Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Accent Funds Flying, Now Rumors Flying

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the
second in a series of articles on Accent
69. This deals with the budget and
finance problems encountered in the
production of this years program and
investigates allegations of misuse of
funds.)
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
With the rumors of Accent 69 funds
flowing freely during the last few weeks
of the Clyde Taylor administration, a
special senate investigating committee
was ordered by the Student Senate.
The committee was charged to
conduct an investigation and study
into the operations of the Accent 69
Program, particularly in the area of
Student Body funds allocated to the
organization for the conduct of the
program.
In the first meeting of the committee
Accent 69 Chairman Larry Berrin told
the group he would assume all financial
responsibility from that point on, until
all outstanding debts were paid.
However, that in itself could not

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 134

NO DEMANDS, JUST IDEAS
Administrators, Blacks
Meet And Air Gripes

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Assignments Editor
In an attempt to bridge UFs
racial communications gap,
black students and members of
the administration met Friday
night for a dialogue concerning
campus attitudes toward blacks.
Although there were no
specific decisions or promises
made, both top administrators
and Afro-American Student
Association leaders said they left
the meeting with a new
understanding of each Others
positions.
UF President Stephen C.

IIP
jfpj
BBSslhu i
,Sil A mLi
m
"T#, i-kc/- Jlr M
A/E^for orphans
ROTC Sweethearts Maida Sokol and Dianne Baron gather clothing,
toys and toilet articles for shipment to an orphanage in Khe Sanh,
South Vietnam. The Sweethearts need donations of money or articles
for the project.

MIMIIH rtOOIOL QgPOSn^fI^UW^j^C^COWPOIIATtOM
v PA IQ" I
i Cl
v rja :,q noLjjuii
CITIZENS rV-fiz 7n
BANK. ..T'.VillE, FlC.' iDA
GAINESVILLE. FLORitlJu
:09,1i-00 SD: 01 CUS ?
jccc 5: tv. /6 rf/T-

solve the problems confronting Accent,
or still the rumors of misuse of funds.
One of the most fertile areas for the
rumor-mill to churn was a checking
account in Citizens Bank taken out in
the name of the Accent Symposium.
Under the Student Body Finance
Laws, Jiapter 80! .042, such an account
is illegal.
The finance law reads: All other
income besides student fee money
received by chartered organizations
must be deposited with the University
Cashier and are also subject only to

The
Florida Alligator

OConnell, who had been invited
to speak at the AASA-sponsored
meeting, described it as a good
beginning and I hope we have
more of them.
The purpose of the
get-together was a presentation
of individual gripes among
members of the organization,
said Emerson Thompson, A ASA
spokesman. There were no
demands or ultimatums given, he
said.
The discussion centered
around black student recruiting,
dormitory bigotry, remedial
programs for disadvantaged

University of Florida, Gainesville

students and the black
studen t-administratjon
relationship, Thompson said.
OConnell said there was no
specific discussion on a remedial
program. We are just not
structured at this institution for
remedial instruction to the
extent that counseling can
help.
An effort will be made to
improve counseling for all
students, not just blacks, he
said.
UF Vice President for
Student Affairs, Lester Hale,
said blacks should be concerned
about getting into upper
division, rather than worry
about entering as freshmen.
He said UF is becoming more
upper division oriented, and that
junior colleges should be the
focus of black student
recruiting.
One of the biggest gripes
voiced by blacks at the meeting,
Hale said, was the problem of
keeping white roommates.
One particular student at the
meeting said he has had no less
than four white roommates since
he entered in the fall. Hale said
the student told him that he
wound up with a single room,
and that he attributed the
move-outs to racial bigotry.
Student Body President
Charles Shepherd, who was also
at the meeting, said, The whole
problem of roommate
discontent could have been
eliminated two years ago when
my administration
recommended to housing
computer rommate matching.
The proposal has been buried in
the bowels of housing ever
since.

requisition by Legislative Council
(Student Senate) through the Treasurer
of the Student Body.
Berrin said the money deposited in
the Accent account in Citizens Bank
came from cash receipts collected by
Accent 69, and was not student fee
money. However, under the finance law,
all money, regardless of how acquired,
must be deposited in the student
depository.
Student Body Treasurer Jim Roll was
unaware of such a law and said he did
not think a large per cent of the 58


" vHHT
KTr
h^^^nhkt
fp fl \
-d hl^^h^^lKlk'W*-
wil*!
f*'*> **&
JH Br
J| |r
| hT" Th
|AK#t: >f V ?S. : :*
w -
wPm : ~
iK&r v
HPT ?**''& ,-'* .-'*
% v * > '#*;
*. .H# **\ .*. x
* AX * > jsii&ri'
j^*' a*vv3fc'' cT v v a* 'v2larot
... i-

UF ATHLETES IN WINNERS CIRCLE
Weekend victories put UF's tennis and baseball teams in the
spotlight as the netters captured the SEC championship and the
batmen topped Vandersilt to clinch the Eastern Division share of the
SEC crown. See pages 11-12.
Attention To Dorms
Asked By Shepherd
Student Body President Charles Shepherd has called for immediate
attention to several problems in campus living areas which he says he
observed during his recent campaign.
In a letter to Housing Director Harold Riker, Shepherd noted that
many dorm residents complained garbage is not collected' on
weekends, frequently causing unsanitary conditions when the trash
chutes fill up and residents discard trash in the hallways.
Garbage and litter in the halls not only presents a problem of
sanitation, but it also constitutes a Are hazard, Shepherd said. I
suggest that some arrangement be made for garbage pick-up on
weekends.
Shepherd also pointed out that many study lounges are still in a
state of disrepair, despite a promise nearly two years ago that proper
lighting and furnishings would be provided.
The student president said he hoped these problems would be
resolved shortly.

groups chartered by Student
Government operated by the legal
means in regard to private accounts
outside the university.
Roll also said he was not aware of
the treasurer's office enforcing such a
law, and questioned the possibility of a
revision in the law by the senate.
A check of the Student Senates
latest edition of the Constitution and
Statutes of the UF Student Body
showed that chapter 801.042 is
unrevised law.
Helen Powell, Student Government
bookkeeper handling Accents accounts
in the university, said she did not know
of any such account held by Accent 69.
If they had any such checking
account I didnt know anything about
it ... besides, its illegal,"she told the
Alligator on May 6.
Berrin, however, acknowledged the
account, number 0-016657, and
said it was the only thing we could do
at the time with the m:ney we had on
hand to keep it safe, and it was the only
legitimate way we could make our cash
purchases during the week.
(SEE 'ACCENT' PAGE 2)

Monday May 12, 1969

Ji *?SC*y' i^
fcev. :d:,.,,.
' tSv
>
If Ife
&
"*%^(*:; IdgS 41Ivm|| :
; ; : ; ? ;<%;
d"'-d'' '" r .ddgi, Ik-

