Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
JORDAN

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first in a two-part
series on UFs black students.)
See Editorial Page 8
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
To UFs 98 black students, one of the most
pressing problems is the lopsided white-black
student ratio.
More important than recruiting black faculty,
believe many blacks, is getting more black students
to attend the UF.
Were concerned about the lack of black

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 140

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TOM KENNEDY
THEYRE EVERYWHERE
Coming and going, these three UF coeds agree that campus living,
walking and class-going is really done best in the uniform of the day:
The fraternity-sorority team jersey. Wearing the jerseys Monday
commenced Greek Week. The week climaxes with Spring Frolics with
the Four Seasons in the Florida Gym Saturday night.

White-Black Ratio Concerns Blacks

The
Florida Alligator

INCREASED RECRUITMENT CALLED FOR

! DEPTH REPORT |
administrators and faculty, said Sam Taylor, 3AS,
but what we want now is a significant number of
black students.
The UF should have about 6,000 black students
in order to represent all the people of Florida, he
said.
The administration is not prepared to handle a
situation like this, he added. They dont consider
it valid, and 1 dont think theyre going to do
anything.
Black students met with administrators twice in
the past week to hash out problems of admissions,

University of Florida, Gainesville

IN [MASSIVE SHAKEUP
Four Cabinet Positions
Reopened By Shepherd

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
*%
Tremors from a massive
shakeup in the three-week-old
Charles Shepherd administration
began rocking UF Student
Governments executive offices
Monday afternoon.
Shepherd and his vice
president, Charles Harris,
announced the unexpected
reopening of four cabinet
positions thought to be already
filled.
The surprise announcement
came in the wake of an
executive decision to open SG to
a greater cross-section of the
student body who are willing
to put forth more than the
average position seeker.
Were tired of being pushed
around by the politicians and
this is why weve taken this
action, Harris told the
Alligator.
He said Shepherd realized
how closed SG has been to
students after attending a
womans leadership conference
Sunday afternoon, and the
decision was then made to try to
channel new talent into the
infant administration.
Shepherd is unhappy with the
applications for cabinet
positions now on his f d es k and
says he wants to get the best
people for the posts, regardless
of affiliation, to carry out the
aims of his administration.
The four cabinet positions
now available are: student
organizations, health and
insurance, student services and
married student affairs.
The Secretary of Student
Organizations coordinates
student-run and student-oriented
organizations on a campus-wide
basis. This coordination also

campus attitudes and housing. The Afro-American
Student Association (AASA) invited key
administrators to a meeting May 9, and UF
President Stephen C. OConnells Committee on
Disadvantaged Students met with blacks last
Tuesday night for a similar session.
The May 9 AASA meeting admittedly produced
nothing in the way of specific promises or
guarantees. It also produced mixed reactions from
students in attendance.
We werent really getting through to a majority
of the administrators, said Harry Lamb, 4AS. The
types of answers they gave no promises, no
(SEE 'RATIO* PAGE 2)

Were tired of being pushed around by the politicians
and this is why weve taken this action.
Charles Harris

includes development of liaisons
between all groups.
The Secretary of Student
Organizations is responsible for
organization of proposed
registration and recognition
changes and procedures in the
Shepherd administration.
It will also be his job to
organize a leadership conference
and inter-organizational council
as well as editing and designing
the Inter-organizational
handbook.
He will also serve on related
university committees.
This position involves
handling claims problems and
investigation into Infirmary
procedures to recommend
changes.
Negotiation of new student
insurance contracts and
investigation of health standards
in campus eating areas are a
major part of this secretariat.
He will serve on the Insurance
Commission and the Traffic and
Safety Committee.
The Secretary of Student
Services will be required to
supervise and direct physical
improvements on campus as well
as student services demanding

Four Seasons Tickets
On Sale For Frolics
Tickets for Saturdays Spring Frolics, featuring the Four
! Seasons, go on sale today at the Reitz Union Box Office when it j
[ opens at 12 noon.
Tickets will be sold at $5 a couple and are available on a first
i comefirst served basis. After all r tickets are sold at the box
i office, some may be obtained by contacting individual
1 fraternity houses.
[ Frolics is sponsored by the Intlrfraternity Council.
L

Tuesday, May 20, 1969

material involvement.
Coordination of campus
recreational activities also falls
to this position.
The direction of plans for a
student cooperative grocery and
bookstore, campus ampitheater,
and Reitz Union rooftop
activities constitute a large part
of this secretarys
responsibilities.
The Secretary of Married
Student Affairs will coordinate
SG activities and programs with
the needs and problems of UFs
married student population.
Such projects include police
protection, parking, bus service,
recreation areas, laundry
facilities, fire and safety in the
married villages.
Participation in the Mayors
Council and Housing activity
planning as well as work on
wives student IDs and family
infirmary privileges are the
responsibilities of this post.
Harris plans to make
applications for these posts and
positions in various SG agencies
available in specially constructed
booths around campus this
week.
Shepherd hopes to make final
appointments within ten days.

O'CONNELL

America's
Number One
College
Daily



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 20,1969

Sovereiantv Question Mav End In Legal Action

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
David A. West, Gainesville attorney, has been
retained by UF Student Government to advise on
legal action which may be taken against the City of
Gainesville.
Charles Shepherd, president of the student body,
said Monday that West had been hired to find out
if we have a case, in SGs claim that the city did
not have the right to tax Camigras.
The city coUected $1,300 in licensing tax from
the carnival group brought to campus in March to
raise money for the Gator Loan Fund.
Then-Student Body President Clyde Taylor
fought the tax, saying the city had no right to tax

Release Praises
'Greek Week
UF President Stephen C. OConnell released a proclamation
Monday, declaring the week of May 18 as Greek Week. The
release stated:
Whereas, the fraternities and sororities at UF have
strengthened the spirit of brotherhood on the campus and have
established friendships that will endure for a lifetime, and
Whereas, the fraternity and sorority system has encouraged
and maintained high standards of scholastic attainment for its
members and chapters, and
Whereas, the Greeks, by organizing chapter and campus-wide
social events, have contributed to the social life of students,
which is important to the development of well-rounded
individuals, and
Whereas, the Greeks, by organizing and promoting intramural
programs, have encouraged good sportsmanship and physical
fitness, and
Whereas, the Greeks, individually and collectively, have given
of their funds, time and energy for service projects that improve
our campus and local community, and
Whereas, the Interfraternity Council and the PanheUenic
Council have rendered invaluable assistance to our students and
campus by taking the initiative to sponsor fund-raising programs
for loans and tuition scholarships; by encouraging competitive
programs in scholarship and athletics; by strengthening the lines
of communication among chapters and between Greeks and
non-Greeks; by acting as representative councils for organizing
and governing Greek activities,
Now, therefore, as President of this university, I hereby
proclaim:
The week of May 18 as Greek Week and commend all
Greeks, their chapters, and their representative councils for their
continuing efforts and their individual expenditures which have
contributed to the development of our students and our
campus.
Schedule of Events
I Today Faculty Dinner: All faculty alumni should be
I invited to the respective houses in an effort to promote better
I faculty-chapter relations.
7:30 p.m. Seminar, Leadership and Scholarship, in the
I Reitz Union.
10 p.m. Serenades, Orange and Blue League trophy
I presentations.
Wednesday, May 21; 4 to 6 p.m. Delta Upsilon Debates in
I the Union.
7:30 p.m. Rush Seminar, Charter Relations and Finance in
I the Union.
8:30 p.m. Talent Show, in the Rathskeller.
Thursday, May 22; 4:30 p.m. Gator Greek Speedway
5:15 p.m. PanheUenic Bar-B-Que, at the Lake Alice Field
I across from Fraternity Row. A dress casual, ali-you-can-eat
I affair, with a band and Greek Goddesses. Serenade trophies will
I be awarded.
7:30 p.m. Seminar, Contemporary Fraternity Problems
I Panel, in the Union. Greek God and Goddess contest, in the
I RathskeUer.
Friday, May 23; 4 to 6 p.m.- Delta Upsilon Debate Finals, in
I the Union.
9 p.m. to 1 a.m. Greek Dance, in the Gym.
[ Saturday, May 24; 2to 4 p.m. Greek Games, at the Florida
I Track.
8 p.m. Frolics, featuring The Four Seasons, in the Gym.
I Sunday, May 25; Greek Church Day.

SG SECURES ATTORNEYS ADVICE

the fund-raising project. However, the Gainesville
City Commission disagreed and the tax was levied.
City Attorney Osee Fagan holds that the
university is not a sovereign state and is subject to
all city ordinances.
Shepherd, in deciding to take action, deplored
the idea SG was trying to embarrass the city and
said the question under study is not that serious.
He said if West found no case for SG the matter
would be dropped.
Shepherd also said Gainesville attorney Selig
Golden, who raised the $1,300 from 13 local
businessmen, did not speak for the students of the
university and any opinions submitted to the city
commission must have been his own personal
opinions.

