook down and
were there, Stafford said.

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23,1969

CAMPUS CLPSEUP
Active Gannon Starts Mass

The man who is responsible
for the largest turnout ever at
the Rathskeller offered religion
not entertainment.
Father Michael Gannon,
originator of the Folk Mass
which was recently celebrated at
the Rathskeller, is pastor of St.
Augustine Chapel, leader of the
Catholic Student Center, and an
assistant professor at UF.
I cant believe religion is
dead on the campus when you
have 700 people attend a
religious event at the Rat and
have to turn away 250 at the
door. Father Gannon said.
A Folk Mass, the 42-year-old
Father explained, differs only in
form from the regular Mass
the content is the same. The
litany is spoken in English and
the hymns are folk style. They
are celebrated regularly at St.
Augustine Chapel.
St. Augustine Chapel appears
much like any other of its
denomination. The difference is
apparent when the congregation
arrives. It is comprised of
informally dressed young people
who seem to be very reverent in
a relaxed, casual fashion.
The hymns of the Folk Mass
are joyful, rhythmatic, and
accompanied by a guitar and
cymbals. They have been
composed by various Catholic
musicians in the last several
years.
On Sundays and Holy Days
the polished pews of Father
Gannons Church are filled to

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their 1,000 person seat capacity.
Explaining the popularity of
the Folk Mass, Father Gannon
said that it is more relevant to
the feelings and emotions of
young people. They find it less
sanctimonious, he said, and it
allows them to express religious
feelings in a loose, joyous way.
Although the expression is
joyful, it is always reverent. You
can feel the reverence when you
attend the Mass, he said.
Father Gannons success is
not limited to religion. Aside
from his duties with an active
church, he holds a Ph. D. in
history from the UF and teaches
two courses for the History
Department.
His speciality is early Florida
history exploration and
Spanish rule. He teaches one
course in this area, one entitled
Cultural and Intellectual
History of the United States and
two courses in the Department
of Religion.
Father Gannon does not find
his two roles pastor and
teacher in conflict.
He said, There is no divorce
between knowledge and faith.
No one turns me off because I
wear a white collar. My classes
are some of the largest on
campus. I think students are
attracted by the fact that
someone is wearing a uniform of
faith.
Father Gannon said that he
presents knowledge and
historical fact to his students

and leaves the interpretation to
them.
There never has been any
question of my objectivity, he
said.
Tall, tan Father Gannon has a
worldly look when he is relaxed
in his plainly furnished office.
He becomes a little impatient
with people who waste his time.
Time must be important to
the man who has written two
books on Florida history in
addition to his other
responsibilities.
Father Gannon said he wasnt
sure why he purposefully used
every minute of his time.
Maybe, he said, I have a
demon like Socrates. Or maybe I
found my main satisfaction
comes from achievement to
some ideal, some person, religion
or knowledge.
Father Gannon came to the
UF as a full-time assistant
professor in September 1967.
The following year he became
pastor of his student parish. His
job has been to change the
mission-type Church and student
center to one that is
self-sustaining and managed
entirely by students.
He said that he was not
surprised to find students were
able to accept this responsibility
with initiative and concern.
We do not have just a social
center, he said. Our first
purpose is religion and service
our second, fellowship.

MSffl Ml
Inga Erotic, Trite
By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Either Donald Dennis, the director of Inga now showing at the
Center Theatre has constructed a big puton for connoisseurs of
eroticism (college students notably in the lead) or he has failed
miserably in producing a motion picture of artistic merit.
With the trite storyline of a woman possessing a young,
expensively kept boyfriend who renders her young niece for the
amusement of a lecherous benefactor and the concurrent sexual
awakening of a seventeen-year-old innocent, Ingas dubbed in
dialogue is so humorously ridiculous that one hopes that the failure is
just a matter of inept translation.
Casting appears to have been done quite well with Mary Liledahl
perfect as the young, beautiful school girl who becomes a woman.
Lassen Caster as the aunt and Thomas Ungewitter as the boyfriend
Carl are effective although some of their experssions and reactions are
reminiscent of the silent film era, complete with the Oil-Can Harry
prototype in the character of the rich Anas, a man with a penchant
for sweet young things.
The scenes of nudity and love making are many and, considering
the less-than-ample figures of the principals, explicit if not arousing.
But alas, even eroticism must end and without it Inga hasnt a
leg left to stand on.
Its the type of movie seen and then best forgotten, representing
little more than another misguided attempt to exploit sensuality
without imbuing it with sensitivity.
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'Threepenny- -The Players Palest

