Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
WANTS DRAFT POOL OF 19-YEAR OLDS

V
Nixon Asks Sweeping Draft Reforms

WASHINGTON
(UPI) President Nixon
proposed a broad reform of the
draft Tuesday, calling for a
lottery system of selection
which would make the youngest
men most vulnerable.
Under his plan, their
maximum vulnerability to the
draft would last for one year
only between age 19 and
20 rather than for the seven
years, from age 19 to 26, during
which the draft hangs over the
heads of eligible youths today.
In a special message to
Congress, Nixon put aside until
more stable world conditions
prevail his campaign pledge for
replacing the draft with an
all-volunteer Army. In the
meantime, he said, we must do
everything we can to limit the
disruption caused by the system
and to make it as fair as
possible.
the core of the Presidents
projiosaf is a system of random
selection so that chance alone
would determine which of the
19-year-olds would be drafted
and which would be bypassed.
Some system like that is
necessary, White House aides
explained, because each year
another 600,000 men turn 19
but the Army needs only half
that many as long as enlistments
keep up at their present pace.
Under Nixons proposal, the
calendar year would be
scrambled each year so those
19-year-olds born on June 19
might be drafted first, followed
by those bom on Feb. 2 or Nov.
27 dates selected at random.
But for the first year, all
eligibles would be lumped
together, regardless of age so
that those who are now above
20 would not escape
vulnerability by virtue of the
changeover. Nixon told
Congress:
The present draft
arrangements make it extremely
difficult for most young people
to plan intelligently as they
make some of the most
important decisions of their
lives, decisions concerning
education, career, marriage and
family. Present policies extend a
period during which young

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The first share of "stock in students" was
purchased by UF President Stephen C. O'Connell
Tuesday. Handing over the $10; certificate, which
entitles the holder to entrance to all Gator Loan

people come to look on
government processes as
particularly arbitrary.
The President said the
reforms he proposed were
sound from a- military
standpoint, since younger men
are easier to train and have fewer
family responsibilities.
The only legislative change

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 136

Physician Pledges SIO,OOO
For UFs Activities Center

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
and
* ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
The first large Activities
Center donation was received by
the University of Florida
Foundation, Inc., Tuesday when
a St. Petersburg physician
pledged a SIO,OOO contribution.
Dr. Clyde O. Anderson, a past
president of the foundation, sent
a check for SIOOO to Fred H.
Cantrell, the foundations
executive director, and
guaranteed another SIOOO for
the next nine years or payment
of the entire sum in less than 10
years.
The (UF) students for the
past two or three years have
indicated in every possible way
how they felt concerning the
activities center by trying to

BUYING STOCK IN STUDENTS

The
Florida Alligator

Fund events for one year, are Griff McSwine, (left)
chairman of the project, and Eddie Floyd, asst,
chairman.

the Nixon plan required was for
authority to choose draftees by
lottery. The Defense
Department said the White
House had authority since 1967
to go to a system of drafting the
youngest eligibles first but had
not done so because no legal
method existed for making this
completely fair and equitable.

University of Florida, Gainesville

promote various activities to
raise money for the center, Dr.
Anderson stated in a letter to
Cantrell.
If the students and the
university want it then the rest
of the state should wake up and
get with it, Dr. Anderson said.
Dr. Anderson called upon at
least 100 others in the state of
Florida, whether they are alumni
of the university or not, to
make an equal contribution.
This, he feels, would enable the
construction of a swimming
complex.
If there were a thousand or
more, Dr. Anderson said, we
could build the entire student
activity center with or without
help from anybody else.
Dr. Anderson, a current
member of the executive
committee of the UF Alumni
Association, first announced his
intention to make the generous
contribution at an association
meeting on May 3. Nevertheless,
Cantrell is not sure where the
donation will go.
The foundation board has
30 committees, but none of
them are directly concerned
with an activities center fund,
Cantrell said.
The activities center
feasibility study currently

The President proposed
retention of deferments for
undergraduate college students
and permitting graduate students
to complete the full academic
year during which they are first
ordered for induction rather
than just the term. But graduate
students would not be eligible
for further deferment.

underway should eventually
provide for a fund-handling
committee, Cantrell said, but the
study is expected to last for six
or eight months.
Right now I cant say
exactly what will be done with
the donations we have received
to date because the foundation
has no specific guidelines for this
matter, Cantrell concluded.
Dr. Andersons initial SIOOO
contribution m o the
Gainesville Tipoff Clubs
January donation for the highest
gifts to date. In addition, Project
SCAT has coordinated student
fund .raising on campus through
such activities as a quarter drive

Court Case Could
End City Authority

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
The outcome of an appeal
over a UF petty larceny case
could ultimately determine
whether the City of Gainesville
has authority on the UF campus.
The case being appealed
involves a sophomore coed who
is charged with stealing a book,
and selling it to the Campus
Shop and Book Store.
The girl in question was tried
in Municipal Court. Her
attorney, Herbert Schwartz, a
former UF Honor Court
chancellor, contends the city has
no jurisdiction oyer the campus,
and cannot legally try a person
for an on-campus offense.
If his appeal is successful, it
could have far reaching effects
on city-campus relationships.
The city, for instance, could not
have charged Camigras SI3OO
for a license, because the
carnival was not in the city of
Gainesville.
Schwartz reasoning is based
on state law, which he feels
adequately removes the campus
from city authority, except in
cases involving traffic violations.
Traffic offenses are tried in
city court by state statute
(239.53-239.58) and by
approval of the Board of
Regents.
There is no doubt but that
the campus offender should be
tried in a state court, Schwartz
said. In Gainesville, it would be
the Criminal Court of Record.


. K't **
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jtfHHjflH|H JO
PRESIDENT RICHARD NIXON
... proposes lottery plan

Wednesday. May 14, 1969

and the TEP-Gator football
game.
Dr. Anderson, who attended
the UF from 1926-28 and is now
*
a specialist in internal medicine
in St. Petersburg, concluded his
letter to Cantrell with this
comment:
Im a great believer in
physical fitness and education.
Apparently,- the Board of
Regents feel education is all that
is necessary and that physical
fitness is secondary. 1 do not feel
that way and being a medical
man, 1 try to stress the point
that we need both so, it is with
this in mind, that I will start my
pledge of $10,000.


City ordinances are ens orceable
only within the city limits.
The university is on state
property, Schwartz said.
When the state moved the
campus here, the city gave up all
jurisdictional powers. The only
ones the city has is traffic
violations, and this had to be
done by act of the legislature.
Schwartz took his argument
before a Gainesville court
hearing Tuesday afternoon, and
was turned down.
An appeal has been filed,
however, and Schwartz said he
would take the case as far as his
client wanted him to.
I know Im correct in this
matter, he said. What it will
do for my particular client is an
irrevelent issue, as is its
advantage over trial in municipal
court.
Schwartz has filed a motion
for appeal. A hearing date before
circuit court will be at least a
month away.
mnnuoioD^^
'Rat 1 Gets Dion
Dion, famous for his
recording, Abraham, Martin
and John, will appear at the
Rathskeller May 23 and 24.
Advance tickets will go on sale
Friday at the Rathskeller.
Tickets will be $1.50 per person.
Dion will present a wide
selection of music at six shows
on Friday and Saturday nights.
Tickets will be sold individually
for each performance.
lllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHlliat

A merit's
Number I
Coilete
Daily



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 14, 1969

Carniaras License Fees Remain With City

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
The Gainesville City
Commission Monday night I
refused to return the $1,300 i
collected from SG for Camigras
licensing fees. i
In answer to a letter from
Selig Golden, Gainesville i
attorney, the commission said ]
they could not give away the
taxpayers money, regardless of <
the worth of the cause. i
Money collected from 1
Carnigras was met on a nine to ;
one basis by (he federal

Draft Reform Talk Replaces
Hersheys Prepared Speech

By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Selective Service Director Lt.
Gen. Lewis B. Hershey put aside
a prepared speech Tuesday in St.
Augustine and remarked on the
proposed reform of the draft
lottery system.
Hersheys original speech was
on the status of the selective
service system. He was given an
advanced wire story of the
President Nixons announcement
just minutes before the meeting
convened.
Calling it jokingly
interference from Washington,
he said he was not surprised at
the news, that it was
forthcoming.
A random choice is fine
when there is a surplus available
to make the choice, he said.
The plan is to take the
19yearolds but those
who are 1A are not going to be
ignored, Hershey said.
Neither are those who
unfortunately will be graduating,
getting thrown out of school or
becoming 24 years of age, he
said.
Under the new system,
graduate students will be able to
finish their academic year rather
than just the term in which they
were drafted.
An age group will be liable
for a year and then they will
drop to the back of the list.
Hershey reminded the
audience of the fact only the
local draft board or the board of
review can give a person the
coveted deferment.
Although the local courts
and the supreme courts have
Jury Dufy
Postponed
Students requested for jury
duty by Honor Court for this
Sunday will not be required to
attend until the following
Sunday, May 25.
Trials have been postponed a
week and the same jurors called
for t{}is Sunday should report to
the Courtroom May 25 at the
same time instead.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florid and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and t j revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

government and all monies were
contributed to the Gator Loan
Fund for needy UF students.
Gainesville Mayor Walter
Murphree held that the tax was
not levied on SG but on the
carnival as a commercial
enterprise.
The students of the
university did not lose one
penny, Murphree said.
Golden and a group of 12
other Gainesville businessmen
donated the $ 1,300 to cover the
tax which was not levied last
year.
Last year the carnival was

tried to do this, he said.
He pointed out the proposed
reform did accomplish one
thing-it gave the people what
they have been asking for.
This system will restore to
the President the power he had
from 1940 until 1967 to have a
random lottery, Hershey said.
1 understand the report says
the National Security Council
and the Selective Service
Director will study ways and
send out guidelines to assist local
boards, Hershey said.
Campus demonstrations dont
bother Hershey who feels more
sorry for the demonstrators than
for himself.
Whatever evil they
accomplish, they will have to
live with it longer than I will,
said the 75yearold general, in
an earlier interview.

Student Files Lawsuit
For Delayed Induction

A UF law student has filed a
U.S. District Court lawsuit to
block his induction into the
armed services.
Thomas Schiereck filed the
suit against Lewis Hershey,
Selective Service director, state
draft officials and St. Petersburg
and Gainesville draft board
members.
Key Correction
A comment recorded Monday
from a meeting of SG leaders
concerning a private checking
account held by Florida Blue
Keys Homecoming was
inaccurate. We regret the
mistake.

EAT-IN
TONITE
6PM
THIRSTY

held in the back part of the
campus and nobody knew it was
there until it had come and
gone, the mayor said.
Murphree said the university
was not a sovereign state and
subject to the same laws as
any other organization.
Commissioner Ted Williams
moved that the commission
answer Goldens letter with an
explanation that the city has not
charged the students anything.
The city has the right to
license a carnival within the
corporate boundaries of the city
and we appreciate the 13

Presently the U.S. has a
fighting force of 3.6 million
men, and we will always require
at least 1.5 million of them as
professionals, he said.
He did not feel that higher
pay would entice men to form a
professional army because it
would be just as easy for
someone else to offer them more
money.
Hershey has served as
Selective Service Director since
1941. He was promoted to Lt.
General in 1956.
He said his continuance in the
position would depend on his
health and whether or not the
Chief Executive wanted him to
continue in office.
His job, he said, is to enforce
the draft laws which are made
by Congress and not to create
them.

i Schiereck says he should be
reclassified 1-S until he has
completed this academic year.
He is asking the federal court to
delay his induction until the case
. goes before the court.
In the lawsuit Schiereck said
; that his requests for
reclassification have been denied
by the draft boards and he had
been ordered to report for
induction on April 28.
Earlier orders for him to
report were postponed while his
petitions for student deferment
were being reviewed.
The case has been assigned to
a judge but no trial date has
been set.

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businessmens interest in Dollars
For Scholars (now Gator Loan
Fund), Williams motion said.
It passed the commission by a
three to two vote.
Commissioner Cortland
Collier held that the
circumstances in this request
were unique.
Usually in a situation like
this the city is required to
furnish police or crowd control
services and cleanup. The
university did all of this
themselves, Collier said.
He also pointed out that the
university community makes up
one half of the citys population
and any tax rebate of taxpayers

* ,
Scientific Theme
Set For Accent
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
Accent 7O, in the throes of early planning, has chosen a
theme of science and technology for next Februarys program.
Joe Hilliard, chairman of Accem 7O, said the sympQsiums
theme veers drastically from the usual political topic and
opens the door for wider student interest. In its three years.
ACCENT has had as its themes: The Responsibility of
Dissent, You In Politics, and The Dimensions of
Freedom.
The UF is not by any means a totally liberal arts school and
it is time to recognize that a significant portion of our campus
has been ignored by previous programs, Hilliard said.
Plans include invitations to industry to participate in the
Accent program by sending speakers, displays and other
materials representing that segment of society.
Hilliard has also approached several deans of UF colleges
proposing the idea of a Day of Involvement in which classes
throughout the university would be called off in deference to
participation in a program that has educational value and variety
not obtainable in a classroom.
He plans smaller audiences and more dialogue between
audiences and speakers than has been possible in earlier
programs. He hopes to hold more of the Accent programs in the
Plaza of the Americas, the Architecture and Fine Arts Plaza and
the Reitz Union.
The emphasis will be placed on making Accent a learning
experience rather than a first class show, Hilliard said.
Also in the early production stages is an Accent magazine
which will feature interviews with national figures and a history
of the development of Accent.
Hilliard does not plan to have a hospitality room serving
liquor to speakers and guests as did Accent 69.
All monies that had previously been spent on banquets and
hospitality rooms will be diverted to the program so that more
people can become involved, he said.
Greater community involvement is being sought by the new
Accent staff and cooperation with community organizations,
government, and educational institutions are being discussed by
the Accent 7O executive committee.
Hilliard said the city will be asked to proclaim Accent Week
as well as the Day of Involvement.
University colleges, clubs and organizations will be asked to
plan programs around the Accent theme.
Accent Week has been scheduled for February Bl 4.

money would include this
money from the up
administration, faculty
personnel and students.
The mayor agreed with a
statement from a Gainesville
resident in the audience who
questioned the desirability 0 f
bringing something ]fc e
Camigras to the city.
They were gambling,
pitching nickles and
quarters.. .and I dont think we
should encourage something like
this in our city, he said.
A proposal introduced by
Collier to refund half of the
$1,300 was also voted down by
the commission.



Lighter Loads For StudentLeadersTroposed^

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assignments Editor
Ron Jourdan, the worlds top
high jumper, came within inches
of flunking out of school last
month. Harold Aldrich, a
W HATS
HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writers
PICTURE PICK-UPS: Seminoles
can be bought or picked up this
week on the second floor of the
Reitz Union. Bring your
receipts.
NEWIE ART FILMS:
The University Film Series
Movie, New Kinetic Art,
Program I will be shown
tonight at 7 and 9 in the Union
Auditorium. Catch it on
Thursday night, too.
JOURNALISTIC JOLLIES: The
College of Journalism will hold
its annual awards banquet on
Thursday, May 15 at 7 p.m. An
address will be given by Leo
Stalinaker of the Tampa Tribune
and awards will be presented.
PLEASING POETRY PEOPLE:
The English Department
presents Edward Field. The
poetry reading will be in
McCarty Auditorium at 8 p.m.
Thursday.
Peace Union
To Sponsor
SDS M eeting
It appears that the UF
administration will make no
effort to prevent the
non-sanctioned SDS from
meeting on campus.
A recent SDS press release
announced a meeting in the
Reitz Union, Sunday. The
meeting is sponsored by the
Student Peace Union.
Question has been raised
concerning the nature of the
policy which allows
non-sanctioned organizations to
use campus facilities.
Assistant Dean of Student
Affairs James T. Hennessey said
the SPU is operating at this time
and may invite groups to campus
at its own discretion.
SPU is a suitable functioning
organization and not merely a
letterhead which serves as a
front for SDS activities,
Hennessey said.
According to a Union
Reservations Office spokesman,
SPU reservations were made by
Ed Freeman, who is a prominent
member of SDS.
By The Way
A story in Tuesdays Alligator
inadvertently omitted the Billy
Mitchell Drill Team as among
those groups which wrote off
charges for services rendered at
the Rascals concert.
Excellence in Food

National Hearst Writing Contest
award winner had to resign as
Editor of the Alligator because
of deteriorating academic status.
These were but a few of a
multitude of instances in which
leaders of student extra
curricular activities have been
forced to sacrifice their grade
point averages to bring a name
to the UF in other than
academic areas.
But a letup is just around the
comer if agriculture professor
Max Tyler has his way.
Tyler proposed at the last
faculty senate meeting that any

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NINE HOURS MAY BE FULL TIME

student engaged in an extra
curricular activity can be
classified as a full time student if
he is enrolled for no less than
nine credit hours.
The present minimum is 12.
Tylers proposal hinges on a
faculty senate vote. The measure
will appear on the senate agenda
a week from Thursday.
If adopted, Tylers new
minimum load will not mean
blanket assurance to the active
student that he can take three
less credits and still be
considered a full time student.
The student must get

approval from his dean.
The new amendment will
read:
To hold any elected or
appointed office in student
self-government or in any extra
curricular activity, a student
must be free of disciplinary,
scholarship, academic or
admissions probation.
He must also be classified as a
full time student enrolled in a
minimum of 12 hours; provided,
that the dean of a college, may
at his discretion, upon appeal
from a student, allow that
student to enroll for no less than

Wednesday, May 1 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

nine credits and remain eligible
to hold office of significant
service to the University
community.
If the activity involved has
higher requirements for
membership, a designated
official of the activity is
responsible for enforcing these
requirements.
Soviet Scholars
Officers in the Soviet Union
forces spend almost twice as
much time in schools as their
western counterparts.

Page 3



Page 4

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 14, 1969

Greek Deadline
Set Thursday
Deadlines for all Greek Week
activities is Thursday.
Fraternities or sororities
having questions concerning the
upcoming events can call John
Cosgrove, Greek Week
Chairman, at 376-6646 or
392-1673.

FOR EDUCATION GRADES
Appeals Board Formed

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
A grade appeals board has
been set up on a working basis in
a section of the College of
Education for students who feel
a professor has judged them
unfairly on their performance in
a course.
The board is now functioning
for* the Counselor Education
Section of the Department of
Personnel Services and is in
effect for appeals of grades
received at the end of the Winter
Quarter, according to Acting SG
Secretary of Academic Affairs
Cliff Dropkin.
Education's Department of
Foundations has also approved
the idea of a grade appeals
board, Dropkin said.
The board as it is now
operating in the section of
counselor education will be in
the form of an ad hoc
P.T. Honors
Top Senior
The Florida Chapter of the
American Physical Therapy
Association has selected Elise
DeLoach as the recipient of the
Chapters recognition award as
the Outstanding Senior of this
years Physical Therapy
graduates. The award will be
presented to Miss DeLoach
during the annual meeting of the
Florida Chapter in Fort
Lauderdale.
Criteria for selection of a
student to receive the award are
an overall grade point average of
at least a 2.5 based on a 4.0
system, outstanding professional
and clinical performance, and
demonstrated interest above that
required.
This award takes the form of
a certificate presented to the
student. There will also be a
master plaque to be left at the
school which will have the
recipients names and the year of
graduation engraved upon it.
The award this year is given
in memory of the late Charles N.
Lautzenheiser of Clearwater,
who practiced physical therapy
in Florida for many years,
EAT-IN
TONITE
6PM
THIRSTY

DROPOUTS

/ SOOPgYfeL SANPX
PEAR FRIEhID? ./
ifff 0 f I'LL SEMP |
W/'YcKaA FOR YOLi
TYa e 4j\ ALF, OLP
t PAL J

committee appointed by the
department chairman. Whenever
possible, at least one member of
the committee will have taught
the course for which there is an
appeal.
This committee, however,
will be appointed only after the
student takes his grievance to
the professor who gave him what
he feels to be an unjust grade.
If the student continues to
feel he has been unfairly treated,
he may then ask for the ad hoc
committee to hear his appeal.
After hearing both the student
and the instructor, the
committee will decide whether
to recommend that a grade be
changed.
The committee will only be
able to advise that a grade be
changed or not be changed,
leaving it up to the professor to
decide whether to accept the
recommendation of the
committee.
This maintains the idea of
academic freedom, Dropkin said.
A grade appeals board is
presently under consideration in
the College of Business
Administration, says Dropkin.


I Go ahead.
|Pii\ us down!
I Whats a Frischs? Frischs is
I a coffee shop. Its a restau restau-1
-1 restau-1 rant. It has in-car service and
carry-out service. We serve
1 breakfast, lunch, complete
dinners and anytime snacks.
I If you must pin us down, just
Isay, Frischs is a good
thing! (You can be a good
I thing, too! Ask for your tree
Good Thing button.)
I W^GOOD
I THING IS AT
I 2035 N. W. 13th Street
I Phone 378-2304
I After $
I dinner special
I HAM STEAK DINNER only $1.34
Served with pineapple, potatoes, salad,
roll and butter.

