Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 135

V
{Reasons Cited
{For Accent's
High Budget
:j (EDITORS NOTE: This is
the third part of a series on
Accent 69 and the charges
and counter-charges
: surrounding it.)
j By CAROL SANGER
| Alligator Executive Editor
Charged with investigating
S the operations of the Accent
j: 69 Program, the Student
Senate committee received a
j: typed list of eight reasons for
> Accents., $1,600 budget
:j excess.
: According to Larry Berrin,
chairman of Accent 69, the
£ budget was high because:
§ Assured that if
A successful, we would be able
to get covered by either the
Alumni Association,
President OConnell, or the
Student Body President;
X t Madalyn Murrays
double billing, an unforeseen
complication now in the
process of rectifying, (Miss
Murray chose to stay over an
extra day and billed the
JULIAN BOND
£ ... unplanned dinner
i?
V.V.V.'.V.VKV/AWAvl'/lv/I^Wl'/AVl'iVlv!

Shepherd Announces Four
v r
SG Cabinet Appointments

Student Body President Charles Shepherd
announced four appointments to the SG Cabinet
Monday. The names go to the Student Senate
tonight for confirmation.
Larry Jordan, 3JM, was named secretary of
minority group affairs, a post Shepherd considers as
one of the most important in his administration.
Scott Holloway, 2UC, was appointed secretary of
legislative affairs. The new secretary of athletics will
be Robert Stevens, a fifth year engineering student.
Kevin- Davey was named to lead the interior
department.
Jordan, who has no previous experience in SG, is
a past president of the Afro-American Student
Association. He has also worked as a reporter and
columnist for the Alligator. He is 20 years old and a
native of Jacksonville.
Holloway, 20, is a former minority floor leader
of the Student Senate, in addition to having served
as chairman of the budget and finance committee. A

The
Florida Alligator

MADALYN MURRAY |
... an extra bill
Accent Symposium an extra
$750 for an unscheduled >:
speaking performance. £
OConnell told Benin to

refuse the billing last week.)
Banquet was almost a $
total expenditure; almost
total group ate at our
expense;
Julian Bond and
Frederick Flott dinner was
not planned;
Many technical
expenditures, including
physical plant, were well over
estimated cost, (Benin said :
the bill for janitors and :
university that totaled :j
$557.62 was more than :
double the bill for Accent :*
68.) |
You get what you pay :
for; the program was first :
class with the speakers :
comfort and pleasure of top if
priority; jf
All expenditures over if
the budget were deemed if
necessary for the success and :
value of the program; and fi
The annual trip for two s:
to Washington and New York f:
was deemed unnecessary for fi
our purposes. fi
The senate committee, fi
expected to simply accept the fi;
financial report and present a fi
report of their own to the fi
senate by May 6, decided to fi
(SEE 'REASONS' PAGE 2) l


member of Pi Kappa Alpha fraternity, Holloway
was president of his pledge class. His hometown is
Ft. Lauderdale.
Stevens also has experience in his new job, having
served as under-secretary of athletics. The
22-year-old member of Tau Kappa Epsilon comes
from Ft. Lauderdale.
Davey, a 19-year-old sophomore, is a former
director of the SG book exchange. He has served on
the Student Senate and was a member of the
Florida Blue Key Dialogue staff for two years. He is
a member of SAE fraternity from Manatee.
Shepherd said he is still reviewing the more than
150 applications for SG positions and hopes to
make a final decision on most positions later this
week.
Student Body Vice President Charles Harris is
also assisting in the selection process. He will serve
as the administrative supervisor of the cabinet.

University of Florida, Gainesville

REDUCED FROM $23,000

IFC-Rascals Debt
Remains At $5,000

See Related Story Page 2
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
The IFCRascals Concert for
the Student Activities Center,
once in debt $23,000 has
succeeded in reducing that debt
now to less than $5,000.
The only hitch now left
before giving a relatively happy
ending to the rained-out show is
whether the student body will
pick up the bill for the
remainder of the debt.
IFC goes before Student
Senate tonight to ask that
Student Government keep its
part of the bargain -to
underwrite any loss on the
concert.
In an agreement reached two
weeks before the concert,
Student Government agreed to
underwrite any losses the
concert might suffer, as well as
to pay for rain insurance.
That insurance might have
covered the cost of the concert,
but the required amount did not
fall, despite the Rascals failure
to play.
If approved, the Student
Activities Fund will have made
no profit, but at least will not
show a loss.
The story of the debt
reduction is one of cooperation
by many groups on and off
campus.
Steve Zack, IFC president,
said nearly all groups concerned
were willing to provide their
services at cost.
First, he said, there were
the Rascals themselves. We had a
big contract with them, yet
when we spoke to them after
they had left, they were willing
to settle for just their expenses
in coming to Gainesville.

That was $2,000. The second
group, which was to appear with
the Rascals, was not so generous,
however, charging $1,700 for
their non- appearance.
Then there was the Physical
Plant Division, Zack said.
They just wrote off the entire
debt. Were really thankful to
them.
Other groups also wrote off
or reduced their bills to the IFC.
Among these were Hi-Fi
Associates, which reduced their
bill from SI,OOO to SBOO.
Gator Guard, which took
tickets for the event, wrote off
their bill entirely.
That left us with about
$3,750 for entertainment
expenses, Zack said. Then
there was another $3,000 for
fixed costs; advertising and
transportation mostly.
The total bill for the program
came to about $6,750, but
unclaimed tickets accounted for
$1,750, leaving the present debt
of $5,000;.

71 R |
SEMINOIES ON SALE
Students who did not order their 1969 Seminoles may buy them
on the second floor of the Reitz Union beginning today.
Ronna Goldstein, Miss Seminole, here displays the full-page picture
of her in the yearbook. Ronna was selected in a picture-judging
contest by movie star Omar Sharif.
Students who ordered their Seminoles may pick them up at the
~Reitz Union, room 205.

America's
Number One
College
Daily

Tuesday, May 13, 1969

STEVE ZACK
...really pleased
Im confident SG will keep
their end of the bargain, Zack
said. This was a venture by the
whole university, and Im sure
that after hearing the facts, the
senate will agree that the request
is justifiable.
And if the Student Senate
turns down his request?
Well cross that bridge if we
come to it, he said.



Page 2

!, The Roritfa Arfrgal6r, Tu6sday,lvfay T 3, fS6S

Rincons Cited For Excessive Accent Budget

FROM PAGE ONE j
hold off on the report and
investigate further despite
reprimands given to Berrin and
Joe Hilliard, Chairman of Accent
7O for playing cheap politics
bordering on McCarthyism.
Jack McEwan, attorney
general of the Honor Court and
chairman of the committee,
charged that Accent was
lowering itself in the eyes of
the students.
Stewart Hershey, student
senator and committee member,
again raised the question of

$5,000 VOTE SET FOR TONIGHT
Senate To Bail Out IFC?

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
Two Student Senate
committees voted unanimously
Monday to recommend that the
IFC be given about $5,000 of
SG funds to cover the loss
incurred by the ill-fated Rascals
Concert.
The recommendations will be
considered tonight at the Senate
meeting in room 349, Reitz
Union, at 8:30.
Both the Budget and Finance
and the Investigations and
Information Committees heard
IFC President Steve Zack
Monday explain the reasons for
the cancellation of the concert
before recommending to the
senate that IFC be given the
funds to cover their loss.
Zack said if the senate did
not approve the funds, the loss

Eureka: Atlanta Editor Talks

Reg Murphy, editor of the
Atlanta Constitution, spoke
Friday night at the annual
Student Publications Banquet.
Murphy talked on the Politics
of Eureka: Developments in
Southern Politics in the Past Six
Months. He explained how
many political leaders in the
south have discovered the needs
of the people and are responding
to them.
Karen Eng was named the
most outstanding student in
publications, anu the
outstanding newcomer award
went to Jessica Everingham,
Florida Quarterly Editor.

TKSMV STEAK SPECIAL
JLONDON BROIL J
1225 W UNIVERSITY
]r Vj BIOCR FROM CAMPUS
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florid and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion. V L

foiTstiidfkit SENATE INVESTIGATIONS

dubious finances. Berrin
demanded to know what
questions ... I didnt hear any
questions.
Then-Student Body Treasurer
Phil Burnett said the whole
committee makes the senate
look like an idiot, and
demanded a public repudiation
of Senate President Jack
Vaughns statement by the
investigating committee.
Vaughn had been one of the
first to voice the rumors of use
of funds that may not have been
legitimate at a senate meeting
several weeks ago.
Burnett, as student body

would be absorbed by the IFC
general account.
Zack showed the budget
committee an agreement signed
April 22, by then-Student Body
President Clyde Taylor and
then-Treasurer Phil Burnett that
SG would cover any loss that
may incur in the production or
presentation of the concert.
This agreement was not
brought to the senate for
approval. The SS has authority
over all major expenditures of
SG.
Zack said the agreement was
not brought by Taylor to the
Senate for approval because of a
restructuring of SG reserve funds
that was taking place at that
time.
The Senate appropriated
$3,000 before the concert for
what the senate was told was a
guarantee for the Rascals if the

1 J S
. ;; ' ff^^ftj
Hi nyMMy
- H W:.
ft
REG MURPHY
... Constitution editor

treasurer during the Clyde
Taylor administration, is
ultimately responsible for the
funds spent by Accent 69.
Hilliard didnt have the
backbone to stand up when he
started the rumors and cast
aspirations on the Accent
people, Burnett charged.
Hilliard held he did not start
the rumors and merely asked for
a financial report, not an
investigation.
Investigation is the senates
own word, Hershey said.
Then-Student Body President
Clyde Taylor charged Burnett
with bad feelings because he

concert did not make money.
This money was not to go for
rain insurance, the senate was
told,when it appropriated the
money, because the concert
would go on rain Or shine.
Zack told the budget
committee Monday the $3,000
did go for rain insurance. Zack
said the IFC did not collect on
the insurance because a
sufficient amount of rain did not
fall.

UFs Freshman Studies
Get Low Gourman Score

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
On a shelf in the Graduate Research Library sits
a 1,187-page book with a little-worn gray cover,
apparently unopened by UF administrators.
The book is the Gourman Report, a rating of
most colleges and universities in the United States,
published in 1967 by the Continuing Education
Institute Inc. It gives UFs freshman studies program
the lowest possible score D.
According to the author, the score is an attempt
to evaluate freshman programs and give prime
consideration to the drop-out rate, failure rate,
transfer rate, and counseling.
The book was mentioned in a column in
Mondays Alligator, where Mark Leibovit called it
the now renowned Gourman Report.
But UF administrators have apparently never
read it.

Students
8 Track Stereo Tape
Reg. $7.25
Special $5.91
i
Imperial Wholesale
Williston Cutoff at S.W. 13th ST

felt the TEPs have gotten a raw
deal with Accent, and the record
shows just the opposite.
Six of the 10 members of the
Accent 69 executive committee
were members of the Tau
Epsilon Phi fraternity.
In the midst of all the senate
investigation of Accent 69,
Burnett began considering still
another investigation of his
own ... an investigation into the
Rathskeller of which Hilliard is
chairman of the board.
Burnett denied that this
move, which has not developed
to date, was a personal vendetta
against Hilliard. But he
(Hilliard) may be involved in the
discrepencies, Burnett said.
He declined to make any
statements as to what may be
wrong with finances in the
Rathskeller, but said an
investigation would be called for
if I thought it was justified.
Burnett said the matter
would have to be taken to the
Faculty Club since the
Rathskeller is a private
corporation.
He would only say that
money may have been spent
for things it should not have
been spent for, the same
allegations that were made
against Accent.

University College Dean Franklin Doty
confessed, I do not know what it is. Rae Weimer,
special assistant to the president, and Roy Lassiter,
associate dean of academic affairs said theyd never
heard of it.
Perhaps they should not despair after reading the
report, because freshman studies programs at all
other rated colleges in the state received the same
grade, as did a majority of the colleges listed in the
book. Bryn Mawr, University of California and
Davidson all got Ds too.
Most of the Ivy League colleges received grades
of C or better, but a quick survey of the book
showed no scores of A in freshman studies.
On the average, for all departments in the
university, UF received a grade of C-plus. Freshman
studies was the only D and the category of
government contracts was the only A.

As far as the Accent bills that
remain unpaid, Tom Wells of the
UF business office said he would
not want to answer the question
of who is legally responsible for
the bills acquired by Accent 69.
If the money is not there
when the new group must
assume the responsibility for the
unpaid bills und Student Senate
must allow for this in the Accent
7O budget request, Taylor said.
S'*
Hilliard said, In many ways
Accent is being made an
example of. There is a tradition
of things being done that had
been done before and Berrin
cant be held responsible for it.
Craig Lawrence, chancellor ox
the Honor Court, said the Honor
Court may eventually get the
question as to the legality of
funds not accounted for on a
line-item basis.
It may call for a
constitutional interpretation of
the existing student body laws in
regard to Accents actions this
year, but right now the Honor
Court has not jurisdiction,
Lawrence said.
And so squabbles over
Accents Finances continue and
actions now being discussed to
avoid future troubles in the
organization will be taken up in
the fourth part of this series.



UF NEWS
SHORTS

life Sciences
Gels $250,000
UF Life Sciences Department
recently received a $250,000
grant toward construction of a
life sciences building.
- very happy to get
$250,000, said Dr. G.K. David,
director for UF Biological
Sciences. He said the request had
been for $450,000 but the grant
was in line with those awarded
to other universities.
The grant was awarded under
Title Two of the Health and
Educational Facilities Act of
1963. Other funds for building
the seven-story science facility
have been provided by a bond
issue and a grant under Title One
of this same act.
The plans are ready. Its
now a matter of working out the
details, Davis said.
The department has between
$1,400,000 and $1,500,000 of
the estimated cost of
$1,761,860.
Graves Joins
Dialogue Talk
UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves has accepted an
invitation to appear at the
Dialogue program tonight at
7:30 in the Rathskeller.
The Florida Blue Key
program has been set up to
answer questions about the
proposed UF Activity Center.
The moderator Mel Libby will
ask questions of the panel and
then the audience will be able to
ask questions.
Along with Graves,
Gainesville Director of
Recreation Ray Massey,
Alligator Sports Editor Marc
Dunn, and Student Center
Action Team Chairman and
Assistant Chairman, Joe Scaffuti
and Steve Rohan, have been
invited to participate.
Robert Frost
'Lives Again
Robert Frost has been
reincarnated.
Frostiana, a musicial
spectacular co-hosted by the
English and Music Departments,
brings to life seven of Frosts
poems in musical composition.
Randall Thompson, a
distinguished American
composer, has set the poems to
music. They will be sung by 150
combined voices of the
University Choir and the
Womens Glee Club, under the
direction of Elwood Keister and
John Grigsby.
Poems will also be read and
discussed by Dr. Clifford Lyons
Excellence in Food

between each musical selection.
Lyons is a former chairman
of the UF English Department
and is presently the dean of arts
and sciences at the University of
North Carolina. He has currently
been named as the Keenen
Professor of English.
Frostiana will be presented
May 20 in the University
Auditorium at 8:15 p.m.
Right Track,
Wrong Tub
In Mondays Alligator it was
stated that the Accent 69 party
in which liquor was kept on ice
in the bathtub was held at Joe
Hairs apartment. The Alligator
since has learned that the party
was held in Ronnie Blooms
apartment. We regret the
mistake.

wSlf *HNi i iH 7** 7
%. liiliM
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' jjr JZvZhJ? .... ininiiirrff 1 111 'HH||b
. iiillllM lliiiiii 111 1 1,1,11, M v M

DR.OLDSIMBILH
no-no=
F*Bs UI-31.

Or. Oldsmobile posters now available. Set of four (24" x 16"). pips Dr. Oldsmobile Booklet. Send SI.OO to: Oldsmobile, P.O. Box W-31, Dept. CN. Plymouth, Michigan 48170

FSU Flying Circus Canceled

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Those who were counting on
seeing the FSU Flying Circus
Saturday night will have a long
wait. The performance has been
canceled and plans to bring the
circus to campus next year are in
the offing.
We stand to lose S2OO since
we have already incurred
expenses for printing and
advertising, Griff McSwine,
chairman of Gator Loan Fund
Productions said.
The performance was canceled
because we didnt get the
necessary approval to put the
equipment on the field,
McSwine said.
In order to move the
equipment for the circus on to
the field, the lower part of the
south bleachers would have had
to be removed.
What was holding up things
was the final report on the
structural feasibility of
removing the bleachers, Union
program director Bob Dawson
said.

Getting into an air-inducted head headturner
turner headturner these days is a snap. If you
dont mind swallowing a rather large
and lumpy chunk of price tag.
Well, the good Doc, bless him, has
just crowbarred the rule book all out
of shape to bring you a minimum minimumweight,
weight, minimumweight, 350-cube, cold-air honker for
less than the average nickel-nursing
family sedan!
And on that family steed, youre
not too likely to find behemoth front
air scoopers, cold-air carb, high highoverlap
overlap highoverlap cam, minimum combustion
chamber volume, oversized valves,
low-restriction dual exhausts, or an
Anti-Spin axle (to 4.66-to-1).
And if youd like to order more,
order more! New heavy-duty FE-2
suspension with front and rear stabi-
lizers. Close- or wide-ratio 4-speeds.

Assistant Director of
Intercollegiate Athletics, Percy
Beard, told Dawson that the
removal of the first twelve rows
of the South bleachers would be
too expensive.
FSU Coach Catarzi told
Dawson that even if the Gator
Loan Fund received approval by
Tuesday (today) there would
.not be enough time to set up the

Student Shares Sold
How would you like to receive complimentary tickets to all Gator
Loan Funds productions for one year, and help put a UF student
through school at the same time?
The first complimentary share of stock in students was
presented to UF President Stephen C. OConnell Monday by the
chairman of Gator Loan Fund, Griff McSwine.
Organizations, businesses, and individuals can buy stock for $lO a
share. The money raised from the sales will be put into a matching
fund with the federal government and used for students who need to
take out a national defense loan.
Stockholders receive complimentary tickets to all of the Gator
Loan Fund productions for one year.
A new goal was set for SIO,OOO starting with Charles Shepherds
administration, Assistant Director of Gator Loan Fund Eddie Floyd
said.
Stocks will be sold state wide, with emphasis on the Jacksonville
area, where the biggest alumni are from, Floyd said.

Tuesday, May 13,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Special beefed up W automatic
with firmed-up shifts. Et cetera.
And tires? Just about every size
and type that clings: wide-boot red redlines,
lines, redlines, whitewalls, raised letters, or
fiberglass-belted. Up to F7O x 14".
How does the good Doc do it for
so little? Thats for us to know-know,
and for you to find out at your
nearest Olds dealer's.
DR.DLDSmOBILE'S Ui-31
Make your escape from the ordinary.
* I I i T rVT - j-.

equipment on the Held/'
Delaying the production by a
week or two was ruled out
because of proximity to finals.
At 9 a.m. today Coach Ray
Graves, Beard, maintenance
supervisor Mr. L.E. Waters, and
the Gator Loan Fund staff will
meet to make plans for bringing
the show next year.

Page 3



Page 4

l. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 13, 1969

Apply For Fall
Orientation
The Dean of Mens Office is
now accepting applications for
staff positions for freshman
orientation. Applications may be
picked up at the Student
Activities Desk on the third
floor of the Reitz Union
beginning Tuesday. Interviews
will be held May 19-23.

UF, Scotland Exchange
Medical Housestaff ~

A unique international
exchange program between the
University of Edinburgh,
Scotland, and the UFs College
of Medicine begins this month.
Arrangements for the
program, calling for periodic
exchange of housestaff (resident
and interns) between the two
schools, have been completed,
Dr. Leighton E. Cluff, professor
and chairman of the Department
of Medicine said Monday.
First to take part in the
resident exchange program, with
the Scottish university is Dr.
Jacques R. Caldwell, chief
resident in internal medicine at
the UFs Shands Teaching
Hospital. He is spending this
month as a staff member of the
1,300-bed Royal Infirmary of
Edinburgh.
Previously, medical exchange
programs have been available
largely to students and faculty,

Robot Kicks The Bucket

The UF electrical engineering
department is looking for a
robot to replace Otto who has
greeted visitors to the annual
Engineers Fair for the past 23
years.
The department found it
necessary to replace Otto
because he has grown too old,

New York Poet
To Give Reading

Edward Field, author of
Stand Up, Friend, With Me
an on campus Thursday.
He will present a reading of
his poems at McCarty
Auditorium at 8 pjn., to be
followed by a reception in the
Reitz Union Lounge. Field, a
Folk Mass
Televised
WFGA-TV in Jacksonville
will present a half-hour color
special Wednesday on UFs
recent folk mass at the
Rathskeller.
The time is 7 p.m. WFGA
is channel 12.
CRANE IMPORT*
t: ~ '(
SAL ES-SER VICE VICERE
RE VICERE PAIRS
I ;
Good Se, dJ; u f' s a ?*
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Univ. Ave. 372-4373

DROPOUTS
X CANI'T SLEEP? ALF. TkY
...I KEEP THINKING- COUNTING- ( nn \
OF THOSE BIG, JUICY SHEER aIF
STEAKS WHEN I M HO SOOU, Alt
(SET RACK

leaving a void in such
opportunities for residents and
interns, Cluff said.
The residents duties in
patient care, teaching,
administration and mastering his
own field of specialization have
made him such a vital member
of the hospital health team that
opportunities to expand his
career through varied education
experiences have been
overlooked, he said.
Practice in a Scottish
hospital, Cluff said, will give the
American physician a wealth of
experience in British clinical
medicine, with an organization
of health care quite different
from the United States.
Recognized as one of the
most distinguished medical
colleges in the Western world,
the Faculty of Medicine of the
University of Edinburgh has
always been one of the worlds

and they feel they need a newer
and more sophisticated robot.
The department is holding a
contest to choose the new robot.
A prize of $25 is being offered
for the best suggestion of what
the robot should look like and
do.
Since the mechanisms of a

native of New York, was a
Guggenheim Fellow, and a
recipient of the Lamont Award
in 1962.
Recently labeled the author
of pop sex stories by Alexsander
Nejgebauer in the 26 April New
Republic, Field is noted for his
ability to focus a sharp poetic
eye on such banal activities as
drinking a coke.
He will be presented by the
Department of English in
conjunction with the Florida
Quarterly.

HEAR
GENE MIDDLETONS
RHYTHM KINGS
REITZ UNION
FRI. MAY 16
9pm 1 am ITS FREE

jin nffriri
i T||P' /
JACQUES CALDWELL
... Going to Scotland
leading medical centers, he said.
Costs for the exchange
program will be shared jointly,
but no arrangements have been
made for a Scottish resident to
come here in the near future,
Cluff said.

robot can be mounted in almost
any shape body, the only
requirement for the new robot is
that he should have a friendly
appearance.
Entries should be on xll
or larger paper with name and
address included and may be
sent to: Robot, c/o Electrical
Engineering Department.
The contest closes May 30.
Hidden Antenna
The hidden radio antenna
of one 1969 model automible
actually stares the driver in the
face if he looks closely
enough. The antenna is in the
windshield, according to PPG
Industries, a major supplier. PPG
engineers say two extremely thin
wires are sandwiched inside the
glass.

Now Leasing
FREDRICK GARDEN
apartments
1130 S. W. 16th Ave. 372-7555

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TRAILWAYS BUS TERMINAL



fp mmi&m.
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MAA A n /,.. TOM KENNEDY
1200 FOR SCAT

Members of Delta Upsilon Fraternity voted to
donate S2OO to SCAT for the Student Activity
Center fund. Presenting the check are left to right.

Senator Says Fortas
Resignation Certain

WASHINGTON (UPI)-Sen. Paul J. Fannin,.,
R-Ariz., said Monday he has very reliable
information that Abe Fortas will resign this week
from the Supreme Court.
Fannin said the information came to him from a
Washington attorney in a position to know. He
would not name him.
At the same time, Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell
confirmed that he met secretly with Chief Justice
Earl Warren to give him certain information known
by me which might be of aid to him.
Mitchells terse announcement confirmed
Newsweek magazines report of a Mitcheli-Warren
meeting. Newsweek said the attorney general called
on Warren at the behest of President Nixon and to
tell the chief justice of far more serious evidence

AAUPNot Hiding Anything

Local American Association
of University Professors chapter
president Ray Fahien said the
secrecy in the investigation into
the Marshal Jones tenure denial
case did not extend to the local
AAUP chapter.
The local chapter was kept
informed at every stage of the
investigation. The AAUP was
not trying to supress
information, but was merely
trying to follow national policy
concerning impartiality, Fahien
said. Neither the UF
administration nor the local
chapter were trying to hide
anything, but were merely trying
to be fair to both -the
administration and the
individual by avoiding publicity
while the investigation was in
process.

I ROBBIES I
The Best In Steaks^^
Mealsi^ypVsanderichei
RoiOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.
I -On The Gold Coast I

He felt by avoiding
pre-judging, the investigation
could be more objective.
Three representatives from
the national AAUP made the
investigation. They will write a
report and present separate
recommendations to the
national AAUP convention next
I Miller-Brown I
I I
1 W r
ONE MILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL NKfl
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER
I Open til 8 p.m. nightly J

J. Michael Malone, DU president, John Bryan, DU
treasurer. Accepting is James Devaney, president of
SCAT.

against Fortas off-the-bench activities than those
made public so far.
Warren also confirmed that he met with Mitchell.
Denying Newsweeks story, presidential Press
Secretary Ronald Ziegler said Nixon and Mitchell
had discussed the Fortas case only in general.
Im expecting it to occur this week, the
Arizona Republican said. I expected something to
happen over the weekend., I feel very confident it
will happen sometime during the week.
Later, Fannin said that if Fortas does not resign,
Congress should begin impeachment proceedings
against him.
Fannin said it was his understanding that
additional information very damaging to Fortas
exists but declined to elaborate.

spring.
If a serious violation of
academic freedom is found, the
AAUP can vote to censure UF.
In effect this attaches a stigma
to the UF and advises
prospective faculty members to
consider employment with some
care.

c^e'' a ..ft'" w o < w 'JsSsF^^*-
CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY

Alberts Location
Still Questioned

By RICHARD MCCULLOCH
Alligator Staff Writer
From time to time students
become concerned with the
location and living conditions of
Albert, UF mascot.
In the fall, a Student
Government committee on
relocating Albert was headed by
Chuck Riggs. The committee
wanted to move Albert to the
vicinity of the Reitz Union,
either in the pond or in a cage
that would provide improved
living conditions and more
lecurity.
It was discovered that the
Union pond is unsuitable for
habitation as the Union air
conditioning system dumps into
it, changing the temperature and
polluting the water.
Union Director Bill Rion said
a move to the area of the Union
would be approved so long as
adequate facilities are provided
at no expense to the Union.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd said his
administration would consider
relocation plans, but that any
move would have to include
imporved living conditions and
that funding would be a
significant factor.
Actual care and feeding of
Albert is handled by Leslie
Melvin of the Plants and
Grounds Department.
The present cage is suitable
for Albert. He is seen by a lot of
people and has not been
harrassed like some of the earlier
alligators, Melvin said.
Alligators can spend a long
time underwater. In a pond
Albert would be seen for only a
few hours a day while sunning.
Albert himself answers all
questions concerning a move
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'DANDYUON

T uesday, May 13,1969, The Florida Alligator,

with little more than an alligator
grin. He seems rather contented.
In his present location he is able
to listen in on a few classes,
takes in free concerts on
occasion, and in general keeps
his ear to the ground concerning
campus activity.
Alberts food, provided by
Melvin, is mainly fish. He spends
as much time as possible in the
sun, like most UF students. But
this is the slow season for
mascots.
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Page 5



Page 6

>, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 13, 1969

Florida Alligator

PiotaJttfe
All
A^JMM

isnt That Contempt of Court?
ABM Misled
MR. EDITOR:
President (sic) Richard M. Nixon (sic), Vice-President (sic) Spiro
(sic) T. (sic) Agnew (sic), Gerald Ford, Ev Dirksen, Ronnie Reagan,
and other leading hawks have been lately speaking out on behalf of
the greatest boondoggle of them all, the ABM system. The
Anti-Ballistic Missle system is a farce and a farce, in that order; it is
easy to see why the initials ABM REALLY stand for Americas Being
Misled.
Professors Abram Chayes of Harvard Law School (former legal
adviser to the State Department) and Jerome Weisner of M.I.T.
(science adviser to President John F. Kennedy) read to Congress on
May 6 a report they had written criticizing the ABM system,
concluding with these words: The system, even if considerably
expanded and upgraded, over the years following initial deployment,
cannot perform effectively the missions suggested for it/
Moreover, the Defense Department has admitted (according to The
Miami Herald of May 7) that Deputy Secretary of Defense David R.
Packard was innaccurate when he gave a figure of $6.6 billion for the
system intended to protect two Minuteman missle bases in North
Dakota and Montana. Spokesmen for the Pentagon and the Atomic
Energy Commission now say that the cost of nuclear warheads for the
defense missiles sl.2 billion was not included in the Defense
Department estimate. The total cost for initial, limited deployment
will thus be nearly $8 billion.
Why spend so much money on such an insane death machine when
billions are desperately needed to eliminate hunger, poverty, disease,
illiteracy throughout this nation? It is said that the ABM will be a new
means of wasting defense mondy, to be employed once the Vietnam
undeclared wan, It seems to me that this money should not be
spent on defense (which is just a euphemism for aggression,
genocide, and jingoism) at ail.
In a speech to the Womens National Democratic Club, Professor
Chayes said he believes Defense (sic) Secretary Melvin R. Laird
conjured up the SoViebthreat of a nuclear first strike to strengthen the
administrations casefor theAfylJ Chayes concluded: The American
people are, I hope r gwwil up enough.today not to be frightened by
dire warnings that the goblins will get us if we dont watch out.
DA' r TD MILLER

'The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility:''
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor

Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors

EDITORIAL

Blacks Have Faith

This university has apparently entered a
new day. Hopefully.
During last Friday nights calm and
rational meeting between UFs black
students and members of the administration,
many of the universitys buried racial
conflicts were unearthed and hashed out.
Good.
The Afro-American Student Association,
representing about 60 of UFs less than 135
black enrollment, called the meeting. There
were no ultimatums, and more importantly,
no demands issued.
However, at the same time, there were no
commitments made by the administrators
present. President Stephen C. OConnell
called the meeting a good beginning and
hopes there will be more of them. But, he
told the Alligator, just as he probably told
the blacks at the meeting, that the issues and
problems raised would be referred to a
committee on the disadvantaged he
appointed some months ago.
OConnell, being a former state supreme
court justice, believes in the legislative way.
We do not deprecate his beliefs. But, he
must realize he is dealing with an
extra-legislative problem. He is dealing with
an attitude. Racial bigotry. White racial
bigotry.
Attitudes are not legislated away. They
are not changed by referring the problems
created by them to a committee, where
more than likely they will be hashed out,
hashed over and finally, after many months
of pettifogging, would be lost in the
shuffling of papers and preliminary reports.
Blacks have reacted to campus racism, as
OConnell found out last Friday. The
problem of white roommate move-outs in
the dorms has been attributed by them to
this prevalent lingering racism. Spencer
Boyer, whose walkout the administration
never gave much attention to, was the victim
of local racism. The anticipated buildup of
police after slashings at Camigras was, say
the blacks, caused by racist attitudes.
Blacks have good reason to believe these
conditions are created by race hatred. They
need only look at the racial mix on this, a

Common Flaws In The Right Way

MR. EDITOR:
At least two of the points
made by Hilliker and Sugg are
espoused by conservatives, and
thus support Mattoxs thesis: the
conservatives often do the most
damage and are fundamentally
on the side of their apparent
opposition.
Hilliker calls capitalism a
faith. Conservatives preach and
support their bastardized version
of faith (Mattox cites an
example), as something they feel
is right, as Gods Will, as The
American Way.
These conservatives, these
Baileys, give Hilliker grounds for
his ad hominem arguments (viz.
blind fools), they give him the
mud (illogical, fanatical,
rave) to sling. Which is what
Mattox says.
Sugg dislikes Mattoxs
negative freedom, and
proposed positive
encouragement to the exercise
of rights. Some conservatives

have the same idea: freedom of
religion, they assert, is not
freedom from religion. Exercise
your right by going to the
church of your choice but go.
These conservatives would
like positive encouragement
(armed escort?) for
church-going. This example
should reveal what positive
encouragement
(encouragement!) would mean,
and what kind of freedom it
would foster. Freedoms enemies
in the name of freedom, as
Mattox says.

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the ampices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices In Room 330, Reitz Union.
Phone 392-1681, 392-1682, or 392-1683.
*
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors
V. writer of the article and not those of the University of
rlonOl.

lily-white campus. Less than 135 blacks in
a sea of snow-white faces.
One of the ways blacks feel this attitude
might begin to be changed is through
recruitment of educationally disadvantaged
blacks. But, Lester Hale, vice president of
student affairs, dismisses this plea with the
fact that UF is becoming more upper
division oriented with smaller, stabilized
freshman classes comprised of better
prepared, and therefore white, middle class,
students.
He is probably right. This trend is
obvious. But, he goes further to imply that
recruitment is not UFs problem, but rather
the junior colleges, where blacks can get
remedial instruction. We agree. But what
happens in the meantime? And what does he
do about the high drop-out rate of junior
college transfers?
Therefore, the administration, since it
cannot, by proclamation, erase racism, must
be a model for both faculty members and
students alike. It must, like it has rarely
done before, lead. That is what it is there
for. Leadership.
Blacks here on campus have put a great
deal of faith in the system by not attacking
it and by trying to work within it.
The administration, with the student
bodys help, cannot let them down.
Senates Turn
The Student Senate will be asked tonight
to appropriate funds to cover the losses of
the ill-fated Rascals concert for the benefit
of the Student Activities Center Fund.
As it stands now, the fund will not get
any money from the concert and the
Interfratemity Council stands to lose several
thousand dollars in costs.
If the senate will appropriate this money
to cover the costs, they will be supporting
the center fund by bailing a group that tried
to help out of the hole.
i
If the UF is ever going to have a coliseum,
every group is going to have to help.
Its the senates turn now.

Glittering generalities are a
common flaw in conservative
argument. Would someone
explain sense of community
with fellow man, what things
youre against when youre for
man, human (vs. property)
rights, Positive social freedom
(to do what?), to engage in
society, revolutionary
society, really changing
society, dissent thats not
responsible, and tin
commodities,
DARCY MEEKER, 4AS



No Help
MR. EDITOR:
Being one of the
enterprizing law students who
quoted the JOMO publication,
Burning Spear, out of context
according to Wednesdays
BLACK VOICES column, I
believe I owe a response to Mr.
Homes article.
I wont bother to attempt to
debate whether or not my
quotes were out of context, but
will only refer anyone interested
to the copy of Burning Spear I
have placed on reserve in the law
library. Neither will I comment
on Mr. Homes tirade of
emotionally charged prose
denouncing my use of the term
racist in describing JOMO.
The vastly more important
issue is why these merchants of
hate and destruction are able to
gain a foothold here in
Gainesville; why they have any
appeal whatsoever to members
of the black community. To
answer this question, one has
only to enter the black
community and observe.
Go into the schools and see
the children; the ones with
hookworm, or the ones covered
with sores due to vitamin
defficiency, or suffering from
malnutrition so badly that they
cannot muster enough energy to
even pay attention in class.
Smell the unwashed bodies.
See the looks of puzzlement
on the faces of the first graders
who cannot understand why
they dont have enough to eat,
or clothes to wear, or a decent
place to live. See the puzzlement
turn to frustration and finally
ripen into naked hostility
toward a world which has failed
to adequately fulfill even their
basic physical needs.
These are the conditions
upon which JOMO type
organizations thrive, and it
behooves us to remedy these
conditions, if for no other
reason than to attempt to avoid
violence, or the door will be left
wide open for the Charles
Fulwood types and I fear that
the situation will explode in our
own complacent faces.
JOHN L. AVERY

Fluted Columns

I dont know. Ive been sitting around reading
the stuff of Charles Fulwood and some of the
JOMO boys and Im prompted to make some
observations.
JOMO was attacked for being racist and
pro-violence as evidenced by statements in one of
their publications.
Fulwood recently explained the allegations by
telling us that the black movement doesn t need
white people, that we should organize our own
communities that we thought they just wanted to
marry our sisters, that Malcom and Shabazz found
out the system was corrupt, that whites can t get
into the Black Panthers etc. and that we simply
cant understand what the black movement is doing.
Well, hes right about one thing. I cant
understand what the hell hes talking about. I ve
heard enough academic semantic footwork in my
time to recognize an attempted smoke screen.
Fulwood and crew seem to be expert at it.
What ever happened to the allegations that
JOMO was violent and racist? We are told that we
cant really understand what dolence and rascism
are because were not black. Well, Ive got some
news for JOMO. I can recognize the feeling ot

AJriiu
ml
VIAAMt

ROTC Is Poison, Purge It From Campus

MR. EDITOR:
In answer to a question which appeared in the Alligator (May 8):
No, I have never seen an ROTC cadet seize a campus building; but
then again, I have never seen an SDS member bum down a
Vietnamese village. The idea that ROTC should remain on campus
because all different opinions should be heard is outrageous. Why not
invite the Mafia on campus; their methods are the same; organized,
criminal, mass violence.
TK£ idea that ROTC somehow liberalizes the military is equally
absurd. Every since the military insinuated itself into American
campuses, the tempo of this countrys violence and meddling in affairs
of other nations has increased to monstrous proportions. Quite the
contrary, the University is endangered of being polluted by an
organization which stresses brutality and irrational obedience to
brown-shirted goons.
This poison must be deracinated from American colleges;
institutions established to be civilizing, humanizing, factors in society
ought to shun these brown-shirts and their toadies, whose lies,
bungling incompetence, and senseless violence are becoming daily
more apparent.
As a student of history let me say that the United States is the
most bellicose, aggressive nation in the world today, and that only
Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan can offer a similar spectacle. We
were the aggressors in Mexico in the 1840s;in the Spanish-American
War in the 1890s; in Panama in the 1900s. We invaded the Soviet
Union in 1918, (Have they ever invaded the US?), Cuba and
Dominican Republic in the 19605, and now Vietnam.
DON ENGLES 6AS

That Club Is Confusing, JOMO

Survival Without Effort ?

MR. EDITOR:
Once again the goon squad has answered the
Challenge. The Challenge was the advocacy of
capitalism; the response was the standard
regurgitation of anti-capitalistic dogma, expressed in
that special language developed for this particular
body of mythology.
For example, Lee Hilliker speaks of our having
no sense of community with our fellow man, of
mans having become alienated from his labor and
himself, of oppressors sucking out the life blood
of their black, [etc.], brothers, and inevitably, of
the ethos of the tin commodity [which] has
corrupted and defiled our humanity.
Aside from these emotional appeals to his readers
for the cued-response: disapproval, there is provided
one statement which explains the reason for his
hatred of capitalism. How is a man to be free to
develop his talents, his capabilities, his humanity, if
he must continually produce for the market? In
other words, How can I be expected to live by my
own effort, without slaves?
John Sugg speaks of Americas productivity
[being] built on the backs of the poor who have
had no share of this productivity, of the white
affluent Americans, of the military-industrial
complex, of imperialist wars, of a small group
of parasites [living] off the productivity of the
masses, ruling the masses through control of
property, and of that Utopian revolutionary
country, Red China solving human needs [while]
America satisfies the profit motive.
This display of Suggs mastery of Marxist

having my skull caved in just as easily as a black
man.
The point? Simple. Here I am. White,
college-educated, all American boy. I dont hate
Negros, Chinese, Tibetans, or Greeks. 1 think the
Negro has gotten a raw deal in this country. I would
like to help in any way I can to see that he is treated
like any one else. I dont care if a Negro marries my
sister, daughter, or maiden aunt.
I dont want to try to guiltily befriend every
black man I see, but I want to associate with people
that I like regardless of the color of their skin, the
nasality of their voice, or the wart on the end of
their nose.
But what the hell am 1 supposed to do when
some flame-head eomes at me swinging a
throwing a bomb in my house, or attacking my girl
friend? Do I step casually aside and say, look, I
know that youve been through an awful lot and
that a hundred years ago my ancestors held your
ancestors as slaves, so I deserve whatever you may
have in store for me.
I think not. I thinu that \ treat such people for
what they are. Criminals. Period. Ask them what
they want, they say black courses in school. Black

Tuesday, May 13,1969,11 Honda AiiigauM,

theology is supplemented by insolent insults to Ayn
Rand (the ad hominem fallacy). But redicule is not
refutation.
The only argument presented is the remarkable
and entertaining proof that since property rights
are protected, a given individuals quantity of
rights(!) is proportional to the quantity of his
property.
As an alternative to the concepts of rights and
freedom, Sugg proposes concepts of human rights
and positive freedom,* viz., everyone has equal
access to material goods and equal control over the
means of production. Once again the plea is heard
for survival without the necessity of effort for the
human right to the sustenance of ones life, as an
alternative to the right to live ones life. The
positive freedom is the alleged freedom from the
fact that mans survival requires his effort, as an
alternative to capitalisms freedom from
interference in ones activity.-,
As usual, then, the argument for collectivism is
the abject plea for protection by men from reality
even (incredibly) without the consent of the
protectors. Incompetence to live by ones effort
somehow qualifies him to rule those who are
competent to live as slaves; inability to rule
nature qualifies him to rule the men who master
nature.
So much for the cacophonous anti-capitalist
chorus. For those who dare to hear the full
argument for capitalism, I refer you to
Capitalism: the Unknown Ideal by Ayn Rand.
R.E. OSTEEN, 7EG

9 IHK
abHv jo- ji

courses? Are you kidding? What about all the
people in this country with Irish Blood. Do we offer
courses in Gallic especially so that they may retain
their cultural heritage? Black courses? That sounds
like somebody made it up on the spur of the
moment because they couldnt think of what to ask
for.
What they should ask for is for the terms black
and white to have less relevance than human
being.
And its happening. There are people like me
around to whom the garbage mumbling of the
Klanners of yesteryear make no more sense than the
garbage mumbling of the militants today. Thats
your only hope, Charles, because you cant ctub ( it
into those bigots that youre ijust as good as' they
are. n v<. y.\
If they cant listen to how could you
possibly expect them to listen to a baseball bat?
Forget about them. They, are sstupid arid-they ate i
passe. Organize, get unity,iget pfeople educated, £81?
them feeling, reacting, and raising heH. Intellectual,
legal, non-violent heH.t And Tll be there right with
you. If you want me.
But please dont swing that club at me. Its
confusing, and it makes me nervous.

By JohrrParker

Page 7



Page 8

f, Tire Fioi kla AH'r^alLy., Taaday, May 13,1S£C

Orange and

address all campus calendar
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, May 13
Distribution of Yearbooks, 206
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Student Senate Meeting, 349
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Sailing Club Elections, 122
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 D Union,
7:30 p.m.
MBA Club Meeting, 346 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Foreign Language Dept: Movie,
"I am Pablo Neruda", Union
Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Education Dames Meeting,
Home of Mrs. W. F.
Breivogel, 3226 N. W. 23rd
Ave., 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept. Carolyn Trouping,
pianist, University Aud., 8:15
p.m.
Wednesday, May 14
Distribution of Yearbooks, 106
Union, 8:00 a.m.
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.
English in Action, Baptist
Student Center, 4:00 8:00
p.m.
University Film Series, "New
Kinetic Art, Program I",
Union Aud., 7:00 fk 9:15
p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting & Slide Show, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Center for Latin American
Studies Colloquium, Latin
American College Room,
College Library, Lecturer:
Prof. J. W. Freels, 8:00 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 357 Union,
8:30 p.m.
Thursday, May 15
Distribution of Yearbooks, 206
Union, 8:00 p.m.
University Film Series, "New
Kinetic Art, Program I",
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:15
p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Sigma Delta Chi Awards &
Initiation Banquet, Holiday
Inn, 1-75, 7:00 p.m.
English Dept: "Edward Field",
Poetry Reading, McCarty
Aud., 8:00 p.m.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION f -=5?%.
If a *** r 9 T\
mouts* 8 \ ,fy\g
90V TF Why miss out on one of Florida's favorite sports? From JL J 7 L \
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... VA
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel, -AM- /
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your a 9-Ors /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole £ Y
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! cV

Friday, May 16
Distribution of Yearbooks, 206
Union, 8:00 p.m.
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Baseball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Rossins, Gainesville, 2:00
p.m.
Union Movie, "Exodus", Union
Aud., 6:00 & 9:30 p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, "Lord
Jim", 7:00 p.m.; 'The Mouse
that Roared", 9:45 p.m.,
West Wing Main Cafeteria.
Union Dance, "Gene
Middleton", Union Terrace,
9:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
FSU Circus: 2:00 Mat., SI.OO
Adults, $.50 Children; 8:00
Eve., $1.50 Adults, $.75
Children. "The Three Penny
Opera", U. of FI. Studnets,
$.25; Students, $.75; FS &
GP, $1.50.
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CEH 133 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 13,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,,10,11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; M td Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;Sto
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5, 7,18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CPS 123 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 15,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,

BLUE BULLETIN

233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10, 11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
NOMINATIONS NEEDED
FOR UNIVERSITY
COMMITTEES: Members of the
faculty interested in serving on
University committees or in
recommending others for
vacancies are urged to send their
recommendations in writing to
Dr. Cecil N. Smith, 141-B
McCarty Hall. Recommenda Recommendations
tions Recommendations should be sent to Dr.
Smith by May 15. A brief
statement of the interest and
qualifications of faculty
members suggested for service
on specific committees should
be made.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
Thursday, May 15, at 1:30 p.m.
in Room 235, Tigert Hall.
STUDENT EMPLOYMENT:
University of Florida students
are needed for eight weeks of
full-time employment June 16
through August 8 as counselors
for a Gainesville day camr*.
Students must be eligible for ti'<
College Work-Study Program.
For further information contact
Student Employment, Room 23
Tigert Hall.
STUDENT UNREST PROVISIONS
Departments of Labor, and
Health, Education and Welfare
Appropriation Act, 1969
LAWS AND DISSENT:
Recent Federal laws have been
enacted to deal with campus
unrest and disruptions. These
laws provide for withholding
Federal monies from students
who violate criminal statutes.
The following are the provisions:
SEC. 411. P.L. 90-557. No
part of the funds appropriated
under this Act shall tie used to
provide a loan, guarantee of a
loan or a grant to any applicant
who has been convicted by any
court of general jurisdiction of
any crime which involves the use
of or the assistance to others in
the use of force, trespass or the
seizure of property under
control of an institution of
higher education to prevent
officials or students at such an
institution from engaging in
their duties or pursuing their
studies.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Administrative Notices

HIGHER EDUCATION
AMENDMENTS OF 1968
Eligibility for Student
Assistance
SEC. 504. P.L. 90-575 (a) If
an institution of higher education
determines, after affording
notice and opportunity for
hearing to an individual
attending, or employed by, such
institution, that such individual
has been convicted by any court
of record of any crime which
was committed after the date of
enactment of this Act and which
involved the use of (or assistance
to others in the use of) force,
disruption, or the seizure of
property under control of any
institution of higher education
to prevent officials or students
in such institution from engaging
in their duties or pursuing their
studies, and that such crime was
of a serious nature and
contributed to a substantial
disruption of the administration
of the institution with respect to
which such crime was
committed then the institution
which such individual attends, or
is employed by, shall deny for a
period of two years any further
payment to, or for the direct
benefit of, such individual under
any of the programs specified in
subsection (c). If an institution
denies an individual assistance
under the authority of the
preceding sentence of this
subsection, then any institution
which such individual
subsequently attends shall deny
for the remainder of the
two-vear period any further
payment to, or for the direct
benefit of, such individual under
any of the programs specified in
subsection (c).
(b) If an institution of higher
education determines, after
affording notice and
opportunity for hearing to an
individual attending, or
employed by, such institution,
that such individual has willfully
refused to obey a lawful
regualtion or order of such
institution after the date of
enactment of this Act, and that
such refusal was of a serious
nature and contributed to a
substantial disruption of the
administration of such
institution, then such institution
shall deny, for a period of two
years, any further payment to,
or for the direct benefit of, such
individual under any of the
programs specified in subsection
(c).

(c) The programs referred to
in subsection (a) and (b) are as
follows:
(1) The student loan
program under title II of the
National Defense Education Act
of 1958.
12) The educational
opportunity grant program
under part A of title IV of the
Higher Education Act of 1965.
(3) The student loan
insurance program under part B
of title IV of the Higher
Education Act of 1965.
(4) The college work-study
program under part C of title IV
of the Higher Education Act of
1965.
(5) Any fellowship program
carried on under title 11, 111, or
V of the Higher Education Act
of 1965 or title IV or VI of the
National Defense Education Act
of 1958.
(d) (1) Nothing in this Act,
or any Act amended by this Act,
shall be construed to prohibit
any institution of higher
education from refusing to
award, continue, or extend any
financial assistance under any
such Act to any individual
because of any misconduct
which in its judgment bears
adversely on his fitness for such
assistance.
(2) Nothing in this section
shall be construed as limiting or
prejudicing the rights and
prerogatives of any institution of
higher education to institute and
carry out an independent,
disciplinary proceeding pursuant
to existing authority, practice,
and law.
i.
(3) Nothing in this section
shall be construed to limit the
freedom of any student to verbal
expression of individual views or
opinions.
PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for June and August
graduates unless otherwise
indicated.
MAY 14: DELTA
AIRLINES Engineers.
BOEING CORP. ME, IE.
MAY 15: PRATT &
WHITNEY AIRCRAFT EE,
ME, CE. U.S. citizens only.
BROWN ENGINEERING EE,
ME, CE. GENERAL
MOTORS Electronics, EE,
Math, Physics. U.S. Citizens
only.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

.......v.v:v%v*>X'X'X*XX i XX*X*X*X*X>:.SS JX
FOR SALE |
Mint'Honda S9O 66 model. Excellent
condition $l3O or make offer. 4546
NW 13 St. Lot 21. (A-3M34-P)
For sale: Bx3l trailer and Bxl
cabana air conditioned. Next to
campus in Glynwood Park. Good
condition, 1495. Call 372-2673.
(A-5M34P)
Playful 7-wk. tiger kittens. Part
Siamese, predominately black, beige
markings on face. Dewormed
house-broken $4 ea. Call 378-2077,
1766 NE 21 PI. (A-3M34-P)
BASSETT-HOUNDS AKC registered,
3 females, 5 wks. old. Tri-colored,
predominately black, bred for
temperment, call 378-8422.
(A-2M34-P)
1964 Pontiac Lemans, 2 dr,
automatic, V-8, radio, good
condition. S9OO or best offer. Call
Elaine 392-3569 or 378-4179.
(A-5M34-P)
1964 Rambler station wagon.
Transmission needs repair. $325.8000
BTU air conditioner SIOO. Call
372-3356. (A-3t-133-p)
Express Yourself. Maiya-sekor
1000DTL. 5 months old still under
warranty. Also 500DTL. Both very
reasonable. Brian Goodheim,
376-1701. (A-3t-133-p)
Yammaha 350 Ex. condition.
Crash helmets incl. owner in service.
Low mileage. Call 372-0148 after
4p.m. (A-st-133-p)
1967 PORSCHE 912 5-speed,
chrome wheels, abarth exhaust. Call
or write Mr. John Morton 1735 N.E.
2nd St., Ocala Fla. 6290695.
(A-3t-133-p)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2V2 acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge Jots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20M16-P)
Why pay rent? 1 bedroom mobile
home 8X36 with 10x20 paneled
cabana. Air cond., furn., pool and
tennis courts in park. $795.
378-5880. (A-st-131-p)
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
1964 Lambretta 125 cc runs great
good transportation and econpmical.
Luggage rack incl., tires lifte new.
$75.00 Call 378-8072 after 6:00.
(A-5M32-P)
SCM portable electric typewriter,
model 110. Like new, 1 yr. old,
hardly used. Must sell for S9O. Need
cash. Call 378-3709. (A-5M32-P)
1968 Vandyke 12x52,
airconditioning. Located Varsity
Villa, $650 down, $81.92/mo. Call
376-6555 after 6 p.m. (A-st-132-P)
65 Honda S9O recently overhauled.
Tools included, $l6O. Call Kathie
anytime 392-9796. (A-3M35-P)
PUSSY CATS Descended from a
genuine Turkish alley cat. Long hair,
6 to 12 weeks old, 5 cents apiece.
Call Brenda 392-1451 before 5:00.
(A-2M35-P)
Bell tape deck use with any amp.
New $250, now SBO. Also LUCAS
flamethrower driving lights
loo,oooc-Pea. Both for $lO.
378-2719, Steve. (A-5M35-P)
remington STANDARD
TYPEWRITER: NEARLY NEW.
BEST OFFER. Call 378-4994.
(A-3M35-P)
NOW PLAYING
Bombays most 4*
daring manhunt!
v m
8:30 &
12:00 A
JNMETROCOLORIjB^iP
ALSO AT 10:20
WITH SIX YOU
- GET EGGROLL"

FOR SALE |
''lXvXvX^X'X'X-X.y.y.yivXvtv.'-X-Xv-!*!'
SURFBOARD HANSEN 50-50
Model, very good condition 9 6.
Good stable riding, can be seen at my
apt, call 372-5007 after. 6.
(A-5M35-P)
FOR RENT I
2 br; IV2 bath Williamsburg
townhouse apt; dishwasher; central
air ; off pool; nice view; Available
June 15. Cail 378-8638 after 5 p.m.
(A-5M35-P)
Summer sublet 1 bedroom furn. A/C
apt. at Williamsburg 5 min. from
campus behind VA Hospital, sllO
mo. From 15 June 392-0140 days,
376-5091 nts. (B-5M35-P)
Available for summer qtr trailer, 3
br, IV2 bath, washer, air cond.
completely furnished, sllO monthly,
plus utilities. Call Hugh, 378-3301.
(B-5M35-P)
Sublease quiet, comfortable Village
34 apt. AC & priyate patio, $lO5/mo.
Last mo. rent (fajcL'Call Pete evenings
372-3991. (B-5M35-P)
Will give 20% discount on security
deposit on single apt at University
Gardens starting June. 12 month
lease. Call Bobbie 376-5542 after
4:00 p.m. (B-5M35-P)
Apt. 1 bedroom, A/C, 1 block from
Tigert Hall, SBS/month for summer,
furnished. Can have for fall too,
378-6054. Call after 4:00 for best
results. (B-5M35-P)
Best Deal In Town! Sublet this
summer 2 bdrT cent, ac; wall to wall,
furnished brand new, apt. Everything
you could want, only $125/mo.
378-8777. (B-2M34-P)
Lankmark poolside apt. 3 girls to
sublease summer quarter. Good
condition, choice location. Avoid the
rush. Come by No. 37. (B-st-134-P)
Williamsburgh Poolside Apt. For 3 or
4 to sublet starting June 15. June
rent paid. Spacious 2 bedrm, 2 bath,
AC, SSO per mo. 376-0362.
(Bost-134-P)
Artist Studio and apt. Fantastic
floorspace. Summer only. Located on
Univ. Ave. above Quick-Save
Records. Call 378-3413. (B-2M34-P)
Williamsburg Apt. to sublet for
summer. 2 bedroom townhouse w
dishwasher. Reasonable. Call
378-6193. (B-2M34-P)
Four bedroom-two bath house,
air-conditioned, one block from
Tigert. For rent for summer quarter
200 a month. Call 378-5914.
(B-st-134-P)
Williamsburg 1 bedroom poolside
apt. to sublet for summer quarter.
Call 378-0291. (B-st-131-p)
Private A/C rooms, linens, maid
service, located one block from old
law school. Male students only. 1 and
2 BR A/C apts. in same area.
372-6263 (B-3t-133-p)
50 trailer with 40' closed-in cabana 2
bedroom, AC, pool, tennis arts, VB
CT etc., 4 minutes from campus
SBS/month avail, for sum. qrt. Call
378-0748 nite. Also looking for
roommate when I return for fall.
(B-6t-133-p)

announcing
An International Festival of New film
The First American Showings
Os 26 Short Films from 9 Countries
...... .... :
: J : : : :: .
: :.... ... ;, s s: *.
. ; : : : ?vlj \l j \i V I
in : : * : : ~ :
a distinguished series of three programs presenting the new newest
est newest achievements in creative cinema by the world s most tal talented
ented talented film makers.
the show was extraordi extraordi,
, extraordi, nary ... delightful, exhilarat exhilarati
in exhilarati 9' deeply moving. . Con Congratulations.
gratulations. Congratulations. gratitude, huzzas.
wmmm. three cheers and a tiger!"
, Brllr the evening star,
Washington. DC
"Beguilingly creative ... di diverting
verting diverting bill."
THE WASHINGTON POST
-9 THREE PART SERIES SERIESSTARTS
STARTS SERIESSTARTS MAY 14 & 15

Tuesday, May 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

:vY.v.yxvX^ys:xwx\\\'y:y:yvyy.y.ssx
FOR RENT §
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-3990.
(B-21t-115-p)
Sublet one bedroom Summit House
Apt. E-26. Pool, air cond. $134
monthly. Availalbe June 1. Call
378-6784 after 6 p.m. or contact
office. (B-st-132-P)
Moving Must sublet June 1, Beautiful
new furnished 1 br apt. overlooking
pool at Summit House 378-9734.
(B-5M32-P)
WANTED j
Stamp out mediocrity! One male
roommate for the summer and next
year. Ranch house with poo! and
fireplace. Cal! 378-4877 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M35-P)
2 coed roommates summer qtr,
Landmark Townhouse; poolside,
dishwasher, TV, disposal, IV2 baths,
air cond, barbq, $46/mo. Call
392-8487 or 392-8496. (C-3M35-P)
One male roommate needed for
summer quarter in Phase II
Landmark Apt. June rent free. Call
378-7142. TV cable; pooi, etc.
(C-2M35-P)
Male roommate 60.00 per month Air
conditioning 1105 NW 4th Ave. no
utilities. Private bedroom 376-5381.
ext. 308. (C-st-133-p)
Male roommates wanted for Summit
House apt. Air cond, pool, two
bedrooms, cable. $41.75 plus util.
Call 372-5552. (C-3t-133-p)
Need 2 coed roommates or persons
to sublet 2 bdrm Landmark apt for
sum qtr with option to renew lease
Ca 11376-2129. (C-4t-133-p)
Roommates, 1 or 2. to share 2 bdrm.
Village Park Apt. for summer or
more. Desirable location, low rent. If
no response will sublet.
376-7439.(C-3t-133-p)
Such a Deal! S9O each for summer
qtr. Need 3 male roommates or
sublease apt. 2 bedroom, fireplace,
AC, cable TV, dishwasher, disposel, 2
pools, gym, sauna bath, laundry
room, many extras. No. 9 Landmark
378-9844 anytime. (C-st-133-p)
Two roommates wanted -for 2
bedroom French Quarter apt.
Immediate occupancy or summer
quarter. Call 376-0613 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-133-p)
COED roommates for summer.
Village Park poolside 2 bedroom apt.
MONETARY CONCESSIONS. Call
378-7272 or come to VP 56.
(C-st-133-p)
Male roommate for Butler Garden
Apt. starting June 14, W-To W
carpet, ac, pool, Call 376-4823 after
5 p.m. S6O month & V? utilities.
(C-st-131-p)
RED PIN
BOWLING
Blo p.m.
Reitz Union Games Area

Page 9

WANTED |
Two female roommates for summer
quarter in French Quarter Apt. no.
96. Call 372-5246. (C-3t-133-p)

TY Y jyi FLORIDA PLAYERS &
JljL Hi dept, of music
THREEPENNY
OPERA
UWIT6D ENGAGEMENT |
TOMORROW onl WURSDAY ONLY
Performances at 1:00 3:12 5:24 7:36 9:48
...For the first time, motion picture cameras
have been permitted to roam the magnificent chambers of
Englands royal and historic palaces and of such treasuries of
the national heritage as the Tower of London.
j|Rlaces ofaQueen
fgg pjf
L THIS ENGAGEMENT ONLY-ALL SEATS $2.00,
Kn ENDS TODAY
uLZitBH "100 RIFLES"
Ti v . Ssii
Tlphn 371-2434 J ! W**
Coty/es
'Viiituuj !>
NOW! AN IMPERRNENT, V i
I i DELICIOUSOTTLE^ATIRE.
AJ ft r.y
1T"11 1 J 1 * f ~
(g) lireetings y

WANTED |
Male roommate for summer qtr. at
Summit House. SIOO for entire qtr.
including utilities. Call 378-4242.
MX OFFICE OPEN R: PJI 1
SHOW TIME *3O
SCHELL- McCAMBMDGC I
a --
I pius "VIOLENT ONES COtOt
I HKNANDO IAMAS J



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
w*m?kmwm.sv:w!s
1 fern for 2 bdrm apt sum qtr
possibly longer. Very large newly
painted, AC. Ideal location, low rent.
Grad stud or sr. Call 376-4758 after 4
p.m. (C-st-132-P)
Wanted: Female roommate for
summer quarter. 2 bedroom Camelot
Apt. on pool. You can move in
immediately. Apt 256. Call 378-9694
after 5:00. (C-5M34-P)
Need one male roommate for 4 man
apartment summer quarter. Call
Terry, 84 Landmark, 378-0674.
(C-5M34-P)
One groovy roommate to share a new
townhouse starting in September.
Such art apartment! Call Fran or
Bobbie, 378-3234. (C-3M34-P)
3 male roommates wanted for
summer. Air cond., pool, w-w carpet,
2 br. $41.25 per month. June rent
free. Call 376-6087 after 5 p.m.
(C-st-134-P)
| HELP WANTED
Swcwwooccwi&wtfwrwxW'XOM-xtfrW
Male: Have three part-time openings
for evening cashier. Also two
openings at 11-2 daytime. Apply
Kings Food Host, 1430 SW 13 St.
(E-ts-133-C)
Several attractive girls to work
promotions. Next promotion
5/21-5/24. Rate $2.00 per hour. Can
split 9-6 with another girl if
necessary. Pormotions will run every
other week until Sept. All
promotions Wed. through Sat. Can
work daily or all 4 days. For
interview, call Humble Oil & Refining
Co. 372-0218, Mrs. Davis.
(E-3M35-P)
: vx-x-x-x-:-x*x-x-x-x-x*x-x-x-x-x-x-x.x.v ; :>
AUTOS
:*l;srwx<*>xc.xx.:.s?x<*x*x*x*xx.ss!s;*x*x*>:'
Sunbeam Alpine 1964, good
condition, British sports car. Fun to
drive, economic transportation $620.
Call George Agraz, 392-0929 or
376-1453. (G-4M35-P)
1969 MGB Army forces sale. Call Lee
Klein at 372-9404. (G-st-132-P)
66 Pont. Temp. Custom 2 dr. HT.
AC, R & H, 3 Speed Hurst Tran.
41,000 mi. Getting married, must
sell. $1,500. Call 378-5645.
(G-st-132-P)
63 VW Microbus, excellent
conditon, new paint, 2 new tires,
$895, 378-4260 or 376-7812.
(G-st-133-p)
69 Pontiac Tempest 6mo. new OHC
6 cylinder, stick-shift, radio, heater,
limelight greenAsk for Mike Hatton
at circulation dest research library or
Call 378-4554 after 5:30 P.M.
{G-127-10t-p)
We buy & sell c> an used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen Dealer, 4222 N.W. 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-130-ts-c)
1965 Sunbeam real clean good tires.
Real good shape mechanically and
low mileage. Call evenings 372-7971
up to 11:30 p.m. (G-st-133-p)
66 Chevy Impala, clean, A.T.; R.H.,
327 engine, new tires, new brakes.
SISOO or best offer. Ben Poole,
376-3468. (G-st-134-P)
PONTIAC Tempest, 1966 custom
sport coupe, 326 with Hurst 4-speed.
Excellent condition, must sell by end
of month. Make an offer, 372-5688.
(G-5M34-P)
Dart 62 automatic, new brakes
inspected, radio, real clean. Must sell.
$350. Mike 376-0453. (G-2M34-P)
THERE 'S MORE OF
The Wide,
Wild World
of New Film
PROGRAM!
In r MAYI-UN.N
~
f
:: : :

uOO 0 0
00
00
i 0 0 0000
KINETIC
art;

I AUTOS i
v M
Jv/KvWXvX^wX'Xv'l'XvW'V'SSv-viiV'X 1
64 MG 1100. Rebuilt engine,
transmission. New clutch,
differential. Must sell. Call 378-9110.
(G-3t-134-P)
Corvair '1964, 2 dr. safety checked,
$350 or best offer. Call 378-1489.
(G-5M34-P)
[ PERSONAL |
Wfl 8 ItMWWWtH 8 WWWWMjiSSSSWiy
Happy Birthday to a wonderful girl! I
love you very much S.E. Only 228
days to go and lots of happiness to
come! Vic. (J-lt-135-P)
Sleeter Bull strikes again! Who DOES
have the bell??! (J-2M34-P)
WMAR, Miami: Thanks, love, for a
beautiful weekend. Ill return to love,
laugh, and conquer" soon. Until
then remember and smile. Be good
do-do. Your Southern Belle.
(J-5M34-P)
Would you like to be a member of
Maas Brothers 1969-1970 College
Board? Apply now any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15t-129-c)
THEY'RE HERE: Silver rings from
Mexico. Many unique styles. THE
SPANISH MAIN 105 W. Univ. open
Mon-Sat till 9:00. (J-st-131-p)
Come eat pie with the BETAS on
BETA THETA PI day May 17.
(J-3t-133-p)
BRIDE-to-BE? Size 10 Jordan Marsh
dress; floor length mantilla worn 3
hours. Cost $125, will sell for $75.
Call 376-9091. (J-133-3t-p)

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
fdf private bedroom hr
£$ / each student one
J block behind normar.
{I ft hall
11 APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT-CALL 372-2662
Hi VX' \ SPECIAL HI
11V- TUESDAY SPECIAL ||
1 FRIED 1
I CHICKEN 1
1 AIL YOU QQI H
H CADE TO EAT XxC H
11 WEDNESDAY SPECIAL |||
I CHICKEN STEW 1
S DUMPLINGS 49 MORRISON'S I
9 CAFETERIAS |
J||

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 13,1969

Page 10

1 LOST & FOUND I
y. >:
.yx*X'Xx*x*x*x.x.w.w.v.v;wx*xx*>X'X*XA:.*
LOST! LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOK,
medium blue, 2 inches thick.
Important! Has all my class notes.
Please call Richard T. Speight at
372-9276. (L-5M34-P)
. X I X"X-X^NNV.S*X X*X-X ,I XX*X-XXVXS VS>
SERVICES I
TYPING IN MY HOME five
YEARS EXPERIENCE IBM
ELECTRIC standard TYPEWRITER.
CALL 376-7809. (M-st-131-p)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)
Disserration, thesis or publication
drawings or graphs professional
graphic artist, Nancy McClelland.
378-4260. (M-st-133-p)


TUESDAY SPECIAL
OLD FASHON
STEWED CHICKEN
& DUMPLINGS 49£
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
ITALIAN STYLE /L O A
VEAL PARMIGIANA* V
WBtMMj LUNCH
mfiiA DINNER
I//CAFETERIA | 313 w. UNIV. AVE.
KTiIMSI 1/2 BLOCK WEST OF
MiW-uJaHI FLORIDA THEATER
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredJMinimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601. No refunds.
Deadlino -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
W K> n
ll l| l| | £
(/)
2aco £ Q O
nnnn i f 31; I> s
- s2s I s 5.* n
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Ul 111 N M
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8 R X £
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HHHH 1

Use our handy
mall In order
form.



UF Ski Club Does 'Tricks
To Win In Cyprus Gardens

The UF Water Ski Club team
slalomed and tricked their way
to the overall honors in the 23rd
Annual Southern Intercollegiate
Ski Tournament Saturday lit
Cyprus Gardens.
Slalom is where a skier uses
only one ski and tries to
successfully score points over a
m gged water course laid out for
the contestants.
Trick skiing involves a series
of intricate individual maneuvers
in which points are awarded
according to difficulty of each
trick.
This is the second year in a
row that the national champion
Gators have won the Southern
Intercollegiate, largest ski
tournament in the state.
The Gators swept both mens
and womens divisions overall

S Chucks Chuckles i-***"'*-^
f$ Writer Drinks
rds On Skiing
By CHUCK PARTUSCH i
Alligator Sports Writer a
ng UFs champion skiers on TV Saturday night ?
Spring Southern Intercollegiate Water Ski (
Cypress Gardens, I decided skiing looked easy $
easy, I was soon to gulp those words. /
lat the beach we got the boat in the water and \
warmup the Johnson SO horsepower marine ;
raciously allowed my friend the honors of doing i
rategist I figured Id watch him do it, just to /
the proper technique down. i
some nice cuts and very smoothly glided atop A
a tne water covering the area with fine spray. \
\ Gee, it sure looked easy to do! \
I felt after watching him and the cute little blond skiing near l
5 us, that skiing was pretty simple. ?
/ Before I knew it, I was chest-deep in the water and 0
l supposedly already to go. I mean like I had the skis on my feet, A
/ the safety belt around my waist and proper instruction (I a
\ thought) from my friend. \
\ After one false start, I was almost skiing. \
Me ... (the Great Spastic) ... was actually up there l
T skimming slowly over the water. t
| What a great sensation! Wow! It was really cool, I even liked
\ Five feet later I hit the drink for the first of many times. \
i Gulp ... easy I had said ... gulb. \
\ After several other attempts in which I remained consistent
i by falling again and again, I decided to quit for awhile. ?
v While resting, I noticed that my ankle was beginning to swell v
7 an d that I has incurred lashes across my thighs. A
A Evidently when I was so excited over actually skiing, I had a
\ forgotten to let go of the ski rope when I fell. The rope broke \
i a d came back to pop me on my thighs. Boy, that smarts. |
Besides that, I found out today that lam totally sun-burned ?
v and stiff and sore from my unforgettable experience. |
y But strangely ... I have this great urge, call it suicide, to go $
A back to that beach with my added hard-earned knowledge, and A
a try to learn again. A
/ Really, its easy! \
TWT 41*1 B jl"^
T* I il* PjTiXiuiU

scoring 1,264 points to
runner-up University of Tampas
982 points. Florida Atlantic
University of Boca Raton placed
third with 978 points.
Individual honors went to the
UFs John Bedingfield in slalom,
Tampa s Alan Kempton in
tricks, FSUs Jim Hackson in
jumping and UFs Pat
Boutchyard in womens slalom
and tricks.
The Gators Jacques Tillement
and John Bedingfield placed
second and third respectively in
mens tricks helping rack up. all
important points for the overall
title.
The one day ski tourney
attracted ski competition from
the UF, Tampa, FAU, University
of South Florida, Rollins
College, Stetson University,

University of Miami and Polk
and Brevard Junior Colleges.

Taylor Shuts Down White
In Gator Speed Weekend

The UF turned out en masse
Saturday night at the Gainesville
Dragway to vie for trophies in
the Ist Annual Gator Speed
sponsored by the
Student Union.
Headlining the show was a
special match race between
Clyde. G.T.W. Taylor, past
Student Government President
and Bob Red Light White,
president of the Student Union
Program Council.
The arch-rivals were handling
the driving chores in the two
Gainesville Dragway Station
Wagons, White in the 396 Chevy
and Taylor in the 383 Plymouth.
In the fast and furious first
round, White romped and
stomped off the line, for about
two feet, as the Chevy bogged
down with too much traction
action. Taylor took the win
clocking 16.50 seconds at 88
miles an hour.
White earned his revenge in
the second round by nosing out
Taylor in the traps clocking
16.30 seconds. On the wire to
wire third round thriller, the
lead changed hands several times

Bow / Vii
Apartments
Now Leasing for Guaranteed September
Occupancy
1,2&3 Bedroom Apartments
Also a Few Townhouses Left
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v
Two Pools Study Hall
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309 S.W. 16th Ave.
Ph. 378-3457 ;

there

|pc^ A ILL
Li F MARC DUNN, EDITOR TRACK fl

f ' ".
STOCK ELIMINATOR
... Frisch in his winning Dodge takes off

with G.T.W. Taylor shutting
down White by 1/100th of a
second, copping the Top
Eliminator Trophy.
Special E.T. classes were
reserved for the UF entrants.
Receiving trophies for then thenefforts
efforts thenefforts were Doug Tannenbaum,

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LONDON BROIL 0
POT., SALAD 1.35
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Tuesday, May 13,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Mike McKinney, Vic Casento,
Bob Fisher, Frank Caputo, Dale
Cook, Jan Zeigler, Dan The
Man Ponce, Larry Hummer
Huber, C.B. Browne and Ben
Big Frisch. Top Bike
Eliminator was Arthur instant
road rash Kowitz.

Page 11



Page 12

* The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 13, 1969

Punjab Singing Songs After Signing

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Former UF football player
Jim Yarbrough, whos so big it
was once feared hed be the first
campus pedestrian ever to run
over a car, may for all his
imposing size be forced to stand
on a chair this summer and
sing for his dinner.
Yarbrough recalls viewing the
film, Paper Lion, which
reveals that rookies attending

i
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lygfifll
*; Bp'*<* i J| "c rv
P /JIH .jas^Blj*
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TIGER PUNJAB
... switched to defensive tackle from split end

Wishful Thinking
With regret the error in
Mondays paper concerning the
number of home runs hit by
Guy McTheny, Rod Wright and
Skip Lujack in the seventh
inning at Vanderbilt Saturday.
Each Gator mentioned above
hit a two-run homer not two
home runs as we reported.
The reporter got carried away
with the Gators strong hitting
attack against Vandy and was
apparently home run crazy.
Then again it may be that the
reporter saw something in the
stars that was to come against
Mississippi.
V E TE R A N S
Be a commercial pilot!
NEW G. j. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASS ELS IN THE AIR
Area's only approver! school
378-2646

the Detroit Lions summer
training camp are required to
stand on dining room chairs and
sing their schools Alma Mater.
Somewhat embarassing to the
rookies, the scene draws lengthy
sarcastic remarks from the
diabolical Lion veterans, who sit
at their own For Men Only
table.
Whats this boot-camp
hazing got to do with
Yarbrough?

Now Taking Applications
at
Summit JJouse
1700 S. W. 16th Ct.
for
September
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rates start
1 BR^sl2l
28R5147
Summer Term
Special Rates
376-9668
RAKE IN THE fife &
PROFITS WITH / V~'/*X
GATOR ADS fIJ^TN
l

AT LION BOOT CAMP

The 6-foot-8, 265 -pound
former UF tight end is brushing
up on the lyrics and tone of the
UF Alma Mater.
Ive got a lousy voice
moaned Yarbrough. I can't
quite see missing a meal because
of it.
Drafted in the second round
of the January pro draft by the
Lions, Punjab cant realty
afford to lose any weight.
He usually towered above ha
collegiate and
invariable weighed much moee
than the defensive backs who
shadowed him on pass patterns
In the National FoothnM
League, however, Yarbrough wfl
be a giant among giants.
Tabbed for a summer-camp

When a Man Boys I
A Sports Car... He Boy* I
A I
firet out-of-dwwaA wm al m mm m mi mm I
RIVERSIDE, CALIF Smmntm, m* fax* *mm mm I
ha drove ha Datum 2000 in a Ona aamnO mm Ora mem m me I
preliminary event.
HOLTVILLE AEROOROMf OH thOARBMI RMHBMI I
-CALIFORNIA April 13 |
of t Ds- TSs mm mZm I
SAVANAH INTERNATIONAL RACEWAY I
Jim Fitzgerald of Clammom. H faretina and Aw *mmm Cm meeem
respective D and C Production Dmmn 2000a Tim Wm*m'mm I
year in a national event for both dm era
Franklin finished more Own 00 soaandi alwan <* mm memme mem
Porsche 911 driven by Greg Lumas of AOwon Ge
WAR BONNET PARK RACEWAY Ofctohwnio I
Doc Foerster of Oklahoma City, OMa.. Ti lii mm ome .**
of the day outdoing even the big bore worts rasing mrnernmee m mm
first in class and second overall in hie D frrulin atn L
Foerster's Datsun, sponsored by Ray Brower rtfj m Ornmmrnm c a
outhandled the larger can on the ran tooled i b course.
Godding & Clark Motors I
Now Downtown by the Post Office I
Open til BP.M. Mon-Sat 2nd Ave A 2nd fi t I

tryout at etWemem anduv htY
Asyln M fkraa' i sanes era
fw et 2bS furaufi mm
which m At wmom mm m aha
want me to eapnvt m wine rang
opens faly If YwhunsgA
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