By MIKE SIMMONS
Entertainment Editor
This term last year Richard
Green, a drama professor in the
speech department, attempted a
task none of the other
teacher-directors would touch
with the proverbial
ten-foot-pole the avant-garde,
musical drama-with-a-message,
Marat-Sade. It had a 40-odd
man cast, astronomical blocking
problems, and received
considerable acclaim in the area.
This term Green tried on a
long shot again -a Broadway
simile of the cocky-cokney,
musical comedy-with-a-message,
Threepenny Opera.
Unfortunately, hes failed to pull
off this challenge as well as his
last.
To be fair, part of the misfire
is due to an ill-formed liason
between the Speech and Music
Departments, creating a
situation in which good actors
are forced to sing (and cant)
and fine singers must act (ditto).
Yet things could have cohered a
bit better than they do.
At any rate, the production
appears to be one in which the
aspirations were high and the
talent of considerable potential,
but one where the scotch tape
has been liberally applied to
hold together poor preparation
due to time shortage and a wee
bit of miscasting.
One gets the impression that
the performers resolved their
actions only a few moments
before coming on stage (or
perhaps while they were on it)
and that many of their minds
were elsewhere during the
musical numbers. In a play
about crooks, prostitutes,
beggars and the like its strange
that most of these people should
come across as good-natured good-naturedbut-naughty
but-naughty good-naturedbut-naughty children totally
oblivious of their undertakings
even if it is a comedy.
And speaking of comedy
Threepenny really isnt. Nor is
it really a drama or anything else
for that matter. The tunes are
half-hearted and dead, the music
tinny, and the portrayals so
indistinct in most cases as to fall
short of even melodrama. In
general, the audience cant
identify with anyone on stage,
laugh at or with them, hate,
weep with them, or do much
else but watch. This is theatre?
Richard Council as Macheath
is a fine speaker and comes close
to physically fitting his part, but
he never manages to bring what
should be sharply delineated
character to life. His voice is
never projected either, all of
which makes one doubt that he
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really has one. Robert
Stallworth (who plays the Street
Singer) should have had the part.
Elizabeth Green as Polly
Peachum is sweet in voice and
image, but thats about it. And
Joy Chutz as Lucy Brown
should stick to comedy, as she
did in this years The
Successful Life of Three. Harry
Murphy (Tiger Brown) cant
seem to find himself in his
musical numbers, so perhaps he
should stick to something else
too.
Macks Gang should have
stood out as a cluster of
dynamically various

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COUCH'S

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characters, yet only Bob
Nader stands out with any
promise or offers the audience
the chance to get to know
him. Green has achieved some
success, however, in his casting
and arrangement of the beggars
and the Ladies from

Wapping both show
considerable flavor.
Accolades also are in order
for the fine and close-to-profes close-to-professional
sional close-to-professional performances given by
Jenny Streiff (Celia Peachum),
Dan Jesse (Jonathan Jeremiah
Peachum), Eleanor Broome
(Jenny), and David Chafln
(Reverend Kimball). Its a shame
they didnt have more to work
with.
The shows program sheet
indicates that the time of the
play is sometime soon. And
yet, Michael Gillettes sets
appear to have been borrowed

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Friday, May 23,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

from dn off*Broadway
production of Dickens Oliver,
hardly a contemporary or
futuristic portrayal of anyones
conception of London. What
happened to the flair shown'in
After the Rain?
But all in all, the really
notable thing about the whole
show is the costume design and
construction, creations of Mary
Davis and Dana Preisler. Its
worth seeing the whole
production just to take in the
variety, color, and animation
theyve poured into these
outfits, some of the best the
players have ever worn.