-i-'J

I have met with the
chairman of an ad hoc
committee on grade appeals
boards in the business college,
he said, and I would hope the
proposal would be brought
before the entire faculty of the
college in the near future.
I cant really say at this time
what action the college will take
on the idea of a grade appeals
board.
SGs Office of Academic
Affairs has supported grade
appeals boards for several
months. The guidelines it has
been supporting were also
approved in principle by the
non-defunct Action Conference
in February.

What have YOU
done today to
improve the
image of YOUR
Country.

u WHAT NEXT?
AS OIIP ENG
ZUu AG
ED
let
INTRODUCTION to UPPER DIVISION
p. C r~ -r
help you
Coming Soon will be programs presented for several of the upper division colleges.
PROGRAM FORMAT
* The Dean introduces HIS college
* A representative from the Placement Center offers ideas concerning
job opportunities for graduates of the college
* Each department chairman gives a capsule view of his field
General questions from the floor are invited
* Informal social
YOU WILL BE ABLE TO
Ask specific questions about curriculums
* Get acquainted with the chairman
* Gain valuable Information that can help you make the choice
among upper division colleges more intelligently
presentation' 1 ann U Cin9 dates places for each
I U D is presented by
The Gamma Beta Phi Society

Cmrx FOR ME, SANPY/ ) (v(BLCOMe'\
yjl ( ABOARP/ j
"'
f 1949 E, ! F.o'v'. Sf"dx'9. '*<

BY HOWARD POST

OPEN "
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru Fri
7/fc
1236 N.W 3rd Ave
JML STEAK HOUSE 4
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida



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GETTING SOME POINTERS
Nuclear engineering graduate students are at a premium these days,
possibly because of Vietnam, but the UF has three good enough to
rate U.S. Atomic Energy Commission fellowships. Getting some
pointers form Dr. Roland Dalton (coat), professor of nuclear
engineering, on how the analog computer's patchboard gives it
flexibility in problem solving, are (from left) Frank R. Markwell,
North Miami; Steve Long, Rockville, Md., and John Robert Genser of
here.
Says Dr. Dalton, the hybrid computer facility (analog-digital
combination) used here for nuclear research and graduate training
the only known university-owned unit in the Southeast United States
makes the university nuclear engineering program one of the best
equipped in the nation.

Campus Hub
Remodeling
The Hub is presently
undergoing a face lift. Plans call
for the building to be extended
out to the covered sidewalk.
Sam P. Getzen, Director of
the Campus Shop and
Bookstore, said this is the
second and final phase of
expansion which started last
year with improved Book Store
facilities.
The remodeling of the Hub
will allow for improved service
and more convenience for
everyone using the facilities,
Getzen said. The Bookstore
and Campus Shop will be
combined and the self service
sales will be handled by a single
fine of cashiers. There will also
be an outside window for the
sale of used books.
UF Business Manager Tom
Wells expects the renovation to
be completed by the start of the
Fall quarter.
Tha new single enterance
operation is designed to handle
the needs of the projected
34,000 students that will be
attending UF by 1980, Wells
said.
THERE 'S MORE OF
The Wide,
Wild World
of New Film
program 1
in MAY 14-15 UNION
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GAINESVILLE MALL

PLANETARIUM DECISION COMING TODAY
Museum To See Stars?

By TOM SPAIN
Alligator Correspondent
You may be able to see the
stars without the aid of drugs if
a planetarium is added to the
new Florida State Museum on
campus. A decision on
constructing a $150,000
planetarium is expected to be
made by Wednesday.
Construction costs of a
planetarium would add $70,000
to the museum project with
furnishings and equipment
bringing the total to around
$150,000, according to UF
planning consultant William
Munson.
The planetarium would be
similar to the one recently
completed at the University of
South Florida. It would seat
about 150 people, and be
capable to three shows daily.
Only the best quality equipment
would be used to make the
facility useful for teaching and
research.
The biggest problem is
money.
Dr. J. C. Dickenson, director
of the Florida State Museum, is
working with various
foundations trying to secure
funds.
Munson said it is very
unlikely the whole project could
be delayed, so the money will
have to be committed by
Wednesday if the planetarium is

Just a walk away
from U.F. campus a,
1620 W. UNIV. I
UN ,V E RS,TY PLAZA j
t&%\ Bettes I


to get a definite go-ahead.
If the planetarium were
constructed after the museum is
completed, costs would be
higher so Munson feels it would
be more economical to build
them both at the same time.
Construction of the Museum has

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Wednesday, May 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

begun at the comer of Newell
Drive and Radio Road.
Architecture of the
planetarium would follow the
lines of the rest of the museum
with the planetarium below
ground level and covered with a
mound of earth.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 14,1969

EDITORIAL
Rumor is an ugly animal nobody knows quite how to
kill. And rumor has had a tight strangle-hold on Accent 69
for the past month or more. Its time for the rumor to die.
Accent 69 is not snow-white by any means. Many of
their actions were slightly on the left side of right and
Accent 69 Chairman Larry Benin admits it. But this is not
to say the only memory of this years Accent should be bad.
Benin and his crew put on a great show, and this is what
they wanted to do more than anything else. They deserve
the praise they received. And they also deserve more now
than the sly whispers floating around among ambitious
student politicos.
The rumors ranged from embezzlement of up to $3,500
of UF student money to accusations, never attributed to
anyone, of all sorts of lesser graft and corruption.
Lets make the rumors fact, Benin said. We agree. But
things suddenly got very quiet and rumor become a voice
out of the woodwork.. .everywhere but nowhere to be
found.
We looked at Accents books. 7 hey didnt try to hide
anything. Receipts form the liquor stores were there. So
were the cancelled checks from the illegal checking account.
And to the frustration or amazement of the rumor-mill, the
toatals Accent 69s budget report listed balanced.
And so the story is out, and we hope the rumor animal
will die in the woodwork and rot away. It should never have
been bom in the first place, and now it must die.
There are more important problems facing Accent.
The Student Senate must realize that a program like
Accent cannot be produced on a strict line-item budget set
eight or nine months in advance. There are expenses the
new Accent chairman will encounter that he cannot imagine
until the program begins to materialize. And what is he to
do once the money bags are closed and the senate is
guarding the golden eggs like a hungry bird?
Accent has no slush fund. It can only go to outside
sources for the extra dollars at the last minute. And Accent
got, and will probably continue to get, promises of all kinds
of financial support tossed out in the heat of enthusiasm for
the program.
But what happens when the dust of the week dies down
and the budgetary deficits stand out like sore thumbs?
There must be a provision allowing Accent to get cash
for the small expenditures of the week without expecting
the students involved to lay out their own cash and only
hope the Student Body Treasurer approves the requisition
two or three days later.
There is also the question of the hospitality room and
the purchase of liquor with funds taken in from delegate
tickets. Is this to be allowed, and if not, why not say it in
black and white instead of leaving the chairman of Accent
in limbo, forced to be a teetotaler or a book juggler?
These are things of substance that must be answered with
the same energy the rumor-mongers tried to manufacture
their own substance.

paaasThe Fifth = B B Be3BO = laanrinnrlni ~ l r1 mnnnnnni luuaoDDaaaaoDDDnnnn
Enough!...Close,...RealClose
1 ? W
haonnonnnaaiaooooaoDaanaaDDnnnHDennnuuuJqton Straight mbsJ

In a continuing effort to stay on top of things,
(no mean feat in Central Florida) I browsed last
weeks issue of Time magazine the other day.
The lead story fairly leapt out at one THE
CAMPUS UPHEAVEL: AN END TO PATIENCE
meaning, we were duly informed at the close of the
first paragraph, that the feelings of much of the
U.S. towards the radicals was (now get
this) ... enough!
Enough!... ENOUGH! (with an exclamation
mark bygod.) Outasight!... Enough!
Well thats cute.
Thats real cute.
But you gotta give Time credit, its trying so hard
to be objectively liberal (an objective liberal
thats what Hubert Humphrey was). But when the
chips are down, (barricades up) Time shows its true
mettle: It aint got no freaking cojones.
Time prattles on: The depth and danger of
campus disorder was brought home to Americans by
the photograph a few weeks ago of rifle-carrying
Black Militants at Cornell..
Ohmygod.
Cant you see the horrible black humor (no pun
intended, brothers) in the last line? Just change a
few words youve got:

Th- Jafil ... ... ....
_ Florida / -.-. ; ;
Alligator V
is the exercise of responsibility.
Dave Doucette / V
Raul Ramirez / 1
Managing Editor / $ I
Carol Sanger \ jj
Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
Ammm "What Was That?"
Ten Year Budget Inadequate

MR. EDITOR:
Karen Eng has pointed out
quite rightly some of the
problems involved in ten year
budget forecasting for the UF,
but I think several of the main
problems must be enlarged
upon.
To consider the Defense
Department as a model for a ten
year budgeting program is
almost reprehensible. Every
military estimate of what it
takes to run the strategic as well
as tactical uniformed defense of
this country since 1945 has been
questionably inadequate. This
type of scare-budgeting by the
military is really outrageous. For
instance, the installation of the
ABM defense system was first
estimated to be as low as costing
5 billion dollars. Several weeks
later it has risen to 10 billion or
more.

The depth and danger of Vietnam was brought
home to Americans by the photograph of
rifle-carrying white militants (you got a better
description?) at Saigon. Or how about The depth
and danger of political corruption was brought
home to Americans by the photograph of
rifle-carrying badgeless policemen at Chicago .
Time has found the Lost Chord of journalism,
forsooth, the all-purpose sentence.
ENOUGH! Again baby: ENOUGH! One more
time ENOUGH! Eric Hoffer for President!
Well just what the hell does Time and Stephen C.
and LBJ and Dick Nixon ET AL think weve been
saying for the last five years. What was the New
Hampshire primary and the Ambassador Hotel in
LA. and the blood in Chicago all about 9
ENOUGH? ENOUGH?!!! BULLSHIT!
Ill tell you enough.
Enough of Air Force lackeys forging two billion
dollar lies so Lockheed wont get hurt on the stock
market. (Two billion dollars. Isnt that incredible?
Can you imagine what two billion dollars would do
for hunger in this country?)
Enough of fighting for democracy in
Southeast Asia while were paying 100 million
dollars to Franco (that sweet little ol dictator) so

What has this example to do
with the UF? For one thing, we
are living in one of the most
revolutionary societies on the
face of the earth. The progress
of higher education in America
is almost astounding. Even here
in Gainesville/Hogtown the
University of Florida has
expanded unbelievably in the
past two years. Education is
soon going to be the biggest
business in America. Who
would have guessed that new
buildings have sprung up so
rapidly on our campus that
students who have been here
four years have difficulty
locating them? The growth of
the city of Gainesville/Hogtown
itself is remarkable to anyone
who has surveyed the city.
All this leads to is the
proposition that one should
proceed with caution in

w
we can keep our jet bombers in Spain for another
ten years.
Enough of 500 dollar maximum fines for
industries that dumped so much raw sewage into the
' Hudson River last year you cant swim in it south of
Poughkeepsie.
Enough of income tax codes that let over 200
people in the million dollar a year income bracket
get away without paying one cent in income taxes
last year.
Enough of phony patriots and armchair admirals
condemning Capt. Bucher when all he did was save
the lives of 83 men; (something the brass themselves
didnt even try to do.)
Enough of oil depletion allowances and mafia
corruption from Miami Beach to the Ohio
statehouse and illegal stoop labor being allowed,
across the Califomia-Mexico border to help break
Ceaser Chavez strike.
Enough. Qjesuschristenough.
Ill tell you when its enough.
And dont hold your breath waiting.
(EDITOR S NOTE: This was the first of a two
part series. Tomorrow Mr. Straight promises to by
on some intellectual heavies regarding student
dissent.)

estimating the needs of a
university community ten years
from now. By itself, the price of
technological progress is
constantly accelerating, not
merely at a fixed rate, but
cumulatively.
To speak of education in
terms of money is to devaluate
the purpose of learning in its
most spiritual sense, yet to those
who are involved in keeping the
university in operation, money is
an everyday consideration. Let
us hope they are aware of the
pitfalls in prophesy and that on
some new dawn the money man
puts into education hopefully
will lead to a fresh awakening of
vigor and spirit and charity
which this country needs so
alarmingly.
MICHAEL ABRAMS 4JM



-Speaking Out Out

This letter is in reply to your article attacking captialism. It is
certainly not true that my task is freedom from capitalism, partly
because I approve of capitalism but mostly because I do not think
that I have a particular task.
Early in your article you referred to negative freedom as lack of
interference in ones affairs and imply that positive freedom is
different. Does positive freedom involve the presence of such
intereference?
If so, a quick check with a dictionary (admittedly written by the
white power structure) will reveal that the accepted meaning of the
word freedom is more negative than positive.
You state that considerable property is necessary for any
significant exercise of freedom yet your article constitutes such an
exercise. May we conclude therefore that you have considerable
property?
In your unfortunate example, laws which repress black militatns
can hardly be considered the natural outcome of a system based on
lack of interference. Unless the prevention of looting, arson, and
guerrilla action is considered repression.
Your alternatives (human rights and positive freedom) are
neither defined nor explained except by a cryptic statement hinging
on the meaning of the positive encouragement of all diverse
elements, of society to develop creatively.
I would like to give a brief description of the source of your
premises that the poor produce all the and the rich are parasites.
Starting at the bottom, a simple manual laborer in America is likely
to have a television and perhaps a car. He probably lives in a house
H 11 i* 11 r x
sq: voted t-h at
THIS PLACe u/AS }
APeGIUATE HOu)/
Jp, ABOUT AC<.O5£R J
fry |
izzn fW
II )
Have you ever attempted to shoot pool on a weekend?
DARRELL CUNNINGHAM 4ED
Reitz Union No Dump

MR. EDITOR:
As a member of the throng of
at least 10,00 apathetic Florida
students, I usually express my
opinions to myself rather than
write letters to the Alligator.
However, a few students
criticism of the Reitz Union
(Students Sepak Harshly in PR
Survey on Union) in the May 9
issue has moved me to action.
Dont these students realize
that we have here at the
University of Flroida a student
union that would be the envy of
the majority of colleges and
universities in the nation?
Students are provided with a
game room, snack bar, movies,
color TV, and a meeting place
all at a nominal cost.
Os course the combination of
student-oriented activities with
over-all university funcitions is
necessary. This method is the

Benefits To Poor And Rich

only economical way to provide
everyone with the use of a
multi-million dollar facility.
I have seen the student
unions at many other colleges
and universities. They are little
more than ramshackle old
buildings which nobody else
wanted so they were given to the
students.
If these students think the
union has to be a dump to be
enjoyed, I ask them only to
realize that is exactly what we
would have were it not for the
combination of all activities
under one roof.
I wonder what the reaction
will be when we get the
proposed Student Activities
Center. Will this structure be
too antiseptic for students
taste? Will they long for the
good old Florida gym?
JOE DARREL, 4BA

wu

lAttkeu. ar

with a floor, electricity, and running water. Compare his situation
with that of a manual laborerin some other country or in this one a
few decades ago.
The professional or semiprofessional usually has an income
between ten and twenty times that of the manual laborer. It should be
evident however, that he contributes even more than that to society
by making clothing, housing, electricity, and food production and
distribution possible.
As for the very rich parasites they can only spend their money
or save it. If they spend it they must give it to someone, probably
poorer than themselves. When a rich man buys a house he pays the
salaries of dozens of skilled, semiskilled, and unskilled workers. If he
saves it it is immediately lent out to people who will use it.
The only true parasite is the person on welfare. He contributes
exactly nothing to society but gets food, clothing, and shelter out of
it. Granted the food, clothing, and shelter are frequently marginal but
society does not benefit even marginally from the existence of a
welfare class.
I hope that I have at least dented some of the misconceptions
about the relative benefits to the poor and rich in a capitalist society.
In your article you indicated that you feel China is doing a better
job of solving human n&eds than America. I do not feel that my
needs would be better satisfied in China than here, but if you do, I am
certain you could manage to move there. In a capitalistic society
individuals are quite capable of working toward their own conceptions
of dignity and greatness.

I Like My Name, Buddy

MR. EDITOR:
David Hornes message in
Black Voices of May 7 is
clear. It comes through like this:
I see right through you and
your world, Whitey, and I know
what makes you tick. But our

Neo-Nazi Americans

MR. EDITOR:
Recently I came across some literature published
by the National Youth Alliance, which is a national
dues-paying organization comprised of supporters of
George Wallaces presidential campaign and other
young people with ultra-conservative political
philosophies. Many of the ideas contained in these
publications are throught-provoking and disturbing,
to say the least. I thought more people should be
aware of this segment of American politics, and
therefore I submit some quotations, which have not
been taken out of context, from NYA literature.
The following comes from the May, 1969
newsletter, which is headed by the quotation: Free
men are not equal; equal men are not free.
Moving fast to confront the enemies of freedom
and western civilization, regional and state leaders
met in Pittsburgh recently to plan and coordinate
activities of the NATIONAL YOUTH
ALLIANCE ... One of the highlights of the
program was a demonstration of defensive
techniques of judo and karate. During this
demonstration a locked door was unlocked and
broken open by a photographer from Life magazine,
who snapped three pictures and ran, hotly pursued
by the efficient NYA security force ... the NYA
now faces the smears of the organized establishment
and its kept press. Repeated attacks by the high
priest of hatred, Drew Pearson, have only
strengthened the group. In the words of the great
Nietzsche, What Does Not Destroy Me, Makes Me
Stronger.
Os course, not everyone you know can measure
up to NYA standards, and the challenge confronting
us. Prospective members should be strong in mind,
body, and soul. They should be aware of the destiny
of themselves and their cultures, and willing to take
the steps necessary to restore our constitutional
republic.
The following is from an NYA recruiting leaflet:
You are an American student. You probably come
from a middle or working class family where you
have had to work for many of the things you have

By Harry Reid

black world is a whole other bag.
I absolve myself and my
brothers from any moral
obligations toward our white
fellow-Americans, but we blacks
have earned and retain the right
to serve as arbiters of white
morals and behavior. I can

* f Wadnfc&ay/Mrfy'f*; Florida AlfigaW;

owned ... You are in school for one reason to get
a decent education ... Suddenly you find yourself
swallowed up in a morass of confusion, decay, and
anarachy ... You cant stand the sight of the drug
culture on your campus.
Classes are even more shocking. Your history
professor tells you that the three greatest men in
history are Karl Marx, Fidel Castro and Eldridge
Cleaver. Your sociology professor spends most of
his time defending homosexuality and decrying
American fighting men in Vietnam. The black
militants have the run of the campus. Your girl
friend has been insulted by the blacks.
You speak out one day in history class. You say
Karl Marx was a liar, Fidel Castro is a butcher and
Eldridge Cleaver is a convicted rapist. You have
passed all your tests, handed in all your reports and
havent missed a day of class. Yet, when you receive
your semester grade card, you find yourself with an
F in history. You flunk, but the black students who
hardly ever show up for class, never hand in reports
and flunk the tests get top grades.
One day, a fellow student who feels as you do
says that a bunch of students are meeting tonight to
try to combat the Left on campus... A local NYA
field coordinator will speak to you and your friends.
Now you have somewhere to turn. Now you can
fight!
There are other obvious hints and mentionings of
racism and fascism, too numerous to list in this
limited space.
It is one. thing to be conservative or
even-ultra-conservative, but to pattern a fascist
movement along the lines of the Nazi Party of
pre-war Germany is very brazen. People who are
unaware of the true philosophies and aims of the
NYA and campus organizations, which proclaim
themselves as saviors of American constitutionalism
and patriotism, should be wary of such
organizations until they clarify their positions on
these issues, in order to help stem the growing
fascist, Neo-Nazi movement in America.
CHARLES SPIVEY 4BA

Advice
and Dissent

: :
define your world, but mine i:|
way beyond you.
Nice work if you can get it;]
Dave, but no self-respecting man;
of any color will grant you that:]
privilege. Its no starting point.]
t
i
BRUCE P. JENNINGS 7AS
j

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 14, 1969

BA pants suit with wide legs WRAh
and vest in canary yellow Rfegggx fofjSgKJl
by Evan Picone. Peek-a-boo
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Jests to complete the outfit. <>
Modeled by Suzanne.
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p yw
A most unusual style in a |P^
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dress by Tootique
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Wartneeday, May 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 9



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Mint Honda S9O 66 model. Excellent
condition $l3O or make offer. 4546
NW 13 St. Lot 21. (A-3M34-P)
For sale: Bx3l trailer and Bxl
cabana air conditioned. Next to
campus in Glynwood Park. Good
condition, 1495. Call 372-2673.
(A-5M34P)
Playful 7-wk. tiger kittens. Part
Siamese, predominately black, beige
markinqs on face. Dewormed
house-broken $4 ea. Call 378-2077,
1766 NE 21 PI. (A-3M34-P)
1964 Pontiac Lemans, 2 dr,
automatic, V-8, radio, good
condition. S9OO or best offer. Call
Elaine 392-3569 or 378-4179.
(A-5M34-P)
Yammaha 350 Ex. condition.
Crash helmets incl. owner in service.
Low mileage. Call 372-0148 after
4p.m. (A-st-133-p)
1964 Lambretta 125 cc runs great
good transportation and economical.
Luggage rack incl., tires like new.
$75.00 Call 378-8072 after 6:00.
(A-st-132-P)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
SCM portable electric typew/iter,
model 110. Like new, 1 yr. old,
hardly used. Must sell for S9O. Need
cash. Call 378-3709. (A-5M32-P)
1968 Vandyke 12x52,
airconditioning. Located Varsity
Villa, $650 down, $81.92/mo. Call
376-6555 after 6 p.m. (A-st-132-P)
65 Honda S9O recently overhauled.
Tools included, $l6O. Call Kathie
anytime 392-9796. (A-3M35-P)
PUSSY CATS Descended from a
genuine Turkish alley cat. Long hair,
6 to 12 weeks old, 5 cents apiece.
Call Brenda 392-1451 before 5:00.
(A-2t-135-P)
Bell tape deck use with any amp.
New $250, now SBO. Also LUCAS
flamethrower driving lights
lOO.OOOc-Pea. Both for $lO.
378-2719, Steve. (A-5M35-P)
REMINGTON STANDARD
TYPEWRITER: NEARLY NEW.
BEST OFFER. Call 378-4994.
(A-3M35-P)
SURFBOARD HANSEN 50-50
Model, very good condition 9 6.
Good stable riding, can be seen at my
apt, call 372-5007 after 6.
(A-st-135-P)
Honda 50, electric start, excellent
shape. Just touch the button and she
purrs. $75, 376-9025. (A-3M36-P)

Hi V y \ SPECIAL §1
\ 1 Lunch and Dinner
Wy~ fia WEDNESDAY SOCIAL flf
i CHICKEN STEW 1
1 DU MPLINGS 11
w Thursday Special |||-
I BROILED CALVES LIVER 1
1 & ONIONS 1
I MORRISON'S 1
1 CAFETERIAS I
||L GAINESVILLE MALL J||

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 14, 1969

1 FOR SALE
SJ
.>;*x x*>x*x*xxx-ssv;vx*xx*x*x*xssxx £i
GUNS GUNS GUNS. I nventory
over 500, Buy, Sell, Trade, Repair.
Reloading components.
Lay-Away-Plan, no carrying charge.
Reblueing. HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, MICANOPY,
466-3340. (A-18M36-C)
Siamese cats for sale Three of our
male Aristocats" left. Blue point
mother. Seal point father. Litter
trained, playful, lovable. Bargain
$15.00 including Enteritis shots. Call
376-9911. (A-lt-136-P)
For Sale 1964 Monza Corvair. New
tires, 1 owner. Tele. 378-3847.
(A-st-136-P)
Used U-haul type closed trailer for
sale. 6x, sllO. Call Ed 378-1978
evenings. (A-st-136-P)
GARAGE SALE prints, furniture,
dishes, hi-fi, antiques. Sat-May 17.
1731 NW 55th Terr. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
or call 378-2741. (A-3M36-P)
Mens English bicycle $25; Two
headed goose neck study lamp $10;
portable stereo, record player &
clock radio in need of repair best
offer; hanging lamp $10; 9x12 gold
carpet S2O. 376-2308. (A-3M36-P)
SONY TC-355 stereo reel to reel tape
deck with 3 heads, 3 speeds, instant
stop-start, sound on sound and more.
Perfect shape, only 5 months old,
still under warranty. Can be used for
sound effects. Bob, 378-0879, $155.
(A-3M36-P)
HONDA 50cc includes tool kit,
helmet, face mask, Operator's
Manual. SSO. Call 378-7729 after
4:00 p.m. (A-st-136-Pj
Large frost-free Wizzard refrigerator.
Cools well. Body fair. 4 years old,
S6O. 378-3940, 319 SE 26 Terr, after
six. (A-3M36-P)
1964 Pontiac Catalina 2 door sedan.
Excellent cond. New brakes, tune up
hoses, etc., Delco air shocks rear.
Must sell $695. 376-0229.
(A-3M36-P)
DON'T merely brighten your
carpets... Blue Lustre
them .. eliminate rapid resoiling.
Rent electric shampooer sl. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-136-C)
\wwx*xx.xwy>x\x<^xxx<*:*ssssx
FOR RENT 1
2 br; l>/2 bath Williamsburg
townhouse apt; dishwasher; central
air; off pool; nice view; Available
June 15. Call 378-8638 after 5 p.m.
(A-5M35-P)
Best Deal In Town! Sublet this
summer 2 bdr. cent, ac; wall to wall,
furbished brand new, apt. Everything
you could want, only $125/mo.
378-8777. (B-2M34-P)
Lankmark poolside apt. 3 girls to
sublease summer quarter. Good
condition, choice location. Avoid the
rush. Come by No. 37. (B-5M34-P)
Apartment, 1 bedroom, air cond.,
washer; near campus. $265 for
summer. 372-1036. (B-2M36-P)

FOR RENT I
Summer sublet 1 bedroom furn. A/C
apt. at Williamsburg 5 min. from
campus behind VA Hospital, sllO
mo. From 15 June 392-0140 days,
376-5091 nts. (B-5M35-P)
Available for summer qtr trailer, 3
br, IV2 bath, washer, air cond.
completely furnished, sllO monthly,
plus utilities. Call Hugh, 378-3301.
(B-5M35-P)
Sublease quiet, comfortable Village
34 apt. AC & private patio, $lO5/mo.
Last mo. rent paid. Call Pete evenings
372-3991. (B-5M35-P)
Will give 20% discount on security
deposit on single apt at University
Gardens starting June. 12 month
lease. Call Bobbie 376-5542 after
4:00 p.m. (B-5M35-P)
Apt. 1 bedroom, A/C, 1 block from
Tigert Hall, SBS/month for summer,
furnished. Can have for fall too,
378-6054. Call after 4:00 for best
results. (B-st-135-P)
Williamsburgh Poolside Apt. For 3 or
4 to sublet starting June 15. June
rent paid. Spacious 2 bedrm, 2 bath,
AC, SSO per mo. 376-0362.
(805M34-P)
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21t-115-p)
Sublet one bedroom Summit House
Apt. E-26. Pool, air cond. $134
monthly. Availalbe June 1. Call
378-6784 after 6 p.m. or contact
office. (B-st-132-P)
Moving Must sublet June 1, Beautiful
new furnished 1 br apt. overlooking
pool at Summit House 378-9734.
(B-5M32-P)
HAVE YOUR OWN ROOM!!
NEED MALE ROOMMATE
IN MODERN 4-BEDROOM
HOUSE FOR ONLY $35 PER
MONTH PLUS % UTILITIES.
IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY.
CALL 376-0802.

IRisl Sicudi Today |
| T>thow 378-2434 F |
L "A FILM OF GREAT BEAUTY!' I ||
One man's honor... J£% I
Another man's life...
Jf\L I %AttferConies^F
|B ANTHONY QUAYLE ori levy iohn colun Rj |R|
Imm The \e v.rkfi *hn,l Onu TIiPIM P HI'MP IPk h, IKMOKII k I KPMP
HB Produced by ROBERT EMMETT CINNA Directed by | LEE THOMPSON
LAST 2 TO EXPERIENCE Gr6fitlll(iS 111
1 1 1 DAYS I
"' 1 RtUASt IN COiOR I 1
NOTE: SUMMER MOVIE CLUB TICKETS ON SALE NOW 12 SHOWS $1.50
4 ... * .

#v!*M!*X*! V*-*-*- # -*^-*-*-***** *"*** *******"^^****"""'**** # ***"*!!!
FOR RENT I
LIVE AT LANDMARK APTS.
During summer. Corner apt., pool,
health club. Apt 129. Call 376-0374.
(803M36-P)
FOR RENT Comfortable 1 bedroom
apt. 2 blocks from campus, two car
garage. Rent reduced from 100 to
SBO for summer. 867-4182 aft. 8
p.m. (B-5M36-P)
lyte
Admittance will be denied
to all under 18 years of age.
CTATE 2:20 4:35

I- FINAL DAY
KENNER" AND
"WITH SIX YOU GET EGGROLL"
\ Jfe IKM AMERICAN INTERNATIONAL
|| i|pi|| jgs a Jeremy SLATE mam ROARKE JOCELYN LANE
-PLUS CO-FEATURE
BSlgpi
HjWSiF'ZI LI MITE D ENGAGEMENT
TODAY d TOMORROW
Performances at 1:00 3:12 5:24 7:36 9:48
...For the first time, motion picture cameras
have been permitted to roam the magnificent chambers of
Englands royal and historic palaces and of such treasuries of
the national heritage as the Tower of London.
ifirXucES ofa Queen
' "fM mi in rf
'm. R. jpy? ;
, THIS ENGAGEMENT ONLY-ALL SEATS $2.00

%VMW?JQKOJJxrt:ia u ii j
FOR RENT
Sublet 2 bedrm. i ownhouse
Landmark II Apt. You cant afford
not to callgreat deal! After 5:00
any day 378-8066. (B-st-136-P)
showtime 1
| 8:30
J! C OlOl
PLUS THE ALL TIME GREAT
I 'THUNDER ROAD
starrin^ober^aitchua^^B



| FOR RENT ; |
50 trailer with 40 closed-in cabana 2
bedroom, AC, pool, tennis arts, VB
CT etc., 4 minutes from campus
SBS/month avail, for sum. qrt. Call
378-0748 nite. Also looking for
roommate when I return for fall.
(B-6t-133-p)
Four bedroom-two bath house,
air-conditioned, one block from
Tigert. For rent for summer quarter
200 a month. Call 378-5914.
(B-5M34-P)
6O VW camper rebuilt eng. new
paint and interior, radio, heater, large
water tank with elec, pump, ice box
and camping stove. Call 392-9367.
(B-3M36-P)
| WANTED '""1
ft-x-vw
Stamp out mediocrity! One male
roommate for the summer and next
year. Ranch house with pool and
fireplace. Call 378-4877 after 5 p.m.
(C-st-135-P)
2 coed roommates summer qtr,
Landmark Townhouse; poolside,
dishwasher, TV, disposal, IV2 baths,
air cond, barbq, $46/mo. Call
392-8487 or 392-8496. (C-3M35-P)
One male roommate needed for
summer quarter in Phase II
Landmark Apt. June rent free. Call
378-7142. TV cable; pool, etc.
(C-2t-135-P)
Need 2 coed roommates or persons
to sublet 2 bdrm Landmark apt for
sum qtr with option to renew lease
Ca 11376-2129. (C-4t-133-p)
Male roommate 60.00 per month Air
conditioning 1105 NW 4th Ave. no
utilities. Private bedroom 376-5381.
ext. 308. (C-st-133-p)
Such a Deal! S9O each for summer
qtr. Need 3 male roommates or
sublease apt. 2 bedroom, fireplace,
AC, cable TV, dishwasher, disposel, 2
pools, gym, sauna bath, laundry
room, many extras. No. 9 Landmark
378-9844 anytime. (C-st-133-p)
Two roommates wanted for 2
bedroom French Quarter apt.
Immediate occupancy or summer
quarter. Call 376-0613 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-133-p)
COED roommates for summer.
Village Park poolside 2 bedroom apt.
MONETARY CONCESSIONS. Call
378-7272 or come to VP 56.
(C-st-133-p)
Coed roommate for large one
bedroom apt at Williamsburg.
Immediate or summer occupancy.
Call 378-0684 after 6 p.m. Great
view and sunsets!! (C-3t-136-P)
Ride wanted to Advanced Army
Summer Camp from Miami. Will split
expense equally, contact Steve at
372-9435, Rm. 471, call after 7 p.m.
(C-2M36-P)
Two roommates needed for summer
quarter. Two bedroom Summit
House apartment, s4l per month.
Call Cathy, 372-8716. (C-1M36-P)
Male roommate wanted. S9O. Pays
for entire summer quarter. 3 blocks
from campus. Air-conditioned. Call
392-7636 for, more information.
(C-2M36-P)
*
Wanted 1 male roommate for
summer qtr. Landmark apts. No. 25.
378-8438. (C-3M36-P)
Coed roommate wanted for summer
quarter. Place available 2 blocks from
campus. $95 for whole summer
quarter. Call 376-3573. (C-1M36-P)
Roommates, 1 or 2, to share sharp
French Quarter Apt. Summer qtr.
Live in luxury this summer. Call Don
or Paul 376-3947 or come by Apt.
24. (C-3M36-P)
Wanted: Female roommate for
summer quarter. 2 bedroom Camelot
Apt. on pool. You can move in
immediately. Apt 256. Call 378-9694
after 5:00. (C-5M34-P)
Need one male roommate for 4 man
apartment summer quarter. Call
Terry, 84 Landmark, 378-0674.
(C-st-134-P)
One groovy roommate to share a new
townhouse starting in September.
Such an apartment! Call Fran or
Bobbie, 378-3234. (C-3M34-P)
3 male roommates wanted for
summer. Air cond., pool, w-w carpet,
2 br $41.25 per month. June rent
free. Call 376-30*7 after 5 p.m.
(C-5t 134-P)
1 fern for 2 bdrm apt sum qtr
possibly longer. Very large newly
painted, AC. Ideal location, low rent.
Grad stud or sr. Call 376-4758 after 4
P.m. (C-5M32-P)
I HELP WANTED
Male: Have three part-time openings
for evening cashier. Also two
openings at 11-2 daytime. Apply
Kings Food Host, 1430 SW 13 St.
(E-ts-133-C)
Secretary wanted: must be proficient
in shorthand and typing, will train in
legal office. Call Mr. Roscow,
376-5242. (E-5M36-P)
Male parttime help over 21. Apply
Pizza Inn, 316 SW 16th Ave.
(E-lt-136-P)
MALE COUNSELORS NEEDED: At
Camp Mountain Lake for boys and
girls. For information c?lj'£79*o2Bs
evenings. (E-3T-136-P)

HELP WANTED
Several attractive girls to work
SIo,T!Si on n Next promotion
5/21-5/24. Rate $2.00 per hour. Can
split 9-6 with another girl if
necessary. Pormotions will run every
other week until Sept. All
promotions Wed. through Sat. Can
work daily or all 4 days. For
interview, call Humble Oil & Refining
Co. 3 72-0218, Mrs. Davis.
(E-3M35-P)
v
AUTOS
We buy & sell c m used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen Dealer, 4222 N.W. 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-130-ts-c)
66 Chevy Impala, clean, A.T.; R.H.,
327 engine, new tires, new brakes.
SISOO or best offer. Ben Poole,
376-3468. (G-5M34-P)
PONTIAC Tempest, 1966 custom
sport coupe, 326 with Hurst 4-speed.
Excellent condition, must sell by end
of month. Make an offer, 372-5688.
(G-5M34-P)
-?
1965 Sunbeam real clean good tires.
Real good shape mechanically- and
low mileage. Call evenings 372-7971
up to 11:30 p.m. (G-st-133-p)
69 Pontiac Tempest 6mo. new OHC
6 cylinder, stick-shift, radio, heater,
limelight greenAsk for Mike Halton
at circulation dest research library or
Call 378-4554 after 5:30 P.M.
(G-127-10t-p)

The Wide, Wild World
Os New Film Is Coming

in : : : : : :: y :
*! MM *
A UNIQUE 3-PROGRAM SERIES OF 26 NEW FILMS FROM 9 COUNTRIES
featuring
tajP LONDON POP SAN FRANCISCO PSYCHEDELIC
JAPANESEDADA LATERNA MAGIKA
fC \ First U.S. showings of the worlds most outstanding creative
|M m short films ... black comedy and drama of the absurd ...
I m continental wit and lyrical humanism ... animation and
H collage graphics ... electronic color and surreal sound
Sm ... science-fiction fantasy and documentary realism
VERSAILLES
/ > 1 Paris, Albert Lamorisse
/ ] f. A [ \ RAKVICKARNA
y 1 M A J DESERTION
erman Y
SAMADHI
Hnr ) QT>_ San Francisco
\ r&O why DID YOU K,ss ME awake?
\ x t 1 ** West German y
jL Jp 1A
tonight all make love
IN
with Michael The
others
PROGRAM ONE PROGRAM TWO PROGRAM THREE
Ail Shows at 7:00 lonite A Thors. May 18-19 May 21-22
REITZ UNION AUDITORIUM Admission SI.OO

| AUTOS I
iWWiifBWWMMMi aa 13 AVAm^a.l,V
1962 TR4. Needs new clutch, but
OK otherwise. S2OO. Call Joe
Godfrey at 378-9617 after 7:00.
(G-lt-136-P)
1969 MGB Army forces sale. Call Lee
Klein at 372-9404. (G-st-132-P)
66 Pont. Temp. Custom 2 dr. HT.
AC, R & H, 3 Speed Hurst Tran.
41,000 mi. Getting married, must
sell. $1,500. Call 378-5f45.
(G-5M32-P)
63 vw Microbus, excellent
conditon, new paint, 2 new tires,
$895, 378-4260 or 376-7812.
(G-st-133-p)
1961 Chevy stationwagon standard
transmission, $250 or best offer,
376-2308. (G-3M36-P)
Corvair 1964, 2 dr. safety checked,
$350 or best offer. Call 378-1489.
(G-5M34-P)
Sunbeam Alpine 1964, good
condition, British sports car. Fun to
drive, economic transportation $620.
Call George Agraz, 392-0929 or
376-1453. (G-4M35-P)
64 MG 1100. Rebuilt engine,
transmission. > ew clutch,
differential. Must sell. Call 378-9110.
(G-3M34-P)
use
Gator
Ads

| PERSONAL j
WMAR, Miami: Thanks, love, for a
beautiful weekend. Ill return to Icve,
laugh, and conquer soon. Until
then remember and smile. Be good
do-do. Your Southern Belle.
(J-st-134-P)
Would you like to be a member of
Maas Brothers 1969-1970 College
Board? Apply now any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15t-129-c)
Cessna 150 $9 per hr. Flight
instructor wanted, 495-2124 after 7
p.m. (J-10t-136-P)
Photography your bag? Enter the
Reitz Union Photo Contest. Cash
prizes offered. For rules & info, go to
Rm. 310 Reitz Union. 392-1655.
(J-5M32-P)
Attention Photographer needs
models. Choice of photors -in
exchange for modeling. Call John
392-7500 after 4 p.m. (J-3M36-P)
I LOST & FOUND |
*V**************t*!*%?!!Me*e*eW%* 4 i # a*a*#*l # l # I*2*r*r # l*r** # *** # ***'
Lost: Black 3-ring notebook in
scooter zone of school of business,
Friday. Call 372-3877 reward.
(L-3M36-P)
LOST! LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOK,
medium blue, 2 inches thick.
Important! Has all my class notes.
Please call Richard T. Speight at
372-9276. (L-5M34-P)

Wednesday, May 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I SERVICES J
BOYS!!! Your coed maid service is
here! Dont miss out! Call Nancy or
Lisa. Terms to be arranged. Right
now call 378-5993. (M-1M36-P)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible but you'll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-106-c)
Dissertation, thesis or publication
drawings or graphs professional
graphic artist, Nancy McClelland.
378-4260. (M-st-133-p)
A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
il 'A

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 14, 1969

MOSCOW (UPI) Informed
Communist sources said Tuesday
about 1,000 regular Chinese
troops have crossed into Soviet
territory in the Sinkiang-Kazakh Sinkiang-Kazakhstan
stan Sinkiang-Kazakhstan area and are occupying
about 15 square miles.
The report, which could not
be officially confirmed, said the
situation was very tense and a
new military confrontation was
expected at any moment.
The report fallowed by three
days another report which told

Prisoners Get Tax Break

WASHINGTON (UPI) The House voted tax
breaks Tuesday for the 82 crew members of the
USS Pueblo on income while they were imprisoned
in North Korea last year.
The measure was passed* by voice vote without
debate and sent to the Senate for expected
approval. >
Under the bill, enlisted men of the crew would
not have to pay income taxes at all for 1968 while
they were in a North Korea prison for 11 months.

Sen. Ervin Cautions Senate
On Impeachment Attempts

WASHINGTON (UPI) One
of the leaders of the Senates
unsuccessful fight against the
nomination of Aoe Fortas to be
chief justice Tuesday cautioned
against any move to oust him
from the Supreme Court. <
Sen. Sam J. Ervin Jr., D-N.C.,
a former state -supreme court
justice, told the Senate the only
way Fortas could be removed
from the bench was by
impeachment with charges of
actual law violations.
Ervin spoke out after some
lawmakers threatened
impeachment to eject Fortas
from the court or else pressure
him into resigning because of his
acceptance then return -of a
fee from a charitable foundation
controlled by the family of
financier Louis E. Wolfson,
subsequently imprisoned for
stock manipulation.
If the House votes to impeach
an official, the Senate must
judge him. A two-thirds vote is
required for conviction.
Meanwhile, congressional
sources said the controversy
surrounding Fortas apparently
had delayed President Nixons
timetable for naming a successor
to retiring Chief Justice Earl
Warren, and Warren was
reported to have named an
informal committee of associate
justices to Judge Fortas case.
Ervin, who vigorously
opposed President Lyndon B.
Johnsons nomination of Fortas
to head the court last year when
Warren first wanted to retire,
told the Senate that the
constitution states that
l
I Iffliizi
I Sedan, Wagons, Sports
8 Cars, Trucks, 4-whoof
1 drive.
| No. 1 in Japan
I Godding fir Clark
Motors
S. E. 2nd Ave and S. E. 2nd St.
I Opart 8 A.M. f P.M.
378-2311

Chinese Troops Enter Soviet Territory

c (Slntted Wreoo Sntmxaiional

of an armed clash between
troops of the two Communist
countries in the same general
area.
Tuesdays report said the
infiltration was made on the

impeachment proceedings may
be brought only against officials
accused of treason, bribery or
other high crimes and
misdemeanors.
Fortas opponents, while
accusing him of impropriety, as
yet have not charged him with
violating any law.
Ervin also warned against any
action by the executive branch
of the government to pressure
Fortas into resigning or retiring.

I WIN I
WUWU
mm gSajii
I DIAL 1390 I
I LISTEN FOR DETAILS EVERY DAY AS I
8 WUWU SALUTES NATIONAL RADIO MONTH I
THINK MOD
HEAR EDWARD HELD, McCARTY HAU
THURS. MAY 15 2:00 P.M.
ADMISSION IS FREE
t
A University Lecture Series Presentation
Field's poetry has been described (by a Yugoslavian critic no less) as
disarmingly frank pop and sex stories. Field uses the seemingly
unpromising material of American popular culture horror movies,
comic strips, newspaper stories to create poems that are funny,
moving, and incisively descriptive of mid-twentieth cnetury America.
Dylan Thomas once defined poetry (partially) as words which make
you laugh and cry Field does both, often at the same time.

For Cmdr. Lloyd Bucher, the skipper, and the
other officers, taxes would be waived on the first
SSOO of each months pay.
Similar tax benefits now go to servicemen in
Vietnam, since it is a combat zone. Korea, however,
is not a combat zone, making the bill necessary for
the Pueblo crew to get the benefits.
In addition, the measure would waive income tax
owed by the estate of one dead crew member of the
ship.

night of May 2 following the
crossing into Soviet territory of
a group of Chinese herdsmen
driving cattle. The sources said
the civilians were expelled by
Soviet troops without the use of

The restraints placed upon the
President by the constitution are
even more strict than those
placed on the Senate, Ervin
said. It confers no role on the
President in matters of
removal.
Ervin, chairman of the Senate
constitutional rights
subcommittee, did not refer,
however, to consultations
between Atty. Gen. John N.
Mitchell, and Warren.

arms.
But the following night about
1,000 Chinese soldiers crossed
the border along a four-mile line
and penetrated two and a half
miles inside Soviet territory.
The Soviet frontier troops
refrained from any action, the
sources said, hoping to avoid
bloody clashes such as twice
occured in March along the
Ussuri River in the Far East.
More than 50 Soviets were killed
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and many more wounded in the
battles.
If peaceful persuasion fails
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J y A -V
Ombudsman Starts
| Alligator Action Line
| Creation of an Ombudsman Action Line column in the I
| Alligator is one of several changes Bill ModUn has undertaken in $
£ his first week as Ombudsman. '<
f The weekly column will feature a selected number of the |
cases solved through the office during the past week, Modlin S
said. J
jj: To prevent personal problems from being printed in the |
!% column, Modlin said he will ask students to specify whether c
:j: they would mind having their case in the column. No names will if
j; be used. . 5
§ Modlin has also drawn up a bill defining the office of the if
j Ombudsman which will be presented to the Student Senate £
if; tonight. The bill requires the Ombudsman to be appointed by if
|ij the student body president with senate approval. 5
j This is necessary, Modlin said, since in order for the t
i; Ombudsman to operate efficiently, the staff must be kept out i
$ of the political arena. :
x Students may call the Ombudsman office, 392-1650, at any fi
£ time and leave a taped message. :
Rat Cracking Down
OnUnderageDrinkers
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
If you are under 21, dont drink in the Rathskeller unless you want
to get in trouble and see the Rathskeller disappear.
The Rathskeller Board and the Dean of Mens Office are cracking
down on minors drinking beer and adults buying beer for minors.
The obvious reason for the crackdown is that the Rathskeller will
be closed by city, state or county officials, as will any business serving
alcoholic beverages to minors, if the rules are not followed.
A Rathskeller spokesman said, We know that many thousands of
UF faculty, staff and students are enjoying the Rathskeller and all
that it stands for. We dont want some irresponsible person to deny
those thousands the pleasure of the Rathskeller.
For those caught breaking the rules, one of three alternative
measures can be taken:
The case can be referred to the Dean of Men and the Committee
on Student Conduct. This can bring any action from acquittal to
suspension from school.
The case can be turned over to the municipal court. This can
result in a SSOO fine or six months in jail.
The persons membership can be revoked and the person
reprimanded, with no charges preferred.
Joe Hilliard, Rathskeller chairman, said the problem of punishing
minors drinking beer has not been serious. On the average, only about
one person a week is caught breaking the rules, and sometimes several
weeks go by with no one caught.
No one has been turned over to the municipal court. Minors using
fake I.D.s are usually referred to the Student Conduct Committee,
and people over 21 caught giving beer to minors have had their
memberships revoked.
Most of the cases have been falling in the third category, said
Hilliard.
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FLORIDA TOUR PRAISED
FBK Speakers Promote UF

Central Florida is now
gung-ho UF thanks to 16
student speakers from Florida
Blue Keys Speakers Bureau.
During the past three weeks
16 selected representatives
sponsored by FBK dispersed to
several cities in Central Florida
speaking before civic
organizations, high school
boards, and television cameras
on topics affecting college
students and campuses today.
All these businessmen see is
the newspaper reports of radical
protests, teacher beatings and
the warped side of campus life,
said Linda Tarler who spoke in
Fort Myers. The purpose of the
tour is to build a better rapport
between the college students and
adult world.
Other members of the
promotion team, who spoke on
everything from the editors
strike in Jacksonville to SDS,
include Linda Comparato, Keith
Mann, Betty Jo Padron, John
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Englehardt, Grover Robinson,
Dane Griffin and Jeff Fenster.
Also speaking were Ed
McGinnis, Bruce Flower, Lon
Lane, Tom Tworoger, Ralph
Glatfelter, Jack McEwan, Bob
White, and David Holbrook.
FBK and Jack Harkness, this
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Wednesday, May 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

years speakers bureau chairman,
have expressed their satisfaction
with the results of the program.
Letters have poured in from
leading citizens and the media
praising the program and
requesting speakers for this
summer as well as next year.
EAT-IN
TONITE
6PM
iHnr

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, May 14,1989

TEAM FACES MIAMI SATURDAY
Five Gator Netters Make All-SEC Squad

UFs three topseeded tennis
players were named Tuesday to
the first team AllSoutheastern
Conference squad.
The trio of Armi Neely,
Charlie Owens and Jamie
Pressley were the one, two and
three men on the Gator team
which swept through the SEC
championships in Baton Rouge
La. over the weekend.
3 M m HpnaSj MHng -t '
fMh.
NEELY

Gainesville Karate Dojo Club Hosts
1969 v.s. Open Florida Tourney

9
The 1969 U.S. Karate
Association Florida Open Karate
Tournament will be held at the
Gainesville High School Gym
Sunday.
The event is sponsored by
Gainesvilles Universal Karate

Graves Sees No Change
In UF-FSU Controversy

Ray Graves, UF athletic
director, said Tuesday that he
foresees no change in UFs
football schedule resulting from
a bill lately introduced in the

GatorSpeedWeekend
For 7O In Planning

Gator Speed Weekend got off
to a fantastic start with the Fun
Rally Saturday morning. The
Rally course, laid out by the
Harte Rallye Team, measured
the abilities of drivers and
navigators.
The course included the
campus area and the outlaying
districts of Gainesville. The rally
ended at Fat Boys with Bill
Harmon and Pete Kovi taking
first place in the novice class and
Mike and Cam McKinney taking
the expert class.
Tau Epsilon Phi won the
organization trophy during
Saturday nights action at the
Gainesville Dragway. The Teps

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The Gators also had two
members of their team on the
second AIISEC team. They
were Steve Beeland and Greg
Hilley.
Louisiana Stats Steve Faulk,
who lost to Neely in the
conference chahipionship match,
Mississippi States Rob
Cadwallader and Georgias
Danny Birchmore were the other
first team members.
Other members of the second
team were Georgias Bill Shippey
and Norman Holmes,
Kentuckys Tom Wade and
Tennessees Jim Ward.
The five honored Gators will
be in action here Saturday when
Florida hosts the University of
Miami Hurricanes.
UFs tennis team fresh from
their second consecutive SEC
crown will resume its rivalry
with the Miami Hurricanes,
Saturday, May 17th in
Gainesville.
The two schools met earlier
this season in Miami with the

Dojo, and will be directed by
Dirk Mosig, who is state
representative for the U.S.K.A.
in Florida,
The 1967 USKA Florida
Open was also held in
Gainesville, presented by Dirk

state legislature which would
require the UF and Florida State
University to face each other in
the seasons final game.
State representative Jimmy

accumulated 44 points and won
four class trophies. Tep Ben
Frish also won the top
eliminator in his red 440
Plymouth G.T.X.
Rounding out the weekend
was the Gymkhana held at the
Plants and Ground parking lot.
Paul Sundberg won the best time
of the day trophy in his Austin
Healey. Class winners were Dale
Cook, Les OBrien, Mark
Bowers, Clark Griffith and Bill
Kaiser. Program Council
Recreation Chairman Dan Ponce
said he felt the weekend was a
success and added that plans are
already in the making for next
years Speed Weekend.

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match being called 33 due to
darkness. When the match ended
the Gators were leading in the
remaining sets.
Last year the schools split, the
Gators winning in Gainesville
and the Hurricanes in Miami. UF
finished fifth in the NCAA while
Miami was fourth.
In 1968 when the Hurricanes
came to Gainesville, 3,000
OWENS

Mosig, drawing 6ver 150
contestants from all the
Southeast. The Grand Champion
in Sparring was Mike Foster of
Tampa, and in Kata, Randy
Webb, of Chattanooga, Tenn.
Competition at the tourney

Reeves of Pensacola, a FSU
graduate-, introduced the bill in
the Florida House of
Representatives.
in order to comply with the
scheduling requirement if the
bill passes, the UF would have to
break a binding contract with
Miami. This contract extends
into the late 19705.
Graves said that a pact was
just recently signed with Miami,
pitting the Gators and
Hurricanes on the seasons final
date for 12 years.
Said Graves: Were also
bound by contract to play FSU
in the early or middle season
through the 1977 season.
Were sure the legislature
wouldnt want us to forfeit these
contracts, Graves added.
Theres no perfect time to
play either team, according to
Graves. Since both games are
intense rivalries, it would be
poor scheduling to play them
back-toback.
The UF-Miami game has
marked the seasons end for the
last 24 years.

spectators, the largest crowd
ever to witness a collegiate
tennis match at UF, turned out
to watch the Gators defeat
Miami 72.
UF enters the match with an
18-Il record and an SEC
title. Ip the conference
tournament Armi Neely
captured the no. 1 singles,
Charlie Owens the n 0.2 singles,
Jamie Pressly no. 3, Steve
Beeland no. 4 and Greg Hilley
no. 5. Neely and Beeland teamed
to capture the no.l doubles
Owens and Hilley took the n 0.2
doubles and Pressly and Paul
Lunetta added the no. 3
doubles.
The Miami match will pit UFs
Neely against Pat Cramer in the
no.l singles, Owens vs. Luis
Garcia in the no. 2 spot, Pressly
vs. Peyton Watson in no. 3,
Beeland vs Steve Siegel in no. 4,
Hilley vs. Stan Shanbron and
Lunetta vs. Sven Ginman in the
sixth spot.
Saturdays match will be the

this Sunday will be in the
following divisions: Black Belts,
Brown Belts, Green Belts, White
Belts, Women, and Juniors. The
contestants will compete in both
free-style fighting, and kata
(formal exercises). All the top
Black Belts from the
Southeastern U.S. are expected
to compete. Trophies will be
awarded for Ist, 2nd and 3rd in
each division. The title of 1969
FLORIDA STATE CHAMPION
will go to the winner of Ist Place
in Black Belt Sparring.
Over 80 karate schools have
been invited to compete at the
event. Several well known karate
masters will be in attendance
and offer exhibitions for the
public, during the final matches
and events, starting at 5:30 p.m.
General admission will be $1.50;
students will pay $1.25, and
children under 12, 50 cents. The
proceedings will go towards
financing the 2nd TRIAS
INTERNATIONALS, a major
tournament to be held in
October on a nationwide basis.
The Gamesville team will
offer strong competition for the
visiting competitors. Though
Dirk Mosig will not compete,
acting as Director of the event,
Universal Karate Dojos team of
champions of previous tourneys
is expected to win many of the
trophies.

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last appearance for
All-American Neely and
Pressly, who are responsible for
UFs recent tennis success.
The Gators final home match
will begin at 1:30 pm.
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By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
The Gators and the
University of Mississippi Rebels
square off in Oxford, Miss., at
3:30 p.m. EDT today in the first
game of a best of three series
destined to determine the 1969
Southeastern Conference
baseball champion.
UF and Ole Miss reached the
league Finals by winning their
respective division titles. The
Gators breezed to the Eastern
crown with a 134 record while
the Rebels 11-5 mark in the
West eased them past Mississippi
State by a half game.
For the Gators, this is the

j£sWhatever Happened l
1 fjL To Gator Bimson? I

Last May UF Athletic Director Ray Graves
announced the signing of Gary Bimson, a blond
haired speedster to an athleticgrantin-aid for
football and track.
Gary was heralded as a double sportathlete
from California who would add depth to the squad.
He was also immediately available to compete for
the Gator football team since he had graduated
from El Camino Jr. College in California.
When Gary reported in August for football
practice sessions in Gainesville everything was going
smooth.
During the workouts he injured his right knee.
About two andahalf years ago my left
knee was operated on but it had healed by the time
I came here, 6foot, 181 pound transfer said. It
was before the first game that I messed up my right
knee.
After the injury Garys knee was put in a cast for
approximately four weeks. When he tried it out
after the cast was removed he ruptured a muscle in
the back of his leg.
Three days after my injury the coaches told me
I had to take the ACT test to qualify for my
scholarship, Bimson said.
Section six of the Southeastern Conference
application for scholarship states, Before any grant
becomes final I must present qualifying scores made
on a nationally recognized college entrance
examination such as the S.A.T. of the college
entrance examination board or tests of the
American College Testing (ACT) program.
Garys signature is on the application.
We asked Gary if he had taken the ACT before
we signed him and he assured us he had, UFs Head
Coach said. But Gary took the test three times for
us and never scored high enough to be eligible for a
scholarship.
Consequently Gator Bimson never became a

Champions
Purdue has won or shared the
Pig 10 Conference basketball
championship 14 times but the
Boilermakers played in only one
NOAA tournament."
EAT-IN
TONITE
6PM
THIRSTY

Gators Do Battle With Rebels
At Oxford In First Os Three

second straight year they have
reached the championship
round. And, like last season,
they are favored to take the
crown.
But Mississippi hopes it can
duplicate the feat of Alabama
and upset Coach Dave Fullers
nine. The Crimson Tide, after
bowing 4-3, rebounded to post
5-0 and 3-0 victories and go on
to represent the SEC in the
regional tournament of the 1968
college baseball World Series.
I believe Mississippi is
probably a better ball club than
the Alabama team we played last
year, Fuller said. But I think
were better, too, so this should
be a hard fought series.

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COURIER OR PICKREN TO PITCH

scholarship athlete and since he has taken the test
the maximum number of times he is no longer
eligible for a scholarship.
In the fall quarter, before the California transfer
had exhausted his trials at the test, the Athletic
Department helped arrange a loan for him until his
eligibility was cleared up.
The Athletic Department was then forced to
move him out of Yon Hall for the winter quarter.
Gary was also involved in some disciplinary
action in the fall with another football athlete.
I have less control over a non-scholarship
boy, Graves said, And I cant give him any more
chances.
Mrs. Floye Jordan, who runs the Gator training
table, gave Bimson a job mopping floors so he could
earn his meals.
Track Coach Jimmy Carnes had the 9.7 sprinter
try pole vaulting and was attempting to get him a
track scholarship until his chances for eligibility
expired. He has vaulted over 15 feet.
I would like to compete in track if my knee can
be straightened out, Gary said.
Now he can only compete as a nonscholarship
UF athlete.
The problem with his knee is in the process of
being corrected. The Athletic Department has put
him in Alachua General Hospital to be operated on
today.
We will take care of Garys knee operation,
Graves said.
The Athletic Department has made it possible for
Gary Bimson to stay in school and get his knee
taken care of. There are some athletes in other
schools who have gotten nothing after they were
injured.

Unlike in 1968, the deciding
games will be played in
Gainesville on Friday and, if
necessary, Saturday. But Fuller
is not sure if this is really an
advantage for the Gators.
It will be a psychological
advantage to return home for
the final games, he said. But
the fact that we have to travel
twice in one week, as opposed to
their once, may work against
us.
Any way that Fuller looks at
it, though, a win in Rebel
country today would give his
squad the biggest edge possible.
Before flying out Tuesday,
however, he was still undecided
about todays starting pitcher.

Jim Courier, the SECs top
hurler with a 10-1 record and a
1.54 earned run average, appears
the likely choice because it
would be possible for the
southpaw to come back with
two days rest and pitch a crucial
Saturday game. Even so,
righthander Glen Pickren, 4-3
with a 3.76 ERA, may get the
call against Mississippis
predominately righthanded
batting order.
One possible edge the Gators
might hold over Ole Miss lies in
the recent fortunes of the two
teams.
UF is coming off a
three-game sweep of Vanderbilt
in which Gator hitters blasted
away for 35 runs. The Rebels,
meanwhile, dropped a trio over

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Thanks to you,
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If you don't know where it is, then this
isn't for you.

Wednesday, May 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

the weekend to arch-rival
Mississippi State.
Hitting is confidence,
Fuller said. That we did well
against Vandy will definitely
help us in the championship
series. We are playing the kind of
ball now that should make us
tough in these next games.
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Page 15



Page 16

I, The Florida Alligator, H. 1969

ADVERTISEMENT

TC-OTHS&EtiCT.

1392-20971

Reservations
If your club or group is planning to meet at the
Rat for a party or banquet before the end of
the quarter be sure and make reservations now.
We've booked 8 groups in the last week and we
don't want to turn anybody away. Give us a
call for groups from 2 to 220. We also serve the
drop-ins, six days a week.
t*.
Food Specials
Don't forget the great food specials at
the Rat.
Mon.Chicken
Wed. Spaghetti
Thur. Fish Fry
Sat. Steak

GREEK
The Rathskeller is getting
quite a collection of mugs
from fraternities and
sororities to put on display.
Additional mugs were given
by: Alpha Delta Pi, Chi
Omega, Delta Delta Delta,
Delta Phi Epsilon, Kappa
Delta, Phi Mu, Zeta Tau

ISkM Eyfinslp:. T%*a Mjjftiir Pijfl
jM ft >2Pi ftpofftft
BH. jjKr jpsf I HBk
v <§B Bgsi|§
*|||| H^Bj

T.G.I.F. Every Friday afternoon from 2-6 we have a beer-drinking, popcorn-eating time called TGIF.
Plan to be here this Friday, about 200 other guys and gals do. Have some fun!!!

DION IS COMING' A Y
y 23 24

THE
EWING STREET TIMES
'Back By Popular Demand

mugs
Alpha, Alpha Gamma Rho,
Delta Sigma Phi, Delta
Upsilon, Lambda Chi
Alpha, Phi Delta Theta, Phi
Gamma Delta, Pi Kappa
Alpha, and Pi Kappa Phi. If
your house has not given
their mug make sure they
do.

... JT ip*'-
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BT

U. OF F. FACULTY CLUB INC.

NEWS

DION
IS
COMING

'Sounds To Groove By
The Ewing Street Times, a favorite at the "Flick" in Miami will
star at the Rathskeller this Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The
entertainment editor of the Alligator said of them when they
were here last quarter: "Ewing Street Times plays songs to groove
by." They not only play and sing, but also have a great act with
comedy and fun thrown in.
The group originated in California and then migrated to sunny
Florida. "Each member of the quartet has his own speciality
ranging from hard rock to country and western styles. Along with
the electrical folk songs, the group occasionally treats its audience
to a ragtime number," said the Alligator. Don't miss one of the
top groups ever to appear at the Rathskeller. Anyone can make
reservations to see this hot talent. Three shows Friday and
Saturday night.
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Dion Is Coming To The
Rathskeller May 23 And 24.
Advance Tickets On Sale
Friday, May 16. $1.50 Per Person

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1392-2097