ALONG WITH ATTITUDES

Ratio Concerns Blacks

FROM PAGE ONE^I
guarantees upset some of us.
However, others say the administrators were
made aware for the first time of the intensity of the
problems facing blacks.
They were trying to tell us that things arent so
bad, Taylor said, but we showed them the black
viewpoint. They had been unaware of the intensity
of the problems before, because blacks until this
time havent said anything.
If the major problem is black enrollment, what is
the cause and what can be done about it? The
Florida senior placement test, a determining factor
in deciding admissions, is a stumbling block for
many blacks. A black student at last Tuesdays
committee meeting said most blacks do not score
even into the 300 range the cutoff point much
less the 400 s. The average test score for UFs
entering 1968 freshman class was 421.
The tests are highly biased towards the white
middle class, Taylor said.
He cited a question on the test about mortgages,
which would not be relevant to anyone who does
not own property.
Then too, it has been shown that test scores do
not always correlate with subsequent grade point
averages. This has been shown to be the case on
Graduate Record Exams as well as standard
entrance exams.
What we need is a tool to measure the
exception, said Director of Records and
Registration Vernon L. Voyles.
In an interview Thursday, OConnell said the best
way to increase black enrollment is through junior
college recruitment, and one thing the UF can do is
let black students know the administration
welcomes them.
Every qualified black student ought to have the
opportunity to come here, he said. Those who
apply and are qualified do come. Black students
must meet the same standards expected of everyone
else.
According to Carolyn Pope, 3JM, a black
student, at the May 9 AASA meeting OConnell
seemed to think the blacks want lower admission
standards.
We didnt mean that at all, she said. That was

Frosts Poetry Comes Alive

An intimate friend of Robert
Frosts will read Frosts poetry
tonight at Frostiana, sponsored
by the Departments of Music
and English.
Dr. Cliff Lyons, doing the
reading, was Graduate Chairman
of the English Department at
UF, and now is the English
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RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
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Golden, in a letter addressed to the commission
last week asked that the tax money be returned to
the Gator Loan Fund. The commission voted down
this suggestion three to two.
If there is a case for SG and the sovereignity of
the university, Shepherd said it would probably be
filed later this week.
He said there was a legal question as to whom the
plaintiff would be in the possible action.
The president also said West was investigating the
incorporation of SG, which would allow that body
the power to list itself as plaintiff in court action.
The university sovereignty test, already granted
authorization by the Student Senate, now only
awaits Wests final advice.

department chairman at
University of North Carolina,
Chapel Hill.
The combined voices of the
Mens and Womens Glee clubs,
and the Combined Choirs will
sing Randall Thompsons
musical renditions of Frosts
Poetry.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
niversity of florid and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building. University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator*
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Honda 32601.
T U h! S Fi iPt T a 3 .*. is 510 00 P er year or $3.50 per quarter.
,onda Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical ton
objectionab^e ISementS ant * revlse or lurn awa y copy which it consider
adv^J^"? 8 AlU gator wUI n t consider adjustments of payment for any
notfri involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
than onp nt appear s The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for mo
times iWiTp C T eCt ,nsertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
1 sor COfrec tion must be given before next insertion J

something he must have dreamed up. What we want
is for the administration to make a special effort to
recruit more black students.
She said the atmosphere at the UF is
alien you get the feeling that youre not
supposed to be here, if there were more black
students on campus, the hostility would lessen.
A problem with the administration, contended
one black student at Tuesdays meeting, concerns
differences in outlook. Administrators deal with
theories and abstractions, but we have to live with
this problem every day.
Larry Jordan called the administration the
biggest single factor impeding progress, with its
bureaucratic maze and double-talk nonsense.
He cited an incident last year when he was unable to
obtain a complete list of current and in-coming
black students.
But, the administration notwithstanding, many
blacks agree that the biggest problem is in attitude
of the students.
There is a hostile attitude on this campus and
there has been no significant change in the last few
years, said Jordan. However, there is more of an
attitude of toleration now since there are more of us
here now.
It seems unlikely that the skimpy black
enrollment can be attributed partially to campus
attitudes. Emerson Thompson, 3AS, said black
students around the state prefer the University of
South Florida and Florida State University to UF.
High school students are more receptive to the
UF than junior college transfers, he added.
But, as discussed earlier, the placement tests for
high school seniors block most from admission to
state universities lower divisions.
For the 98 black students attending UF, an
obvious question is why did they choose the UF?
The blacks "at Tuesdays meeting agreed that a
determining factor is the degree.
A degree from the UF means more than one
from Florida A&M, said one student.
Another observed that it is cheaper to go to the
UF than someplace like Fiske or Howard
Universities.
If a degree from the UF didnt mean more than
one from A&M, added another, Id leave
tomorrow.

Among Frosts poems set to
music are the ever popular
Stopping By Woods on a
Snowy Evening, Fireflies in
the Garden, and Road Not
Taken.
The presentation begins at
8:00 tonight in the University
Auditorium. There is no
admission charge. ...



Astronauts Theme: 'Up, Up And Away

SPACE CENTER, Houston
(UPI) The three Apollo 10
pilots turned disc jockeys
Monday, radioing back taped
tones of Up, Up and Away as
they bore down on the halfway
mark of Americas final
path finding voyage for a manned
lunar landing in July.
I thought that song was sort
of apropos, said Eugene A.
Cernan, 35, as he, Thomas P.
Stafford, 38, and John W.
Young, 38, soared into their
daring eight-day moon orbiting
adventure.
The astronauts, slowed by the
fading pull of earths gravity to
3,675 miles per hour in 24
houts, were to cross the 125,947
mile halfway mark to the moon
shortly after 3 p.m. EDT.
A few minutes later, a short
burst from the ships main
rocket engine was scheduled to

Supreme Court Overturns
Learys Drug Conviction

WASHINGTON (UPI) The Supreme Court,
operating with eight justices and an empty chair,
overturned Monday the federal marijuana
conviction of Dr. Timothy Leary, the controversial
exponent of LSD and other hallucinatory drugs.
The unanimous decision may compel the
government to ask Congress for new legislation to
prosecute marijuana possession cases.
Leary, former Harvard psychology instructor,
was found guilty in Laredo, Tex., of transporting
illegally imported marijuana and of failing to pay a
special tax of SIOO an ounce for it.
The court on its first decision day since the
resignation of Abe Fortas hit the verdict against
Leary on both counts.
The opinion by Justice John M. Harlan struck
down the provision of the narcotics importation law
which makes mere possession presumptive evidence
that the marijuana was illegally imported and the
possessor knew it.
Harlan also upheld Learys claim that by
registering and paying the tax, Leary would have
been incriminating himself in violation of his sth

Orientation
Applications
Available
Applications are now
available for positions with the
fall orientation program for
incoming freshmen and transfer
students.
Interested students may pick
up applications at the student
activities desk on the third floor
of the Reitz Union. At the same
time applicants pick up an
application form, they should
make an application for an
interview.
Now Taking Applications
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1700 S. W. 16th Ct.
for
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nudge Apollo 1(P onto the
precise path Apollo 11 will
follow when it heads toward
mans first landing on the moon
in July.

United 39 res# Snterrtaiional
jftojs

The goal of Apollo is to clear
up as many of the remaining
uncertainties about moon flight
as possible to pave the way for
this historic moon landing.
Apollo 10s riskiest test comes
Thursday when Stafford and
Cernan fly their lunar lander
Snoppy away from Young in
the command module Charlie
Brown and swoop only 50,000
feet above the forbidding lunar
surface.

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Amendment rights.
Federal narcotics agents have relied heavily on
the statute making possession of untaxed narcotics a
federal offense in their prosecution of drug
peddlers.
In setting aside Learys conviction, Harlan
commented, we are constrained to add that
nothing in what we hold today implies any
constitutional disability in Congress to deal with the
marijuana traffic by other means.
The 47-year-old high priest of the LSD
movement was sentenced to 30 years in prision and
fined $40,000 at his 1966 trial. His 18-year-old
daughter, Susan, was arrested with him at the
U.S.-Mexican border and placed on probation until
she reached legal age.
The Leary decision does not affect state laws
outlawing use, possession and sale of marijuana.
Justice Department sources said that while the
decision may hamper enforcement under the
importation law, the government has been giving
thought to new approaches and can be expected to
recommend new legislation to Congress.

The complete Apollo 10
spaceship, resembling a bullet
with a spider sitting on its nose,
was working so well that its
pilots had nothing more to

worry about Monday than the
bitter taste of their heavily
chlorinated water and the
annoying thuds of control
rocket firings.
Except for their course
adjustment and more of the
spectacular color telecasts they
staged shortly after launch
Sunday, the veteran spacemen
had an easy schedule until they
brake into lunar orbit
Wednesday.

They listened to the morning
news broadcast up from the
mission control nter and then
turned the tables and put on
their own show, beaming back
the Up, Up and Away
rendition recorded by Andy
Williams.
Listen, you guys were so
good to us with the news this
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Tuesday, May 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

morning we thought wed give
you some disc jockey work from
here, Ceman told ground
communicator Charles Duke.
This is Tom and John on the
guitar and the* three of us
singing, Cernan quipped. We
had a little trouble stowing the
bass drum aboard but otherwise
we were OK.
VETERANS
-. Be a commercial pilot!
NEWG. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Area's only approved school
378-2646

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 20, 1969

Certificates
Available
A few Whos Who and Hall of
Fame certificates for 1968-69
may still be picked up in the
Seminole office, editor Ken
Driggs said Sunday.
Certificates awarded to Renee
Millard, Sharyn Hackney, Bill
Wack, Larry Smith and Bill
Zewadski have not been claimed.

Action Conference Report
Will Evaluate Proposals

By KATHIE MORSE
, Alligator Staff Writer
Rae O. Weimer, special
assistant to UF President
Stephen C. OConnell, is
coordinating the final work on
Action Conference proposals
and hopes to have a report on
actions to be taken by the end
of this week.
Eighteen of some 41
recommendations by the
conference are still being studied
and evaluated in committees
which will present their opinions
on the proposals to OConnell.
It has been more than two
months since the final meeting
of the Action Conference, but
the work of studying the
feasibility of its proposal it
germinated takes much longer.
The Action Conference was
first called by OConnell in June,
1968, as a group to study
various university problems and
make recommendations directly
to him. It originally consisted of
75 members one third taken
from the faculty, students and
administration.
In September the infant
conference was attacked by Rep.
Bob Sikes, D-Fla., when he had
received letters calling the group
hippy-oriented and accusing it
of having leftist leanings.
Member Jim Hollis shaved his
full beard off to protest Sikes
interference and the
resignation of the original
chairman, Maj. Russell Ramsey.
In October OConnell
commented on the conferences
proposal for a coordinator on
minorities and disadvantaged
students saying there would not
be funds available in the current
budget. May 14 Dr. Corbin
Camell was appointed to the job
termporarily in hopes that a
permanent one can be named
with funds granted in a new
budget.
At this same time a study of
the problems Black students
have finding outside housing was
initiated. The Alligator was
asked to cooperate with the
off-campus housing office in not

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DROPOUTS
v f -WATCH OUT
FCC-TtHE j

allowing advertising space to
apartment owners who did not
sign an open housing
statement.
In October the conference
examined the problems of the
quarter system and suggested
that a normal student load
should consist of three
academic courses studied
simultaneously. It was pointed
out that eight universities of the
size of UF also on the quarter
system had an average of 70 per
cent of their courses with four
or five hours of credit.
One recommendation of the
conference will be in use by next
year. The pass-fail or
satisfactory-unsatisfactory
system will be available to all
but first quarter freshmen next
fall.
Other proposals directly
concerning courses are one
asking that class attendance be
voluntary and another asking
that all faculty members
participate once a year in a
teacher-course evaluation.
Eighteen more proposals are
currently being evaluated by

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such groups as the Council of
Deans and University Senate so
that their opinions can be given
to OConnell.
In February the Task Force
on Governance suggested a
tripartite structure to act on all
university business. The three
bodies would be equal and
distinct and would consist of
faculty, students and
administrators. Complaints of
unfair proportionment in the
present University Senate have
been brought out this year and
the proposed new system would
stipulate that proportionment be
fair.
It was suggested that faculty
members be taken off the
Student Conduct Committee
and replaced with students. This
committee rules on student
behavior problems outside of
cheating, stealing and passing
bad checks.
A further chance for students
to have a voice in university
affairs was included in the
proposal that students be made
active voting members in
curriculum decisions.
THERE 'S MORE OF
The Wide,
Wild World
of New Film,
irTSTcTHuE
in
MM

s: : :
s :: !*



.
+
|A j s ::
*
# (



M
j
s :: V :


(hyaye//)
* s
I : Jk

BY HOWARD POST
woulp You miHp repeating- /
THATT-THERE WAS THIS /
WAVE THAT PROWHEP OUT /
WHAT YOU WERE SAYING... J
- s= ~

OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru Fri.
7 1236 N.W. 3rd Ave
)
Travel
easy...
mm bus
< sf -i l t V
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Trailways
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Students Personalities
Reflected In Car Choice

By DENISE VALIANTE
Alligator Staff Writer
If you own a Volks wagon, you are probably a cold
person, dull, reserved, slow and quite ordinary.
If you own a Maverick, chances are you are more
non-conforming, more frivolous, more snobbish,
more negative, and more unfriendly than the owner
of the Volkswagon.
But if you happen to be the proud owner of a
Falcon, you are probably conforming, aggressive,
positive, interesting, young, active, distinctive, and
in general a regular guy.
These are the results taken from a campus poll
by the students of a Public Opinion and Advertising
theory class in the College of Journalism. Surveyors
were amazed at the class distinction lines drawn
among the students themselves and how this
affected their car preferences and concepts.
Out of 236 student interviews, it was found that
75 per cent of the students had access to a car while
attending UF and almost half were compacts.

Love Bugs
Invade UF
Why are those two black
bugs dancing like that, Daddy?
Thats the kind of question
that was being asked by school
children all up and down
University Ave. Thursday.
Its all because the love bugs
arrived en masse Thursday
morning after Wednesdays
heavy rain.
The bugs which swarm the
campus city in September and
May were out in force Thursday
and will probably remain for the
next few weeks that comprise
their mating season.
Coeds seen bobbing and
weaving in between classes
during the next few weeks are
not necessarily under the
influence; its just their
individual bouts with cuddling,
coupling creatures.

I Go ahead.
IPirv us down!
I i* ; v v^jry
I What's a Frisch's? Frtschs is
I a coffee shop. Its a restau-
I rant. It has in-car service and
I carry-out service. We serve
I breakfast, lunch, complete
I dinners and anytime snacks.
I If you must pm us down, just
I say, Frisch's is a good
thing! (You can be a good
I thing, too 1 Ask for your free
Good Thing button.)
I W^GOOD
I THING IS AT
I 2035 N.-W. 13th Street
Pnor c 378-230^
I After 5
I dinner special
LkD STEAK DINNER only $1.09
frenciynes, cole sla*. onion

GOING HOME?
CANT TAKE IT WITH YOU?
WELL BUY IT!
Gator PAWN SHOP
LOANS BUY SELL
"We specialize in Gator-Aid"
1334 E, UNIVERSITY 378-5575

' I
THOSE WHO HAVE NOT PICKED
I UP THEIR 1969 I
DO SO BY FRI. MAY 23 H
I ROOM 330 REITZ UNION I
| RECEIPTS & I D 's NECESSARY H
- - -
H THERE ARE A LIMITED NUMBER OF
E EXTRA BOOKS AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE
GET YOURS BEFORE ITS TOO LATE H

Compact cars (those seating four people) are not
cool though. Fiats are cool, Grand Prixs are
c 001... but Volkswagons despite the fact that
they are of a foreign make and 55 per cent of the
students felt that a foreign car carries more prestige,
the Volkswagon was the overwhelming choice of
those single students who rated themselves in the
working class.
Sports cars remain the prime choice in all classes.
It is interesting to note, however, the effect
marriage has on the preference in cars.
While close to 75 per cent of the single students
chose the sports car as their desired mode of
transportation, only 15 per cent of the married
males and females did so.
America buckles under to Europe in the respect
that students feel that the foreign product offers
better gas mileage, higher resale value and is a more
durable product.
Yankee ingenuity has produced a more advanced
styling, however, students agreed.

Load Os Nine Hours
Okayed For Leaders
The University Senate has already approved a new minimum
load rule for students involved in extracurricular activities, the
Alligator learned Thursday.
With the approval of ones dean, a student engaged in
significant extra-curricular activities can be classified as a
full-time student if he is enrolled for no less than nine credit
hours.
The old minimum was 12.
The Alligator learned that the senate had technically adopted
the new measure at its meeting last month after it voted down a
blanket reduction from 12 to nine for all students.
It adopted the measure when dean approval was tacked on as
a condition.
The new load rules will be in effect for the summer term.
Students presently going through advanced registration can
seek their deans approval for the privilege.
I BLACK IS when youd rather face the Viet Cong
than the friendly cop in your own neighborhood
A book exploring in drawings and funny/frightening captions the realities ot
racial relations in the U.S. today.
EITWWrigIBY TURNER BROWN, JR.
1 jij KIW ICIILLUS. BY ANN WEISMAN
$1.25. A Black Cat Paperback. Now at your bookstore, or order directly from
OROVE PRESS SIS Hudson St, New York 10013. (Please enclose payment with order, includ including
ing including as* pottage)
Mill

Tuesday, May 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, TN Florida Alligator, Tuday. May 20,1969

The Florida Alligator

Piutoakto
An
A*OMM

a
tit
Uj (
§
We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all I
men are created equal; that they are endowed by their gj
creator with certain unalienable rights; that among Jt
H these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. . I
1 Thomas Jefferson B
Declaration of Independence I
Though a man escape every other danger, he can j§
b never wholly escape those who do not want such a s
g person as he is to exist. |
g Demosthenes M
From De Falsa Legatione g
illtltlliitlilllllliiliiiiiilliiiiiiiiiiiiitlllillliiiiiliiiiilllilllllliililllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllltllllllllllUllli

Meredith Lives

MR. EDITOR:
For all his dangerous
involvements, James Meredith
has never been slain. At least not
to the knowledge of a court in
New York, which has issued a
summons for his arrest.
In an article in Mondays
Alligator concerning possible
affects of Supreme Court rulings
on the Claxton flag-burning case,
its stated that some cat was
convicted of burning a U.S. flag
in 1966. This, in protest of the
slaying of James Meredith.
I simply wanted to straighten
this out you understand.

Aftermath

(EDITORS NOTE: Reg Murphy, the 34-year-old
editor-in-chief of the Atlanta Constitution, was in
Gainesville on the weekend of May 15 to speak at
the annual Board of Student Publications banquet.
He wrote this column in the Constitution about a
party he attended after the banquet.)
GAINESVILLE, FLA This is Sin City, my
guide said. It turned out to be several hundred
low-slung apartment units next to the University of
Florida. The description may have been accurate,
though it certainly contained elements of collegiate
hyperbole.
That probably is a pot party, there where the
windows are dark, he added. In the soft Southern
air, contaminated only by the smell of burning
rubber from college hotrods, I really couldnt tell.
We stopped in front of an apartment with a red
light glowing at the entry way. I should have
known there would be a red light, the host said.
Inside there was background music, not
particularly a driving rhythm. Somebody took the
record off and replaced it with Hair, whose lyrics
go fron fv-iy tr bawdy to bad.

"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility*"
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
c
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor
*

Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors
i

According to the tenants of
his Bronx apartment building,
the first Negro ever to enroll at
the University of Mississippi has
apparently been a lousy
landlord ... just lately, too.
I believe that Meredith was
shot while marching along a
Mississippi highway on his way
to Memphis sometime after
moving to New York after his
Ole Miss sojourn.
More recently, hes been
involved in Harlem politics, in
addition to his landlord(ing)
duties.
JOHN R. SHIRLEY, 4JM

Is This Really Sin City?

EDITORIAL

Can a multiversity afford to let every
faculty member continue doing more and
learning less without, along the way,
stimulating them to a new social awareness?
The obvious answer is no. But this seems
to be the course this Southern multiversity
has taken.
A university administration must be a
catalyst for new directions. Administrators
should be the motivators of the community,
not just reactionaries and pacifiers.
It is apparent that this Southern
multiversitys administration is at once a
pacifier and an appeaser. Os legislative
reactionaries. Os the white middle class. Os
bureaucrats. And of campus militants.
This multiversity has seemed all too
willing to react to pressures from these
groups. We feel it is time to react to another
type of pressure.
This multiversity has forsaken the goals
of education, while drifting along, steeped in
the conservative traditions of the Old South.
Education equals social change. It stimulates
new thought through reason. The
multiversity is the medium through which
education induces this change. We feel this
multiversity is no longer committed to this
goal. c>
This is 1969.
We have been told we are living in the
liberal New South. That the South
traditionally is the genesis of American
rational, thought-provoking education. We
have been told the New South is moving
toward a more equitable society.
We wonder.
Friday, members of the black UF
community rallied on the steps of Tigert
Hall, to celebrate the fifteenth anniversary
of the landmark Brown v. Board of
Education decision, erasing the
Southern-oriented separate, but equal
doctrine. The demonstrators, though small
in number, made some good points.
This Southern multiversity is as close to
being lily-white as an institution can be. Less
than .5 per cent of the full time enrollment
is black.
Why?
We asked UF President Stephen C.
OConnell; we asked Student Body President
Charles Shepherd; we asked black students

A young man said, If my father came in now,
he wouldnt understand this at all. Nor, probablyi
did the father understand the brush of hair that fell
across his forehead. (The father would have
understood his date, a beautiful blonde with a
properly contoured figure. But thats different,
the father would have said.)
' Looking around the room, it was easy to agree
his father would be disconcerted. Against one wall
empty beer cans had been stacked in a grocery store
pyramid. The structure was higher than my head.
The pop art on the walls spelled out the brands of
beer one may purchase in the Gainesville environs.
A bar had been installed under the stairway that led
to the secondfloor sleeping quarters.
Girls in very short skirts danced in the middle of
the floor. Their long, straight hair swung as
gracefully as a flag on a balmy day as they moved. A
tape deck stood in one corner and came alive with
faster music.
The young man went on talking about his
parents. You know, he said, I just cant explain
to them. My father went off to the second World
War just when he was ready for college. My mother
got a junior college degree. But I know a lot more
than they do about academics, and ?V ~nt it.
They *lso the fact thr. U-, kind of

One More Pressure

themselves.
The answer was the same: The climate is
just not right; blacks simply dont want to
come to UF.
Again we ask why?
Blacks feel they are not wanted here. The
few, and weak, attempts at recruiting in the
past have apparently failed.
The problem is more than a simple desire
to go elsewhere.
This multiversity makes far too many
excuses why it cannot attract blacks here.
That is one reason.
OConnell doesnt want to lower
academic standards, but neither do blacks.
All they want is for the administration to
make a concerted effort to recruit more
black students. And if the administration
cant see fit to do this, blacks would support
a Student Government-sponsored recruiting
program.
But, now we find that both the university
and SG are unwilling to accept this role.
OConnell says appropriations cannot be
used to support recruiting. Shepherd says
student activity fees cannot be used legally
in the same way. We wonder if there is not
some way around this dilemna.
The university uses funds to recruit gifted
students. Individual colleges send out faculty
members to advertise the UF to prospective
scholars. The Athletic Association recruits
well-endowed athletes, with indirect
cooperation from the administration.
Why cannot the university recruit
educationally and economically deprived
students, who in most cases are black, ghetto
dwellers, attending schools plagued with a
background of poor Southern, separate,
but equal educational habits.
There has to be a break in the cycle of
perpetual educational injustice. The
situation, despite its appearance, is not
hopeless. The UF holds the hammer that can
smash the cycle.
Why cannot SG underwrite the
Afro-American Student Association, as a
student organization chartered by students,
in its attempts to recruit deserving and
capable black students?
We feel it is time for the administration
and SG to react to one more pressure: The
pressure of necessity.

By Reg Murphy;

life they would have enjoyed. College is a dream
world, and they missed it. I dont think there is any
way I can ever get them to understand what has
happened to their world.
Thats how they talk in Sin City. And how they
talk in a lot of other enclaves where students gather
this year. Armed with superior knowledge,
accustomed to booze and almost uninhibited
conversation, there still is a basic dignity of thought
under what these students choose to show the
world.
Still groping for away to cope, they invent
names like Sin City (even as we did). Trying to hide
honest sensitivity, they wear outlandish clothes and
long hair. Hoping to stir us to do something about
the world, they argue and cajole and satirize.
To be sure, there are others who resort to
violence. They contribute nothing but defeat. They
have no goals. They have ceased caring about the
consequences. They choose to blame everybody but
themselves.
I m not talking about them. Im talking about a
very bright young man who worries about how to
make his father understand what kind of world he is
creating. Who worries about whether his father
V.v think this is Sin City, instead of
ga tile ring of very bright youngster



FORUM:^^
(\ jAiict W
hope for the complac*njjSSP o^'''
Rampant Greeks
MR. EDITOR:
During this present quarter, each of the Greek organizations holds
a weekend for its brothers. It is designed to be a weekend during
which brotherhood is overflowing and having a good time is the main
goal.
Thursday afternoon, several of these fraternities dressed up in
costumes that corresponded with their weekends theme and they
wandered all over campus, from dorm to dorm and sorority to
sorority to distribute invitations to the dates of their brothers.
The Kappa Alphas were, in my opinion, a disgrace to this campus.
Galloping on horses in rebel uniforms, waving rebel flags, and shooting
blank guns, these fraternity men disrupted dozens of students sitting
and standing on campus property. More importantly, a great many
students were studying for progress tests, only to be distrubed by the
wild antics of the KAs.
Being a fraternity man myself, I find that actions such as these
should not be condoned by this university or the fraternity system.
To live in the past is one of the most tragic errors we can commit
today. To repeatedly feel pride for a cause that was defeated 104
years ago is to show an extreme lack of insight and intelligence.
Holding up a Confederate flag and shouting to a UF black student,
This is my country, was typical of the event.
While having a good time is a fine thing, and promoting
brotherhood is admirable, I cannot appreciate a seemingly racist
demonstration as being fraternal or good natured. If such a display of
actions is among firmly established traditions, I suggest that we move
away from traditional behavior and live in 1969.
One sad thought enters my mind. For the Kappa Alphas, such
actions may be away of living in 1969.
RONALD SACHS lUC

Speaking Out

Capitalisms Dungheap

Harry Reids defense of capitalism in the
Speaking Out column of May 14 abounds with
deliberate, nauseating obfuscation. In extolling the
virtues of a system Mr. Reid has sold out to, he has
quite obviously ignored the many inherent evils of a
system based not on human dignity, but upon
greed, opportunism, and materialist obsessions.
Mr. Reid blindly asks us to compare manual
laborers in the U.S. to those of other countries (by
which he means Asia, South America, etc.). He does
not care to mention the fact that manual laborers
have remained the dungheap of American society,
just as in the non-capitalist, traditional economies.
The only difference between the U.S. and these
other countries is the length of time and extent of
economic investment and development.
Non-property owners are not people, they are tools
of those who own property and power,
UNIVERSALLY.

All-American Violence

MR. EDITOR:
.>
Maybe appearances are
deceiving but it sure seems that
there is something undemocratic
about a minority group using
disruptive tactics to close down
a university with an enrollment
of 20,000.
The
Florida
Alligator
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices
in Room 330, Reitz Union, Phone
Ext. 2832.

Jason Straight says that the
disruptive tactics "used by
radicals is as American as apple
pie.
Jason Straight says that we
have a rich heritage of such
methods in this country.
But it sure seems
undemocratic for 200 radicals to
march into an administration
building, physically evict to
occupants and destroy the
furniture.
Other countries too. Lets
see ... Seems in South America
small determined groups manage
to effect governmental changes
that way with some regularity.
Then there was an incident in
Germany .. and one in
Russia...
.Jason says the radicals arent
really out to destroy the system,
evidenced by the fact that they
go off to jail when arrested.
(Thats what he said, honest.)

By Doug Franco

Mr. Reid blandly expects us to swallow his
argument (?) that rich people must give their money
to poorer people via salaries and loans, which
thereby justifies their being rich. Tell that to ten
Blade Brothers, Mr. Reid, who could well use the
money of this ONE capitalist leech for a minimum
standard of decent living, as defined by our
American society. Thats not too godawful much to
expect, is it? After all, it is THEM that allow you
and me to be so unproductful right now. This is a
system that extorts and ROBS those who produce
and deserve the wealth.
Mr. Reids closing line would be hilarious were it
not so tragically asinine. In a capitalistic society
only those individuals who are fortunate enough to
be bom in the propertied classes are capable of
working toward their conceptions of dignity and
greatness. You were lucky, Mr. Reid. Millions of
Black Brothers were not.

y
BW
tks.y ...
'***** _ 4 0 Jr lii
. WfBBBKBk H IBBf ....
IBBr b
"A Gun And a Horse And They're Happy"

Lots of demands for amnesty
nowdays and even a riot or two
when amnesty isnt granted. The
word revolution is bandied
about quite a bit. Police are
generally met with a hail of
rocks and bottles.
Jason Straight says that
disruption is just another way
for an interest group to do its
thing. He says there is no reason
to single out that method to call
unamerican. After all those who
vote and those who throw rocks
are just exercising a little
political power.
Maybe we shouldnt make
fine distinctions between
methods. But surely some
distinctions should be made.
Somebody said that even a dog
distinguishes between being
kicked and stumbled over.
ARTEMUS JONES

No NYA Hitlers
MR. EDITOR:
I must object rather strongly to Mr. Spiveys letter qf May 14.
Despite his protestation, the quotations were indeed taken out of
context. Having read the same literature, I believe he grossly
misrepresented the National Youth Alliance and its goals.
NYA members are not a bunch of little Hitlers. They are simply
Americans who are deeply concerned about the moral decay and
corruption which are leading their nation down a path of ruin and
destruction. They are true Americans who are dedicated to prevent
our society from selling out to the SDS-black power-communist
conspiracy to completely destroy our heritage of Western civilization.
Messrs. Spivey, Sugg, Straight, Hilliker, and Fulwood do not seem
to realize that the people who worked to make this country a great
prototype for all other nations will not tolerate the irresponsible,
irrational, and wanton destruction of all that the U.S. stands for. If
you dont like my country, then leave. Or decent Americans will unite
together to see that you dont destroy this nation.
MIKE LEE, 4AG
Dirty Talk About Having Babies Is For Parents Only!

Toeay, May 20,1060. The Florida AMtgalor,

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

i: FOR SALE I
New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
Well kept carpets show the results of
regular Blue Lustre spot cleaning.
Rent electric shampooer SI.OO
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-140-C)
8x35 Travelo Mobile home, beautiful
condition. Must sell! SISOO or best
offer. 372-6506 after 7 p.m. or
376-8188. (A-3M40-P)
Great Books of the Western world.
Great ideas Program and Gateway to
the Great Books with bookcase. New
$450 asking $250. Call 378-9527.
(A-3M40-P)
MUST SELL 1967 Honda 65. Very
fine shape. Going to Cal. sllO or
best offer Bob 976-7402.
(A-2M40-P)
Gibson Amplifier. Hardly used
footpedal reverb, tremelo. Believe it
or not SIOO or best offer also electric
mandolin for you turned on gypsies.
Must sell beautiful, long, dark brown
human hair fall cheap! Call Cathy at
392-3001 or 372-3240. (A-2M40-P)
1966 Kawazaki 175, excellent
condition, low mileage, S3OO, call
Andy after 5, 378-8716. (A-2M40-P)
Male Siamese kitten Blue point
father, Seal point mother. Litter
trained. Priced very reasonable.
Enteritis shot included. Call
378-6193. (A-lt-140-P)
1968 Mobile home. 12x60 air cond.,
partly furnished. Dishwasher, nylon
carpet. Available June 15. $4500.
Call 378-9404 weekdays after 6:00
(A-5M40-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS. I nventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-18M36-C)
Used U-haul type closed trailer for
sale. 6x, sllO. Call Ed 378-1978
evenings. (A-st-136-P)
Bell tape deck use with any amp.
New $250, now SBO. 378-2719,
Steve. (A-5M37-P)
Natural vitamins and food
supplements also Hoffmans muscle
building protein for the athlete.
Phone 376-6989. (A-st-138-p)
Upright piano with bench $135.00
62 T-bird AC. All power $695.00.
Both items in very good condition,
call 372-0205 anytime. (A-4t-138-p)
1967 Harley Davidson 65cc excellent
condition low mileage S3O. Helmet
included. All for $l7O. Call
376-1336. (A-lt-138-p)
Judson Super Charger for VW. 8
track 12 volt tape deck & speakers.
12 volt generator & battery. 2
fiberglass bucket seats. Call Ken
372-1053. (A-st-138-p)
Free kittens housebroken all sizes', m
and f need good homes. Call
372-3119 evenings or weekend.
Everyone should have a pet.
(A-3t-139-p)
Friend for sale! 1964 Vespa scooter
(and helmet) S9O. Will sell only to
scooter loving people. Call John at
392-1946 or 372-7194. (A-6t-138-p)
HONDA 150 sl7O. Helmet sls.
Thomas Kennedy. 372-6959.
(A-3t-139-p)
MEET THE Sk
j debutante in a
LEATHER SKIRT! JJPV
Too Yount; Too Tough
j ; 'A v
.. AMU RICAN INTERNATIONA! 41 I
a x- JEREMY SLATE ADAM ROARKE JOCELYN LANE 1
HE USED a
UKE J HSWm
MEN USE 10 26 r :^L^|
a womanonlv m^^ t
taows HARD wotOUWW jfl
m AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL
m COLORSCOPE

ISkin* Diving *Equi^t^l969 1
Equip Tanks, regulators, guns,
mask, fins wet suits to be sold for
storage and freight. Tremendous
savangs. Unclaimed freight. 1228
N.E. sth Ave. (A-ts-139-c)
For Sale BX3I trailer and BXIB
cabana. Airconditioned next to
campus in Glynwood Park. Good
condition 1495. Call 372-2673.
(A-st-134-p)
Gifted Dachshund puppies (reared in
enriched environment) 8 wks old
with shots. $50.00. Please call
372-7744. (A-3t-138-p)
BASENJI puppy. Male, top quality, 4
months old, AKC, no bark or odor,
short hair, small appetite, loves
children. Requires loving home with
adequate facilities. Terms to suit.
Phone 376-4103. (A-10t-139-p)
1966 R6O BMW motorcycle $750
cash or make offer. 378-9512.
(A-3t-139-p)
Bred for beauty and brains, AKC
Reg. 5 wk. old dobe pups, blacks,
reds, and fawns. Heavy championship
bloodlines. Williston, 528-5071.
(A-2M39-P)
I FOR RENT
* £
Sublet 2 bedrm. I ownhouse
Landmark II Apt. You cant afford
not to call great deal! After 5:00
any day 378-8066. (B-st-136-P)
Lankmark Apt for summer quarter 2
bedroom, i x k bath, quiet place in rear
of Phase 2 will take best offer. Call
378-8330. (B-5M37-P)
FOR RENT Comfortable 1 bedroom
apt. 2 blocks from campus, two car
garage. Rent reduced from SIOO to
SBO for summer. 376-4182 aft. 8
p.m. (B-5M36-P)
I*
Must sublease one bedroom, poolside
F Q Apt (41) for summer qtr. Call
Cathy at 392-3001 or 372-3240.
(B-2M40-P)
Poolside 2 bdrm t Landmark Apt. 48.
June rent paid. Choice location,
many extras. 372-7482. (B-2M40-P)
Air conditioned, 2-bedroom, carport,
furnished apt. Couple, graduate
students. Call 376-5828 after 6.
Avail. 6/16/69. (B-5M40-P)
Sublease Available for summer
quarter from June 15, one bedroom
apt., air conditioned. Olympia
Apartments. Call 376-1727.
(B-st-139-p)
Must sublease 1 br. furn. cen. ac,
pool, balcony, etc. University
Gardens. Use my sec. dep. SIOO a
mo.. Must arr. by May 21. Move in
and live free May 23-31. 378-2169.
(B-3t-139-p)
Sublet furn. 1 bedrom, AC apt. La
Fontana 2 blocks form campus.
Available immediately or in June, call
378-5264. (B-st-138-p)
Beautiful one bedroom, furnished, air
cond., pool close to school, $175 for
June 15 to Sept 1. 378-9653.
(B-4t-137-P)
1 or 2 girls at Tanglewood Manor for
Sept. Beautifully furnished,
dishwasher, disposal, IV2 baths, good
location. Call Leah 372-4032.
(B-5M37-P)


%
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PROGRAM THREE
{HHB
J||
BSP
mam sm &Sg
jhi
JpMI Pr Jj
More brilliant, new short film imports from this
unique three-part international festival of creative
and provocative cinema achievements from 9
nations
....among them....
Albert Lamorisse Versailles. Julie Christie and Michael
Caine in Tonight Lets All Make Love in London. Col Collage
lage Collage Graphics from Czechoslovakia German Comedy of
the Absurd Bravura Italian Drama.
" 11 11 1 ii hi -in i. .i '<
The Last of a 3 Part Series
DONT MISS IT!

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 20,1969
11. 1 -ai-'a iiiwiiji mi fi-iw

FOR RENT
1 Bdrm Apt. must sublease. Quiet
and in SW section. Private patio.
378-0632 or 372-8855. (B-st-139-p)
S3OO to sublet 3 bdrm house from 18
June to 28 Aug. AC, appliances, Irg
fed yrd. Tel 378-0329 evening.
(B-st-137-p)
Sublease Nice, quiet, clean eff. apt.
air. cond. 5 minutes from Campus
$l5O for Summer Qtr. N.W. Bth Ave.
Call 378-8890 after sp.m.
(B-st-139-p)
2 br., apt. available for sublease June
1 sllO/mo., 1 block from Tigert, air
cond. Call 372-2769 or 376-7534.
(B-139-st-p)
Sublet summer only. 2 bdrm
concrete blk house, furnished &
air-conditioning. Couples or females
SBS/mo. 378-0728 or 378-8563, ask
for Rosie. (B-4t-139-p)
Summer Sublet 1 bedroom furn. ac.
apt. Quiet only 3 blocks from
campus! Cheap from June 15. Call
378-8384 also wash machine etc.
(B-st-139-p)
Sublet poolside apt. Landmark 59.
Available June. 2 bedroom good
location SIBO mo. 376-3771
anytime. (B-139-p)
Summer sublet one bedroom
airconditioned apt. $lO7. Call
378-4607 evenings. (B-st-139-p)
Must sublet one bedroom apt. Univ.
Gardens AC Pool hndbll cts. Damage
dep. paid. SIOO per mo. for summer
quarter. I pay $125 per mo. Call
372-3915. (B-3t-139-p)
sublet 2 bedroom upstairs apt. Ac, 1
block behind Norman. Special
summer rate slOO per month. S.W.
7 Ave. 376-5509. (B-st-139-p)
Nice 1 bedroom duplex apt. with
patio. S9O a month. Sublet summer
quarter. 4 blocks from campus. 1624
N.W. 4 Ave. Apt. 2. 378-9058.
(B-st-139-p)
Sublease for summer quarter. Two
bdrm, IV2 bath, central air, free TV,
disposal, dishwasher, pool, special
rates to be arranged call 378-8036.
(B-5M37-P)
Camelot. Need 1-2 or 3 coeds for
summer quarter. Large 2 bed/2bath
deluxe upstairs on pool will adjust
rent with you. Call Mary 378-8458.
(B-4M37-P)
Want to sublet 2 br poolside apt. for
summer quarter. Tanglewood Manor.
Ph. 372-8041. (B-st-137-P)
Near campus air conditioned rooms
for 15 graduate men or senior men.
For summer AND/OR 1969-70.
378-8122. 376-6652. (B-TF-138-p)
To sublet summer quarter poolside
French Quarter Apartment Will make
deal for rent no. 103. Cali 378-7988
Evenings. (B-sg-138-p)
Sublet/rent furn/unfurn beautifully
kept 2 bdrm Summit House. Dshw,
full carpet, a/c, dispoer. Very close to
pool and parking but no noise.
Wooded front view. Avail. June.
378-9842. (B-st-138-p)
Live in the best this summer. Need 1,
2,3, or 4 people to sublet.cared for
Landmark .Apt. Good deal on rent.
Call 378-8968 after 5:00 p.m.
(B-3t-138-p)

i FOR RENT
Room in Micanopy country home
which has fireplace heat, upright
grand piano, hundred-year-old poster
bed, wood cook stove, and stable for
horses. Phone evenings and weekends
466-3175. Mrs. Hennessy. ALSO
AVAILABLE: Trailer space on 25
acres. (B-st-138-p)
FOR RENT: In country 15 minutes
of campus. One room cabin with
bath, water and electricity. ALSO
AVAILABLE: Trailer space on 25
acres. Phone evenings and weekends
466-3175. Mrs. Hennessey.
EB-5M38-P)
I ENDS WEDNESDAY
j 3,57,9
/ Ingmar Bergmans
TOflttNH
SWC T

TTT T7I FLORIDA PLAYERS &
II Hi DEPT. OF Ml :ir
THREEPENNY
OPERA T ICKE T5392*1653
' LlfllMr* Ttltphon* 378-2434 j W |
P THE MOTION
\ PICTURE PLAYBOY
% DEVOTED 10 OF
l; s THEIR WILDEST
ft A 4 PAGES TO!
A ZANY EROTO EROTOk.
k. EROTOk. I BIOGRAPHY THAT
*T 1 LOOKS LIKE A
W MARX ...BROTHERS
m MOVIE SHOT IN
f A NUDIST CAMP!
SEE THE OTHER
SIDE OF LIFE!..
THE BARE FACTS!
.. -IN-
L "CAN
LACT DAY MERKINEVER
before FORHEIRONYMUS
wmter HUMPPE AND FIND
c/mes| TRUE HAPPINESS"
SUMMER MOVIE CLUB TICKETS
NOW ON SALE...I2 SHOWS $1.50

! FOR RENT J
Landmark 1 bedroom. Sublease for
summer. June free. On pool. Best
offer. Apt. 75. Call 376-9578.
(B-st-138-p)
Sublet Landmark no. 50 this
summer. Only S9O per person for 2
bedroom apt. on pool. Call 372-0156
or come by after 3:00 (B-3t-138-p)
Sublet 2 bedroom apt. A/C, furn, 1
block in back of Norman. S2OO for
summer quarter. 921 SW 6 ave.,
upstairs. Call 378-6756. (B-st-138-p)
SHOWTIME I
I 8:30
S Col ' c t M U*U< *-** ljH|
£ PLUS THE ALL TIME GREAT ||
I 'THUNDER ROAD
starwngrober^wtchua^^B



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

1 WANTED
l ( I
artist needs living qtrs. next fall,
rheap, close, spacey. Would prefer
real people. Contact Len 392-7554.
Tomatoes, green peppers, instant
frog. (C-lt-140-P)
2 female roommates for French
Quarter apartment for summer
nuarter. Only SIOO each for entire
summer. Call 392-7600. (C-st-140-P)
Male roommate to share Fr. Quarter
aot with 3 others for fall. SSO per
month. Call 392-8263 evenings.
(C-5M40-P)
Two to share 2 bdrm. Village Park
for summer or more. Low rent or will
sublet for $l4O per month. Desirable
location. 376-7439. (C-st-140-P)
1 male roommate for nice air cbnd.~l
br apt, 1 block from Norman. SIOO
plus l /2 utilities. Call 376-5842 after
6. (C-5M40-P)
1 fern for a bdrm. Landmark apt.
148. SIOO + utilities for sum qtr. Call
378-8731 after 5:00 AC, 2 pools,
gym, cable TV, dishwasher.
(C-5M37-P)
2 roommates needed for summer S9O
for full quarter plus utilities.
Landmark. Call 378-8518 anytime.
(C-5M37-P)
RIDER to San Francisco, leaving Ist
week in June, share expenses and
driving (approx. SSO) Lets Talk It
Over 376-1730 (C-st-139-p)
WANTED Attractive, ambitious,
hard working, industrious mature
young lady to help take care of three
boys this summer. Ages five, six and
eight. Primary activities will be
swimming, sailing, motor boating.
Some travel through New York and
Western part of the United States.
Will be in Western part of U.S. about
one week) Time: June 15th to
August Ist. Salary: $75.00 a week
plus room and board. P.O. Box
16213. Jacksonville, Florida 32216
(C-st-139-p)
Girl roommate wanted for summer;
term. June rent free. Own bedroom.
>/2 block behind Norman. Call Kay
378-7638. $45 per month.
(C-st-139-p)
Wanted: Male roommate for summer
quarter. 1 bedroom University
Gardens Apartment. $55/m plus Vz
utilities. Call Joe, 378-3767.
(C-2t-139-p)
2 coeds SIOO for entire summer qtr.
at spacious tanglewood townhouse,
beautifully furnished. Only 4 min.
from campus. Call 372-7882
anytime. (C-4t-139-nc)
1 female roommate needed for Sept,
in lovely poolside Village Park Apt.
9Vz month lease. Such a Deal! Call
392-9403 or 392-9262. (C-st-139-p)
Canoe! Canoe! Canoe! I would like
to buy a reasonably priced canoe in
good condition used. Please call
372-7744. (C-3t-139-p)
3 Male roommates for spacious 2
bdrm house. Walk to campus. Split
rent of $95 per mo. Call 376-1394.
Near ABC! Near Thirsty Gator
Atmosphere. (C-3t-138-p)
FEMALE ROOMMATE Now or for
summer quarter. Airconditioned,
carpet, private room. $55 per month.
Adjustments for May. Call 378-5088.
(C-10t-138-p)
Serious female roommate to share
furn. 2 bdrm. Own bdrm privacy rent
SSO. after 3:00 378-9979.
(C-st-137-P)
HELP WANTED
Adult carriers needed for
afternoon morning newspaper
routes in Gainesville area. Must be
bondable. Call 378-1416.
(E-5M37-P)
RELIABLE HELP WANTED. Male,
Prefer married, for few hrs. work
sarly Sat. AM and during week.
enable transportation necessary,
permanent employment. 376-4912.
(E-3t-138-p)
Wanted 3 part time men to work
evenings and Saturday SIOO 150 per
week. Phone 372-8866. (E-45-138-p)
need bass player for
tarnished rock band must be able
to work next year. Call 372-6474
evenings. (E-3M40-P)
'lililSH

I HELP WANTEDf
MALE: Have three part time
openings for evening cashier. Also
two openings at 11-2 daytime. Apply
Kings Food Host 1430 S.W. 13th St
(E-133-ts-c)
AUTOS |
Mw.iiiaiwwwwti a a;
BMW 1600, 1967. White and black.
One owner, driven 16000 miles.
Extras including radial tires. SI6OO.
Call 376-9647. (G-2M40-P)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen Dealer, 4222 N.W. 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-130-ts-c)
For Sale. 1964 Monza Corvair
new tires 1 owner. Tele. 378-3847.
(G-st-136-p)
PERSONAL
J imtryagaintouchdownverypossilbet
u r k e y c r e eksheroinedef enseswea ken
n ea rgoallinestartattopworkdowngrou
n d f I o o ral waysplaysthiswayfromass
ociation.(J-3t-138-p)
Would you like to be a member of
Maas Brothers 1969-1970 College
Board? Apply now any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15t-129-c)

TUESDAY SPECIAL ||
1 FRIED i
I CHICKEN 5
H ALL YOU QQjl K
m CARE TO EAT ||
II WEDNESDAY SPECIAL ||
I CHICKEN STEW i
| DUMPLINGS 49< I
I MORRISONS 1
I CAFETERIAS 8
||L
For You^
THE
I I AUDIENCE I
(jvaaJ VaJJyP

Tuesday, May 20,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I PERSONAL I
%
Getting Married Soon? Bridallure
Wedding Gown & Veil. Beautiful.
Size 9. $50.00. Call 376-9707 after 6
p.m. for information. (J-st-140-P)
ITS GREAT to be GREEK! Come
find out why by signing up for fall
rush anyday 1-4 p.m. at the JWRU
Rm 315 Panhellenic office.
(J-st-140-P)
Hung-up Heads: Hang On Call
3 72-5976 Tues, Thurs, Sun, 7
p.m.-midnight. After midnight call
378-0313. (J-2M39-P)
Photography your bag? Enter the
Reitz Union Photo Contest. Cash
prizes offered. For rules & info, go to
Rm. 310 Reitz Union. 392-1655.
(J-5M32-P)
Cessna 150. $9 per hr. Flight
instructor wanted. 495-2124 after 7
P.m. (J-10t-136-p)
I LOST & FOUND |
LOST NOTEBOOK: brown Fla.
looseleaf. Class notes for ASE-662,
NES-612, PS-560. Please contact
Steve Long 392-7584. Reward.
(L-2t-138-p)
KAREN VON NIDA. Please pick
your Penneys charge card at Student
Publications, Rm 330 JWRU.
(L-3t-NC-P)
Lost a gold watch in the architecture
building lecture room. If found,
please phone 378-3514. Reward
offered. (L-2M40-P)

Page 9

LOST & FOUND |
Lost: a blue London Fog jacket, size
8 with initials TIC in yellow and key
in the pocked. Please call 392-8458
or return to 328 Graham Hall If
found. (L-3t-139-p)

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
i private bedroom for
/ each student one
B 2/ d* block behind norman
IM I a
ft H APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT CALL 372-2662
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601. No refunds.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
U <> W o
I lI 1| I | £
so S sI S o J i£
___ ss| I s n n
i I >
a H
_ o
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f
>
- yi u ro M M
< < < < 3
**** £
S a S S I 0
a a a w yf
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3 3 3
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Use our handy
mall in order
form.

I SERVICES 'Hj
RieWiftWXWi 8 fIi9WP'9C 0 i 0 8 i i S Ji'IH&WW+W
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)



Page 10

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 20,1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

STUDENT UNREST
PRO VISIONS Department of
Labor, and Health, Education and
Welfare Appropriation Act, 1969.
LAWS AND DISSENT: Recent
Federal laws have been enacted to
deal with campus unrest and
disruptions. These laws provide for
withhholding Federal monies from
students who criminal
statutes. The following are th-
provisions:
SEC 411. P.L. 90-557. No part of
the funds appropriated under this
Act shall be used to provide a loan,
guarantee of a loan or a grant to any
applicant who has been convicted by
any court of general jurisdiction of
any crime which involves the use of
or the assistance to others in the use
of force, trespass or the seizure of
property under control of an
institution of higher education to
prevent officials or students at such
an institution from engaging in their
duties or pursuing their studies.
HIGHER EDUCATION
AMENDMENTS OF 1968
Eligibility for Student
Assistance
SEC 504. P.L. 90-575 (a) If an
institution of higher education
determines, after affording notice
and opportunity for hearing to an
individual attending, or employed by,
such institution, that such individual
has been convicted by any court of
record of any crime which was
committed after the date of
enactment of this Act and which
involved the use of (or assistance to
others in the use of) force,
disruption, or the seizure of property
under control of any institution of
higher education to prevent officials
or students in such institution from
engaging in their duties or pursuing
their studies, and that such crime was
of a serious nature and contributed
to a substantial disruption of the
administration of the institution with
respect to which such crime was
committed then the institution which
such individual attends, or is
employed by, shall deny for a period
of two years any further payment to,
or for the direct benefit of, such
individual under any of the programs
specified in subsection (c). If an
institution denies an individual
assistance under the authority of the
preceding sentence of this subsection,
then any institution which such
FINAL EXAM SCHEDULES:
Widespread schdeuling of final
examinations prior to the time
provided in the published
Schedule of Courses results in
disruption of the final week of
classes and hardships to the
students involved. Therefore, the
following policy is in effect:
No examinations, class
quizzes, special projects or term
papers shall be given or assigned
during the final five class days of
a regular term. Take home
examinations shall not be due
prior to the regularly scheduled
examination period.
All changes in the
published examination schedule
must be approved by the
Sub-Committee on Variations
from the Published Schedule of
Courses of the Schedule and
Calendar Committee. Requests
submitted to the sub-committee
In the case of laboratory-type
courses, the request shall state
that traditionally no provision
has been in the final
examination schedule for such
courses.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION f _^3
a filin r 9 f%
*. v ours' f t^\^% /p^}r ===s
9gV # Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From y.^-<^f\ I\HL/rf'
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... */3S>j V- !( Jib
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, /
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole r% t
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! v ~ r "" ^

individual subsequently attends shall
deny for the remainder of the
two-year period any further payment
to, or for the direct benefit of, such
individual under any of the programs
specified in subsection (c).
(b) If an institution of higher
education determines, after affording
notice and opportunity for hearing to
an individual attending, or employed
by, such institution, that such
individual has willfully refused to
obey a lawful regulation or order of
such institution after the date of
enactment of this Act, and that such
refusal was of a serious nature and
contributed to a substantial
disruption of the administration of
such institution, then such institution
shall deny, for a period of two years,
any further payment to, or for the
direct benefit of, such individual
under any of the programs specified
in subsection (c).
(c) The programs referred to in
subsection (a) and (b) are as follows:
(1) The student loan program
under title II of the National Defense
Education Act of 1958.
(2) The educational opportunity
grant program under part A of title
IV of the Higher Education Act of
1965.
(3) The student loan insurance
program under part B of title IV of
the Higher Education Act of 1965.
(4) The college work-study
program under part C of title IV of
the Higher Education Act of 1965.
(5) Any fellowship program
carried on under title 11, 111 or V of
the Higher Education Act of 1965 or
title IV or VI of the National Defense
Education Act of 1958.
(d) (1) Nothing in this Act, or
any Act amended by this Act, shall
be construed to prohibit any
institution of higher education from
refusing to award, continue, or
extend any financial assistance under
any such Act to any individual
because of any misconduct which in
its judgment bears adversely on his
fitness for such assistance.
(2) Nothing in this section shall
be construed as limiting or
prejudicing the rights and
prerogatives of any institution of
higher education to institute and
carry out an independent disciplinary
proceeding pursuant to existing
authority, practice, and law.
(3) Nothing in this section shall
be construed to limit the freedom of
any student to verbal e)#fe&sion of
individual views or opinions. \
In some cases a policy of
continuing exemption may be
established with respect to
laboratory sections and
laboratory type courses,
for changes in the examination
time must be justified and
include a specific statment of
the effects on the students of
such a change.
lt shall be the
responsibility of department
chairmen and deans to enforce
this policy.
Laboratory sections of many
courses may be exempt from the
above policy provided such
exemption has been approved by
the Sub-Committee on
Variations. In the case of
laboratory sections, such
requests shall specify: 1) that
the laboratory final examination
requires use of laboratory
equipment; 2) that the final
laboratory examination has
traditionally been given at the
last meeting of the lab, and
3) that the laboratory final is
not a substitute for the final
examination in the course.

BLUE BULLETIN

FOREIGN STUDENTS who
are going to graduate within a
year may apply at the
International Center to attend
Florida Crossroads at Stetson
University, July 6-11. There will
be a week's hospitality in an
American home and serious
discussions in a college setting
and group social events at no
cost to the student.
CUBAN STUDENT LOAN
BORROWERS who are leaving
the university at the end of the
spring quarter are urged to have
an exit interview with the
Foreign Student Adviser at the
International Center.
I NFORMATION
CONCERNING FULBRIGHT FULBRIGHTHAYS
HAYS FULBRIGHTHAYS GRANTS for Americans
who will be holders of the
bachelor's or master's degree and
who are enrolled as students is
available from the campus
Fulbright adviser, G.A. Farris, at
the Internationan Center south
of Walker Auditorium. This
year's grant, effective
September, 1970, is for the
purpose of study and research
abroad. The reduction in federal
funds for this program has
greatly reduced the number of
countries and increased the
competition.
INTRODUCTION TO
UPPER DIVISION: The Gamma
Beta Phi Society, a
coeducational honorary service
organization, will present an
introduction to the upper
division of the College of Arts
and Sciences Tuesday, May 20,
and College of Health Related
Professions, Monday, May 26,
from 7:30 to 9 p.m. in Room
362, Reitz Union. Students will
be able to gain valuable
information that can help them
make the choice among upper
division colleges more
intelligently. The dean,
department chairmen and
placement personnel have been
invited to speak. An informal
social will follow the speakers.
PUCEMBIT
MAY 22: ENFIELD'S 3M
CO. All majors. Sales
representative. Some sales or
business experience helpful, but
not necessary. G. T. & E.
DATA SERVICE Computer
programmers, will train.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

TUESDAY
Student Senate Meeting, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Society,
Introduction to Upper
Division, 363 Union 7:30
p.m. Informal Social
afterwards.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 .m.
Florida Players: "The
Threepenny Opera",
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Men's Glee Club & Women's
Glee Club plus the University
Choir, "Frostiana", Lecture
by Dr. Cliff Lyons, University
Aud., 8:15 p.m.
WEDNESDAY
May 21
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.
English in Action, Baptist
Student Center, 4:00-8:00
p.m.
Music Dept: Twlight Concert,
University of Florida
Symphonic Band, University
Aud. lawn, 6:45 p.m.
University Films Committee
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7:00
p.m.
University Film: New Kinetic
Art, Program 11, Union Aud.,
7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 347 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Florida Players: "The
Threepenny Opera,"
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 150 C Union,
8:30 p.m.