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Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23, 1969

IN USTFF MEET AT ATLANTA
Track Team Warms Up For NCAA Finale

UFs Track Team and the
Florida Track Club leave today
to compete in the Southeastern
United States Track and Field
Federation meet Saturday in
Atlanta, Ga.
Led by National Collegiate
Athletic Association indoor high
jump record holder Ron
Jourdan, the defending meet
champion Gators are expected
to win again against most of the.
teams in the South.
Tennessee, however, the
Southeastern Conference
champion, will not be competing
in this Atlanta Track Chit Chitsponsored
sponsored Chitsponsored meet. The Volunteer;
are competing instead in the
California Relays in Modesto
Calif.
The Florida Track Club is led
Two Favored
In Bluegrass
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (UPI)
Sandra Haynie and leading
money winner Kathy Whitworth
head a field of 43 professionals
and eight amateurs Friday in the
opening round of the $15,000
Bluegrass Invitational ladies golf
tournament at nearby Hunting
Creek Country Club.
Only one of the top 10
money winners on the tour this
season, Shirley Englehom, will
miss the fifth annual classic. Miss
Englehom, still bothered by an
ankle injury suffered in 1965, is
skipping the tournament because
of the courses hilly terrain.
Considered likely threats to
Misses Haynie and Whitworth
are Carol Mann and Mickey
Wright.
Miss Mann is the defending
champion, besting Miss Haynie
in 1968 with a 210 score for the
54 holes. Her credentials
coming into this tournament are
impressive, with two victories in
the first nine stops on the tour.
Miss Wright, who is the only
two-time winner of the Bluegrass
1966 and 1967 also holds the
tournament single round record
of 62.
But most of the attention will
be on Miss Whitworth, who
heads the money field with
$15,924, and Miss Haynie, who
has scored triumphs in two of
her last three tournaments.

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by Jack Bacheler, the top United
States 3-mile and Olympic 5,000
meter runner. The FTC finished
second in last years meet and
hopes to better their
performance this year.
The track club is bolstered
for this meet with the addition
of several members of the track
team, according to a UF Athletic
Department spokesman. UF
team members who will compete
for the club will not be known
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until the start of the meet.
Besides Jourdan, who has
jumped 7-feet or better 19 out
of 24 times this season and has
won 23 out of 24 meets, other
top Gators competing in the
meet include new SEC record
holder in the intermediate
hurdles Jerry Fannin, SEC
winner in the discus John
Morton, and SEC long jump
winner Mike Burton.
Other Gators competing
include John Parker, mile; Clint
Fowlkes, hurdles; Tim Oakes,
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hurdles; Ron Coleman, triple
jump; Woody Bozelle, long
jump; Grover Howard, triple
jump; and Bob Lang, 880-yard
run.

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The next meet for the SEC
runner-up Gators will be the
WCAA outdoor championships
June 19-21 in Knoxville, Tenn.



f A Little Spice In The Pep Rallies

By BETH GRAVES
Alligator Feature Writer
Organizing the squad, arranging
alumni get-togethers at out-of-town
games, planning away trips, and
submitting a workable budget will all
be a part of the new head
cheerleaders job.
Twenty years old and majoring in
Industrial Engineering, Phil Johnson
has cheered since he was a freshman
when he was talked into going out by
a fraternity brother and former head
cheerleader, Roddy Grubbs.
Among the technicalities involved
V.V.V.-.-.V.SNV.V-V.V.V..V.V.V.V.V.V

Chi Phis
Nab Blue
League Ist
Chi Phi clinched the Blue
League Presidents Trophy
Thursday for the first time in
the fraternitys 37 years at UF.
The all-small-fratemity honor
was secured when Chi Phi
outscored Tau Kappa Epsilon,
12-16, in a softball game at the
ROTC drillfield.
Hurler Frank Oberhausen
went all the way for the victory
and drove in the tiebreaking
runs in the fifth inning with a
two-run double.
This victory gives the Chi Phis
1,012 points to runnersup Theta
Chis 978 and Fijis 867. Neither
can catch the leader before the
season ends.
The new Blue League champs
won first in football, first in
volleyball, took four of six
events in swimming, second in
basketball and third place ties in
tennis and golf. The softball
victory assures Chi Phi a berth in
the finals and a cinch
no-worse thansecond finish.
AL Baseball
Night Games Not Included
East
w 1 pet. gb
Baltimore 28 13 .638
Boston 24 13 .649 2
Detroit 18 16 .529 6Vi
Washington 20 21 .488 8
New York 19 21 .475 8&
Cleveland 8 24 .250 15#
West
Oakland 21 14 .600
Minnesota 20 14 .588 Vi
Chicago 15 16 .484 4
Kansas City 17 20 .459 5
Seattle 16 20 .444 5 Vi
California 11 25 .306 1014

PLANNED BY HEAD CHEERLEADER

in organizing the squad, one of the
most important aspects is that of
working out a feasible budget.
Our money comes from funds of
the Student Government and the
Athletic Department, Johnson said.
This year we requested a total of
$4500 to cover uniforms, meals,
transportation, and rooms for away
games, and the summer clinic, he
added.
Last year the UF cheerleaders
came back from the clinic with first
place honors.
Included in Johnsons
responsibilities is the role of public

- r '"'' , \ '
\ i mt
m i
|gj
fl
iH
SURE PAL
Larry Smith, No. 1 draft choice of the Los Angeles Rams, stops
after the Orange and Blue Football game to give an autograph. The
young recipient will be very proud of it once the football season gets
started.
PHI KAPPA TAU
Salutes the Greek System for outstanding service to the
community and the University. We are proud of the
contributions our brothers have made to the campus &
community.
Jack Harkness Pres. Blue Key
Dave Doucette Editor Alligator
Randy Williams Gator Growl
John Cosgrove Chairman Greek Week
Lamar Sawyer Head Drum Major
George Crawford Chairman Continuing Projects
Don Reid News Director WGGG
Mike Taylor Tech Dir. 2nd Hundred
Jack Shuler Dialogue
ART ARTPRINT
PRINT ARTPRINT SALE
TUES A,
WED ~Y
- THURS
MAY 27 MAY 29
10AM to 9PM
Room 235 REITZ UNION

relations man or liason from the
squad to the Athletic Department.
We have to work with the
program as well as its alumni, the
veteran cheerleader commented.
On away games, the cheerleaders
are the representatives of the who e
student body to the alumni, and
meeting, impressing and getting to
know them is a routine job of the
squads.
One of the biggest events is the
Florida-Georgia Barbecue which
thousands of UF alumni attend
annually in Jacksonville.

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Friday, May 23, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

When asked if he had any new
ideas for pep rallies on the campus,
or ways for getting crowd reaction
throughout next years season,
Johnson seemed optimistic.
The students like to have a little
spice in the pep rallies, and they
should. Its asking alot for the
student body to come out in the
afternoon only to yell for themselves
the majority of the time. They liked
the idea of watching practice and
cheering at the same time last fall,
and if all works out the way we want
it to, well follow through with the
idea next year, he replied.

Page 17



I, Th Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23,1969
L

Page 18

Twins, A s Are Two Best Clubs In AL

(EDITORS NOTE: The following column is
reprinted from Tuesday, May 20,1969, issue of
the Christian Science Monitor.)
By ED RUMILL
Monitor Chief Sports Columnist
Joe Schultz disagrees with those who call the
East the American Leagues strongest division.
I still havent seen Baltimore and Detroit,
said the manager of the Seattle Pilots. But we
know all about the Tigers from last season and
the Orioles must be solid, with perhaps the
leagues best bench. Boston, if it gets any
pitching, will be tough.
But the two best clubs Ive seen are
Minnesota and Oakland, in the West. And
Chicago keeps improving slowly. The Twins
front-line players have speed and power, and
Billy Martin (the manager) has them hustling.
The Athletics lack Minnesotas or Bostons
power, but they are young, and have good arms
and good speed. Oakland is the type of young
club that will get better with age.
The Oakland club has made Schultz's
comment look good. Through weekend action,
the As had taken eight of their last 10 with
easily the best pitching in the league and a
run-making machine that may be good enough
to keep the club in contention all year.-
The rest of the league was waiting to see
how the As did against Baltimore and Detroit,
whom they had not yet played.
This recent spurt; had put the As ahead of
the Twins in the West. The Twins, though
playing .500 ball for the month of May (6-6),
had dropped their last four, mostly because
they ran into a red-hot Detroit club.
In a weekend series reduced to two games by
rain, the Twins were beaten by Denny McLain
and Mickey Lolich.
Schultzs Pilots, despite a ragged bullpen,
had taken seven out of nine and moved past

c
Cupit Leads
Soil Classic
By DAVID M. MOFFITT
UPI Sports Writer
ATLANTA Jacky Cupit,
mly one of a five-brother golf
amily, who is still on the pro
our, ran off three straight
lirdies early in his back nine
oday to jump into the early
irst round lead in the Atlanta
jolf Classic.
The 31-year-old Texan was
ive under par after 13 holes
iver the hilly Atlanta Country
Hub course. That put him ahead
>f Canadian George Knudsen by
me stroke.
Included in a three-under
rroup right at their heels were
Uae&Palmer, Art W* Charles
pne was
r o ing mHn&upt kcww he had
ost confidence in his putting but
le said he had no intention of
cashing in his chips.

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INDIANS MAY BE AWAKENING

California in the West. Joes team can score
runs.
It put on a power display at Fenway Park
over the weekend, setting 20 runs in three
engagements with Boston.
The Red Sox whose pitching runs hot and
cold, still sported a 10-4 record for May and
were led by only Baltimore in the East.
Bostons Tony Conigliaro was having a
miserable time at bat, but some of the other
boys were hitting. Rico Petrocelli finished the
weekend with a <357 average and 12 home runs.
One of the individual highlights of recent AL
action was the one-hitter young Gerry Nyman
of the White Sox threw at Washington on
Saturday, 6-0, in his first start of the season. It
was one of five shutouts thrown that day.
Kansas Citys expansion Royals, after
winning six of their first eight in May, had
dropped seven out of eight.
In the National League, news was popping
from the strangest places. For instance, the
New York Mets had won eight out of 12
playing Chicago Atlanta, Cincinnati, and
Houston, which must hive inspired a few
banners at Shea Stadium.
Houston, after dropping their last eight April
starts, had done 11-4 in May. The Los Angeles
Dodgers were 6-2, and had taken five straight
from the Pittsburgh Pirates. Walt Alstons
young L.A. club moved ahead of San Francisco
in the West and was a definite threat to
Atlantas lead in that division.
The Braves, who had taken 10 out of 13 and
13 out of 16, made headlines the other day
when they announced that a few World Series
ticket requests were already in their Atlanta
office. Os course, they had to be returned, but
it gives you an idea of the thinking down that
way.

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CHARGED IN SBO,OOO THEFT
Boxer Suspended Following FBI Arrest

NEW YORK (UPI) Frankie
DePaula, who was supposed to
fight Don Fullmer on Monday
night, was suspended by the
New York State Athletic
Commission in the best interest
of boxing, Thursday pending
the outcome of federal charges
made against him for stealing
SBO,OOO worth of copper.

DePaula and his manager,
Gary Garafola, were among five
men arrested by the Federal
Bureau of Investigation Tuesday
in connection with the copper
theft in March, 1968. Garafola
also had his license suspended.
Juarez DeLima of Brazil, the
worlds fifth ranked
middle-weight, was named to

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fight Fullmer in the 10-round
bout at Madison Square Garden
Monday night. On the same
card, Nino Benvenuti meets Dick
Tiger.
The commission reached its
decision after making its own
investigation and carefully
considering all the facts and
circumstances leading to the

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indictment and arrest of DePaula
and Garafola, the commission
said in a prepared statement.
The suspension is effective
immediately and will continue
until the disposition of the
charges in the federal courts.
DePaula and Garafola both of
Jersey City, N.J., met with the
commission Wednesday. Both

Friday, May 23,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

were free on bail.
Despite a mediocre record,
the 29-year-old DePaula has
been one of the Gardens top
attractions in the past year. In
his last Garden bout, he was
stopped by light heavyweight
champion Bob Foster in the first
round of a title bout. DePaula
has a 19-7-3 record.

Page 19



Page 20

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Friday, May 23,1960

f^^MnmKHPMOoauMiTT-MANmTie^^^
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K n33Utig yl Jerry Fannin textbooks-
I I NEW AND USED
1 Jerry Fannin, a sophomore from Lakeland, is this
I week's Alligator Player of the Week for his ARCHITECTURAL
\A I I r I record-breaking intermediate hurdle effort last weekend D e IC kiT A Kin IIDDI ICC
YY ICO m 65 I in the Southeastern Conference track championship in KJUIPMfcN I ANU 3UrrLIC3
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Fannin went the distance in SEC-record time of 51.0 CTlinv I AAA DC
to record one of the two conference marks which went STUDY LAMPS
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ill I got the other with another of his 7-0 leaps. I GYM OUTFITS
I JL JL JmT I Fannin placed second one year ago as a freshman in C\A/F AT^HIRTS
the SEC intermediate hurdles and his time this year is Jff CMIJrI
his career best and one of the best in the nation this COI I PFTS
I I season. V-V^LLC\7C
I I Other athletes who drew support for Player of the COLLEGE SEAL
m I Week this week were tennis stars Jamie Pressly, Greg uacr AT CTATIOkICDY
nf \/ I Gilley, Steve Beeland and Paul Lunetta, who led the IVIAbtUI OIAIIwIMtKT
O\J I Til T I Gators past Miami before over 3,500 fans last Saturday.
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