America's
Number One
College
Daily



Til FitHkia Aiirtfdmi, ViuiMny. mtf 'Z, itoS

Page 2

DEPTH REPORT j
i Swggooooooco<&ooooooooQoooooooooooooocoooooooooiooooo i r:*w*>^
Accent Charges,.
Countercharges
FROM PA6E ONE
Much of the unexpected expense during Accent week involved
buying liquor for the Accent hospitality room on the fifth floor of the
Reitz Union.
Receipts and cancelled checks made out to a local liquor store
from the period of February 4B totaled $68.61. Another set of
cancelled checks made out for cash toward the account totaled $63,
but there is no record to show what this sum was spent for.
Mrs. Powell said only members of the Accent 69 executive
committee handled the checks and receipts from the account which
Berrin said held approximately $305.
Berrin told the SG leaders to whom he presented the financial
report that during the pressures of the program expenses arise that
cannot wait for the two to three days necessary to get requisitions
from the student body treasurer.
He said other student groups have a tradition of doing the same
thing to liquidate their budgets.
Roll said the Homecoming production, run by Florida Blue Key, as
well as several other large groups chartered by SG follow the same
practice every year even though it is against the finance law. He said
he doubted these groups were aware of the law.
In addition to the checking account, purchases for liquor made by
the university or any student group within the university are not
permitted under state law.
However, Berrin held the hospitality room was necessary for the
comfort of the speakers and lent an air of professionalism that made
Accent 69 a first class program.
Joe Hilliard, chairman of Accent 7O, said a more complete audit of
the system is absolutely necessary as is a stipulation in student laws
saying that there should be no money spent for liquor.
It is not necessary and the speakers do not expect it when they
come to a university, Hilliard said. He said he does not plan to have a
hospitality room for Accent 7O.
I question who got the most benefit from the r00m... the speakers
or the students involved, he said.
Hilliard also questioned the necessity of a banquet and a luncheon
for student leaders and speakers in the University Inn which cost
Accent $1,232.70, as well as a private party given by the Accent 69
executive committee for which $122.43 was spent on liquor and food.
In a budget that is $1,600 over, these functions account for
$1,357.70 of the additional expenditures.
Eleanor F. Roberts, university public functions officer, told the
Alligator that she had received only $36 from banquet returns as of
May 6. Only 12 people paid to attend the banquet and 98 per cent of
the people ate free, Berrin said.
As for the party, Berrin said that members of the executive
committee had earned it and several prominent student leaders had
attended. Among them were Taylor, Burnett, and then-Alligator
editor Harold Aldrich.
Bottles of champagne were reportedly kept on ice in the bath tub
at Joe Hairs apartment, and one bottle was poured over the head of a
girl at the party. Hair was finance chairman of Accent 69.
Berrin presented a list of eight reasons for the budget excesses to
the senate committee. These reasons as. well as the proceedings of the
senate investigating committee will be taken up Tuesday in the third
part of this series.

BBS
Mam, Wacom, Sports
Cars, Trac ks, 4-whod
ddva.
No. 1 in Japan
Godding fir Clark
Motor*
S. E. 2nd Ave and S. E. 2nd St.
Opm I A.M. 8 P.M.
378-2311

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florid and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

MG LINE
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE
AUSTIN AMERICA
CRANE.
IMPORTS W
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373

Impersonality? Not Here

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
The Edward G. Farnsworths
would disagree with anyone who
accuses the UF community of
being too impersonal.
Edward G. Farnsworth Jr., 7,
fell from the observation tower
on the football field April 27,
and died six days later.
But it didnt end there, for
some people who knew about
the accident, or knew Eddies
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Edward
Farnsworth, 2764 Corry
Village, didnt simply read the
brief notice and turn to the next
page of the newspaper.
To the Farnsworths, all that
matters iathat their boy is gone.
The residents of Corry, Diamond
and Falvett 111 villages, the
University Police force, and the
many who sent flowers and
offered services also felt what it
must be like to face
overwhelming hospital bills
W HATS
HAPPENING
By BRENDA GEVERTZ
Alligator Staff Writer
FLOWER CHILDRENS
DELIGHT: K. Ramakrishma
Rao of India will discuss
Gandhis Philosophy of
Non-Violence tonight in the
Reitz Union Auditorium. The
lecture, sponsored by the
Department of Religion, will
begin at 7:30.
MAKING WAVES (RADIO,
THAT IS): The Gator Amateur
Radio Club will hold a meeting
at 7 pan. in room 525 of the
Engineering and Industrials
Building.
THE MOSTEST OF
HOSTESSES: Florida Cicerones
will hold their last meeting of
the year tonight, at 7 in union
room 123.
SCRIMPING, SAVING,
SOLICITING: Order of Omega
Project SCAT meets at 7:30
p.m., tomorrow. Carry your
umbrellas to room 150 F & G in
the Union.
LEGAL LADIES: The Law
Dames will have their monthly
meeting Tuesday, at 8 p.m.
Charles Fullwood will speak in
the Law School Auditorium.
The meeting is open to students
and faculty.

Students
8 Track Stereo Tape
Reg. $7.25
Special $5.91
l
Imperial Wholesale
Williston Cutoff at S.W. 13th ST.

while supporting four children.
While the boy lay injured in
the hospital, neighbors helped
fix meals, and sat with the
younger children.
The blood bank for the
married housing residents, which
operates through the mayor s
council, donated seven units of
blood. Mrs. Margaret Hilarides,
who delivers the Gainesville Sun
in Corry Village asked each
person in a breezeway to collect
from the residents around them.
More than S2OO was
collected.
Amazing, considering it was
the end of the month, Mrs.
Hilarides said.
Those who were just plain
flat broke have given what they
could since then, she said. *
She explained how a
university police officer stayed
Pick Up '69
Yearbooks
The 1969 Seminole has
arrived and may be picked up at
the Student Service Booth,
located across from the Hub,
today. Independents should
bring receipts and Greeks houses
will be distributing Seminoles to
fraternity and sorority members.
Jim Moody, former Seminole
Editor, commented that the
whole staff was well pleased
with the results of this years
book.
I feel very optimistic about
getting an Associated Collegiate
Press All-American rating. The
whole staff put in a tremendous
all-year effort and I think the
Seminole shows this effort,
Moody praised.
MODELS
NEEDED-FRI6PM
EVERY FRIDAY
. A- >
' DANDYLION

SALES- SERVICE-RENT ALS
"Authorized Authorized
Adler Dealer" / Smith Corona
add office Equipment
FORMERLY Hancock Office Equipment
582 N. Main St. 376-5551 z.

with Mrs. Farnsworth in the
emergency room, and how
members of the force afterwards
collected donations.
The police nevertheless
wanted no publicity about their
efforts, it was done quietly, they
felt, and that was enough.
The Farnsworths were
surprised at the response, they
didnt expect the overwhelming
concern, Jerry Yakatan, Corry
Village mayor said.
Thats one of the things
about married student housing,
its really great, the people
become so close, he said.
But the struggle ended late
Sunday.
A benefit picnic has been
planned for married students to
raise more money May 24. One
of the things Yakatan said he
was hoping for was donations of
food, raffle prizes, so as much of
the money as possible can go to
the Farnsworths.
The picnic will begin at 12:30
at the Corry basketball court.
The residents hope to reach
at least SI,OOO to help meet the
hospital bills.
They realize money, right
now, matters little to the
parents, that Eddie cant come
back, but as Mrs. Hilarides said,
We wanted to do more than we
could.
Now Taking Applications
at
Summit House
1700 S. W. 16th ct
for
September
(9*lo & 12 month Leases
rates start
1 BR-sl2l
2 BR sl47
Summer Term
Special Rates
376-9668



FBK Dialogue Discusses
Student Activities Center

Dialogue, sponsored by
Florida Blue Key, will hold a
meeting Tuesday night at 7:30
in the Rathskeller to discuss the
possibility of a student activity
center on the UF campus. All
students are encouraged to
attend.
Athletic Director Ray Graves
has been invited to the meeting
by Mike Hill, Chairman of
Dialogue.
Coach Graves said that he
would like to attend the
meeting, but that he has a
previous engagement. He said
that he would try to get free of
his original appointment, and if

New Editors Planning
Responsive Yearbook

To make the Seminole more
environmental is the goal of the
newly-selected 1970 yearbook
editors. v
Ken Driggs, former Seminole
sports editor, is going to try to
make the Seminoie more
responsive to the students and
their feelings.
Instead of following the usual
yearbook format exactly, Driggs
and Jim Okula, managing editor,
plan to expand by making the
Seminole more responsive with a
newspaper attitude.
One way this will be done is
through the coverage of major
events during the year and the
inclusion of the groups that
make the news, such as Samson,
Southern Students Organizing
Committee, and campus
elections.
The layout of the Seminole

TWO VALUABLE COUPONS
1 C 01. Sanders'* |f|f
I
< tfkiakat I
114 N.W. 34th St. I
372-3649 |
MMNMMIMMMMMMM MONDAY COUPON SPECIAL **********************
CHICKEN DINNER
ti oc qq>
3 Pieces Chicken, Cole Slaw, | Jf M W
Mashed Potatoes with Gravy uiw.. vAimAsi
WITH COUPON
and Rolls.
********************** MONDAY COUPON SPECIAL wmaaaanmmmmimmwmi
********************** TUESDAY COUPON SPECIAL MWMAMIMIMMVWWVMMMfMI |
1111 M'lirrr^-^
fcoKTUOTB* II <* aa J] CHICKEN DINNER]
reg. only OQa
$1.25 C
1 3 Pieces Chicken, Cole Slaw,
Mashed Potatoes with Gravy WITH COUPON
and Rolls.
nnmiwinnnnnnnnnnnnr TUESDAY COUPON SPECIAL ***********************

he cannot he will send a
representative from the Athletic
Department. He hasnt called me
yet to confirm exactly what he
will do, Hill said.
Others that have been invited
and accepted are Mark Dunn,
Alligator Sports Editor, Joe
Scaffuti, Chairman of the
Student Center Action Team
(SCAT), and Steve Rohan,
vice-chairman of SCAT, and Mr.
Massey, Gainesville city
commissioner.
The Dialogue committee will
ask questions of these men
concerning the proposed activity
center, and afterward students

will be the same as before,
mosaic format, Okula
commented.
About one-half of the present
staff is returning, but all jobs are
available and the two editors
strongly encourage people to
apply for the positions.
Driggs said he is looking now
for a full staff, especially people
who are capable of
photographing for their
individual sections. The
emphasis is on experience, but
enthusiasm is demanded of
prospective employees, with or
without experience.

will be free to ask questions.
SCAT is the student
organization behind the drive to
bring a student activity center to
the campus. In a pamphlet
entitled SCAT Why?, the
group pointed to UFs outdoor
swimming pool, built in 1930,
and UFs small gymnasium as
examples of a student activity
center which would serve as a
cultural and sports center for
Gainesville.
SCATS immediate goal is to
raise $20,000 to go toward the
expense of a student activity
center. SCAT sponsored the
TEP-Fighting Gators football
game last Tuesday night which
netted about SIOOO, according
to Kathy Horne, publicity
director for Dialogue. SCAT is
also responsible for the quarter
drive which still continues on
campus, and encouraged the
Dialogue meeting.
SCAT was also responsible
for the referendum in the recent
Student Government elections
asking whether students would
be willing for $5 of the $25
tuition hike next fall to be
contributed to a student activity
center fund. A majority of the
students approved the plan.
Excellence in Food

: J'm Bartlett Tom Stewart
George Corl Mel Ward
Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson
Fidelity Union '.ife Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 376-1208
DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN
i ms i'hiph mm mu fnnnni[)\ i
-BECKUM OPTICIANS
22 Wwt Univtmty Ayr, Gainesville, Ha. Phony 376-351 <
'* V-. t* WAUIN oi *M! Ml. A, INC
$!,799*
WhatWhe catch? There isn't any.
$ 1 79 9 'S the suggested retail price at the port
of entry for the VW sedan.
The price includes the Federal excise tax,and
import duty.
It also includes the built-in heater/defroster,
windshield washer, electric windshield wipers,
outside rearview mirror, padded dash, front seat
headrests, and seat belts front and back.
Not to mention the new electric rear-window
defogger and the new ignition/steering lock.
(When the key is removed, the steering wheel is
locked in place.)
Its the price of the real thing, not a stripped strippeddown
down strippeddown economy model.
What else do you have to pay?
The charge for transporting the car from the
port of entry. The dealer delivery charge. And
local sales tax.
There is one optional that makes a lot of sense.
The automatic stick shift. (It eliminates the clutch
pedal.)
Well, that's it.
Unless, of course, you count the cost of gas and
oil it takes you to get here in your present car.
Miller-Brown ($)
4222 N.W. 13th St. A r.'
"Suggested retail price, (East Coast) P.0.E.,
local taxes, and other dealer delivery charges, if
any, additional.

Monday, May 12, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

r, Th Florida Alligator, Monday, May 12,1969

SDS Chapter
Organized
An independent group of the
radical Students For A
Democratic Society (SDS) has
organized a city chapter, a
spokesman said Thursday.
It will be more of a formal
organization with members
paying dues and carrying cards.
Next meeting is set for noon on
May 18 in Room 349 of the
Reitz Union.

State College Competition
Forces Dorm Improvements

By LES SLITER
Alligator Correspondent
State colleges, not off-campus
luxury apartments, are forcing
UF to improve its living
facilities, Asst. Director of
Housing William E. Neylans said
yesterday.
We have to stay competitive
with sister institutions in the
state, he said.
Neylans noted that Florida
Atlantic University and the
University of South Florida are
both completely air-conditioned.
He added that USF has a
swimming pool in the dormitory
area.
At present, 1,100 dormitory
rooms have been air-conditioned
and one dormitory has been
carpeted at the UF, Neylans
said. He hopes that all student
residences will eventually receive

||g *' H
I Pick up your book this week 5-12 to 5-16 I
I from 10AM until 4PM second floor north I
I wall of the J. Wayne Reitz Union. I
I BRING RECEIPTS!
I G R p S pick up your book Monday 5,2 at the loading ramp |
on the parking lot side of the Union at 12:00 NOOK! I
|

DROPOUTS
MY MIND'S MAPe"\
pH U up, ALF. I START. \
TOWORBOW U

the same treatment.
Two swimming pools have been
planned, Neylans said. They will
probably open in December.
Neylans explained that the
average college student today
comes from a more affluent
family.
He is accustomed to these
things, and we want to keep him
happy, Neylans said.
Neylans emphasized that
off-campus apartments have not
spurred the drive for dormitory
improvement. He admitted that
students who desire the
gracious living offered by
luxury apartments will not be
attracted to campus facilities,
NOW POPPIN
KORN KETTLE
GAINESVILLE MALL

since the dormitories are
primarily functional places.
But he added that campus
housing is filled in spite of this.
Neylans said that 6270 students
were living on campus last
September, and that 6300 spaces
are available. (All single
freshmen and sophomores are
required to live on campus or in
Greek houses until they are 21
years old.)
I Miller-Brown I
I I
I ONE MILE I
NORTH OF
THE MALL Mfl
376-4552
I AUTHORIZED I
DEALER
B Open til 8 p.m. nightly B

B Y HOWARD POST
/CaKP TwTYseTTHAMKS,) /I FLIES. -SEE #slr
/ |SFOR | PAL ...WHAT I /MY VENUS FLYTRAP ) Z"
I YoU,ALF... IS IT? J I SETS AT
V I FIVE A PAY... I H
\8 b££

OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru FrL
7 it "DcL*eUfl(6K
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave
~ ENGLAND
\ FRANCE
\4ml AUSTRIA
MpS ITALY
GERMANY
Explore Europe for 21 days of exam-free travel
beginning July 10th.
Conducted by David Kenerson, Professor of Humanities.
S6OO covers all expenses transportation, room, board,
and fees.
FOR DETAILS CALL 392-1517




SUPREME COURT RULING

Decision May Affect Claxton

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
The fate of John Robert Claxton may be
affected by a recent Supreme Court decision
concerning a New York man convicted of flag
burning, according to Claxtons defense attorney
Benjamin Tench.
A March 18-19 trial for Claxton ended in a
mis-trial when the jury announced it was
stalemated. It could not decide if an American flag
had been burned with intent to insult as is stated
in the law under which Claxton was being tried.
No new trial date has been set so far and Tench
says it cant be retried because of the Supreme
Court decision. The Supreme Court ruled April 21
on the flag burner case, Sidney Street v. State of
New York, and reversed the decisions to convict
which were made in lower courts.
Street was convicted of malicious mischief for
burning a U.S. flag in 1966 in order to protest the
slaying of James Meredith. At the time of the
burning the defendant said, We dont need no
damn flag, and, If they let that happen to
Meredith, we dont need an American flag.
In appealing his case, Street argued that the New
York law in question was vague and that the state
can not punish someone who destroys or damages
an American flag as a means of protest because
doing so would deny the protection of the
Fourteenth Amendment.
Claxtons lawyers based their case on the claim

Shepherd Calls For Revamping
Os Teacher Evaluation Program

Launching a major plank of
First partys platform, Student
Body President Charles
Shepherd has demanded that
Omicron Delta Kappa
significantly revamp its course
and teacher evaluation program
or face possible loss of Student
Government financing of the
project.
In a May 5 letter to Fred
Breeze, chairman of the
program, Shepherd noted that
SG has financed the program for
two years which has gotten
little results. Perhaps there is a
need for a different approach to
the entire problem, including a
different type of program.
Since it's inception, the
program has been unable + o
conduct wide-spread evaluations
because many professors are
unwilling to have their course
and teaching methods evaluated
by students.
CARE Needed
It will take 6 million CARE
food packages, at a dollar a
package, to complete programs
that will help feed 28 million
hungry people in 33 countries
during 1969. Contributions to
the CARE Food Crusade, New
York 10016, deliver U.S.
commodity donations or buy
other foods as needed.

NEW .J.
Hawaiian
Village |fe
Now leasing for Sept.
3461 S.W. Second Ave.
PHONE 378-5905
Next to Westgate
Shopping Center
f ownhnusc & F lats 1
Swinimmq Pool
Recreation I tali
Wall to Wall Ca> pet
Air Conditioned
Dishwashers & disposals
Private Pat ios
Master r V Antenna
I a ll ml l v I aci l l l ies
11 A MR., 1,1 Mat hs
MODELS OPEN DAILY 10 5
Hotpomt A;ipi mi 1 S

Shepherd was careful to point
out that he was not blaming
Breeze for past shortcomings of
the program, since Breeze
became chairman only a few
weeks ago.
But, he said, an effective
course and teacher evaluation
program is the core of academic
reform.
If ODKs program cannot get
the job done, Shepherd said,
then Student Government may
Just a walk away
from U.F. campus a,
1 62 W. UNIV. |
UN,VERSITY PLAZA I
m4\ Bettes I
H AIRSTYUST/J
378-2244

-GO-GREEK
a '' '
Sign Up Now
for
Fall Rush
1 4 p.m. Daily at
PANHELLENIC COUNCIL
RM 315 J.W.R.U.
GO GREEK
ITS GREAT!

that the defendant burned the flag as a symbolic
gesture out of respect for what it used to stand for.
The Supreme Court tried to determine if Street
had been convicted for his words spoken at the time
independent of his actions. It set up four situations
in which it would be legitimate to convict on the
basis of the words.
It decided that Streets statements did not incite
others to commit crimes, encourage listeners to use
violence against him, shock others by his words
against the flag, or show disrespect for the flag. The
court said conviction was not justified.
Freedom of expression is a point on which much
of this case hinged. The court referred to a 1943
decision which said that to require school children
to salute the flag would violate rights guaranteed in
the Fourteenth Amendment.
The court added that the freedom of differing in
opinion includes the freedom to express publicly
ones opinion about our flag, including those
opinions which are defiant or contemptuous.
Chief Justice Earl Warren and Justices Black,
Fortas, and White disagreed with the decision of the
majority. Warrens statement said the court had
declined to meet and resolve the basic questions
presented in the case.
Fortas said a person should be allowed to own a
flag, but that this ownership should be subject to
special burdens and responsibilities. He said the
state should protect its citizens from the dangers
involved when someone bums a flag, from the fire
itself and from the obstruction of traffic.

have to assume responsibility for
the program, acting either along
or in cooperation with other
groups.
Breeze agreed with the
program outlined by Shepherd
and said he would be willing to
supervise if funds were available.
He is expected to submit a
revised budget soon.
VETERANS
Be a commercial pilot!
NEWG. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Area's only approved school
3 7 8-2646

W. C. FIELDS
IN
CALIFORNIA BOUND
&
HURRY HURRY
STARTS 9 P.M.
rantsn
MONDAY SPECIAL
ITAUAN STYLE
MEAT SAUCE & AQ&
SPAGHETTI
TUESDAY SPECIAL
OLD FASHION
STEWED CHICKEN AQa
& DUMPLINGS
LUNCH
112 BLOCK WEST OF
FLORIDA THEATER
| SHOP-SHOP
ft ftfv IN
Ift n Drop your dry cloon-
I |fT * any our
on yaur way to work .
up on your
MONDAY, MAY 12 TUESDAY, MAY 13 WEDNESDAY, MAY 14
&B& m ft s mm ftift ftfli
RIPS ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING
& MARTINIZING PLANTS
7 COMPLETE PLANTS
TO SERVE YOU
. L
204 N.W. 13th Street 130 N.W. 10th Avenue
y
p
319 N.W. 13th Street 316 North Mein Street
1603 S.W. 13th Street 3444 West University Avenue
1150 N.E. 16th Aeenue

Monday, May 12, 1969, The Florida Alligatof,

Page 5



Page 6

The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 12, 1969

The Florida Alligator

iA\h t
PiotajJuiv
All
A*IMM

"I Hear Old Banana Nose Is Gone"
No Fair Reporting
MR. EDITOR:
It appears that the Alligator has neglected a report on the outcome
of the Engineers Fair. Many students (myself not included) devoted a
great deal of effort to present to the students and general public a
wide range of exhibits exemplifying the progress of engineering at the
University of Florida.
Selective reporting of campus activities is understandable due to
staff limitations, but the scanty coverage of this significant event by
Americas Number 1 College Daily is inexcusable.

Another View

University College, An Absurd Institution

I think it is about time
administrators and policy makers at this
university wake up to realities and do
something about the one great eyesore
on this campus the University
College.
My opinion concerning this topic
with no doubt is shared by all those
who in the past have been subjected to
its absurdities and its inadequacies.
As a past member of Dean Dotys
University College Student Board, I
have seen fruitless attempts by a
misguided administrator to revise an
institution that should not exist in the
first place.
Why is it that the now renowned
Gourman Report which rated all
universities in the United States assigned
a grade of D (as in Doty) to freshman
studies at our school?
Why is it that freshman and
sophomores are subjected to pressures
and testing procedures no where else
found on our campus?
Is the goal of the University College

"The price of freedont
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor

Carol Sanger
Executive Editor

Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors

KEN ANUSAVICE 7EG

to weed out, flunk out, or at least lower
the academic averages of students who
do not belong at the University of
Florida?
Im sure many of us know numerous
Junior College transfers who could not
make it through the University College
if their lives depended on it! Why is it
then that these students are permitted
to enter Upper Division as equals to
those who ran the rigors of Dotys
disaster?
I am not writing this letter to blame
Dean Doty personally. As a former
Alligator Correspondent, I had the
misfortune to meet certain department
chairman of the University College
personally and see the product of
twisted educational policies and ideas.
Namely testing.
Take, for example, the infamous
progress test. What disease breeds in the
minds of certain University College
professors to provoke them to come up
with questions that are purposely
irrelevant and misleading?

EDITORIAL

Healthy Families

Bob Mandell, immediate past SG
Insurance Commissioner, has proposed a
plan to include spouses of UF students
under the coverage of the student insurance
program.
There are several groups who have
expressed support for the plan, including the
Married Village, and informal support
I offered by SG leaders and an infirmary
official.
But there is opposition to this plan by the
County Medical Association because they
would lose business if student spouses were
treated on campus. The current student
insurance program provides some coverage
for spouses, but the benefits are small and in
many cases the families end up paying the
balance of the bills.
It seems strange to us that the countys
doctors would oppose any plan to provide
inexpensive medical care for spouses of UF
students. The mighty dollar seems more
important to the doctors than inexpensive
medical care of UF student spouses.
The concept of the university providing

New Left Doesnt Run UF

MR. EDITOR:
'
I was disappointed in Suggs
comments on ROTC because his
cancerous diseases, Defense
Department errand boys, and
false class superiorities are
nothing but contributions to
that vast body of valuable New
Left prattle. In the tradition of
his movement Sugg effectively
ignores common sense and cites
a gamut of post hoes that is
music to the ears of trained
sophists.
The ROTC issue does not
concern the Pentagon, the war,
the Action Conference, or the
location of Dempsey Dumpsters
on campus. It does involve a
militant groups ability to
dictate the courses which may or
may not be offered. Ultimately
the issue is who is going to run
this university.
I submit that in no case can a

I think that the educational processes
here, despite attempted revision by
Dean Doty and his student board, have
failed because they are not radical
enough. If it means breaking a long time
tradition at our school, do it.
If it means raising the caliber of D
freshman and sophomore studies to the
point that a student feels he has
accomplished something after two years
of work, do it. And what is most
remarkable is that a significant group of
University College professors feel the
way I do yet do little more than talk
about it to their respective classes.
The associate of arts degree issued by
the University College is not worth the
paper it is printed on. It is just what it
is. A symbol. A symbol of what the
student did not do, did not leam, and
did not accomplish.
As a Journalism major in my senior
year, I feel it is my duty to do
something or at least make my
complaints heard m the right channels
as soon as I can. My contempt for the

militant student minority be
allowed to establish its own
curriculum, even when that
group claims sole title to a
celestial prardigm. I am a
student just as they are, and I
dont appreciate thei r telling me
that for my own benefit ROTC
should not be offered with
credit. Nor would I appreciate
their Delphic evaluation of any
of my courses.
The point is that there are a
good many reasons to consider
any given course undesirable
we all come up with new ones
every quarter but what Sugg
is advocating is the superiority
of the New Lefts moral
pronouncements over yours and
mine. There is nothing
inherently wrong with this
approach, but there are a lot of
liberals who view radical rhetoric
as just that and remain
unconvinced.

for the is not a new one.
The main problenHiow appears that there
is no plan that is acceptable to all parties on
campus involved. If these people are truly
interested in providing this sort of medical
coverage for student spouses, some sort of
concerted effort must be organized.
Although Mandell is no longer insurance
commissioner, he is knowledgable about this
program and can perform a service by
finding away to take charge of this program
and work for its acceptance.
Zap-In
This weekends unsuccessful Zap-In in the
town of Zap, North Dakota was billed to be
the Fort Lauderdale of the North, but the
rowdiness of the students and the actions of
the police turned the Zap-In into a b ig bust.
Fort Lauderdale may be rather dull
during the annual Spring break to some
people, but a sun-in is better than a Zap-In.

By Mark Leibovit

University College reaches beyond my
own personal experiences to those of
my friends and associates.
I WILL make my voice heard. Copies
of this letter are in the process of being
sent to State University Chancellor
Robert Mautz, our illustrious Governor,
President OConnell, and other
bureaucrats both in state and national
politics who supposedly pride
themselves in good education.
Florida
Alligator
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in
Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-168
Opinions expressed in the Florida
Alligator are those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not
those pf the University of Florida/

A recent editorial in the
Tampa Tribune sums it up
(without the poli tics) when
discussing the recent Harvard
fiasco:
If Harvard can cop out
from the military
necessity, will it next,
under student pressure,
eliminate from its credit,
curriculum and faculty
those courses and
instructors related to
; police power? If the next
target of it dissident
students is the amorphous
Establishment, will it
yield by eliminating that
citadel of Establishment
business and finance, its
Graduate School of
Business? (April 21,1969)
ALEX P. MAVRO, JR. 4AS



.-OPEN FORUM:^^
oml 'DiMtot /)
hope for the complacent
y<
f J.X
V.j*
: r^Sl
i A M ,?f Jrt
raw
... TRY THE AMERICAN WAY
l/.S. In Asia

MR. EDITOR:
I see that the interest Jim
Hollis (the only guy I know with
two right hands) has in campus
politics lately hasnt numbed his
interest in important things, in
fact, he has scored a few
concrete points against the Left
in his recent letter about the
opaque logic of Mr. John Sugg.
Mr. Sugg unfortunately
picked the wrong country at the
wrong time. South Korea, Japan,
and West Germany are the only
countries that I know of where
the American Way that we
have imposed has worked. It
certainly isnt working in the
North American or South
American continents.
But, Mr. Sugg, dont ever
forget that life is no better for
anybody in Russia than in the
U.S. and that given a few years
Russia may surpass us in yet
another field: the number of
aggressive and imperialist
international incidents.
While I agree, Jim, that it is a
matter of opinion, any well
informed person would have to
agree that today, in 1969, South
Korea relies on the U.S. less does

You Know How It Is!
MR. EDITOR:
Isnt it comforting to know that a citizen can be arrested and
charged with illegal possession of a narcotic drug after being assisted
in the act by the police? Since when is Dexadrine a narcotic, anyhow?
Sorry I can't give my name folks, but Im a Pharmacy student.
NAME WITHHELD
_ mmmmm
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters
to the editor must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers* names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters in the
interest of space.

the nightmarish Kim
dictatorship of the North rely on
its comrads.
Mr. Sugg, either do more
reading about Korea or stick to
Viet Nam, the best current
example of needless American
aggression. Recently a Korean
professor told me that the
Korean-Viet Nam veterans
report that the average person in
South Viet Nam hates the
American soldier and his war.
This is reasonable when you
consider that 1) the white man
has been in charge of an fighting
in his homeland all of this
average mans life and 2) the
American way has only been
successful in areas that have
been first materially and
culturally razed to the ground as
the three examples above show.
Jim, you might read In a
Time of Torment by I.F. Stone
(Fla. Book Store) and you, Mr.
Sugg, should read the June
Playboy interview with Gore
Vidal. Both are required reading
for anyone who would know the
world better.
JACK ROQUEMORE 7ED

More New Left Nonsense

MR. EDITOR:
The articles by Lee Hilliker and John Sugg
appearing in the May 6 edition of the Alligator are
examples of the twisted logic of the New Left. Os
course logic and reason may have nothing to do
with it if Hilliker is to be believed. He says: As to
the appeal to rationality ... it is the argument of a
blind man or a fool. Man is not an essentially
rational animal... I assume that Sugg shares this
philosophy since he also studiously avoids saying
anything reasonable. For example Sugg says:
(1) Now, since with capitalism,... property
rights are protected ... A person with no property
has no rights. Nonsense? Os course. Property rights
and other rights are not mutually exclusive. This
country protects the freedoms of speech, religion,
assembly, etc., and in addition gives a^citizen the
right to be secure in his. possessions.
(2) These types of rights (property rights) are
negative rights and signify a negative concept of
freedom. In other words, freedom is thought of as
the lack of interference in ones activity ... Since
laws are based on a negative approach to freedom,
no one is encouraged to participate in any
freedom ... Now thats not just ordinary nonsense.
That is prize nonsense.
By definition a right is a state protected privilege.
Without state protection, of course, there could be
no rights since individuals with strength and power
would have their way. Thus the state directs the
aggregate strength of society to protect the
privileges of the individual from interference by
others.
Sugg says the prohibition from interference is a
negative and debilitating influence on society. A few

(EDITORS NdTE: The following is the second
of a two part article by Charles Fulwood of JOMO.)
JOMO does advocate Black Liberation by any
means necessary which is, dammit, self-defense
against the oppressive mother country. JOMO
KENYATTA did, and so did the Declaration of
Independence. (Americas too.) Black People was no
longer letting their values in this racist, imperialistic
and capitalistic system supersede their will to be
Free. Now check that!
Some white people think were jiving; they fail to

accept the fact that Black People
are going to take care of Black
Folks business SELF-DETER SELF-DETERMINATION
MINATION SELF-DETERMINATION and thats where
thats at. Black Folks built and
worked the Black Belt and
participated largely in building
this country to What it is today,
and were gonna have our share.
Jack, were talking about
revolutionary change and we
aint jiving. Now how does that
shake up your spinal cord?
You can dig up all the Roy
Wilkins statements you want to,
but as far as the Black masses are
concerned hes just another
paper tiger who's a modem-type
Uncle Tom striving for wealth
and respectability from
Whites who thinks like he does.
The time of white people and
the government picking our
leaders is long gone. Weve been
through that bit already.
Just because the government
approves and endorses cats like
Roy Wilkins don't mean nothing

to the masses of Black Folk. The poor Black People
in this country are the most revolutionary and
thats where the power is they are not being
represented.
A lot of whites like to talk that jive about
Communism, and it dont even register with Black
Folk. Most of the cats I know all over this country
say, my enemy's enemy is my friend. White
America is the one who have always had the money
and controlled it in the interests of individual men
instead of the needs of poor people.
America is the one thats killing millions of

The Militant Viewpoint

Well Have Our Share

examples will clarify things. The Constitution
provides that citizens shall have the right of life,
liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Citizen A has
the right to live, then. But that means that the rest
of us cant kill him. See how negative that is for the
rest of us.
Citizen B has the right to be secure in his
possessions. But that means the rest of us cant take
his possessions away from him because the state is
protecting his property from interference by us.
Thats negative too, dont you see? Sugg says aO this
negativeness is what discourages everyone from
participating in any freedom. Maybe Sugg should
define his notion of what consitutes freedom.
(3) On the other hand, a revolutionary
country, China . scorns to be solving human
needs ... Sugg must think we are a cluster of
fools. Unless China has devised a method, since the
abortive Red Guard fiasco, of substituting
revolutionary zeal for the necessities of life, China is
in dire economic straits. Certainly we do not wish to
emulate such a desperate country.
These are but three examples of the absence of
logic from the New Left tirades. The supply is great
since the new Left has adopted emotionalism in lieu
of reason; labeling and name calling in lieu of
argument.
It is understandable, since its difficult to
maintain an argument when reason is on the other
side, but it is also insulting that we should be
considered such fools as to be persuaded by it.
Words without meaning, argument without reason,
and assertion without fact has become the hallmark
of the New Left.
JOHN OBRIEN 3LW

people in Vietnam because it has economic interests
there and racist attitudes towards non-white people
on an international level and a national level. This
government throws oodles of food away every day
and people are starving. This government spends
billions of dollars on space research and billions of
dollars on riot equipment and wont spend a
penny to make communities fit for human beings to
live in.
Not long ago, millions of gallons of milk was
thrown into the lakes of Wisconsin to make milk

WXt/ H( HLEtX
" Rtsrn
Tli: £loll*
imujM

about it, and millions of Blade People slaughtered in
this nation since weve been here and not receiving
one inch of land or one dollar for this some
whites have the audacity to call Blade Nationalists
racist.
You can sit around in your middle-class homes
and apts., with your thick carpets on the floor,
smoking Winston cigarettes and watching Mod
Squad and talk all the shit you want to, but Black'
Folks are gonna take care of Black Folks business
from now on in their organizations, and Black Folks
have got a share of power and wealth in this country
and were gonna get it!

Monday, May 12, 1960,T1M Florida Alligator,

By Charles Fulwoo

more valuable so that the
prices would have to go up. This
government kills millions of
animals for the hide and fur and
bulldozer the meat into holes in
the ground and kids go hungry
to school every day in some
parts of the country and the
world.
And 1 aint talking no damn
politics either; Im talking about
the lives of human beings being
controlled by racist idiots who
are insane with the value of
money. Thats what Im talking
about. No, you cant talk to
Black Folk when you talk that
jive about the venom of
communism, flowing to take
over America.
After 100 years ofv physical
slavery, 300 years of economic
slavery, and 400 years of
dehumanization, and brothers
being thrown in prisons without 1
fair trials on framed-up charges,
and sisters being raped by white
men and nothing being done

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator. Monday, May 12, 1969

fflnea international
33eu)0

SecretTalksClaimed
Best Hope For Peace

PARIS (UPI) Saigons chief
negotiator to the Vietnam peace
conference said Sunday he has
orders to open serious
discussions with the
Communists if they indicate
they are ready to get down to
serious bargaining.
Ambassador Pham Dang Lam,
back from two weeks of
consultations in Saigon, said
private or secret conversations
still offered the best hope, in
Saigons view, of getting the
Communists to put their cards
on the table.
I have general instructions
to engage in serious discussions
with the other side if they want
them, he told newsmen at Orly
Airport.
But to be able to explore
even more deeply the
possibilities of agreement, he
said, it seems to me that the
very flexible formula of
President Thieus proposals of
private or secret conversations is
the most appropriate way to
permit the other side to make
more precise things they cannot
be precise about at the formal
weekly negotiating sessions in
Paris.
Lam affirmed Saigons
willingness to discuss with North
Vietnam and the Viet Congs

Si^M
Fpickin up
the pieces HHSK^^H
UMMmmmumm including: 1^
love

National Liberation Front
(NLF) the questions of exchange
of prisoners of war,
reestablishment of the
demilitarized zone separating
North and South Vietnam and
the neutrality of Laotian
territory.
They are among the points
which both the United States
and South Vietnam consider
worthy of further exploration
while rejecting simultaneous
Communist demands for
unilateral U.S. troop withdrawal
and setting up of coalition
governments in Saigon.

STUDY IN CUERNAVACA
SPRING TERM 1970
ALTERNATIVES IN EDUCATION
A THREE MONTH TERM
Twelve seminars on the practice and ideology of school schooling,
ing, schooling, especially in Latin America, and the investigation
of alternative educational possibilities. The aim is to de develop
velop develop a fundamental critique of existing and alternative
educational systems.
Seminars are scheduled to accommodate students from
U.S. Colleges (Quarter or Semester Plan) and can be
combined with Intensive Spanish and other courses at
Write:
CIDOC-SPRING 1970
APD0.479, Cuernavaca, Mexico

Israeli Raids Intensified

TEL AVIV, Israel (UPI)
Military sources Sunday
predicted an intensification of
Israeli commando raids into
Arab territory that could include
strikes against Egyptian army
bases across the Suez Canal.
The purpose of such forays
would be to convince the
Egyptian government and high
command that Egyptian attacks
on Israeli forces lining the east
bank of the canal can be costly.
Egyptian President Gamal Abdel
Nasser has ordered his troops to
destroy Israels Suez army.
In Beirut, political sources
reported no progress Sunday in
attempts to solve the crisis
stemming from demands by
Arab guerrillas for the right to
use Lebanese soil as the staging
ground for raids into Israel.
Lebanon fears Israeli reprisals
for such attacks.
Israeli diplomatic and
military officials are convinced
that Arab harassment along
Israels frontiers is designed

mainly to impress the Big Four
powers currently discussing the
Middle East crisis in New York
that an imposed peace
settlement is necessary. Israel
has refused to accept any
formula against its ihterests that
may emerge from the Big Four
talks.
With few exceptions in recent
months, Israeli forces have been
content to trade artillery fire

announcing
An International Festival of New-Film
The First American Showings
Os 26 Short Films from 9 Countries
...... .... .. . .... ..... a
. ........ j.*..... j. /..* :*v :
111 too# ###
- 0
a distinguished series of three programs presenting the new newest
est newest achievements in creative cinema by the world's most tal talented
ented talented film makers.
. the show was extraordi extraordinary
nary extraordinary ... delightful, exhila.at exhila.at
exhila.at ing, dee P | y moving. . Con ConifHi
ifHi ConifHi gratulations, gratitude, huzzas,
'IBjPI three cheers and a tiger!"
Washington, D C.
|j|[ya|MH|M|. "Beguilingly creative . di di-9
-9 di-9 THREE PART SERIES
STARTS MAY 14 & 15

with Egyptian troops across the
Suez Canal or to silence
Jordanian attacks on settlements
on the Israeli-occupied west
bank of the Jordan River with
mortar fire or small scale air
raids.
But the sources Sunday also
pointed to recent Israeli
commando raids as a sign that
Israels patience is wearing thin.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE I
the proven carpet cleaner Blue
Lustre is easy on the budget.
Restores forgotten colors. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. A-1M34-C)
Mint Honda S9O 66 model. Excellent
condition $l3O or make offer. 4546
MW 13 St. Lot 21. (A-3M34-P)
For sale: Bx3l trailer and Bxl
cabana air conditioned. Next to
campus in Glynwood Park. Good
condition, 1495. Call 372-2673.
(A-5M34P)
Playful 7-wk. tiger kittens. Part
Siamese, predominately black, beige
markings on face. Dewormed
house-broken $4 ea. Call 378-2077,
1766 NE 21 PI. (A-3M34-P)
BASSETT-HOUNDS AKC registered,
3 females, 5 wks. old. Tri-colored,
predominately black, bred for
temperment, call 378-8422.
(A-2M34-P)
1964 Pontiac Lemans, 2 dr,
automatic, V-8, radio, good
condition. S9OO or best offer. Call
Elaine 392-3569 or 378-4179.
(A-5M34-P)
Guns Guns Guns lnventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, Micanopy 466-3340.
(A-ts-104-c)
1964 Rambler station wagon.
Transmission needs repair. $325.8000
BTU air conditioner SIOO. Call
372-3356. (A-3t-133-p)
Express Yourself. Maiya-sekor
1000DTL. 5 months old still under
warranty. Also 500DTL. Both very
reasonable. Brian Goodheim,
376-1701. (A-3t-133-p)
Yammaha 350 Ex. condition.
Crash helmets incl. owner in service.
Low mileage. Call 372-oA**o after
4p.m. (A-st-133-p)
1967 PORSCHE 912 5-speed,
chrome wheels, abarth exhaust. Call
or write Mr. John Morton 1735 N.E.
2nd St., Ocala Fla. 6290695.
(A-3t-133-p)
>anta Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2V2 acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20M16-P)
Why pay rent? 1 bedroom mobile
home 8X36 with 10x20 paroled
cabana. Air cond., furn., pool and
tennis courts in park. $795.
378-5880. (A-st-131-p)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave,
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
CHEAP, DEPENDABLE
TRANSPORTATION. Suzuki
Scrambler 50cc 1965 Good cond.
Helmet, tools ONLY $95. Call
392-9889. (A-st-130-p)
1964 Lambretta 125 cc runs great
good transportation and economical.
Luggage rack incl., tires like new.
$75.00 Call 378-8072 after 6:00.
(A-5M32-P)
Honda 50first SSO takes it. Musi
sell, must be cash as is SSO. Call Bob
Burns 378-5789. (A-4M30-P)
BjRQMni
PlvTfSjJ LAST 4
K ll DAYS
, TOO RIFLES
HURRY!
I LAST
2 DAYS
' An overground sex-protest film!
-Archer Winsten, New York Post
| Greetings
[ RELEASE in COLON laJ j

Monday, May 12,1969, The Florida Alligator,

| FOR SALE
1969 49cc Riverside moped only 250
miles. Must sell. Need money SBS.
239-U Flavet IIT agter 5:30 p.m. 2
helmets included. (A-5M32-P)
Best buy! 1968 Saab in top
condition. Only 8750 miles! Deluxe
model, pirelli tires, radio with rear
speaker. S2IOO. Call 378-6792 now*
(A-3M32-P)
ROBERT'S 1719 4Tr Sterio Tape
Recorder; Only 4 mo. old, slightly
used; $l6O or best offer. Call
378-3876. (A-3t-132-P)
SCM portable electric typewriter,
model 110. Like new, l yr. old,
hardly used. Must sell for S9O. Need
cash. Call 378-3709. (A-5M32-P)
196 8 Vandyke 12x52,
airconditioning. Located Varsity
Villa, $650 down, $81.92/mo. Call
376-6555 after 6 p.m. (A-5M32-P)
Evening formal jacket, size 42;
burgundy with black silk trim.
Madras sport coat, white, blue-green
pattern; size 42. Both by Saks Fifth
Ave, Like new: $35 & $25. 372-2592
Ed. (A-3M32-P)
4 Michelin X tires 155-14 plus tubes.
Gone less than 2000 miles $125 or
best offer 378-7103. (A-3M32-P)
FOR RENT
Best Deal In Town! Sublet this
summer 2 bdr. cent, ac; wall to wall,
furnished brand new, apt. Everything
you could want, only $125/mo.
378-8777. (B-2M34-P)
Lankmark poolside apt. 3 girls to
sublease summer quarter. Good
condition, choice location. Avoid the
rush. Come by No. 37. (B-5M34-P)
Tired of sharing a bedroom with a
great snoring gator? 3 bdrm paneled
& carpeted house w/AC & cabled TV
$ 120/month. Call 372-7789.
(B-lt-134-P)
Williamsburgh Poolside Apt. For 3 or
4 to sublet starting June 15. June
rent paid. Spacious 2 bedrm, 2 bath,
AC, SSO per mo. 376-0362.
(805M34-P)
Artist Studio and apt. Fantastic
floorspace. Summer only. Located on
Univ. Ave. above Quick-Save
Records. Call 378-3413. (B-2t-134-P)
Williamsburg Apt. to sublet for
summer. 2 bedroom townhouse w
dishwasher. Reasonable. Call
378-6193. (B-2M34-P)
Four bedroom-two bath house,
air-conditioned, one block from
Tigert. For rent for summer quarter
200 a month. Call 378-5914.
(B-5M34-P)
Williamsburg 1 bedroom poolside
apt. to sublet for summer quarter.
Call 378-0291. (B-st-131-p)
Must sublet immediately new section
Summit House. Must be married. Call
378-0942 for further information.
(B-3M32-P)
Enjoy summer living at Landmark
Apt. Pool with free health gym and
sauna bath. Call Mike, days
378-1413, or nites 378-0674.
(B-3M32-P)
Private A/C rooms, linens, maid
service, located one block from old
law school. Male students only. 1 and
2 BR A/C apts. in same area.
372-6263 (B-3t-133-p)
50 trailer with 40 closed-in cabana 2
bedroom, AC, pool, tennis arts, VB
GT etc., 4 minutes from campus
SBS/month avail, for sum. qrt. Call
378-0748 nite. Also looking for
roommate when I return for fall.
(B-6t-133-p)
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21t-115-p)
POOLSIDE Williamsburg apt. 2 bdrm
townhouse central air
dishwasher Bar-B-Q Available
from June 15. Call 378-4732.
.(B-st-130-p)
Sublet one bedroom Summit House
Apt. E-26. Pool, air cond. $134
monthly. Availalbe June 1. Call
378-6784 after 6 p.m. or contact
office. (B-5M32-P)
Moving Must sublet June 1, Beautiful
new furnished 1 br apt. overlooking
pool at Summit House 378-9734.
(B-5M32-P)
Sublease, for summer, 2 bdrm A/C
upstrs, corner apt. Tanglewood.
Poolside, custom bar. $175/mo. You
keep sec. dep. Call 378-7212 aftei
4:00. (B-3M32-P)
WANTED JH
Two female roommates for summer
quarter in French Quarter Apt. no.
96. Call 372-5246. (C-3t-133-p)

Page 9

boo qwm ;
| WANTED i
Male roommate 60.00 per month Air
conditioning 1105 NW 4th Ave. no
utilities. Private bedroom 376-5381.
ext. 308. (C-st-133-p)
Male roommates wanted for Summit
House apt. Air cond, pool, two
bedrooms, cable. $41.75 plus Vt* util.
Call 372-5552. (C-3t-133-p)
Need 2 coed roommates or persons
to sublet 2 bdrm Landmark apt for
sum qtr with option to renew lease
Ca 11376-2129. (C-4t-133-p)
Roommates, 1 or 2. to share 2 bdrm.
Village Park Apt. for summer or
more. Desirable location, low rent. If
no response will sublet.
376-7439.(C-3t-133-p)
Such a Deal! S9O each for' summer
qtr. Need 3 male roommates or
sublease apt. 2 bedroom, fireplace,
AC, cable TV, dishwasher, disposel, 2
pools, gym, sauna bath, laundry
room, many extras. No. 9 Landmark
378-9844 anytime. (C-st-133-p)
Two roommates wanted for 2
bedroom French Quarter apt.
Immediate occupancy or summer
quarter. Call 376-0613 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-133-p)
COED roommates for summer.
Village Park poolside 2 bedroom apt.
MONETARY CONCESSIONS. Call
378-7272 or come to VP 56.
(C-st-133-p)
Male roommate for Butler Garden
Apt. starting June 14, W-To W
carpet, ac, pool, Call 376-4823 after
5 p.m. S6O month & V 2 utilities.
(C-st-131-p)
1 fern for 2 bdrm apt sum qtr
possibly longer. Very large newly
painted, AC. Ideal location, low rent.
Grad stud or sr. Call 376-4758 after 4
p.m. (C-5M32-P)
Male roommate for 2 bdrm apt at
Summit House. Immediate or
summer occupancy. Air conditioned
s4l month. Call 372-7732,
7:30-8:30 a.m., 4-6 p.m., 12-2 a.m.
nite. (C-4M32-P)
Wanted: Female roommate for
summer quarter. 2 bedroom Camelot
Apt. on pool. You can move in
immediately. Apt 256. Call 378-9694
after 5:00. (C-5M34-P)
Need one male roommate for 4 man
apartment summer quarter. Call
Terry, 84 Landmark, 378-0674.
(C-5M34-P)
One groovy roommate to share a new
townhouse starting in September.
Such an apartment! Call Fran or
Bobbie, 378-3234. (C-3M34-P)
3 male roommates wanted for
summer. Air cond., pool, w-w carpet,
2 br. $41.25 per month. June rent
free. Call 376-6087 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M34-P)
Male roommate for summer qtr. at
Summit House. SIOO for entire qtr.
including utilities. Call 378-4242.
(C-7t-129-p)
.%i*>X4<*x<*x*:M*sww ww';*iliS:SJS w*xct
| HELP WANTED 1
:i>;*x*x< x X4< X44*w*w;s*>>>x*x*x*SMWrJC
Experienced tractor driver;
knowledge of cattle operation;
fencing; worming; etc. Afternoons
and/or Saturdays your convenience.
Phone 376-6339 after 7:30 p.m.
(E-st-129-c)
WOODYS male student, part time,
no exp. req. Good pay and hrs.
flexible. 378-2900. (E-3t-132-p)
Male: Have three part-time openings
for evening cashier. Also two
openings at 11-2 daytime. Apply
Kings Food Host, 1430 SW 13 St.
(E-ts-133-C)
AUTOS
X
£..;.;.;.;.; X.X.X.>: ;.;.V* ** : X X X Vi!?i*K Xv
1969 MGB Army forces sale. Call Lee
Klein at 372-9404. (G-st-132-P)
66 Pont. Temp. Custom 2 dr. HT.
AC, R & H, 3 Speed Hurst Tran.
41,000 mi. Getting married, must
sell. $1,500. Call 378-5645.
(G-5M32-P)
Corvair? Stabilizer bar for front,
1965 and later: sl2. Spyder?
Exhaust insulation kit for 15 extra
hp sls. Both never used. Ed,
372-2592. (G-3M32-P)
63 VW Microbus, excellent
conditon, new paint, 2 new tires,
$895, 378-4260 or 376-7812.
(G-st-133-p)
69 Pontiac Tempest 6mo. new OHC
6 cylinder, stick-shift, radio, heater,
limelight green Ask for Mike Halton
at circulation dest research library or
Call 378-4554 after 5:30 P.M.
(G-127-10t-p)
We buy & sell dean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen Dealer, 4222 N.W. 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-130-ts-c)

1** AUTOS ~ ~ j
1965 Sunbeam real clean good tires.
Real good shape mechanically and
low mileage. Call evenings 372-7971
up to 11:30 p.m. (G-st-133-p)
66 Chevy Impala, clean, A.T.; R.H.,
327 engine, new tires, new brakes.
SISOO or best offer. Ben Poole,
376-3468. (G-5M34-P)
PONTIAC Tempest, 1966 custom
sport coupe, 326 with Hurst 4-speed.
Excellent condition, must sell by end
of month. Make an offer, 372-5688.
(G-5M34-P)
Dart 62 automatic, new brakes
inspected, radio, real clean. Must sell.
$350. Mike 376-0453. (G-2t-134 : P)
64 MG 1100. Rebuilt engine,
transmission. New clutch,
differential. Must sell. Call 378-9110.
(G-3t-134-P)
Corvair 1964, 2 dr. safety checked,
$350 or best offer. Call 378-1489.
(G-5M34-P)
| PERSONAL
Sleeter Bull strikes again! Who DOES
have the bell??! (J-2M34-P)
Samantha and I would like to wish
you a very happy 21st birthday.
Love, TUNA. (J-1M34-P)
WMAR, Miami: Thanks, love, for a
beautiful weekend. I'll return to love,
laugh, and conquer soon. Until
then remember and smile. Be good
do-do. Your Southern Belle.
(J-st-134-P)
Would you like to be a member of
Maas Brothers .1969-1970 College
Board? Apply now any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15t-129-c)
THEY'RE HERE: Silver rings from
Mexico. Many unique styles. THE
SPANISH MAIN 105 W. Univ. open
Mon-Sat till 9:00. (J-st-131-p)
Photography your bag? Enter the
Reitz Union Photo Contest. Cash
prizes offered. For rules & info, go to
Rm. 310 Reitz Union. 392-1655.
(J-st-132-P)
Come eat pie with the BETAS on
BETA THETA PI day May 17.
(J-3t-133-p)
BRIDE-to-BE? Size 10 Jordan Marsh
dress; floor length mantilla worn 3
hours. Cost $125, will sell for $75.
Call 376-9091. (J-133-3t-p)
MX OFFICE OKU I: PJL 1
SHOW TIME IK
|SCHELL- McCAMBfVDGE I
la Harli art
fcUClCfit riwrwtn
BpALUZZILOM color |
I PIUS "VIOLENT ONES COtOil
B FEKNANPO LAMAS |

Hi VV \ speqals m
\ I Lunch and Dinner §g§§
Monday Spocial
p BAKED MACARONI A||
;# MEAT SAUCE if
g ALL YOU CARE TO EAT ||
Tuesday Special |g|
p FRIED CHICKEN if
P ALL YOU CARE TO EAT If
fi MORRISON'S 1
1 CAFETERIAS 1

PHlost A FOUND I
REWARD Lost one tan female
puppy with black muzzle. Answers to
name of Princess. Rumored near
Jennings. Call 378-6675. (L-st-130-p)
Lost: small gold box containing
watch, bracelet, ring. Left at Hort.
greenhouses, late Tues. Call Eleanor
372-9510. