Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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DEAN LESTER HALE
r.. makes stopgap" appointment

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 137

WILL PUT UP S4OBI
Student Senate Agrees
To Cover Concert Loss

By DEAN 3UNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Senate Tuesday
verwheimingly agreed to
i the loss incurred by the
- r rjtermty Council (IFC) in
tteesr production of the Rascals
t < President Steve Zack told
he' senate the loss had been
reduced to about $4,081
ir* >uen negotiations with the
arums groups who were owed
tones The Rascals, whose
ntract called for the payment
P. 500, agreed to accept
$2,000.
Zack was questioned from
the floor on alleged preferential
seating at the concert, which he
denied, and on statements made
to the senate on the use of an
original $3,000 appropriation.
The senate had been
informed that the $3,000 would
not be used for rain insurance
since the concert was to be
performed rain or shine.
Zack said the money had
been used to buy rain insurance
but said that he nor any IFC
member had ever misled anyone
on where the money was going.
He apoligized for the
misunderstanding over the
original appropriation.
Senator Bob Blunt
questioned an agreement made
between former Student Body
President Clyde Taylor and Zack
which stated that SG would buy
the rain insurance and cover any
losses incured by the concert.
This agreement was never
brought to the Senate for
ratification.
Blunt said he supported the
granting of the funds to IFC but
told the senate that it should be
a high-priced education for
the next time a similar
expenditure arose.
First Party Floor Leader
Bruce Boudreau said lie
supported covering IFC loss

Cornell Named Coordinator
Os Minority Student Affairs

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Assignments Editor
A part time minority students coordinator, called
a special assistant for student affairs, was appointed
Wednesday by Lester L. Hale, vice president for
student affairs.
Hale termed the appointment a strictly stopgap
measure until a possibly full time Director of
Programs and Aid for Disadvantaged Students can
be named if next years budget provides for one.
The new assistant is Dr. Corbin Camell, a
40-year-old associate English professor and
University College instructor of humanities. He has
worked with the Office of Economic
Opportunity-sponsored upward bound program
tfor college bound educationally and economically
disadvantaged students.
Camell sees his job, which will take up

The
Florida Alligator

because they staged the project
in good faith and in an effort to
benefit the student body
through raising funds for the
coliseum.
The other issue which stirred
heated debate in the meeting,
which lasted until after
midnight, was a proposed
amendment to the Interhall
Council charter.
This amendment, which was
passed by three votes last week
'yT y V'' i'-
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STEVE ZACK
... IFC off the hook
|Higher Tuition!
| Likely In Fall §
UF students will probably
i| be paying higher tuition in
| the fall. j:j
Vice President of Business
i Affairs William E. Elmore
said Wednesday that the bill
raising in-state tuition to £
$l5O for undergraduates and
§ $175 for graduate students :
£ will probably be passed by
| both houses of the legislature. :
j: The original bill called for j:
i a uniform tuition hike to j:
| $l5O for all Florida students, :
: but the Appropriations £
S Committee added the extra :
$25 for graduate students.

University of Florida\ Gainesville

on first reading, allows the
president of Interhall to be a
member of the paid university
housing staff. A bill to prevent
this was passed by the senate
several months ago.
The amendment failed
Tuesday on a roll call vote, 42 to
29.
Speaking in favor of the bill
was outgoing Interhall President
Mike McNemey. He said there
(SEE 'SENATE', PAGE 2)
Nixon Tells
Peace Plan
For Vietnam
WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixon Wednesday
night proposed a new Vietnam
peace formula calling for staged,
simultaneous troop withdrawals
by both sides over the next 12
months and an end to all
fighting at that time.
The President coupled his
proposal with an insistance that
agreement first be reached which
would guarantee the South
Vietnamese people the right to
determine their own political
future unhindered by outside
influences.
In a half hour speech to the
nation on radio and television,
the President also made clear
that the United States would not
abandon South Vietnam.
Nixon said that his
administration had ruled out a
purely military solution to the
war on one hand, and a
one-sided withdrawal from
Vietnam on the other. He said it
also would not accept terms
that would amount to a
disguised defeat.
To. abandon them (the
South Vietnamese) now would
risk a massacre that would shock
and dismay everyone in the
world who values human life,
Nixon said.

one-quarter of his time as a teacher, as a chance to
help choose the right director.
My task is to help Hale write the job description
and locate the right man for the permanent
position, he told the Alligator.
Camell was given time off from his regular
teaching duties by UC Dean Franklin Doty, Hale
said.
In the event that next years budget does not
provide for a full time director, Hale said, we do
have permission from UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and University System Chancellor Robert
Mautz to find a faculty member who can work half
time.
A full time or half time director must be found
by July 1, because Camell said he will be wrapped
up in sponsored research after that time.

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COACH OF THE YEAR
For the second consecutive year, UF tennis coach Bill Potter was
named "Coach of the Year" in the Southeastern Conference. Coach
Potter's netters captured the SEC championship last week.
Art, Movies Headline

Spring Minifestival
ODK presents its Spring Minifestival Saturday as a preview to a
quarter-long spectacular planned for next year.
The day-long affair will feature music, food and painting, with
most activities centered in the Reitz Union area.
The schedule of events includes an art festival from 11 a jn. to 6
p.m. on the Union collonade. The show will feature works by artists
in sculpture, ceramics and leather, as well as oils.
All of the original works will be offered for sale.
Beginning at 1 p.m., the UF Music Department will present a series
of impromptu shows in the mall area behind the Union. Rock, jazz,
and string quartet music will be included.
For movie buffs, a continuous showing of W.C. Fields movies will
be available for students without charge in the Union Auditorium.
The movies, which include My Little Chickadee, have been donated
by the Thirsty Gator.
Finally an outdoor case will be set up on the collonade to provide
coffee and donuts for art show visitors.
The minifestival is a prelude to Celebration 20, next years ODK
presentation of a quarter-long art festival. While it does not duplicate
the coming presentation, it should give students an idea of what to
expect.

MbHk
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DR. CORBIN CARNELL
... to aid disadvantaged

Thursday, May 15, 1969

America's
Number One
College
Daily



!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 15,1969

Page 2

P..M.V PofrttiVmc Past Draws Senate tire

By DENISE VALIANTE
Alligator Staff Writer 0
Student Body President Charles Shepherds
request for the creation of the office of Director of
Communications for student government has caused
discontent among sosie student senators.
The expected appointment would go to Harold
Aldrich, former Alligator Editor.
Aldrich, who masterminded Shepherds publicity
campaign writing ads, speeches, and the platform,
would be receiving a salary of $35 a week. The
senators feel that this is too much money to be paid
for a job which has never been a paid position.
Previously, the job of public relations for student
government was handled in an informal capacity.
Shepherds proposal would establish the office of
Director of Communications who would handle all
press releases and publicity for the entire student
government.
If I thought for a moment that this job was a
political payoff, I would not even consider taking
it, said Aldrich. I can make more money stringing
for the St. Pete Times. Im taking a cut in pay to do
this.
The fact that no qualification stipulation was put
on the proposal spurred the senators to argue that
the office could be used for the personal edification
of the student body president and granted as a
personal favor to some loyal campaigner, whether

LAST STEP FOR RIVERS?
Court Reviews Death Order

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Willie Samuel Rivers is now
sitting at Raiford Prison waiting

UPD Adds 3 Men
Three more police officers will join the University Police
Department beginning Thursday morning, UPD Lt. V.K. Holliman
said Wednesdays
One man will go on duty Thursday with two more reporting to
work Monday, Holliman said.
These officers will be employed on a full-time temporary basis
through excess monies in the Other Peoples Services (OPS) funds.
The UPD was notified last week of these additional funds and were
given the approval by the UF Physical Plants Division to hire nine
additional officers immediately.
Under state law, we may hire these men for a maximum of three
months at a salary of 10 per cent less than the standard full time
permanent job pay, UPD Chief A.I. Shuler said last week.
The new officers will start at $2.10 per hour based on a 40-hour
work week.

Senate To Cover Concert Loss

FROM PACE ONE
was not a conflict of interest
between residence staff members
and Interhall officers.
McNemey, who said he is not
seeking re-election, said Interhall
should themselves be able to
decide who they want as
president taking into account
whether or not that person is a
member of the residence staff.
Opposing McNemey was
Senator Ric Katz, a former
president of Interhall. Katz
contended that a paid residence
staff member should not be
allowed to be Interhall
president.-
During the debate McNemey
said he had been threatened by
someone to not press for the
measure.
Katz asked who had made the
threats.
McNemey said Katz had
threatened him and Katz denied
this, in the debate on the floor.
McNemey later told a
member of the press that Katz
had threatened to vote against
his tapping into Florida Blue
Key if he continued to press for
passage of the bill.
McNemey then indicated he

to hear if he will die or not.
Sentenced to die for the
murder of a UF coed last year,
Rivers appealed his case to the
Florida Supreme Court last

would deny that statement if it
appeared in print.
Katz said in reaction to this
statement by McNemey that he
was opposed to McNemeys
tapping into Blue Key but that
this opposition had been
formulated before this issue
arose.
First Party, which claims a
majority of senate members, did
not take a stand on the issue
when it passed last week. Floor
leader Boudreau Tuesday, in a
party caucus before the meeting,
urged First Party senators to
vote against the measure.
The senate approved a SSOO
loan which would go to the
Afro-American Student
Association for their off-campus
headquarters.

official student
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

ALDRICH A PPOINTMENT_RAPPEg

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DEAN J. P. JONES

he had any background in journalism or not.
I would not like to see this office turn into a
public relations agency for Charles Shepherd, said
Senator Robert Blunt at the Student Senate meeting
Tuesday night.
The possibility was investigated to have a student
from the College of Journalism fill the position for
credit, thus insuring a journalistic background and
saving money.
Dean John Paul Jones of the college said that
since the job did not fall under the area of technical
journalism, the position would have to be paid with
no credit granted.

October. Tuesday the last step in
the appeal was taken by Public
Defender Robert A. Green, Jr.
Green and law clerk DeLane
Anderson made their oral appeal
to the court Tuesday, the final
step in a series of moves begun
in October. The original brief
was written at that time and andanswered
answered andanswered by a return brief from
the attorney general. Green then
sent a reply brief back to the
attorney general.
Now all Rivers can do is wait
until the court hands down a
decision on the case, which was
appealed on the basis of
unfairness in the trial.
Anderson said Wednesday
that the decision may take two
months or it may come
tomorrow.

The post of SG Director of
Communications was approved
with the stipulation that this
person must submit a monthly
report to the senate on his
activities and the person who
fills the post must have senate
approval.
An amendment to the finance
law was passed which allows
student organizations to have
private bank accounts for funds
which they collect
independently on projects which
are not funded by SG.
Absent from the Student
Senate Tuesday night were:
Larry Bercu (off-campus), Linda
Dallager (Graham area), Jeff
Estes (1 UC), Andrew Schuster
(lUC), and Suzanne Jones
(Nursing).

HAROLD ALDRICH

If you want to get someone who is qualified,
and who will work, you will have to pay them,
said Aldrich. If anyone wants to check my
qualifications, I dont care. I had to pass the
inspection of the Budget and Finance, and
Information Investigating Committees and they
seemed satisfied with my qualifications for the job
The attack then turned from the proposed bill to
the near certain office-holder, Harold Aldrich.
At a senate meeting, Aldrich said he was willing
to work 50 to 60 hours a week on this job. If he was
flunking out as editor of the Alligator, I dont see
how he could handle this, said Senator Archie
Maldanado. We dont want to mess Aldrich up, but
neither do we want to mess up student government.
These are our fees that will be paying him, mine and
yours and we want the best qualified person; not
someone who got the job as a payoff.
An amendment was proposed to the bill whereby
the Director of Communications would be
responsible for a monthly report to the senate,
listing all of the releases he has written and the dates
and to what publications they were sent. The
senators felt that this would insure student
government that the job was being handled
adequately, and if they found that the director was
deficient in his responsibilities, some action could
be taken.
The bill will come up for its third reading on May
20.

Registrar Plans Ahead

t
Summer quarter students will
be registering for their fall
schedule in July, but they dont
need to worry that advanced
registration students will fill up
all the courses.
A new policy begun by the
Registrars office will set aside a
proportionate number of places
in each class and reserve them
for those who register in the
summer or next fall.
The number of places set

Vietnam and
World Treedom ...
Is there a connection?

IN PRAGUE
The Soviet Army marches in,
students defy Soviet tanks, but
censorship and thought control
are reimposed.
IN MOSCOW
Sinyafsky and Daniel and
thousands of Russian intellec intellectuals
tuals intellectuals are sent to Siberian labor
camps or committed to asy asylums
lums asylums by a regime that seeks to
stifle all voices of dissent.
FROM CHINA
The Red Chinese Army con conquers
quers conquers Tibet, practices genocide,
and then is launched on an un unprovoked
provoked unprovoked attack against India.
ON THE AMERICAN
CAMPUSES
Extremists man-handle profes professors,
sors, professors, burn libraries, seize and
vandalize buildings, and create
a climate of intolerance and
anti-intellectual terror.
IN VIETNAM
Thousands of teachers apd
civic leaders are murdered by
the Viet Cong while a strug strugfiling
filing strugfiling underdeveloped country,
seeking to improve the quality
of life, finds itself under as assault
sault assault by an ideology that
would deny freedom to all men.
IMs our belief that there is

STUDENT COORDINATING COMMITTEE
FOR FREEDOM IN
VIETNAM AND SOUTHEAST ASIA
P O. Box 1451, Main Post Office
Washington, D.C. 20013

aside will vary according to the
level of the students for which
the class is aimed, said L.V.
Voyles, director of records and
registration.
Most sophomores do not
attend the summer quarter but
nearly all graduate students do,
he said. Few places would need
to be reserved for the
sophomores but most graduate
students would need to register
late.

a connection between all of
these developments. The places
are different, the circumstances
vary, but the phenomenon of
totalitarian aggression against
freedom is the same.
The Vietnam war has been
widely misunderstood because
of the tendency to view it in
isolation. This war assumes a
clear and compelling signifi significance,
cance, significance, however, when it is
viewed in its global context
when it is seen as an integral
part of a world-wide struggle
by the forces of total tyranny
against the human mind and
the free spirit of man.
Over the coming critical
months of the Paris peace
talks, some of those who op oppose
pose oppose our Vietnam commitment
will do everything in their
power to compel the Adminis Administration
tration Administration to scuttle and run so
that the Communists can take
over there. This imposes a duty
on all of us, liberal and con conservative,
servative, conservative, who are committed
to an honorable peace, to make
our voices heard.
If you believe as we do, and
if you want to do something
about it, either as an individual
or as a leader of a student or organization,
ganization, organization, please write to



Drug Arrests Spur Protest
On Two N.Y. Campuses

By United Press International
Police made a narcotics raid
on Southampton N.Y. College
Wednesday and arrested 13
students. Black students,
protected by a wedge of Negro
townspeople, ended a building
occupation at Springfield Mass.
College under threat of eviction.
Gov. John McKeithen of
Louisiana met with a delegation
of 10 black students of Southern
University amid a tenuous truce
to discuss violence that erupted
twice this week on the schools
Baton Rouge campus.
Nearly 1,400 Louisiana
National Guardsmen were on
standby against a possible new
outburst of fighting and
vandalism. Rampaging students
on Tuesday threw rocks and
beakers of acid at police. More

Astronauts Preview
Lunar Panorama

CAPE KENNEDY (UPI)
The Apollo 10 astronauts got a
preview Wednesday of the
fantastic panorama of jagged
mountains and gaping craters
they expect to see on their
record 32-orbit trip around the
moon.
Thomas P. Stafford, John W.
Young and Eugene A. Ceman,
aiming toward a Sunday
blastoff, spent much of the day
reviewing lunar topography with
astronaut-geologist Harrison H.
Schmitt.
Os prime interest to Stafford
and Cernan was a
three-by-five-mile oval site on
the Sea of Tranquility, where
Apollo 11 is scheduled to land if
the Apollo 10 mission is
successful. The two Apollo 10
pilots will fly a lunar lander
within 50,000 feet of it.
To moon walkers, the landing
site is expected to resemble
sandy beach dunes with what
might look like a layer of
crushed and pulverized coal
spread over it. To Stafford and
Ceman, as they hover over the
site, it will look gray with
smooth-rimmed craters ranging
in size from a football stadium
down to as small as they will be
able to see.
The Apollo 10 team,

THURSDAY SPECIAL
Southern Style
FRIED CHICKEN
FRIDAY SPECIAL
TASTY
BAKED MEATLOAF AQ
IN CREOLE SAUCE
_____ LUNCH
| DINNER
//CAFCTERiA i 313 W. UNIV. AVE.
'A BLOCK WEST OF
MiW'iMi FLORIDA THEATER j

than 100 officers drove the
rebels back with tear gas fired
from shot guns.
As talks to iron out the
Southern University problems
were held, a bill was introduced
in the Louisiana senate to make
campus demonstrations a felony
offense, punishable upon
conviction by sentences of up to
five years in jail and fines of
$5,000.
The narcotics raid at
Southampton, on Long Island,
netted 11 students who were
charged with possessing or
selling narcotics and two who
faced riot or resisting arrest
charges for lying down in front
of police cars.
The college provost, Edward
C. Glanz, criticized police for
the surprise pre-dawn raid. If
they wanted students and had

meanwhile, got a 12-hour rest in
the countdown before resuming
at mid-aftemoon with most
work concentrated on removing
test equipment from the
spaceship and installing flight
gear.
Everything is proceeding on
schedule, a space agency
spokesman reported. The
astronauts are scheduled to
begin their eight-day mission at
12:49 pjn. EDT Sunday.
They will swing into orbit
around the moon May 21, circle
it for 2VI days and then return to
a Pacific Ocean splashdown May
26.
The goal of the mission is to
check out moon landing
machinery, perfect lunary
navigation techniques and
inspect the Apollo 11 landing
site. 1
WSBrn 1 |Kkf lUBOBB
Excellence in Food

warrants for them, wed have
been happy to produce the
students, he said.
The president of the student
body said student government
funds would be used for bail and
to hire attorneys to defend the
arrested students.
It was the second narcotics
raid in as many days on New
York State college campuses.
Fourteen students were arrested
early Tuesday at the Stony
Brook campus of the State
University of New York. That
raid touched off a wave of
vandalism by angry students.
Addict Inhibitive
Two substances which may
help narcotics addicts overcome
their habit have been discovered
by a professor of pharmacology
and toxicology at the University
of California Medical Center.
Dr. E. Leong Way reported
discovery of the substance,
which prevents mice from
becoming addicted to morphine.
He said the discovery may have
' application to human drug
addicts.

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c 3lmte*i 3Sreoo Snfcrnaiional
Justice Dept. OKs
Fortas Proceeding
WASHINGTON (UPI) A spokesman for the Justice Department
said today no objection would be raised to any House impeachment
proceedings against Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas.
In a statement issued by the department after a telephone
conversation between Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell and Rep. Clark
Macgregor, R-Minn., Mitchell pledged cooperation with Congress in
any proceedings that might be started against Fortas.
As yet, the department has received no formal communication
from the House on the matter, the Justice Department spokesman
stressed.
Rep. H.R. Gross, R-lowa, said Sunday that he would introduce a
bill of impeachment in the House if Fortas did not soon step down or
further explain his relationship with imprisoned financier Louis E.
Wolfson.
If the House voted for impeachment, the Senate would act as judge
and jury in the case. It would take a two-thirds vote of the Senate to
convict Fortas.
A spokesman for Mitchell said any possible cooperation between
the Department of Justice and the Congress would be guided by the
statutory and constitutional powers and obligations imposed on e*ach
branch.
OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru Frl
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave

Thu reday, May 15,1969, Th# Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

LIFE ISNT ROSES
IN A WAR ZONE
ORPHANAGE

. But At Khe Sat, S. V ietnam Someone Cares

They wear no shoes, speak no English and have
no parents; but the 78 children of Khe Sat
Orphanage know theyre loved by the UF care
packages they receive.
Early last November 40 Army Reserved Officer
Training Corps (ROTC) Sweethearts consulted Maj.
Charles B. Campbell, assistant Professor of Military
Science, about sponsoring an orphanage, school or
some other civil affairs project in South Vietnam.
Campbell, preparing to leave for his third active
duty tour of Vietnam, wrote the Office of the
Chaplain at the U.S. Army, Vietnam Headquarters,
seeking assistance.
The letter was forwarded to Col. Joseph G.
Gefell, Staff Chaplain for II Field Force, Vietnam.
A Catholic priest for 28 years, Gefell selected Khe
Sat, an orphanage in the Due Tu District village of
Ho Nai in the Bien Hoa Province.
Since that time, the Army Sweethearts have
responded with 15 boxes of clothing and toilet
articles collected from the UF campus.
The 38 boys and 40 girls of Khe Sat range from
infants to 13 years old. A 13 year old Vietnamese
cluld is about the size of average American child
nine or ten years old. The children are supervised by
seven sisters and two novices of the Sisters of the
Holy Cross order.
The orphanage is in the war zone and alls not
quiet on the Southeastern front. During April, Viet
Cong food scavengers raided the small outpost. The
courageous sisters out talked the Vietcong and no
harm was done.
When the perils of war arent shrouding the
poverty-stricken village, the hazards of nature take
-

^ r KBit w w^*fe^-# 'si ' IsQjHfr' w- # v; *** ***** -^-V^tes*^ :
i i 15
... shows orphans' sleeping and kitchen are^**

f /

'* 4

V The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 15, 1969

WXSK MM Pfafl em mm | Mfl 11 B Wmm
FRONT YARD OF KHE SAT ORPHANAGE
.. roof was destroyed by high winds

their place. Recently a wind storm blew off half of
the orphanages roof, but has since been repaired.
Gefell wrote a letter to the Army Sweetheats
recommending the types of goods to send. In the
past, all goods were collected from sororities,
fraternities, and dormitories students donating
whatever they could. But although everything is
appreciated, South Vietnamese children just have no
use for woolen clothing, stockings, and socks in
their tropical climate.
- He asked for lightweight tropical clothing all in
slim or petite style.
Shorts, preferably made of denim, short sleeve
shirts and t-shirts are well liked by the boys.
Jumper suits for the girls seem to be the most
practical item. These should be longer than the
length of American girls clothing. Normal American
prl s dresses are not worn by older girls, who wear
the traditional ao dai for school and special
occasions. F

MAJOR HORVATH, CIVIL AFFAIRS OFFICER
... adjusts tee-shirt on orphan at Khe Sat Orphanage

For infants, plastic milk bottles, lightweight
clothing, pacifiers, baby powders, disinfectants, and
liquid vitamins are most needed. Diapers are not
commonly used in Vietnam.
-A Although toys are welcome for the smaller
children, the older children prefer any type of
athletic equipment. The Army Sweethearts have in
the past sent numerous books, but as yet none of
the children can read or write enough English to use
them.
In answer to Gefells prayers that a sewing
machine be sent, if possible, to Khe Sat, the
Interfratemity Council has donated the money for
one to be bought.
Clothing and detergent drives are continually
going on. The sponsorship of Khe Sat Orphanage is
a never-ending project. Any donations may be given
to the Army Sweethearts.



Inquiry Could Lead To Fortas Impeachment

WASHINGTON (UPI) A Republican
congressman took the first step Wednesday toward a
congressional inquiry which could lead to the
impeachment of Supreme Court Justice Abe Fortas.
Rep. Clark MacGregor, R-Minn., proposed that
the House Judiciary Committee hold public hearings
with Fortas and Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell as
invited witnesses into charges that Fortas
behavior violated the constitutional provision that
he serve for life during good behavior.
Rep. Emanuel Celler, chairman of the committee
and the Houses leading expert on constitutional
matters, interrupted House debate to announce that
he and his Republican counterpart, Rep. William M.
McCulloch of Ohio, had reached agreement on a
course of action:
This appeared to assure a House inquiry into

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GOP CONGRESSMAN PROPOSES PUBLIC HEARING

Fortas financial dealings with imprisoned financier
Louis E. Wolfson.
Rep. H.R. Gross, R-lowa, who has demanded
Fortas impeachment and announced that he was
preparing a bill of impeachment for introduction if
Fortas does not resign, rose to Celler what his
plan was.
Celler replied: I am sure the gentleman will be
satisfied with the action to be taken in the not too
distant future.
MacGregor told reporters he believed Fortas
would accept an invitation to appear before the
Judiciary Committee but should be subpoenaed if
he refused to appear voluntarily.
Failure to respond to a subpoena, he said, would

Thursday, May 15,1969, The Florida Alligator,

in itself be ground, in his opinion, for an
impeachment action.
If the House were to vote to impeach a public
official, the Senate would act as judge and jury with
a two-thirds vote necessary to convict. Although
impeachment proceedings ware initiated against
Justice Samuel Chase in 1805, no member of the
Supreme Court has ever been removed through
Senate conviction.
Fortas remained silent on the affair, as he has
since May 4 when he issued a statement denying any
impropriety but acknowledging he had accepted and
then returned a fee from the charitable family
foundation of Wolfson and his brother. Wolfson is
serving a years prison term for stock manipulations.
A spokesman said Fortas was working on court
business in his office.

Page 5



Page 6

>, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 15,1969

AWS Meeting
Set Thursday
There will be a meeting of the
Association of Women Students
(AWS) Thursday, in room 355
of the Union at 7:30.
The purpose of the meeting
will be to formulate a new
budget. All old and new
representatives are urged to
attend this meeting.

STUDENT MEMBERS INCLUDED
A&S Forming Petitions Board

ST

" By DENISE VALIANTS
Alligator Staff Writer
Students will be able to voice
their opinions and have full
voting privileges on the new
petitions board being established
in the College of Arts and
Sciences.
Dr. Harry Sisler, dean of the
college, said the College
Petitions Board will now include
two student members who will
review the petitions along with
the faculty members of the
board.
11*8 important to have the
student's point of view," Sisler
jsaid, because a lot of times

State AAUP Backs
National Resolution
The executive committee of the Florida Conterence of the
American Association of University Professors met last week and
endorsed the national AAUP resolution on campus disorders.
The committee condemned unwarranted and punitive new
legislation that is politically inspired."
It prefers constructive support of higher education and alleviation
of legitimate problems.
The committee also noted that college students in Florida have not
engaged in extreme behavior.
At the national meeting the AAUP recognized demonstrations
and confrontations on campuses across the nation are frequently a
manifestation of deep and sometimes profoundly moral discontent
arising out of social injustice, public policy and, in some cases, out of
inefficiency, irresponsibility and unresponsiveness within the
institutions themselves.
It called on all members of the academic community to seek
appropriate remedies, encourage necessary change and discourage
disruptive action.
AICE President Schedules
Speech Here Monday

Hugh D. Guthrie will speak
on Decision Making in the
auditorium of the Architecture
and Fine Arts Building at the UF
Monday at 7:30 p.m.
Guthrie is National President
of the American Institute of
Chemical Engineers and
Assistant to the General Manager
' of the refineries division of the
Shell Oil Company.
The executives visit to
Florida will include sitting in on
the Apollo Launch from Cape
Kennedy on May 18.
In addition to board activities
in organizational and vocational

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they know what certain
situations involve and how it
affects the students and we
dont."
The function of the board is
to review student problems
which involve the waiving of
some regulation which may be
detrimental to the students
particular case.
The two students are now in
the process of being selected.
They will be recommended by
the colleges Student Council on
the basis of academic standing,
demonstration of interest in
student problems and the desire
and ability to devote a lot of

areas, Mr. Guthrie is holder and
co-holder of several patents on
processes currently employed in
the petroleum industry, and has
been a regular lecturer at the
University of California.
The talk here is open to the
general public.
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time to the board.
This will be a working
committee, Sisler said, and
the students selected will have to
be willing to put as much time
into it as the faculty, as they will
be given equal rights and voting
privileges.

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FOR STATE UNIVERSITIES
Admission Demands Rising

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Demands for admission to
state universities and land-grant
colleges continue to rise this
year to such an extent that some
institutions are forced to turn
away qualified applicants.
The UF, however, has not yet
been forced to turn away any
applicants qualified for
admission.

Fulwood Criticizes
'White Supremacy

By LORETTA TENNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
Junta of Militant
Organizations Charles Fulwood
outlined three problems facing
the United States Tuesday night
and said the people of America
are awakening to the fact that
something is wrong with the
culture and attitudes of America
today.
The 19-year-old JOMO
Minister of Information cited
racism, capitalism and
imperialism, or white
supremacy in an international
level, as the most pressing
problems facing the nation
today.
Calling for an end to schools
that teach white is best; white
is only ; white is right, Fulwood
spoke before 125 persons at a
Law Dames meeting in the
Spessard L. Holland Law Center
auditorium.
He said a redistribution of
wealth and power, food,
clothing and housing must take
place so that Blacks and other
minority poor will have the basic
human necessities available to
them.
Even a dog gets food in
America, Fulwood said. Food
isnt something you grant a
human being. It is a human
right.
There is a mad element in
the US. todav and it is mad

A circular periodically
released by the National
Association of State Universities
and Land Grant Colleges, stated
that 30 of 91 member colleges
and universities responding to a
survey were forced to turn away
qualified applicants.
Applications for admission this
year are 10 per cent above those
Jkst year. At this university, the
number of applications has risen

with the white folks system, not
with the privileged class.
Until you fight your racist
and supremacist attitudes, we
cant cooperate with you, he
added.
Americans who disagree with
the systems in the U.S. are
finding out that America isnt
turning Nazi its been Nazi.
Its just now starting to treat
everyone who disagrees with it
the same.
If America decides it does not
want a socialist society, the
Blade people of America will be
asked if they want to
incorporate their communities
into cities which would create
jobs for the people who would
then work for the state and the
business it would run.
Fulwood said this will come
as a last resort after the Black
people of America present
demands to the United Nations
for land and money in payment
for the suffering Black people
have gone through in this
country during their 100 years
of physical slavery and 300 years
of economic slavery in this
country.

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Thursday, May 15, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

also, although to a lesser extent.
Some 6851 high-school
students had applied as of May 7
for admission to the UF next
September, while there are only
2800 places open for freshmen.
It is the policy of Dean R.N.
Whitehead, Director of the
Registrar and Admissions Office,
to accept about 4500
applications. In this way about
2800 freshmen can actually be
expected for the next fall.
Some institutions cope with
the problem of rising
applications by allowing an
increased number for their
freshman class or by raising
admissions standards. At the UF
neither recourse has been
necessary.
The number of entering
freshmen which the Board of
Regents allows each fall has been
set at 2800 for several years, and
admissions standards have not
been raised since 1962.
Standards of admission for
out-of-state students, however,
are higher than those for in-state
students.
TONIGHT'S
THE
MIGHT
(VR GINS
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GRIS' DUNKS 2St
SIB W 19 mm

Page 7



I, The Florida AHBtor. Thursday. May IS. 1989

Page 8

The Florida Alligator
i ......
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
umSsHm Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor
Alt
Arnmu Carol Sanger Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
Executive Editor News Editors
Wgs^Wr m^-r*
Put it right in the deans office!

The Fifth Column :

Probably one of the most erroneous but
nevertheless accepted myths about radical dissent is
that it is supposedly undemocratic.
But if one is to examine the history of our
American democracy, it soon becomes obvious that
radical dissent is one of the oldest traditions of this
country.
First of all, this country is not a pure democracy.
Despite fourth of July oratory about the land of
Horatio Alger, Joe Brown in Keokuk, lowa does
not swing the same weight, politically as Nelson
Rockefeller does. Now a million Joe Browns united
on one issue may have as much power, but thats
precisely the point. This country is an Interest
Group Democracy; if you want something done,
you better get a lot of other people who want
same thing to go along with you. Every politician
talks in terms of interest groups the Catholic vote,
the Oil and Gas Lobby, the Blue Collar workers,
etc., and like it or not, this country operates on the
theory of competing interest groups.
So what happens? Well for the first time the
Blacks and radical students have become organized ;
they are now interest groups SDS, SSNC, SSOC,
CORE, BSU. And nobody runs especially tight
about this, because there are tons of interest groups
who are powerless: Hillel, YMCA, liberals. (I jest).
The hang-up comes in over how the interest
group chooses to effectuate its potential power.
Traditionally there are four forms of interest
group power. The first three, being non-physical, are
the most commonly approved and held up as
examples of the American Way of Life. They are
brain power, economic power and political power.
Brain power is the route normally taken by
small, single-issue oriented groups. Thus in the early
stages of its dissent (1963-65), the anti-war
movement consisted largely of articles in liberal
publications like Harpers and The Atlantic by
Schlesinger and Galbraith. It depends upon
extensive exposure by the mass media to have an

7

The Disruptive Power Factor

EDITORIAL
A Break For Leaders

If agriculture professor Max Tyler has his
way, UF students who sacrifice a portion of
their grade point average to bring
recognition to the UF in other than
academic areas may be given a break.
He has proposed to the University Senate
that students holding high offices in student
activities be allowed to be classified a full
time student with only a nine hour academic
load, with the approval of his dean.
This idea is an excellent one and should
be passed for many reasons.
Many student leaders continually sacrifice
their academic standing to serve the student
body and the university. They have made a
committment to serve and work as hard, if
not harder, toward that goal than academic
excellence.
The experience that a student leader
(Student Body President and Vice President,
Alligator Editor and Managing Editor, Honor
Court Chancellor, and others) gains in his
area of service is just as much an educational
experience as sitting in a classroom. The
number of student body leaders who have
been successful after their stay shows the

MR. EDITOR:
One thing impressed me
about Mr. Fulwoods article,
Minding Black Folks
Business. Until whites get rid
of their racist attitudes we
cant work together, he said.
He went on to picture the
Whites as a monolithic
structure of bigoted oppressors
who, because of their racist
attitudes would not be allowed
to join Black groups.

effect, and it is slower and weaker than the other
forms of Interest Group power.
The route taken by wealthy interest groups that
are small in numbers is economic power. The use of
lobbyists, expense accounts, and campaign
contributions are the most effective way for this
type of interest group to succeed. Needless to say,
because the majority of the people are not wealthy,
this route to power is most distasteful to the
radicals.
The most traditional form of Interest Group
Power is political. If your interest group is large in
numbers, i.e, labor unions, then you swing your
weight in the most accepted manner in the voting
booths.
Now the representatives of the currently
powerful interest groups, (some elected, some
bought, some self&ppointed all known as the
Establishment) have decreed that these forms of
power are the only acceptable ones in a
Democracy.
They say that the fourth form, that chosen by
the radicals Disruptive Power is illegal, fascistic
communistic, unamerican. They patently ignore the
facts and history of this country. They somehow
forget that interest groups have traditionally used
disruptive power when the other three routes were
not practical, either because of lack of money,
people or time. The labor unions in the 3os are the
most obvious example of an interest group using
disruptive power successfully. (Thus the ultimate
irony of George Meany condemning the use of
violence by the radicals.) And it doesnt stop there
- the Grange movement in the late 19th century
the Ku-Klux-Klan in the twenties,... think about
For while there is no shortage of radical brain
power, (Evergreen, Ramparts, The Village Voice
The Realist) this route to power always takes the
longest succeeds on its own, rather it
must transform itself into one of the other forms

Race Not Black & White

Mr. Fulwood is refusing to
talk about people; he does not
recognize the vast range of
attitudes and opinions among
both Blacks and Whites. He
either cant grasp or wont admit
that not all whites are racists nor
all Blacks militants.
It has been my experience
that both groups are minorities
of their races. Why shouldnt the
rest of us work together to solve
this'problem?
V m m m m -

And economic power is not possible for
economically dependent students and impovershied
blacks; nor is political power considering the true
minority status of these groups in the classic
demographic sense.
So the radicals use Disruptive Power because all
it takes is willing bodies; no money, no votes, no
brains.. .just a fever for a cause. And its working
look at the increase in Black Studies, the decrease
in ROTC accreditation, pass-fail systems, student
membership on previously non-student committees.
The Establishment better wake up this
Disruptive Power is quite democratic and the
radicals will continue to use it until it loses its
effectiveness. (As did the labor unions until passage
ot the Taft-Hartley bill.) For the radicals arent
really out to destroy the system; what better proof
at they will abide by it than the fact that they go
ott to jail when they are arrested. The system
doesn t need to be destroyed it needs to be
restructured, i.e. a realignment of Interest Group
Power.
And the radical dissent will continue until the
Establishment decides to stop it and saying theyll
stop it is as ineffectual and unlikely as the radicals
own naive cries of revolution.
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681. 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions express in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
_of the University of Florida.

values of extracurricular activities in ghrm*
an individual a strong basis toward
successful life. a
Former Student Body Vice President
Gary Goodrich, current Student Bodv
President Charles Shepherd, Former
Alligator Editor Harold Aldrich, track star
Ron Jourdan and other student leaders in
varied activities all have one thing i n
common. They have been in academic
trouble because they have tried to do the
best possible job in their particular areas
even to the extent of sacrificing grades.
This proposal is needed.
But it must be administered by the
college deans in such away that large
numbers of students are not allowed to take
advantage of this plan. If the program is
abused, it will be done away with.
We suggest that the University Senate and
the Student Senate get together and devise a
list of student activity positions that should
be allowed to carry the nine hours almost
automatically, and another list of positions
that should be left up to the discretion of
the deans.

Our racial conflict has many
subtleties in both cause and
effect. Mr. Fulwood apparently
lacks the maturity to realize that
not even a racial problem is
purely Black and White. Until he
gains the integrity to treat each
man as a person, instead of a
racial stereotype, he will be
worse than useless in solving our
worst problem today.
STEVE LONG 7EG

Jdson Straight*



The Dissenter

Charles Fulwood, Larry Jordan, David Home, and some other
Blacks are trying to tell us Whites something, but most of us dont
seem to be listening or comprehending. What they are saying is so
damn necessary and important that we had better start understanding
now, right now.
Black people are fighting for their lives. They have lived by White
values and standards and in economic subjection to White interests for
as long as they have been in this country. And now after years under
the yoke of White masters they are attempting to break the chains of
manipulation. Blacks are insisting upon defining the courses of their
lives, their goals, and above all their people-hood.
They are attempting to develop a sense of historical and cultural
unity and pride as Black people. Blacks have come to realize that they
have a tradition and country of their own, that their heritage and
origins are not in common with White society. Recognition of
thievery has come upon the Blacks in America. Their historical
identification and solidarity has been taken from them, and now they
are demanding it back.
Along with the reawakening of historical and cultural identification
has come a realization of the power that Blacks as a people are
capable of achieving, both economically and politically. In short, the
concept of Black Power has arisen as a new force in America.
But the mistakes of defining Black Power in terms of White
society, i.e., Nixons Black Capitalism, must not be made. This is one
of the most effective instruments of oppression employed by the
s established order, not only as concerns Black Power, but any forces
antagonistic to society.
Black Power has been redefined as the right of individual Blacks to
come out of the ghetto and make their way in capitalistic society.
They become absorbed into the middle class and its dominant values.
Where does this leave the great mass of Black people? Down in the

MR. EDITOR:
After reading Charles Fulwoods
Well have our Share, I realized that I
am prejudiced. I am prejudiced against
all men who get what they want by
using force. I am beginning to think that
the only way to keep America from
going up in flames is to stop these
revolutionary forces by whatever means
necessary.
In his article Fulwood said, millions
of Black People have been slaughtered
in this nation and we havent received
one inch of land or one dollar for this.
A good answer to this a friend of mine
had I dont owe a damn penny for
something my grandparents did, and I
could not agree with him more.
Fulwood seems to be living in the past.

[The Movement Lest uuuuul jnnnnnnDannn nDaann^DrJ - n
Naive, Insubstantial Arguments J

For these know that if ignorance be removed,
amazed stupidity, the sole ground on which they
rely in arguing or in defencing their authority, is
taken away....
Spinoza
In reading the last few editions of the
ALLIGATOR, I am reminded of the motto of the
now defunct CHARLATAN, Sacred cows make
the best hamburger. So I guess I must make a few
replies to those people who have so kindly made my
task easier by supplying me with sacred cows.
First, I would like to comment on Jim Hollis,
who, for as long as I have known him, constantly
relies on sarcasm and innuendo to back up rather
insubstantial arguments. He is well aware that, if
you take a condescending attitude, people wiU
believ you know more than you actually do. His
tone of an elder lecturing a child is a ruse to hide
incomplete data and faulty tcasoning.
Robert Allen, highly naive, believes that the U.S.
is seeking peace through deterrence. You dont
build weapons unless you plan to use them. It is like
a bandit holding a pistol to a man s head and saying,
Believe me, I would never use it. Would you
relieve him? y
Aden's pjtcmise fin die-last paragraph is mat
... uAivwlu.als
tit sint&V world.conquest,if
.
Aey though? nty o.did get awey yvu ?;
...

Blacks Need Understanding Now

PrejudicedAgainst The Use Os Force

As to millions of blacks slaughtered that
is nothing but a lie.
Mr." (I use the term Mr. very
loosely.) Fulwood if you dont like
America enough to obtain what you
want through legal means, then by gosh
get out! I wish I had enough money for
you and all like you to send you where
you fit in Maoist China, for example.
Charles Fulwood is the bigoted racist
that makes matters worse instead of
better in our nation. Within a generation
there would be no white bigotry in our
country, but screwballs like you are
going to mess up the whole works.
Jack, were talking about
revolutionary change and we aint jiving.
Now how does that shake up your
spinal cord? This statement is from a
so-called leader. Who do you think you
talking to when you use the word

Adm
OMjI
ViMtot
tm
i
CHARLES FULWOOD

from this type of aggression. I applaud your
premise, Mr. Allen. There are such individuals and
nations (and, I might add, corporations) running
loose.
You need a minor premise, however, a bill of
particulars. For that, examine who is the aggressor
throughout the world. From there, you might
conclude that the actual role of the military is one
of protecting U.S. economic, cultural and political
imperialism.
Allen seems concerned about me objecting to
authoritarian structures. I suppose I am. If I have no
part in deciding who is placed above me, you can
bet I object. It is curious how Allen connects
relinquishing ones total freedom with being free.
Moreover, he says he objects to war, but apparently
because he is afraid for his own skin (and he links
his opposition to mine somehow). I hope my
opposition to war is more morally and ethically
grounded than selfish considerations. One does not
stop war. or try to. merely by oeing afraid.
There is no freedom in the military,
(incidentally, 1 am a veteran, Mr. Allen.) The recent
heavy-handed suppression oljlissent, legitimate and
peaceful at Presido, Ft. Oix, Ft. Brage, Ft. Sill, etc.,
etc. are witness to *bis. One does not defend
freedom by crushing it.
/ so. concerning : ; /-r Alex Mayro >whost;
< ; :.mecr!.Urg rivals ~ t : .a* the ;: -ue
! .... ; ay so::..; .on, ... - '.r, the v n
nierence or the location pi )ei p
BumnsteK. ,.;/% *he U :'t ymi, to mn

Jack? Fulwood you are damn right
that it shakes up mine and a hell of a lot
of Americans spinal cords who feel
something for the future of our nation.
And finally the concluding statement
of his article, Black folks have got a
share of power and wealth in this
country and were going to get [take]
it! I inserted the word take because
that is exactly what Charles Fulwood
meant. Disrupting the status quo is
goint to create hypertensions and
prejudices that far outreach your
prejudices, Fulwood. I am speaking of
violent revolutions, not legal means.
I agree that the black race has been
discriminated against for a long time,
but this has drastically changed in the
last half century. Why did it change;
because of militants like you
HARDLY!

ghetto exploited as they have always been.
Black Power means a movement of Blacks as a people. Not as
individuals but as a race. It does not mean the integration of Blacks
into White society. This would mean the acceptance of the primacy of
White values and the superiority of White culture and White
institutions. And this is what the Black Power cats completely reject.
To expect them to embrace a system which has subjugated thern is
ridiculous in the extreme. They insist on building a movement,
perhaps a society, based on Black values, Black culture, Black
revolutionary nationalism, and Black is Beautiful.
This is why the charge of racism so often leveled at exclusive Black
groups displays a complete misunderstanding of the Black struggle.
Whites are not allowed because they do not have a Black heritage,
because they can have no comprehension of what it means to be Black
in America. They have no business defining the nature and goals of
another people. This can only be done by the people themselves.
White society has in the past had the audacity and the power to
define what the Black man and the Black people will be.
No more. The Black man is shaking his fist in White Americas face
and demanding what is his. The days of politeness and subservience
are gone forever. There are those who say they agree with the ends
but not the means employed by militant Blacks. There have been
promises of reform in the past. But the realization has come that the
words were empty and the promise meaningless.
More and more the Black people are heeding the words of
Frederick Douglass. They were written more than 100 years ago and
they are at last being listened to: Those who profess to favor
freedom yet deprecate agitation, are men who want crops without
plowing up the ground; they want rain without thunder and
lightening ... The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of
those whom they oppress.

the university. Incorrect as he is (we dont want
the damn thing), he almost stumbled onto
something. This is, who does run the university?
First, ROTC is an issue only as much as it
involves university support of the war and the
military. It is not an academic field but an
indoctrination process for an activity the university
should not be engaged in.
Second, examine who runs the unviersity now,
Mr. Mavro, and I think you will better understand
what part the university plays in promoting the
interests of the corporate-military elite, the war, etc.
and I think you will better understand our objection
to ROTC. (Read Who Rules Columbia published by
NACLA, Box 57, Cathedral Station, N.Y., N.Y.
10025.)
To Lance Stalnaker, who again accuses us of
censorship (attempted), I would like to point out
that removal of academic credit and removing
ROTC from campus does not constitute denying it
the means of distribution. ft- could, for example,
charter as an organization with Student
Government. And, again, how could one censor
the military? It is entrenched in every aspect of
American life (see my other articles).
You made one correct statement, however,
ROTC cadets dont seize compps buildings (I doubt
ii d*ey understand why Blacks and SDS do *ieze
. .. ROTC cadets- grow up andbum villages,
tally > by your log .. dS should be givi i
building add academic a edit. Is -this, whs? you
/propose / ..

Thursday, May 15, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

In closing, Charles Fulwood if you
and your militants plan to use violence
to get what you want (I am certain now
that this is what you want) look for a
fight with blood of both races spilled.
And since your militant group does not
even represent the black masses the
outcome for you and all militants can
.be nothing but defeat which both races
of America will not soon forget.
America will not, I repeat will not, be
intimidated by a militant JOMO who
thinks America owes them something!
JOMO, if you think you deserve
money and land, then you wouldnt get
much because the Indians in America
deserve one hundred times as much as
you do!
RONNIE CLARK lUC

By Lee Hilliker

Page 9



Page 10

l. Tha Florida Alligator, Thuwday. May 15.196


< )

[TvmwToivwlcn]
[LIBBY'S
CATSUP I
[ a 5/ $ l J

f OLD MILWAUKEE ]
BEER
("r-95<

[ fyfRYDA Y IOW PRICE
BJ
I KING SIZE I
I FAB or I
I COLD POWER I
! ONLY I

Save Everyday on Your
Health and Beauty Needs!
$1.65 ILSEWHIRE. 430x TUBE. HEAD4SHOULOERS
SHAMPOO 99
CHILDRENS CHEW ABLE VITAMINS. REG. OR WITH IRON
ZESTAB'S,.. V, ..*:: 1 99*
694 ELSEWHERE. 25V
ALKA SELTZER 54*
$1.49 ELSEWHERE. 13ox CAN.REO OR EXTRA HOLD
WHITE RAIH...-SS.SSST 99*
$1.19 ELSEWHERE.Sez NEWI. ANTI-PERSPIRANT
RIGHT GUARD 77*

gAY LOW PftlCf/j
I
tRCOAL I
QUETS I
88 t J

Daily-Fresh Baked Goods
SAVE 104.2L8 4oz RING GIANT GOLDEN
POUND CAKE 89*
SAVE 174. PKG OF 8. ICED ASSORTED
SWEET BUNS 3/*1
SAVE 1148. FRESH BAKED
APPLE PIE 38*
SAVE 44. PKG OF 12. LITTLE DEBBIE
LUNCH CAKES 45*

* * am UK Ki ~

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[KRAfT
I MUSTARD I
1 s 9< J

[EV£f?yD4y IQW PRICE r\
W KOUNTY KIST CJ I
I SWEET I
| POTATOES I
I WHOLE 6. PIECES B ORtiN GIAN!
[ ?iNs 4/ $ 1 I

g)AY LOW PRICE!]
iPPsJPI
BY FOOD I
AND VEGETABLES
B*l

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
W QUICK REFRESHER Q7I
I GATOR I
| ADE I
[ss 3/ $ 1 J

ai flt K OUR EVERY Prob- save
COMPARE!
LISTERINE - $1.09 $1.98 89*
TOWN TALK SYRUP *.- 49* 59* 10*
PANTRY MAID LUNCH BAGS 5/SI.OO 5/SUS 15*
7 oz. COLD DRINK CUPS ' 79* 89* 10*
BOOK MATCHES 11* 13* 2*
PANTRY PRIDE BLEACH 28* 31* 3*
CHICKEN POT PIE 6/SI.OO 5/SI.OO 20*
GALVANIZED GARBAGE CAN $1.89 $1.99 10*
WHISTLE SPRAY CLEANER 49* 59* 10*
CLAPPS STRAINED BABY FOODS
| EVERYDAY LOW PRICnI
r O ~TB
I TOMATO I
SAUCE I
[,*i IQ< J

COMPARE!
ROYAL GELATIN DESSERTS *** * 9* 10* 1$
PILLSBURY FLOUR 59* 63* 4*
PANTRY PRIDE CAKE MIXES a.*** 4/s].oo 4/$1.16 16*
KELLOGG'S CORN FLAKES ** 39* 45* 6*
BORATEEM 69* 79* 10*
TURKEY DINNER iM**ouTwa. 38* 49* ju
KRAFT MACARONI DINNER 19* 23* 4*
PANTRY PRIDE COOKING 0IL~ 69* 93* 24*
PANTRY PRIDE FLOUR * 37* 47* 10*
ALUMINUM FOIL "X" 4/SI.OO 4/$1.32 32*
PACKER LABEL MUSHROOMS 4/SI.OO 4/$1.32 32*
CHOCOLATE JUMBO PIES *<* 3 /SI.OO 3/$1.17 17*
MANDARIN ORANGES 4/SI.OO 4/$1.16 16*

[everyday low pricer]
T GREG'S
ASSORTED I
I COOKIES I
10* I
PKG

ISIITS "IE TNI MB
PW* SANDWICH SLICED 1
GIANT 11/2 LB.
WHITE BREAD
? 4/99. 1

I everyday low price. l ]
CLOVER VALLEY WI
I FREESTONE I
PEACHES I
[ 290 z CANS J* /£ I
I HIAVY Ml § J§§!

COMPARE! WST
WHITE PAPER PLATES-9 69* 89* 20*
BRECK SHAMPOO o, " 39* 65 26 <
COLGATE INSTANT SHAVE St ,7?' 39* 79* 40*
LUSTRE CREME HAIR SPRAY 49* 99* 50*
WHITE RAIN HAIR SPRAY T. * 99* $1.49 50*
SUAVE HAIR SPRAY ST 49* 99* 50*
HALO HAIR SPRAY 5V'"""" 49* 99* 50*
GET SET HAIR SPRAY 49* 79* 30*
ASPIRIN .19* 39* 20*
CONTAC CAPSULES > 99* $1.59 60*
/S

[EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
9" WHITE I
I PAPER I
PLATES I
[ a, MT 99< J

COMPARE! WS*
SOUTHLAND SANDWICH COOWES£ 39* 49* 10*
PANTRY PRIDE BATH TISSUE 22* 29* 7*
PANTRY PRIDE PAPER TOWES** 4/51.00 4/51.48 48*
IECROY PURE BUCK PEPPERTO* 19* 9*
PANTRY PRIDE SHORTBfING <* 69* 79* 10*
FROZEN FRENCH FRIES >""> 10/SI.OOIO/$1.65 65*
LYKES POTTED MEAT TO* 2/29* 9*
PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN WAFHF >.*. ]O/SI.OO IO/51.45 45*
PANTRY PRBE COFFff LYKES BEEF STEW 3/51.00 3/51.17 17*
BUMBLE BEE RED SALMON 99* $1.09 10*
PANTRY PRIDE CATSUP *>" 4/51.00 $4/1.16 16*
CARNATION INSTANT BREAKFAST £?& 69* 79* 10*
LONG GRAIN RICE ommmui.(wim 39* 43* 4*

[ mypmow price r]
| RICH'S
1 & SERVE frozen I
[TOPPING I
OQc I
PINTS V

COMPARE!. ISrSff
MIRACLE WHIP *auoomiii* l 4m 594 67* 8*
''W' SPRAY CLEANER 77* 79* 2*
YUBAN COFFEE 1 394 93* 4*
PANTRY PRIDE WAFFLE SYRUP *.*. 39* 65* 2 6*
FROZEN SLICED STRAWBERRIES 4/SI.OO 4/$1.20 20*
VANILLA WAFERS 11 *< ohm uc 4/SI.OO 4/$1.32 32*
STOKELY TOMATO SAUCE "* ']]* 14* 3*
MAXWELL HOUSE COFFEE oao 69* 77* 8*
PANTRY PRIDE TEA BAGS*cr. 68* 79* 11*
PANTRY PRIDE BLEACH * 39* 45* 6*

EYPAY LOW PRICE!
VAN CAMP'S tt*
OR LYKIS W
VIENNA
AUSAGE
e/$i
- Ml /
w J

[ EVERYDAY LOW PRICE?"]
GRAPEFRUIT I
I JUICE I
[ 29-J

I ivimoat tow mcf'|
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FROZEN SLICED 1
I STRAW- I
I BERRIES I
[ 4- $ l J



I
lv yM ImiJb n fl|AI
ONUS BUYS GOOD THU WEDNESDAY, MAY 21st MMOTT BM USftVEB

| BONUS BUY}
T CROSS RIB OR fcll
I CALIFORNIA I
ROAST I
78 ( I

f bbI VBD CHUCK 1 /SLICED 1/4 PORK)
ifoV.sK. ROASTs lOIM *"**
* 1 (^vSLli(il4tsy (^

[ BONUS BUY!
I COTTAGE I
I CHEESE I
[ g 29< J

mm-W*. m. M our every prob- save
COMPARE!
Turkey Drumsticks jew* 29c 39 0 <
Fryer Breasts w ."' 49c 6< 20*
Breaded Fish Sticks tsw 89c ~,9 so*
Shrimp $1.49 i. so*
Fish Fillets S!r 89c i w 20*
Sliced Bacon FYNE TASK U. BOX 59c 69* 10*
Grown Liverwurst <*" 29 39* io<
Sliced Ham .r?.a 59c 49* ro*
Skinless Franks irzr 39 m io<
Pork Sausage *str 39c 4 * 10*

[ EVERYDAY tow PB/CF
J BREADED HEAT'N EAT I
I FISH I
STICKS I
I 89
- H OUR EVERY pROB-. S *£ E
COMPARE!
TWIN PET CAT FOOD ,AU 3/29* o/fnn 3k
CUT GREEN BEANS W g 31*
WHITE POTATOES /$ -JO 8/. 6 6*
CHARCOAL LIGHTER FLUID 3/SI.OO 3/J1.17 Vi
PANTRY PRIDE PEANUT BUTTER"-'** 48< 65# 17#
KB) BIRO VIENNA SAUSAGE 4,fcCAN 10/SI.OOIO/$1.25 25#
KRAFT MAYONNAISE"" s <
PACKER LABEL SALTINES * f* W
POTATO STICKS 3/Sl'OO 3/SLI7 Vi
WHU RATION DOG FOOD 6/si.oo o/s,wd. 5#

[ tow price
I CHUCKI
I STEAK I
I
M3O iPw iB I

B^TTmvmoM
H FROZEN I
:ean I
IRIMP I
$149 I
| f|

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE!']
UVER
[ 39" J

I BONUS BUY! 1
F" r, T\ I
CHOICI UMI HOU Nl !ILANS I
I SHOULDER I
I LAMB ROAST I
39 I
I fl
[ lAwn chj*'- M

[eVER/PAT LOW PRICE
W FYNE-TASTE
I SLICED I
BACON I
[ * 59" J

COMPARE!
Fyne Spred Soft Oleo ";tv* 33c 45* m
Cream Cheese 29c 39* 10*
Hygrade Cheese Loaf > 59c at to*
Solid Oleo PANIY mum ib. ms. 2/29c 35* 6*
Sliced American Cheese u.m. 69c 79* 10*
Sliced Bologna All Mmt LB. PKG. 49? 59c 10,
Lamb Roast 49 * **
Pork Chops FIRST CUT ms PERU. 49c 69* 20*
Western Spareribs '"W 1 49* * *
Pork Loin Chops *£'s' 68c 79* n*

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE f]
I w !\ wrapped
CARROTS I
[ PKG IQ ]

COMPARE! 7i'§-T
DEL MONTE CUT GREEN BEANS4/ST.OO 4/SU6 16*
FISH STICKS n. PKG. BOSTON BONNK MOL 3/SI.OQ 3/$1.17 17*
CHOC CHIP COOKIES 4/SI.OO 4/$1;32 32*
TUNA FISH <.-* 5/JI.OO 5/$135 35*
CUT GREEN BEANS 2t*x.YM UNO COU 25* 33* 8*
DEL MONTE GARDEN' PEAS - 4/JI.OO 4/SI.OB 16*
FYNE TASTE STRAWBERRY PRES.-> 58* 67* 11*
RICH'S FROZEN COFFEE RICH 4/fI.OO 4/51.16 16*
FROZEN BAGELS- r 4/SI.OO 4/$1.56. 56*
GEORGIA PEACHES MM 475!.00 4/SL24 24*

( 1
GAINESVILLES
LOWEST
IfjjgfflgU PRICES!
I nr NORTH Maw AT TNI
CORNER OF 10H> ITMIt

| BONUS BUY!
BRAND <9 l
! PURE PORK I
SAUSAGE j
[ p 77< J

t fVPRy'PAy' LOW PRICE
I
I FRYER
COMHiN p \C W \C? Jj
I 59* j
I DRUMSTICKS THIGHS 9
L & BREASTS WITH RIBS^^R

C/jMgi U.S. NO. 1 FANCY SWEET |
M s CORN
oPlfl fwiriff] I
luiniMj ]
SAVI44. LB FKO.AU MIAT
HORMEL FRANKS A... 65*
SAVi 144.L8 FKOOBos SMOKIBB 790
OSCAR MAYER BACON.

| EVFRKD/W tOW PRICE!']
f -"
I GREEN I
[ CABBAGE I
[ 6 J

fAHcy 60tD | M mp|"^
4BANANAS
hV\ M I

Thursday, May 15,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

E BONUS BUY! "|
SMOKED I
SAUSAGE I
Puei POOP M
?ILI

| bonus mi 1
j
I 4^ cntlHOlLl I
I jf/ SUCfO iIJKKEY I
I wjftl ANU Ijri.iVt Ok I
H tS&r Xf CARPS'.'.; pm-
1 1.29 J

gi 7y tow PRICE 7I
'FRESHW I
3RIDA j
pefrujtJ
ANGES I
45]

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 15,1969

S ktftts } m^'m^ o '^ m^o^
,^'_-^ I \ ImT. J>;

Elsewhere in the nation, when a new crop comes in from Florida, its news.
But something good from Florida's lush truck gardens is always to be found
down produce lane, at Publix. So we don't make a big thing of it.
What we do make a big thing of is getting the best of the best.
Thats why we keep our produce buyers down on the farm out in the groves
right in the fields, close to the good earth. They buy the cream of the crop,
at the moment of flavor perfection . and see that these prizes are
rushed to Publix while they're dewy fresh and delicious.
Its one reason why we and you are lucky to be in Florida!
Sdrnm (dfircducp

U.S. No. 1 Russet Baking
Potatoes. 10 79 c
Juicy Fresh Florida
Grapefruit 8 £ 49 c
While they last! Sweet Juicy
D'Anjou
Pears 6 69*
Warm Weather Refresher, Sun-Kist Big
Lemons .. 39*

Keebler Tasty
Cinnamon Crisps 'V4l
Heinz Kosher P 9
Dill Pickles "r. r, 49 c
Heinz Hot Dog or Sweet or
Hamburger Relish .... 4 n £ r 0 $ 1
Heinz Regular or Smoked
Bar-B-Q Sauce !LV39 C
Heniz Rich, Thick
Tomato Ketchup 2 b 4 .,V 49 c
Cool Refreshing Nestea
Instant Tea .V 99 c
10<-oH deal, Ilactric DUhweiher Detergent
Cascade # ,£ 69 c

Sealtest Assorted Flavors (limit 2 please)
Ice Cream 79
Lady Betty Healthful
Prune Juice s£ 39*
Dole Hawaiian
Pineapple Juice .. 3r $ l
TAP Bartlett
Pear Halves # r 39*
TAP Flavorful Fruit
Cocktail 5-. Is l
Aqua Liquid Detergent,
Texize r 39*
Party Perfect, Heim
Pork & Beans 8-- $1
The All-Purpose Oil, (Limit 1 please)
Wesson Oil r 39*
Plain or Self-Rmng Fleur (Limit 1 please)
Gold Medal C 49*
ln Pop-Top Cans,
Old Milwaukee . 89*



iff ', Premium Braunichwoigor r Swift'i Premium Brown Sugar-Cured
sandwich Spread .. .-535' Sliced Bacon * 69 e
Ham, "or Turkey ... * 35' -*. ll DOll't forget, redeem
, 0c Braunscnweiaer ...,. 49 c ] pnMiv
Pork Sausage .... pk S 59 Swift'* Premium Tru-Tender Sliced JfOlMf I
raid Currrr.. ;c49* Beef Liver *. 69* ft coupon #* H
(Pickle Pimento, Olive Pimento, Boot Bologna) Tarnow'f Zosty Flavored (from f u ||. CO lor folder)
Red Grouper' .75' Smoked Sausage 79* 1: awe*mtti HH
Sealood frvotl - Orange-Band Ml FREE MASTERPIECE iHS
Deli Rath's Honey-Cured Boneless 3 to 5 lb. avg.) | | ARKETS PI
Plus 100 Extra S&H Green Stamps with coupon jaw ill 1
p EXT
'4HHS> Cl: 4 '.-e^' yJttb Hunt's Solid Pock or Italian TXTRA
Tomatoes 3- 89- [FiTjb^GreenStampsM
r .--> rrc:en 'feed Wpecuih Rath's Honey Cured Boneless |
IS, v>r. .Xlw. TF ckick.i ci,o.M,i. I <3 to 5 ib. average) I
I* I.* 1 .* Chur King Dinners .. p£ 49 c Fully-cooked Ham |
Pot Pies 5 pV, 1 ,. J i | 33. (Expires Wed., May 21, 1969) £
Lifts premium proten government (Chicken, Beef, Turkey, Macaroni £ Cheese,
hr : iTiniTiTiriiii ,ALI II min yk 7" ,* eg". 3iiw fAessSHrla
Butter Beans X43 C I Singleton's Family Pack
t Roast ,*.69* y?r:? bl ? s ~ 39, i. . **i
iAfcMr 1
ft s premium Boneless Imperial LeOt OpinOCh .... a- p kg, 4Y MW EXTRA
lees Roast ,8t IMnS
b a*sSr hC * AAc Fish Sticks" ;:59' 1 t -.*i''?"* r
Ibbl Roast # 1*.99 ..., 99 c 1
Cooked Shrimp .... p* 9 99 3s (E jres Wed May 21, 1969) I
*s*>-selr Btoakfi T £ IT'S //v facU
mien 9TwM I*. Aifl ....^..,.. ujl^GreenStampsPO
ihort Ribs .. .*.69* .... i assays 1
Witts Premium Tender-Grown Govt Inspected Margarine Wt 15* |^ lW *JdSjsLn I
ipped, D&D, Fresh Not Frozen Plant Grade m-,.i. c.m 0,.
Ikious Lean Meaty W MorgOTine pkg. 4J EXTRA
! ryer Thighs ~.59* SSP*. # HsfiS!asFE3
Pillibury Snowflake ,
IWhiteMeat (with ribs) Fryer p.- DIU t. 6 ox.QQc 5, Chicken or Beet |
- AH# Dinner Rolls zy | Rice-A-Roni |
Sreasts 59 S e55:6.....r ~,,...A" C.';,
r The Kids, Fryer vTI I Armour', Mi Wiecomin Blunt *> X
2*Q C Muenster Cheese .. !X69 C
P| g lb. w
Sharp Cheddar tk79
!auam a Jf/i]
B lligw lb. w W Terra,,o Seal.r l.r Ow
pi ti t X'B
m gainesvilleshopping center westgate shopping center Where shopping
?014 N. Main Street . Avenue a 34th Stre is a pleasure
2830N.W. 13thStioot Stores hours: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9*7 Sat.

Thursday, May 15, 1989, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 13



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE |
For sale: Bx3l trailer and Bxl
cabana air conditioned. Next to
campus in Glynwood Park. Good
condition, 1495. Call 372-2673.
(A-5M34P)
Yammaha 350 Ex. condition.
Crash helmets incl. owner in service.
Low mileage. Call 372-0148 after
4p.m. (A-st-133-p)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
65 Honda S9O recently overhauled.
Tools included, $l6O. Call Kathie
anytime 392-9796. (A-3M35-P)
REMINGTON STANDARD
TYPEWRITER: NEARLY NEW.
BEST OFFER.' Call 378-4994.
(A-3M35-P)
SURFBOARD HANSEN 50-50
Model, very good condition 9 6.
Good stable riding, can be seen at my
apt, call 372-5007 after 6.
(A-5M35-P)
GUNS GUNS GUNS. Inventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading corruonents.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-18M36-C)
For Sale 1964 Monza Corvair. New
tires, 1 owner. Tele. 378-3847.
(A-5M36-P)
Used U-haul type closed trailerfor
sale. 6x, sllO. Call Ed 378-1978
evenings. (A-st-136-P)
GARAGE SALE prints, furniture,
dishes, hi-fi, antiques. Sat-May 17.
1731 NW 55th Terr. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
or call 378-2741. (A-3M36-P)
Won a S7O Certificate towards the
purchase of a new sewing machine at
National willing to bargain or
trade Call Jeff, 376-9440.
(A-2M37-P)
Bell tape deck use with any amp.
Now $250, now SBO. 378-2719,
Steve. (A-5M37-P)
GIRLS Columbia 3-speed bicycle,
one year old. $40.00. Call 392-7489.
(A-2M37-P)
SUPER DEAL 66 Honda S-90
Engine just reworked mechanically
sound. sllO. Helmet included. Call
372-9363. Ask for Ray or Tim.
(A-3M37-P)
Honda 150. Excellent condition,
parts and accessories. No helmet. Call
378-7255, home at 8 a.m. $250 cash.
(A-2M37-P)
Flying squirrels, 6.50. Baby boas,
6.00. The Underground Zoo is a
bizarre pet bazaar. Phone 378-8810
for the animal of your choice.
(A-lt-137-P)
Mens English bicycle $25; Two
headed goose neck study lamp $10;
portable stereo, record player &
clock radio in need of repair best
offer; hanging lamp $10; 9x12 gold
carpet S2O. 376-2308. (A-3t-136-P)
SONY TC-355 stereo reel to reel tape
deck with 3 heads, 3 speeds, instant
stop-start, sound on sound and more.
Perfect shape, only 5 months old,
still under warranty. Can be used for
sound effects. Bob, 378-0879, $155.
(A-3M36-P)
HONDA 50cc includes tool kit,
helmet, face mask, Operators
Manual. SSO. Call 378-7729 after
4:00 p.m. (A-5M36-P)
Large frost-free Wizzard refrigerator.
Cools well. Body fair. 4 years old,
S6O. 378-3940, 319 SE 26 Terr, after
six. (A-3M36-P)
1964 Pontiac Catalina 2 door sedan.
Excellent cond. New brakes, tune up
hoses, etc., Delco air shocks rear.
Must sell $695. 376-0229.
(A-3t-136-P)
SHOWTIME
****' I
(SUB *h ft-. .** sy
I PLUS THE AIL TIME GREAT I
'THUNDER ROAD
STAWNOtOIMyjjTCHOj^J

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 15,1969

Page 14

&WWSW 80989 BIWIQB'B
2 br; IV2 bath Williamsburg
townhouse apt; dishwasher; central
air; off pool; nice view; Available
June 15. Call 378-8638 after 5 p.m.
(A-st-135-P)
Best Deal In Town! Sublet this
summer 2 bdr. cent, ac; wall to wall,
furnished brand new, apt. Everything
you could want, only $125/mo.
378-8777. (B-2M34-P)
Lankmark poolside apt. 3 girls to
sublease summer quarter. Good
condition, choice location. Avoid the
rush. Come by No. 37. (B-5M34-P)
Apartment, 1 bedroom, air cond.,
washer; near campus. $265 for
summer. 372-1036. (B-2M36-P)
Summer sublet 1 bedroom furn. A/C
apt. at Williamsburg 5 min. from
campus behind VA Hospital, sllO
mo. From 15 June 392-0140 days,
376-5091 nts. (B-5M35-P)
Available for summer qtr trailer, 3
br, IV2 bath, washer, air cond.
completely furnished, sllO monthly,
plus utilities. Call Hugh, 378-3301.
(B-st-135-P)
Sublease quiet, comfortable Village
34 apt. AC & private patio, $lO5/mo.
Last mo. rent paid. Call Pete evenings
372-3991. (B-5M35-P)
Will give 20% discount on security
deposit on single apt at University
Gardens starting June. 12 month
lease. Call Bobbie 376-5542 after
4:00 p.m. (B-5M35-P)
Apt. 1 bedroom, A/C, 1 block from
Tigert Hall, SBS/month for summer,
furnished. Can have for fall too,
378-6054. Call after 4:00 for best
results. (B-5M35-P)
Williamsburgh Poolside Apt. For 3 or
4 to sublet starting June 15. June
rent paid. Spacious 2 bedrm, 2 bath,
AC, SSO per mo. 376-0362.
(Bost-134-P)
LIVE AT LANDMARK APTS.
During summer. Corner apt., pool,
health club. Apt 129. Call 376-0374.
(Bo3t-136-P)
FOR RENT Comfortable 1 bedroom
apt. 2 blocks from campus, two car
garage. Rent reduced from 100 to
SBO for summer. 867-4182 aft. 8
p.m. (B-5M36-P)
Sublet 2 bedrm. 1 ownhouse
Landmark II Apt. You cant afford
not to callgreat deal! After 5:00
any day 378-8066. (B-st-136-P)
50 trailer with 40' closed-in cabana 2
bedroom, AC, pool, tennis arts, VB
CT etc., 4 minutes from campus
SBS/month avail, for sum. qrt. Call
378-0748 nite. Also looking for
roommate when I return for fall.
(B-6t-133-p)
Four bedroom-two bath house,
air-conditioned, one block from
Tigert. For rent for summer quarter
200 a month. Call 378-5914.
(B-st-134-P)
Artists modern studio apartment
located, in Center of Modern Art,
Micanopy. Available June 7th at
$75.00 per month. Call 372-4979.
(B-st-137-P)
Lankmark Apt for summer quarter 2
bedroom, IV2 bath^ quiet place in rear
of Phase 2 will take Best offer. Call
378-8330. (B-5M37-P)

LHIHII'I'I TW BOX OFFICE OPENS 8:00
SHOW STARTS 8:30
_ FEATURING TWO FIRST
thrillers
T^ga-r/ja
AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL < 9§&l!!l
JEREMY SLATE ADAM ROARKE JOCELYN LANE
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'XNSSWNXWx-x-x-x-x.v.svwxtt-x-x.ssS]!
FOR RENT
Want to sublet 2 br poolside apt. for
summer quarter. Tanglewood Manor.
Ph. 372-8041. (B-5M37-P)
Camelot. Need 1-2 or 3 coeds for
summer quarter. Large 2 bed/2bath
deluxe upstairs on pool will adjust
rent with you. Call Mary 378-8458.
(B-4M37-P)
Sublease for summer quarter. Two
bdrm, IV2 bath, central air, free TV,
disposal, dishwasher, pool, special
rates to be arranged call 378-8036.
(B-5M37-P)
1 or 2 girls at Tanglewood Manor for
Sept. Beautifully furnished,
dishwasher, disposal, IV2 baths, good
location. Call Leah 372-4032.
(B-5M37-P)
Fantastic floorspace. Room for 3
people Artist studio and apt. 1636 W.
University Ave. Summer only. Great
location. Call 378-3413. (B-2M37-P)
S3OO to sublet 3 bdrm house from 19
June to 27 Aug. AC appliances,, Irg
fed yrd. Tel 378-0329 evening.
(B-st-137-P)
To sublet for summer: Central air
carpeted furnished 2 br. One block
from campus. Call 376-9782 or see
Olympia Apts. 107. $l3B month.
(B-3M37-P)
Beautiful one bedroom, furnished, air
cond., pool close to school, $175 for
June 15 to Sept 1. 378-9653.
(B-4M37-P)
1
£x....;.:a 1 wwww motbw c
Stamp out mediocrity! One male
roommate for the summer and next
year. Ranch house with pool and
fireplace. Call 378-4877 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M35-P)
2 coed roommates summer qtr,
Landmark Townhouse; poolside,
dishwasher, TV, disposal, IV2 baths,
air cond, barbq, $46/mo. Call
392-8487 or 392-8496. (C-3M35-P)
Such a Deal! S9O each for summer
qtr. Need 3 male roommates or
sublease apt. 2 bedroom, fireplace,
AC, cable TV, dishwasher, disposel, 2
pools, gym, sauna bath, laundry
room, many extras. No. 9 Landmark
378-9844 anytime. (C-st-133-p)
Two roommates wanted for 2
bedroom French Quarter apt.
Immediate occupancy or summer
quarter. Call 376-0613 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-133-p)
COED roommates for summer.
Village Park poolside 2 bedroom apt.
MONETARY CONCESSIONS. Call
378-7272 or come to VP 56.
(C-st-133-p)
TT JOYCES
to all under 18 years of age.
CUTE 2:20 4:35

WANTED |
Syj^^www-ww'K^xW'yftW'W'iww
Coed roommate for large one
bedroom apt at Williamsburg,
immediate or summer occupancy.
Call 378-0684 after 6 p.m. Great
view and sunsets!! (C-3t-136-P)
Ride wanted to Advanced Army
Summer Camp from Miami. Will split
expense equally, contact Steve at
372-9435, Rm. 471, call after 7 p.m.
(C-2M36-P)
Male roommate 60.00 per month Air
conditioning 1105 NW 4th Ave. no
utilities. Private bedroom 376-5381.
ext. 308. (C-st-133-p)
Male roommate wanted. S9O. Pays
for entire summer quarter. 3 blocks
from campus. Air-conditioned. Call
392-7636 for more information.
(C-2t-136-P)j
Wanted 1 male roommate for
summer qtr. Landmark apts. No. 25.
378-8438. (C-3M36-P)
Wanted: Female roommate for
summer quarter. 2 bedroom Camelot
Apt. on pool. You can move in
immediately. Apt 256. Call 378-9694
after 5:00. (C-5M34-P)
Need one male roommate for 4 man
apartment summer quarter. Call
Terry, 84 Landmark, 378-0674.
(C-5M34-P)
1 fern for a bdrm. Landmark apt.
148. SIOO + utilities for sum qtr. Call
378-8731 after 5:00 AC, 2 pools,
gym, cable TV, dishwasher.
(C-5M37-P)
Will interview interested part-time
typists. By appointment only
376-7160. (C-2M37-P)
Serious female roommate to share
furn. 2 bdrm. Own bdrm privacy rent
SSO. after 3:00 378-9979.
(C-5M37-P)

LIMITED ENGAGEMENT i
FENDS TONIGHT
Performances at 1:00 3:12 5:24 736 9:48
...For the first time, motion picture cameras
have been permitted to roam the magnificent chambers of
Englands royal and historic palaces and of such treasuries of
the national heritage as the Tower of London.
|l|Rlaces
In I
"I# nil in gggg jjp
, THIS ENGAGEMENT ONLY-ALL SEATS $2.00,
hqQXW Im
mi
| 171 KM IT J
A RARE BLEND OF PICTURE!
COLUMBIA IMCTIJKKS Ii. sinls A WINDWARD PRODUCTION l Mu \
os, DAVID NIVEN TOPOL
FF ANNA KARINA JOHN HURTjS> Jj
K r\ %/htfer
COLUMBIACOLOR [(wL
IWlFai^^GEtnwes |ii. .
PARAMOUNT PICTURES PRESENTS
JULES dassinlJu ilSol,
ira LTm j
Suwtsito tdf MATURt audunoTl Hflfli I KJaIU
(pafenui discretion ativneO I | WtCI T.V. j I
SUMMER MOVIE CLUB TICKETS ON SALE NOW
12 SHOWS $1.50

THIS SUMMER: Your own bedroom
with double bed in huge, modern,
air-cond duplex cable
TV QUIET shady, yard pets
OK near Mall ssO/month.
372-6598. (C-3M37-P)
WANTED: Honor court clerk: Must
be available at least 30 min. a day
Mon thru Thur. afternoon. If
interested please apply Rm 364,
Reitz Union. (C-3M37-C)
Wanted 3 coed roommates for fall.
Apartment undecided. Call 392-8611
afternoons or evenings. (C-lt-137-P)
2 roommates needed for summer S9O
for full quarter plus utilities.
Landmark. Call 378-8518 anytime.
(C-5M37-P)
One male for summer quarter. Air
conditioned, garage apartment, SSO
month. One & Vz block from campus.
915A SW 6th Ave. Come evenings.
(C-lt-137-P)
Male roommates for two bedroom
Summit House apt. Air cond, pool,
cable. $41.75 plus V util. Cali
372-2607 after 5 p.m. (C-3M37-P)
Roommates, 1 or 2, to share sharp
French Quarter Apt. Summer qtr.
Live in luxury this summer. Call Don
or Paul 376-3947 or come by Apt.
24. (C-3M36-P)
3 male roommates wanted for
summer. Air cond., pool, w-w carpet,
2 br. $41.25 per month. June rent
free. Call 376-6087 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M34-P)
| HELP WANTED
Secretary wanted: must be proficient
in shorthand and typing, will train in
legal office. Call Mr. Roscow,
3/6-5242. (E-5M36-P)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I HELP WANTED |
:>::a *
Male: Have three part-time openings
for evening cashier. Also two
openings at 11-2 daytime. Apply
King's Food Host, 1430 SW 13 St.
, E -ts-133-C)

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY!
4 private bedroom hr I
££ / block behind norman
jk / a--
Clife
II II APARTMENTS, I
914SW8IHAVE I
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT-CALt 372-26621
|> Reeking Chair /Twiw\J *'
THE SEA GULL IS A BEAUTIFUL
AND MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE!
It is a play of unrequited loves, each loving the one
who loves still another, but it is much more, too,
very Chekhovian in its presentation and analysis of
character. In its quarrels and reconciliations, its
philosophies and generation gaps it speaks very
directly to us across the years and the nations!
New York Post
HBl y HH
Warner Bros -Seven Arts Presents
James Mason Vanessa Redgrave Simone Signoret David Warner
in Sidney Lumets Production of Chekhovs
Technicolor {§ SUGGESTED for general AUDIENCES <3Sr|/(|^
| Mocking CMr I
wcfcisiii i ll fIOEBBSSHI
MO I N. W. UH S. V /ll
HiMT EASTWOOD iS BACK
i AND BURNING AT BOTH ENDS i
Prints by TECHNICOLOR E J
These are the two original
Man With No Name" classics J
screen was
smoking.
N. Y. Daily Column
J

P Roekii

Thursday, May 15, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

ftNNNv.v;NS?x > xo: i x*x*x*xxxx-:.>:.%ssxx£
HELP WANTED
*** *
******* *"***'***'*'*****'***'*'** *-**'-'-'-'-*''"*!*v yv i i i iJ'!
Adult carriers needed for
afternoon morning newspaper
routes in Gainesville area. Must be
bondable. Call 378-1416.
fE-st-l 37-PI

Page 15

HELP WANTED ;i
j£'ww*x*x.x.x:*%vxxx-xxw-x*x*x:"
Several attractive girls to work
promotions. Next promotion
5/21-5/24. Rate $2.00 per hour. Can
split 9-6 with another girl if
necessary. Pormotions will run every
other week until Sept. All
promotions Wed. through Sat. Can
work daily or alt 4 days. For
interview, call Humble Oil & Refining
Co. 3 72-0218, Mrs. Davis.
(E-3M35-P) __
MALE COUNSELORS NEEDED: At
Camp Mountain Lake for boys and
girls. For information call 378-0285
evenings. (E-3t-136-P)
| AUTOS
We buy & sell u an used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen Dealer, 4222 N.WML3th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-130-ts-c)
1964 Pontiac Lemans, 2 dr.
automatic, V-8, radio, good
condition. S9OO or best offer. Call
Elaine 392-3569 or 378-4179.
(G-5M34-P)
'6O VW camper rebuilt eng. new
paint and interior, radio, heater, large
water tank with elec, pump, ice box
and camping stove. Call 392-9367.
(G-3M36-P)
66 Chevy impala, clean, A.T.; R.H.,
327 engine, new tires, new brakes.
SISOO or best offer. Ben Poole,
376-3468. (G-5M34-P)
PONTIAC Tempest, 1966 custom
sport coupe, 326 with Hurst 4-speed.
Excellent condition, must sell by end
of month. Make an offer, 372-5688.
(G-st-134-P)
1965 Sunbeam real clean good tires.
Real good shape mechanically and
low mileage. Call evenings 372-7971
up to 11:30 p.m. (G-st-133-p)
BMWI6OO, 1967. White and black.
One owner, driven 16000 miles.
Extras including radial tires. Best
offer over SI6OO. Call 376-9647.
(G-2M37-P)
Corvette Healey O time engine B.W.
4-speed, 3/4 cam, new rear tires,
crome roll bar, A.F.B. Bluestreaks
on front Call 378-3413 on 5/19/69.
(G-2t-137-P)
Sunbeam Alpine 1964, good
condition, British sports car. Fun to
drive, economic transportation $620.
Call George Agraz, 392-0929 or
376-1453. (G-4M35-P)
1961 Lincoln Continental.
Merchanically good. Clean. Must sell
S6OO or best offer. Call after 4 p.m.
leave message If not In. Pete
Connelly, 376-9271. (G-3t-137-P)
1961 Chevy stationwagon standard
transmission, $250 or best offer,
376-2308. (G-3M36-P)
*63 VW Microbus, excellent
conditon, new paint, 2 new tires,
$895, 378-4260 or 376-7812.
(G-st-133-p)
Corvair 1964, 2 dr. safety checked,
$350 or best offer. Call 378-1489.
(G-st-134-P)
£ ....
PERSONAL
y #|
* *
THINK MOD, HEAR EDWARD
FIELD, MCCARTY HALL,
Thursday, MAY 15, 8:00 p.m. FREE
ADMISSION A University Lecture
Series presentation. Fields poetry
has been described (by a Yugoslavian
critic, no less) as disarmingly frank
pop and sex stories. Field uses the
seemingly unpromising material of
"American popular culture horror
movies, comic stirps, newspaper
stories to create poems that are
funny, moving, and incisively
descriptive of mid-twentieth century
America. Dylan Thomas once defined
poetry (partially) as words which
make you laugh and cry Field does
both, often at the same time.
(J-lt-137-C)
Play the Trivia" game and win a
radio every day on WUWU, the
Smooth One! Dial 1390 and be a
winner! (J-lt-137-C)
Hung-up Heads: Hang on. Call
378-0148 Tues, Thurs, Sun, 7
p.m.-12. After midnight call
378-8138. (J-lt-13 7-P)
COMMERCIAL PILOT LEAVING
FOR CINCINNATI IN PRIVATE
PLANE MAY 19, RETURNING
MAY 26 CAN TAKE 2-$5 O ROUND
TRIP. CONTACT LENNY AT
376-5326. (J-3M37-P)
Cessna 150 $9 per hr. Flight
Instructor wanted, 495-2124 after 7
p.m. (J-10t-136-P)
" J
Attention Photographer needs
models. Choice of photos in
exchange for modeling. Call John
392-7500 after 4 p.m. (J-3t-136-P)

| PERSONAL
MWS!BW<<<<<*S*l< l 4 i BWS99 M 9OOR.
WMAR, Miami: Thanks, love, for a
beautiful weekend. Ill return to Jove,
laugh, and conquer soon. Until
then remember and smile. Be good
do-do. Your Southern Belle.
(J-5M34-P)
Would you like so be a member of
Maas Brothers 1969-1970 College
Board? Apply now any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15t-129-c)
Photography your bag? Enter the
Reitz Union Photo Contest. Cash
prizes offered. For rules & info, go to
Rm. 310 Reitz Union. 392-1655.
(J-5M32-P)
SERVICES |
T utoring in GERMAN by
Professional Instructor. Steamlined
Course for ETS Exam. Individual -jt
Group Sessions. 376-9674 p.m.
(M-lt-137-P)
Tennis racket restringing. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19M07-P)

announcing
An International Festival of New film
The First American Showings
Os 26 Short Films from 9 Countries
...... .... ..j .. s .*. a
/FI J : : s :... : : v :
a distinguished series of three programs presenting the new newest
est newest achievements in creative cinema by the world's most tal talented
ented talented film makers.
<' > Syyiif
... the show was extraordi extraordinary
nary extraordinary ... delightful, exhilarat exhilarating.
ing. exhilarating. deeply moving.... Con Congratulations,
gratulations, Congratulations, gratitude, huzzas,
three cheers and a tiger!
THE EVENING STAR,
Washington. D C.
Beguilingly creative ... di diverting
verting diverting bill.
THE WASHINGTON POST
-9 THREE PART SERIES SERIESSTARTS
STARTS SERIESSTARTS MAY 14 &15 I
IP \ SPECIALS 1|
IHI4 \ I Lunch and Dinner ||g§
g|| Thursday Special |||
BROILED CALVES LIVER 1
i & ONIONS 1
M FRIED SHRIMP WITH M
m FRENCH FRIES, HOT M
§§ SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES m
1 SLO9 I
I- MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I
||L OAINCSVUIiMAILIL^^^^

| SERVICES |
Disserration, thesis or publication
drawings or graphs professional
graphic artist, Nancy McClelland.
378-4260. (M-st-133-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-123-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)
LOST & FOUND f
> >.
Lost: Black 3-ring notebook in
scooter zone of school of business,
Friday. Call 372-3877 reward.
(L-3M36-P)
LOST! LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOK,
medium blue, 2 inches thick.
Important! Has all my class notes.
Please call Richard T. Speight at
372-9276. (L-st-134-P)
H iTTiH
ll Mrl dfl



Page 16

' Th Flori< a Alligator, Thursday, May 15,1969

Wfe iMmk muddmffMd^
mark K ofqullitv TU iCV' jk |f jj
GRANAPAr

I N*. 2-1/2 Can THRIFTY MAID BARTLETT
1 PEARS 3/sl.|
PINEAPPLE 4/sl.l
SAUSAGE... 5/sl. I
TUNA FISH 3/sl.|
9 No. 300 Con HUNrS TOMATO Jr?
SAUCE 5/sl.|
9 No. 303 Con THRIFTY MAID CALIFORNIA i
TOMATOES6/SIJ
I Toothpaste 25? I
fl 4-ox. Site DAN ,1 J, I
1 SPRAY DEODORANT flfP I
I 49* Si
HaSwg* J
B MORE DOLLAR SPECIALS^
9 4 - x LEN FARMS STEMS A PIECES
IMROOMS 4/SI.I
9 No. 303 Glass DEL MONTE SLICED
BEETS 4/SI.I
9 No. 303 Can THRIFTY MAID CUT 3gf'
|GR. BEANS 8/SIJ
(POTATOES 4/SI.I
| POTATOES 10/SI. |
|DOGFOODI2/SIJ

: H)b W KSa :
I COr'ON ND c<
Coffee Creamer
' I t&fjsK GOOD THRU MAY 21
TOP MALwTSTAMPS j
iTH Htwinm cotroN amo tuicmam o*
ROCKINGHAM WHOLE (
GOOD THRU MAY 21

No. 2 SAUER COCONUT
Flavoring
_ 19*
__J
s'* BLACKBURN MADE
Syrup
63*
I
Mfll iim iip'm MHMUBMMMMM

' i yy li* i - -.& *' JBR AAm

+ m m m * m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m m
EXTRA
B*l 11 M TOP VALUE STAMPS
p
THREE 46-OZ. CANS
Fruit Drinks
GOOD THRU MAY 21
with '.ivm cOuroM ano ihicm o* |
ONE GIANT BOX j
Colgate Axion ;
* GOOD THRU MAY 2 1
*T *Of IOCAI WINN Mil I I

8-oz. SWITCH
Cat Food 10 2
16-or. SUNSHINE
Hydrox Cookies . 53*
16-oz. KEEBI.ER DUTCH APPLE or
Grammy s . 49*
1 2-oz. KEEBLER BAVARIAN 6
Fudge Cookies . 49

Ife EVAP. MILK 7/$l
DETERGENT 7.7. &
BKcHfK DRINKS 15/$1
WINN-OIXIC STOREt__COPYRICHT_i969

DEEP CUT SPECIALS
4%-oz. BEECHNUT STRAINED
Baby Food 9*
4%-oz. GERBER STRAINED
Baby Food 10*
THRIFTY MAID LONG GRAIN EXTRA
Fancy Rice 3 39*
16-oz. DEEP SOUTH RASPBERRY OR
Apple Jelly 4/sl.
16 oz. DEEP SOUTH BLACKBERRY OR
Cherry Jelly 4/sl.

Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Wed, noon thru Wed. noon May 15-21
pAN^^UNSHINET!ISS3SiSSr^
mBbiRK Ihs
Ua I WITH IMS on MOM LB. i
EXCLUDING CIGARETTES. J
9L Wr
I 'rif 8-oz. KELLOGGS
.Jo, Corn Flakes 15'
fe AST R mit 1 W th ss or more P urc hse excluding cigarettes
Ay Cooking 01L...... 39'
I
Mayonnaise 39'

100 FREE STAMPS w/coupon
1-Lb. GOOD LUCK (Qlrs.)
margarine
4/$l
11 111 T E |i
IUJI TOP VALUE STAMPS ;
FU R 1-LG. PROS
GOOD THRO MAY 21
- -- --- i .".. itr.'.T.". L

BAKERY SPECIALS
GOOD BIG CREMES 39* BUNS... 3/89*
BREAD...2/49* BUNS.... 3/89*
ROILS... 2/39* BUNS... 3/89*

8-oz. DOGS LOVE'EM
Dog Yummies . 29*
s'/2-oz. HUNTS
Tomato Juice . 3/29*
lO/a-oz. HUNTS
Tomato Puree . 2/39*
6-oz. HUNTS
ornate Paste ~ 2/37*

MONEY SAVINGS VALUES
250 CT. ASSORTED
Arrow Napkins 29*
18-INCH ARROW HEAVY DUTY
Aluminum Foil. 49*
BRIQUETTES
Charcoal 20 89*
48-0. ASTOR
Tea Bags 39*
20-Pk. WRIGLEYS DOUBLEMENT OR
Spearmint Gum 69*

32-oz. HEINZ
Cider Vinegar . 39*
20-oz. 41c . 26-oz.
Heinz Ketchup ... 470
12-oz. HEINZ
Chili Sauce ..... 39<*
N.O Can HENNV P£n
Doa Fooci z/oOct



GRANADA
I) with
T p "' $3 purchase
E* c h weel< a piece * distinctive Granada dinnerware
vfSBWIr Tjjjfe r Jf will be featured for just 29(. For each $3 in grocer)
r_lf'' purchases, you are entitled to one piece at this low
- price. There's no limit . with a $6 purchase you can
'-3kj v?' 'WF*'- ~ B*t P' eces and so on.
*Eieludinf: tobacco, liquor and liquid dairy products.

SUNNYLAND
TENDER FULL SHANK HALF or WHOLE j
SmoVed Hstjjr ra
U.S.D.A. CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED &
E-Z Carve Rift AA I "= I
roast 99* ;
808 WHITE SLICED USDA CHOICE W:) BRAND CORN TED BONELESS STEAK.
ID ht AMI Top Sirloin T
|DAWII| Shoulder Steak 98
|4D $1g29 1 Delmonico Steak l
I A cko I I Short Ribs 59
Stew 39' Chuck T 9
Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon May 15-21
WINN-DIXIE STORES, INC COPYRIGHTI 969
g-CORH 10 59
MORE HARVEST FRESH PRODUCE

LARGE FRESH HEADS
Cabbage 2 39*
WASH. STATE EXTRA FANCY WINESAP
Apples... 4 69*
Cello Bag YOUNG TENDER
Carrots 2 25*

PERCH
V A F '7ci CREAM FISH I
I MILK PIES Sl [ E^ S I

HUNTS 8-oz. w/Onions 2/33c . 0/0 Of7
Tomato Sauce
8-oz. VAN CAMP # 07f/
Beanie Weenie .
PHASE 111 Regular Size 2/39c . Both Size
Pink Soap .... 2/49*
Regular Size 3/45c Bath Size / A O H
Lifebouy Soap . 2/43*

Wed. Noon ThruWelNooi^^i

US No I REGULAR (20-lb. bag.. 990
Potatoes 10 59*
SUNKIST JUICY |
Lemons 11/49*
FRESH JUICY STRAW
berries 2 79*

ASSORTED Regular Size 3/37c . Both Size _
Lux Soap .... 2/35*
DOVE 12-oz. 35c . 22-oz. 63c . 32-oz.
Liquid Detergent . 852
LUX 12-oz. 35c 22-oz. 63c . King Size
Liquid Detergent . 852
Pints 45c . Half Gallon e- 57
Wisk Cleaner ... .1

I This schedule
I during the next 15 weeks I
| f FIRST Z ~ f
li_ W£EK DINNER PUT E 20c I
I ws DESSERT DISH '£ j 29c' w 9 B ' I
V w** | If
wttK COFFEE CUP *?-: 9flr I
I *' v S3 purchase* j I
1 fourth
I ** SAUCE *'v 20c i I
r -- 53 purchase* |§
I wkk Bread* Butter .. I
J PLATE & 29C si. I
I T l! e Jb V i em *'wiiTbr*old at these ~ I
I prices only in the weeks thoy are featured. I
' ; ur end liquid da.ry products

U.S. No. 1 YELLOW
0ni0n5...3 39*
I Lb. BASKET SALAD SIZE
Tomatoes.... 29*
CHERRY RED
Rhubarb 2 39*

BTcTp VAIt^STAMM
TWO PKGS.
RICH'S CHOCOLATE
GOOD THRU MAY 2 1
VALIS"STAMM
5-PK. PKG W D
CHOPPED BEEF
Steakettes
GOOD THRU MAY 2 1

Large 41c . Giant Size
Breeze Detergent . 91*
3-Lb. FLUFFY
All Detergent .... 87*
ADVANCED 3-lb. 77c . 10-lb.
All Detergent .... 2
Giant COLD WATER
All Detergent .... 87*

Thuraday. May 16.19 M, Tka Florida AWpinr.

Meat Department Specials I
M ARMOUR MIRA CURE ___ H
I SLICED BACON 73* I
Wk 1-Lb. OSCAR MAYER All Riff FRANKS or 12-ox. K
| SMOKIE LINKS 79*1
I SAUSAGE 79* I
IBRAUNSCH WEIGER.... 49* I
I 6-0%. SUNN YLAND Vac Pk. Spited Lunch Meat, Salami or
HAM & CHEESE 45*
I SLICED BOLOGNA 53* I
Wk FRESH BONELESS BOSTON BUTT H
PORK ROAST >69*l
PORK STEAK 69*1
9 GRADE A QUICK FROZEN TURKEY QUARTERS
turkey LEGS >29*l
19 TASTE O SEA BONELESS PERCH K
fish FILLETS 39*|
fish STICKS 99*
Sf Savings in Our B
B Dairy Case B
S 12-ox. BORDEN S SLICED SINGLY WRAPPED AMERICAN
I CHEESE FOOD 69*1
|H 10-0. MERICO BUTTER-ME-NOT t \w'-
can BISCUITS 2/37*
SUB Five 2-ox. KRAFTS Variety Pack, Sharp or Extra Sharp Sp
CHEESE STICK .83*
CHEDDAR CHEESE.... 83*
19 1-Lb. MRS. FILBERT'S Soft Golden or SoH Whipped" Ilf
MARGARINE 2/79*1
-lb. MAZOLA Diet" __x H§
MARGARINE 43*
1 I Frozen Food Values I
6-ox. FROZEN LIBBY S§
ORANGE JUICE 5/sl.|
PIE SHELLS 85* I
M OCOMA CHICKEN, BEEF OR TURKEY
meat DINNERS 39*1
H 6-ox. Cans ASTOR PURE CONCORD gi
GRAPE JUICE 6/sl.|
19 MRS. SMITH'S APPLE, LEMON MERINGUE OR m
COCONUT PIE 2/sl.l
89 2-1/2-lb. Bag SLIM JIM SHOESTRING FRENCH MB
FRY POTATOES 2/sl.|
PERCH DINNERS....3/$lI
I BREAD DOUGH 2/sl.|
meat ITEMS 4/sl.|
COFFEE RICH 4/sl.|
k I Poly Bag DIXIANA GREEN PEAS, CUT CORN OR |
| GREEN BEANS 2/sl.f

BSSHRSmm
ONE HALF OR WHOLE
SUNNYLAND TENDER
Smoked Ham
GOOD THRU MAY 2 1
wauT STAMPS
TWO PKGS OF 8
Eggo Waffles
GOOD THRU MAY 2 1


mm
VgOD

BkTp PS
5-LB PKG W D BRAND
Ground Beef
GOOD THRU MAY 21
fToi VAIM" SJAMPS
whcSl c or cut up
Fresh Fryers
GOOD THRU MAY 21

Page 17

50's SWEET N LOW
Sweetner
49*
No. 5 SAUER BUTTER
Flavoring
29*



Page 18

i The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 15, 1969

New Dion Sings
Blues For UF Rat
Dion, of Abraham, Martin and John fame will be at the
Rathskeller on May 23 and 24. Advance tickets will go on sale Friday,
16 at the Rathskeller and other locations to be announced. All tickets
will be $ 1.50 per person.
To make sure everybody has a chance to see one of the hottest
talents in the music field today the Rathskeller announced that Dion
would give six shows on Friday and Saturday nights. The shows will
start at approximately 8:30,10:30, and 12:20 each night. Tickets will
be sold individually for each separate performance. There will be a
new audience for every performance.
Dions record of Abraham, Martin and John has sold over one
million copies.
The sone of an artist, sculptor, poet and puppeteer Dion was
influenced during his early life by the unique lyrical sounds of
country singer Hank Williams. His recording career had its start in the
late 50s with Laurie Records . and he quickly compiled a stimg of
million sellers that continued when he later went to Columbia
Records.
However, while at Columbia several factors began to influence
his musical concepts, as well as his life. It was during this period that
he was influenced by the legendary blues singers such as Robert
Johnson, Big Joe Williams and Lightnin Hopkins. He was deeply
affected by their sincerity, feel, and the simple style with which they
used music and lyrics to tell what their life was really about.
All during these years the simple strength, lyrics, and chord
structure of the blues were becoming part of his musical existence. He
wanted to introduce the blues into his recording repertoire, but the
change in image was unacceptable to the recording companies. Dion
began to work on his own, while further developing his concept of
musical totality.
The evolution of his musical concept sees the music and lyrics as a
part of a totality of sound. The lyrics are not simply recited or sung;
but their sounds are interwoven with the music to create a complete
muscial portrait.
Dion sings the sounds of the words rather than the words
themselves. He uses the voice as a chord instrument to be orchestrated
and integrated with other insturments.

SPECIAL REVlEW"* l ""* 1 '?
| 51 In Gear, |
I Belous Lets Go |

By CAROLYN HERRINGTON
Alligator Reviewer
The mid-campus scene was
lively this past weekend at the
Rathskeller. The Jo Whalen
Quintet and their vocalist Fran
Belous entertained there
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
evenings. A newly-formed group,
this was one of several
performances they have given at
the Rathskeller since it opened.
The Quintet is a jazz combo
consisting of a piano, tenor sax,
electric bass guitar and trumpet.
Their interest lies in all forms of
jazz but recently they have been
leaning toward progressive
jazz. The group composes and
arranges many of their numbers.
Their floor show consists of a
few jazz instrumentals followed
by the female vocalist. From the
moment Fran Belous walks on
stage you know the actions
begun. In true nightclub fashion,
she leans back, clenches her face,
flicks her wrist and with all
five-feet-one of her in gear, she
lets go. When she belts out
Theres Such A Lot Os Living
To Do you know shes right in
there doing it.
Miss Belous, a 2UC, has
mastered the most important
quality of an entertainer. She
appears so absorbed in her
singing that her enthusiasm
Southpaws
Left-handed bowlers were
once the forgotten men of
bowling but not any more with
20 lefties among the 160
tournament players on the
Professional Bowlers Association
tour.

radiates out and touches
personally every member of the
audience. Her voice is strong and
throaty and in tune with the
words shes singing. She truly
grooves with her music and the
listener finds himself doing the
same.
The Quintet is made up of
University students. Joe Whalen,
the pianist and the drummer,
Gary Peyton, are both in
graduate school, one in Physics
and the other Chemistry. The
two of them do the arranging
and composing for the group.
Bruce Gora on the trumpet is
also in a soul band. The tenor
sax player Johnny Sauls will be
going into the Army TAC Band
in June. The fifth member of the
Quintet is Chuck Miller on the
electric bass.
The group has been together
for three months. They have
achieved a remarkable balance
between the freedom that is
inherent in jazz improvization
and the necessity of harmonizing
with one another.

I Rat Seeking Heads |

The Rathskeller board of directors, which has
had the same members for over a year, is now
looking for two replacements to fill jobs left by
graduating seniors.
Eric Williams, public relations chairman, and
Alan Vengel,, entertainment chairman are
graduating.
The present board has been together since last
April. Under chairman Joe Hilliard, they were
responsible for the planning, development and
opening of the campus beer hall. They currently
operate the Rat entirely, from hiring and firing to
setting the prices.
The two positions that are to be filled are public
relations and special events chairmanships. Fran
Belous, current special events chairman, will take

I Miller-Brown I
1 I
I I
ONEMILE I
NORTH OF
THE MALL Ntfl I
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER
g Open til 8 p.m. nightly B

do your
contact lenses lead
a dean life?

p* 1
ajDflWgQflOf-;
jqflftftyvjy
Hr
Sb ::::: :-:-: : :f ; ;: : : : ; : : y :^^^W
Contact lenses can be
heaven ... or hell. They
may be a wonder of
modern science but just
the slightest bit of dirt
under the lens can make
them unbearable. In
order to keep your con contact
tact contact lenses as comforta comfortable
ble comfortable and convenient as
they were designed to be,
you have to take care of
them.
Until now you needed
two or more separate
solutions to properly pre pre*
* pre* pare and maintain your
contacts. You would
think that caring for con contacts
tacts contacts should be as con convenient
venient convenient as wearing them.
It can be with Lensine.
Lensine is the one lens
solution for complete
contact lens care. Just a
drop or two, before you
insert your lens,coats and
lubricates it allowing the
lens to float more freely
in the eye's fluids. That's

WONDER HOUSE:
14 SW Ist STREET
LONDON BROIL -iqf
POT., SALAD 1.0 D
VEAL PARMIGIANI OJ OJw/
w/ OJw/ SPAGHETTI, SALAD 1.0 J
FREE DESSERT

over the entertainment job.
The public relations chairman is responsible for
all advertising, public relations and photography.
Sepcial events schedules, coordinates and
supervises all non-scheduled events at the Rat.
Chairman Joe Hilliard said the board wants to
replace the two board members by the end of this
quarter so they can learn the ropes before the
present members leave.
Were also looking for some people to finish out
this quarter, he mentioned, we need a sound and
lights man, a few bouncers and a bartender.
If anybody is interested in either the board
positions or the others mentioned to drop by the
Rathskeller for application forms.

because Lensine is an
"isotonic" solution,
which means that it
blends with the natural
fluids of the eye.
Cleaning your contacts
with Lensine retards the
buildup of foreign de deposits
posits deposits on the lenses. And
soaking your contacts in
Lensine between wear wearing
ing wearing periods assures you
of proper lens hygiene.
You get a free soaking
case on the bottom of
every bottle of Lensine.
It has been demonstrated
that improper storage be between
tween between wearings may
result in the growth of
bacteria on the lenses.
This is a sure cause of
eye irritation and in some
cases can endanger your
vision. Bacteria cannot
grow in Lensine which is
sterile, self-sanitizing,
and antiseptic.
Let your contacts be the
convenience they were
meant to be. Get some
Lensine, from the Murine
Company, Inc.
; i
m
H
UlflaU



~ - v x
Ik
Esfe*. iMPiM
I C <*
,'-. ', W" - ;
' .>ljjfey:ffi
. mhwa&te?' iH
W
PLAYERS IN REHEARSAL
Richard Council (Mac the Knife) and Eleanor Broome (Jenny) practice their tango number for next
week's 'Threepenny Opera." In the background are the "Ladies" of Wapping's brothel.
'Rifles-Bland Shoot- Up

By CAROLYN HERRINGTON
Alligator Reviewer
100 Rifles, just finished at
Plaza I, was the managers best
advertisement to go to Plaza 11.
Despite the flashy names of
Raquel Welch and Jim Brown
co-starring together the movie
would put a Birmingham
redneck to sleep.
The movie is the typical
Western transplanted into
Mexico. The only variation is
that the Indians are the good
guys. The plot rotates around
the Mexican governments
Greeks Selling
God Contest
The first annual Greek God
and Greek Goddesses contest
will be conducted May 24 at the
Spring Frolics Concert.
Lamar Sawyer, Phi Kappa
Tau, is directing the contest and
has prepared voting for each
fraternity and sorority for their
choice of the ideal Greek.
To vote, each house must put
its nominees name on a special
envelope and deposit a 25 cent
contribution to the coliseum
fund.
Deadlines for all entries is
May 15.
Gods will be judged on
athletic prowess and social
composure.
Goddesses will be selected on
their charm, poise and
attractiveness.
The ideal Greeks will receive
hundreds of dollars in gift
certificates and merchant
donations.
For details contact Sawyer at
376-7380 or the Greek Week
office at 392-1693 on Tuesdays
and Thursdays.
TONIGHT'S
THE
NIGHT
(VIRGINS
NUE, THAT IS)
GirPt Drinks
may

attempt to gain control of an
area occupied by the Laqui
Indians.
How an American ex-calavary
man and would-be sheriff Jim
Brown gets involved in the
Indians plight takes quite a bit
of contriving.
Raquel Welch plays the
hot-blooded Indian maiden who
has dedicated her talents to the
tribes fight for survival. Her
devotion is so deep that it takes
half the movie before she has a
breath to spare for Jim Brown.
However, then after only a
token No, not you, she
bounds into bed with him.
The movie is underscored
with a theme and variation study
of the different ways to die by

Hurry
Today and Tomorrow
Are The Last Days
[ iL 2
to Pick Up Your
1960 Seminole
I I
il
j 0 H
I Bring Receipt And I.D. j
I i
There Is Still A Limited Number Left For Purchase
Hours 10-4
V |
Pick Up At Reitz Union 2nd Floor North
i*> X
l i U __ U _^ J __ IJ 1J U __ U __ L^

rifle shot. The only thing the
movie offers in the way of
abundance is blood. At least half
the Mexican population is killed
off and the viewer gets an
excellent, color close-up
everytime.
The movie is basically a
reshuffling of the basic
components of any shoot-em-up
complete with last moment
calvary charges. The lines are flat
or dripping with sentiment, the
photography is simple eye-type
viewing with little use of varying
angles of distance and the acting
is just plain poor. The only part
of the movie that is solid and
well-structured is Miss Welchs
body and that doesnt out-weigh
the other.

Poet Field Here

He writes for people who
dont like poetry Alfred
Chester in the New York Herald
Tribune. He posses a tantalizing
off-center view of the world
New York Times. ... Writes
like a man possesed by a gift
Christian Science Monitor.
The man these critics praise
so highly is Edward Field, a
noted poet appearing on campus
today in a free presentation
offered by the UF Department
of English and the Florida
Quarterly. The program will
begin at eight p.m.
Members of the Quarterly
staff will be on hand to sell their
latest issue to any who attend.
Field was bom in New York
City in 1924. He has two books
in print: Stand Up, Friend,
With Me (1963) and Variety
Photoplays (1967). He won the
Lamont Poetry Prize for the first
of these and, among other
awards, has won a Guggenheim
fellowship.
He wrote the narrative for the
film To Be Alive, a
documentary which was the hit
at the New York Worlds Fair.
VETERANS
of \
Be a commercial pilot!
NEWG. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Area's only approved school
378-2646

Thursday, May 15,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Fields poems have appeared
in some of the most lively and
important literary publications
in the United States: The New
York Review of Books,
Evergreen Review, Poetry, Paris
Review, Partisan Review and
The Southern Poetry Review.
Professor Aleksander
Nejgebauer of the University of
Yugoslavia, in an article in The
New Republic describes Fields
poetry as disarmingly frank
pop-and sex stories.
One might add that Field uses
the seemingly unpromisng
material of American popular
culture horror movies, comic
strips, newspaper stories to
create poems that are funny,
moving, and incisively
descriptive of mid-twentieth-cen mid-twentieth-century
tury mid-twentieth-century America.
THERE S MORE OF
The Wide,
Wild World
of New Film
PROGRAM I
in v!Sn^sUNo .
..... . j...
If ii

is::
: : : :...
: ; : v :: :**: /*%
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A
/*. \
1
: .::?:... : : v
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Page 19



Page 20

l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 15, 1969

OXFORD, Miss The
hard-hitting University of
Mississippi Rebels rocked Gator
ace lefthander Jim Courier for
three homeruns in fbur innings
here Wednesday enroute to an
8-2 victory and a commanding
lead in the best-of-three
Southeastern Conference
championship series.
Courier, the SECs top
pitcher going into the contest
with a 10-1 record and a 1.54
earned run average, had trouble
containing the Rebel attack
from the first man he faced to
the last.
Only a leaping catch against
the left field fence by Tony
Dobies saved a possible three-run
Ole Miss outburst in the first
inning. The spectacular grab
came after Courier walked the
leadoff man and allowed a single
to Rebel shortstop and football
quarterback Archie Manning.
Sophomore Whitey Adams
home run ball was stolen by
Dobies but John Shaw tagged at
third and scored easily, giving
Ole Miss a lead it never

Gators Add Four
To Frosh Team

Four non-scholarship
basketball players announced
their intent to attend the UF
and join an array of incoming
players to the 1969 Freshman
team, according to Head Coach
Tommy Bartlett.
They are 6-foot-2 Sandy
Sharp of Knoxville, Tenn.; 64
Jimmy Hinson, Pensacola; 64
Roger Peace, Coral Gables; and
6-2 Steve Kiley, Brandon.
Sharp averaged 26 points a
game to be the leading scorer in
the Knoxville Interscholastic
League last season. After
studying numerous college offers
he decided to attend the UF.
Bartlett said, He is a
welcome addition to our
freshman squad.
Hinson averaged 18 points
and 14 rebounds a game for
Pensacola.
Peace played both football
and basketball at Coral Gables
and helped his team to the
semi-finals of the state Class AA
tournament. He decided not to
accept a college football
scholarship.
Kiley is the brother of Gator
football lineman Jim Kiley.
UF has signed five freshman
and one junior college player to

GOING HOME?
CANT TAKE IT WITH YOU?
WELL BUY IT!
Gator PAWN SHOP
LOANS BUY SELL
"We specialize in Gator-Aid"
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575

LEAD SERIES 1-0
Ole Miss Homers Rock Gators. 8-2
*

Football* *j
f
relinquished.
The Gators opened the
second with singles by Skip
Lujack and Rod Wright and,
after two fly outs, loaded the
bases on an infield hit by
Courier. The UF missed one of
its few chances of the day to
score, however, when Guy
McTheny ended the threat with
a fly to center.
The bottom of the third was
Couriers undoing as the winner
of nine straight games was
touched for four runs after two
were out. Ed McLarty supplied
the big blow, a three-run homer,
and he was followed by Lee
Moores round-tripper off
Dobies outstretched glove.
Coach Dave Fullers Eastern

scholarships and still has two
grants remaining.
Signed previously have been
Mark Thompson, Mt. Pleasant,
Ohio; Bill Nagel, Bellevue, Ky.;
Tim Fletcher, Evansville, Ind.;
Kan Van Ness, Seminole of St.
Petersburg; Terry Miller, Garrett,
Ind.; and Earl Finley, West Palm
Beach JC.
Bartlett toured Tennessee last
week on a goodwill tour and was
the speaker at the all-sports
banquet of the Martin Branch of
the University of Tennessee.
Now Taking Applications
at
S um mit House
1700 S. W. 16th Ct.
for
September
(9-10 & 12 month Leases
rates start
1 BR.sl2l
28R5147
Summer Term
V G7
Special Rates
376-9668

Division champs tried to put a
scare into the capacity Ole Miss
crowd with a two-run rally in
the fourth.
After Lujack took a third
strike, Wright reached 4 second
when the Rebel left fielder
dropped his routine fly ball.
Tommy Blankenship walked
after watching Mike Ovca fly out
and Courier followed with a soft
single into short right field
scoring Wright. McTheny then
lined a hit into left, scoring
Blankenship with what turned
out to be the Gators last run of
the game.
A leadoff homer by Manning
chased Courier from the mound
in the fifth but the .300 hitter
moved into right field for the
remainder of the game. While
pitching, Courier allowed six
earned runs on six hits while
walking two and striking out

Im sorryabout your
parade, sir. I guess I
splashed on too
much after shave.
-O !p
) ROTCi J
l! 97yf V
Km r y
l yif If
a J.
Even the might of the military cant protect you if youre not
careful how you use Hai Karate After Shave and Cologne. One
whiff and females get that make love not war look in their 90
eyes. So to maintain military discipline and keep your uniform
intact, we put instructions on self-defense in every package.
Just in case it comes down to hand-to-hand combat. (J^l
Hai Karate-be careful how you use it.
1969, Leeming Divisipn, Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc., Nev. York, N.Y.

three.
Wayne Rogers relieved and
got two quick outs before Moore
connected for his second
four-bagger of the game. The
homer was the Dyersburg,
Tenn., seniors seventh solo shot
of the year.
Mississippi tallied again in the
seventh when Adams collected
his 45th RBI of the campaign on
his second sacrifice fly. Manning,
who had tripled for his third hit,
scored the run.
The big story from the fifth
inning on, however, was junior
righthander Fred Setser.
The 6 l, 180-pounder
shutout the Gators without a hit
over the last half of the game,
although he walked two men in
the seventh and ninth innings.
The six-hitter raised Setsers
record to 5-3.
The championship action
moves to Perry Field Friday for
a 3 p.m. encounter. The Gators
must win then to force a

| MMMTOMIMI I
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Saturday game, now there only
route to the SEC crown. ED
PAVELKA



Gators Face Canes In Net Rematch

3y JEFF FRAW
Alligator Sports Correspondent
The Southeastern Conference Tenn
Champion Gators play their las* match of the
season Saturday at 1:30 against the University c
Miami Hurricanes.
Tiiis is the first match for the UF rietters since
they won the Conference title last week in Baton
Rouge. There they amassed 35 out of a possible
36 points, the second highest total ever scored by
a team in winning the title. The overall Gator
record is 17-1-1.
Coach Bill Potter was named SEC Coach of
the Year last week at the end of the tournament.
This is the second year in a row the 17-year UF

By Alligator Services
Phi Delta Theta nosed out
defending champions ATO and a
strong Pi Kappa Alpha
contingent to win the Orange
League track crown.
Jim Walsh was the only
H pf Wj SWOB
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BRADBURN
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' FIJIS COP BLUE TITLE
Phi Delts Race To Orange Crown

POTTER SEC COACH OF THE YEAR

double winner with victories in
the 220 and 100 yard dashes and
Tom Christian captured the
discus and Bill Dorsey the shot
put to pace the Phi Delt victory.
This years meet was
considerably slower than last
years record setting pace but
the closemess of the outcome
made this years event as
exciting as any before.
Tom Kennel led off the meet
with a 14.7 winning time in the
120 low hurdles to give the Pikes
an early lead. Walsh then won
the 220 in a 22.9.
ATO successfully defended
its 440 relay championship but
lost .3 seconds to last years
effort with a 44.4. Pikes and Phi
Delt finished right behind.
In the broad jump Bill
Mcride won for the Pikes with
a leap of 20-feet-7 1 /2. Tom
Christian finished second with a
jump of 19-45/2, a jump that
would not have even qualified in
last years meet.
The 100 was almost a dead
heat as Walsh won it in 10.2.
Larry Smith won the event last
year in 9.9 seconds. Gator end
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veteran has been honored with tills distinction.
Potter has coached the Gators to a 244-72-1
rCvOrd while he has been Head Tennis Coach,
ine Viators have won the SEC title three times
under Potter and 20 individuals have beeij
named Ali-SCC.
The Gators lone tie came in a match with
Miami earlier this season, in Miami. Both teams
won three singles matches apiece. Miamis
number 1 player Pat Cramer defeated UFs
All-American Armi Neely 6-4, 6-4. This was one
0; only three losses for the Gator ace this season.
Miamis Luis Garcia defeated UFs Steve
Beeland 6-1, 10-8. Stan Shambron defeated Paul
Lunetta 6-8,6-1,6-1,
Gator victories were scored by All-SEC

Carlos Alvarez came in second at
10.3.
Once again strong in the
relays, ATO stormed to a 1:33.9
clocking in the 880 yard relay.
Jerry Graves of Pike took the
880 yard run in 2:06.4.
Larry Rentz, who barely
qualified last year with a jump
of 6-0 in the high jump, won it
this year with a leap of 6-1.
Bill Dorsey won the shot put
with a put of 49-11. In past
years it took close to 50 feet just
to place.
The Phi Delts amassed 46
points for the victory that
placed them in fourth place in
the league. Pi Kappa Alpha
moved into third behind ATO,
and TEP.
The Blue meet was a two
sided affair with Phi Gamma

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Charlie Owens over Peyton Watson 6-4, 6-1,
All-American Jamie Pressiy over Steve Segal 6-2,
6-3, and Greg Hilley over Sven Ginman 6-3, 64.
The Gators were leading in two of The three
doubles, when darkness caused the match to be
CcLllcd,
The UF neners are looking forward to
Saturdays match eagerly. For three of the
netters Armi Neely, Jamie Pressiy, and Steve
Beeiand it will be their last appearance play ing
for th£ UF at home.
Potter announced that the parents of all the
players have been invited to attend this match.
Last year a crowd of about 3,000 saw the
most exciting match of the season. Saturdays
match should be a repeat of that.

Delta edging out Theta Chi.
Theta Chi in the process moved
to within 24 points of league
leading Chi Phi with only
softball remaining.
John Reynolds of Fiji started
the ball rolling with a 14.8 sec.
win in the low hurdles. Bruce
Bradburn also of Fiji picked up
the pace with a 23.3 win in the
220.
Fiji went on to win its third
straight event as it coasted to the
440 yard relay win in 45.3 sec.
Roy Brewer and Kurt Westall
then finished one-two for the
Fijis in the broadjump as Brewer
jumped a 20-9.
Amidst all the Fiji victories
the Theta Chis finally scored big
with a one-two punch in the
discuss. Charlie Ruse heaved it
133-3 and Willie Gregory was

Thursday, May 15, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

second with 123-9.
AGR nioved into the winners
circle as Cary Lee won the 100
yard dash in 11.1 seconds.
The Phi Gams wasted little
time regaining their winning
form as they won the 880 yard
relay in a fine 1:34.1 clocking.
Bob Garvin of Phi Tau won
the 880 yard run in an
outstanding 2:02.2. The Fijis
finished second and third. Willie
Gregory then won the shot put
for the Theta Chis with a 46-3
effort.
In the final event Ken Fowle
won the high jump for the Phi
Taus with a 5-10 effort.
Fiji scored 56 points and
were followed by Theta Chi with
46. Delta Chi finished a distant
third with 30 points. Phi Tau
finished fourth with 20 points.

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, May 15,1969

Single Moments Os Spring Sports

Km
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SICIU
Richard Spears lofts the little white ball toward
the pin during play on UF's golf course.

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, TOM KENNEDY
PERSEVERANCE
Jack Bachelor splashes along with the rest of the pack during the Steeple Chase event of the Florida Invitational Track meet. He went on to win the race.

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PATIENCE
Will Sherwood scores during a home tennis
match and awaits for his turn to play.

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THOUGHTFULNESS
Sitting down and just letting the world pass you
by is sometimes what is needed. Swim team member
Bruce Williams is in his own world just for a
moment



11/Fs Rifle Team Shoots-Up Targets
Ifo Capture All-Florida Campionships

By Alligator Services
UFs Rifle Team has wound up a real shootem up season by
winning the All-Florida Championships recently, according to rifle
team captain Jim Waugh.
That Gator shooters won 24 and lost only 10 meets this year out
shooting teams from the University of Miami, Florida Southern
University, Florida A&M, Stetson University and Tulane University of
New Orleans, La.
Financed by SGA and UF Intramurals, the team is composed of 20
students and 17 ROTC members. The team practices outdoors on
campus at a 15-point range, located northwest of the sewage plant...
Leading gunman for the team is Toby Muir, who has been the
Florida collegiate champion for the last three years.
Muir is also pop-up target champion at the English National Games
and placed ninth in the National Service Rifle Championships at Camp
Perry, using an M-14 rifle.
Second shot for the Gators is Lee Morse, who is the Canadian
Junior National Champion.
Morse also placed second in the United States Junior National
Championships, was a gold medalist in the Maccabee Games in Israel
and also a finalist for the 1968 U.S. Olympic Team.
Sports Directors
To Meet Monday
The Athletic Directors of the Southeastern Conference will hold
their Spring annual meeting at Jekyll Island, Ga. May 19-20-21,
Commissioner A.M. (Tonto) Coleman announced. Along with the
ADs, the head football coaches and head basketball coaches of the
ten schools will attend.
The Buccaneer Motor Lodge will serve as headquarters and all
sessions of the Monday-Tuesday-Wednesday calendar begin at 9:00
a.m. Auburns Jeff Beard, Chairman of the ,SEC Athletic Directors and
Coaches Association will preside. Joel Eaves, athletic director at
Georgia, and Doug Dickey, head football coach at Tennessee,
comprise the committee in charge of arrangements for this 1969
meeting. Registration is Sunday afternoon, 4:00 to 7:00.
Commissioner Coleman describes the Spring meeting as
family-type get-togethers in which we discuss our mutual problems.
The three groups review the past school year, consider the problems
among themselves and attempt to arrive at recommendations for
relief.
No official action can be taken at the Spring meetings, just at the
annual conference meetings each January when the university
presidents are in session, but several projects of mutual benefit, and
with some national effect, have been developed in recent Spring
meetings. They include, among others: eligibility of freslunen for
sports other than football and basketball, the basketball television
program and approval for post-season tournaments for the basketball
teams; the football sky-writers tour and the highlights film.
Though presently confined to his home in recuperation from major
surgery performed April 11, the Commissioner hopes to attend this
meeting. The complete recovery program planned by his doctors now
permits him to have daily contact with his office and to accomplish
some of the work at home. This is one more step toward his return to
fulltime duty at the office.
FSU Retires Jersey
Worn By f ig Ron f
TALLAHASSEE No other Florida State football player will ever
wear the No. 34 jersey.
This jersey, worn by two-time All-American receiver Ron Sellers,
has been retired by the Florida State Athletic Department.
During his three years as a Seminole, the Jacksonville senior broke
3 national record for most career yardage on pass receptions with
3,598 yards. He holds every Florida State receiving record.
This is the second football jersey retired by Florida State, the first
being No. 25 worn by the Seminoles first All-American, flanker Fred
Bilentnikoff.
Since Ron achieved such greatness at Florida State, it is
appropriate that no other Seminole football playerwear No. 34. said
Athletic Director Vaughn Mancha. Sellers broke records that will
ety stand for many, many years. ~

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Page 23



Page 24

\, Th* Florida Alligator, Thuraday, May 15, 1960

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ALL WEEK THROUGH MAY 20

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CORN OIL $1.09
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Sultana Frozen Chicken, Beef, or Turkey
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Allgood Sugar Cured Sliced
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