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THURSDAY.^
Contemporary Poet Series,
Frank Sadler, 122 Union,
4:40 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
University Film: "New Kinetic
Art, Program II," Union
Aud., 7:00 & 9:15 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 150
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association Meeting, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Association of Women Students
Meeting, 361 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Florida Players: "The
Threepenny Opera,"
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
FRIDAY May 23
Scabbard & Blade Picnic, Camp
Blanding, 12:30 p.m.
Baseball: Univ. of Fla. vs. FSU,
Home, 2:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Fitzwilly,"
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:00 &
10:00 p.m.
Florida Players: "The
Threepenny Opera",
Constans Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
Greek Dance, Florida Gym, 8:00
p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: 'The
Threepenny Opera," U of F
students, $.25; students,
$.75; FS&GP, $1.50.
POETRY READING: Frank
Sadler will give a poetry reading
Thursday, May 22, from 4:40 to
5:30 p.m. in Lounges 122 and
123 of Reitz Union.
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
election of officers will be
Tuesday, May 20, at 7:30 p.m.
in Room 122, Reitz Union.



Three Gators Named All-SEC Baseball

By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sport* Writer
A leadoff.-batter who leads his
team in homenms, a pitcher who
leads his conference in games
wo n and a catcher who is called
the most valuable member of the
squad by his teammates. The
Gators have all three and they
have recently been selected to
the 1969 All-Southeastern
Conference baseball team.
Sophomore centerfielder Guy
McTheny bats in the No. 1
position for the Gators but he
has exhibited enough power this
season to be anybodys clean-up
hitter. His four home runs, 10
doubles and .324 batting average
all lead the UF and his 27 RBls
are second only to Skip Lujacks
32.
The speedster from Sarasota,
who doubles on the Gator
S 'tgjrajr s .. '
'BHlk ' B
ft V|
DARK VICTORIOUS
UF All-American John Darr
won the Fourth annual Gator
Invitational Golf Tournament.
Darr had rounds of 66 and 72.
Academic Rules
To Get Stiffer
JEKYLL ISLAND, Ga.
(UPI) Southeastern
Conference head coaches and
athletic directors were warned
Monday that stiffer NCAA
academic requirements for
athletes can be expected in the
near future.
The escalation likely will be
forthcoming by the fall of 1970.
Current NCAA rules demand
that any scholarship recipient
must project to a 1.6 grade
average on a 4.0 scale.
The SEC itself has rules
requiring that athletes make a
minimum of 760 on the college
board tests or 17 on the ACT
test.
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gridiron as a split end, uses his
long-ball power to keep himself
in scoring position and he leads
the Gators with 33 runs scored.
McTheny, a 1966 Atlanta
Braves draftee, has collected 71

Theta Chi Closing Gap
On BlueLeaderChi Phi
Chi Phi withstood a five run outburst from the Delta Chis in the
fifth inning of their big match to notch a 7-5 Blue League victory and
move another step closer to the Blue League Presidents Cup.
The Chi Phis thought they had the cup sewn up in mid January but
a third quarter blitz by Theta Chi has narrowed a huge gap down to
24 points. The Chi Phis must enter the finals to sew up the
championship. Should the Theta Chis defeat the Chi Phis in the final,
Chi Phi will win the Presidents Cup by only four points.
Chi Phi won their only other game of last week defeating the Delta
Sjgs, 6-1. Theta Chi has kept pace by defeating the Fijis 8-5. Glenn
liepple smacked two balls out of the park to lead the way for the
Theta Chis.
In Orange League action the battle is now on for third place as TEP
nas sewn up first and ATO is solidly placed in second. SAE squeezed
out a 54 win over the TEPs as they pushed across three in the fourth
and two in the fifth to overcome a four point deficit. Rick Kirby
powered a homerun for the Es. The Es then went on to obliterate
the Lambda Chi Alphas 134.
Only three points out in front of the Es are the Phi Delts who
notched two wins last week. They slammed their way past Sigma Nu
in the first match as Bill Gaisford hit two doubles and a single in
leading the 114 rout. The Phi Delts then went on to edge the KAs 8-7
as Gaisford scord the winning run in the fifth.
PANHILLENIC
SAYS ITS
GREAT
TO BE
GREEK
panhellenic BAR-B-Q
THURSDAY EVENING MAY 22

OVCA, McTHENY. COURIER

total bases in 41 games thus far.
Senior lefthander Jim Courier
has compiled a 10-2 record this
season to be the SECs
winningest pitcher. He has
rebounded from an
injury-plagued 5-3 1968 season
to compile a 2.09 ERA while
allowing opposing batters 79 hits
in 86 innings.
With one more start coming
up against Florida State this
weekend, Courier has hurled six
complete games, one of them a
shutout. He has fanned 59,
walked only 16 and served up
four home run balls.
Courier, who hails from
Oveido, compliments his
pitching record with a .333
batting average. Coach Dave
Fuller recently named him as
one of the best pinch hitters he
has had in 21 years of coaching.
Gator backstop Mike Ovca,
captain of the Gators this season
and winner of the teams MVP
award last year, isUFs only

repeater from the *6B SEC honor
squad.
A senior from Panama City,
Ovca has been a consistent
performer for Fuller since
becoming a starter. Last season
he hit .260 and this year his
average is identical. In addition,
O has scored 27 runs while
knocking in another 13 in the

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Tuesday, May 20, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

current campaign. His defensive
work has been superb as his .985
fielding average indicates.
With three players being
chosen all-SEC, the Gators tied
with Alabama and Tennessee for
most men placed on the team.
The selection committee was
composed of the head coaches
of the 10 member schools.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 20,1969

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
first of a two part series
analyzing the 1969 UF football
teams quarterback position.)
By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs football coaches are
now grouped together in one of
the most decisive huddles in
Gator grid history.
Led by head coach Ray
Graves and top offensive coach
Fred Pancoast, the mentors are
trying to decide who theyll tap
as this seasons No. 1 Gator
quarterback.
The upshot of all the
film-viewing of practices and
scrimmages, plus the swapping
and meticulous studying of
reams of notes on performances,
is that John Reaves and Jack
Eckdahl are running even for
the job.
Also emanating from the
cavernous confines of the
coaches stadium offices is word
that the choice will be
announced within a few weeks.
This observer disagrees.
The guess is here that
nobod y7 including the
quarterback candidates, will
know whos No. 1 until
mid-August when fall practice
begins.
Why?

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1969 Quarterback Choice
Os Monumental Significance

Graves has already attached
monumental significance to the
choice-making effort. Hes
repeatedly intimated, and once
stated, that this summers No. 1
pick will be down under
center when the Gator offense
lines up to open the 69 grid
season here against Houston;
that is, barring injury or a
strange collapse in talent at
that position.
With this attitude of
making the No. 1 man a 10-game
starter, the coaches arent likely
to rush their decision.
While the choice may take
awhile, its felt here that the
decision definitely wont be a
meek one. Bewaring a repeat
scene of the two previous
seasons, the coaches will
strongly assert their reasons for
the choice and defend them
when skeptics brows start rising.
The No. 1 QB can probably
be assured of receiving a 100 per
cent vote of confidence from
his coaching staff.
To stimulate the

decision-making tempo with a
few chords of background
sound, lets groove on 1967.
Eckdahl, Larry Rentz and
Harmon Wages opened the
season about even. Each
expected to see ample duty.
Without formal designa designations
tions designations ... OK; youre No. 1,
and you, youre No. 2 until
something unreal
happens ... none of the guys
really knew where they stood.
When Eckdahl broke his
ankle early that season, Rentz
was more or less summarily
tapped for the job. This, only to
have the well-oiled arm of Wages
resting on his shoulder for the
seasons remainder.
Offensive mentor Pancoast
notes that before the 67
seasons opener, coaches
huddled together and devised a
chart to grade the three
quarterback candidates. Each
QB was assigned a performance

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grade for all drills, based on a
five-point scale and taking an
amazing 12 different categories
of signal calling savvy into
account.
The way I heard it, each
player was almost afraid to call a
pass-run option without first
consulting his attorney.
Pancoast says it was a
confusing scene. Though
Eckdahl graded-out highest of
the threesome, the lefthander
wasn't sent into battle with an
especially overwhelming vote
of confidence, as they say.
In last falls pre-season drills,
Eckdahl was recovering very
rapidly from the break, and
caught up with the healthy
Rentz. They shared duties in the
drills and entered the season
touted as UFs collective
wealth of talent and experience
at the quarterback post.
Somehow, the idea evolved
that if whoever started a game

VA'WJVtViVtW/iVSWVWWWWWnrAWA
didnt have a hot hand in the
games early going, his equal
could be immediately sent in to
take up the slack.
As Pancoast freely admits,
neither Eckdahl nor Rentz had
any choice but to become
gun-shy in their
apprehensiveness that, if they
failed to move the
highly-regarded Gator offense,
theyd be replaced.
Sums Pancoast: If a
quarterback gets real tense, hell
make mistakes.
With Larry Smith hurt and
the Gators maybe overrated,
1968s 6-3-1 Gator record,
including a 3-2-1 SEC slate,
waxed very disappointing to all
Year of the Gator fans,
players and coaches.
Eckdahl and Rentz did not
have good years Jack threw
the only two touchdown passes
of the entire Gator season.
Rentz ran with the ball 59
times, Eckdahl 66. Their total
average rushing gain was under
two yards per carry.
Its with these facts in mind,
plus the wildly different styles
of Reaves and Eckdahl, that the
Gator brain trust tries to solve
the QB problem.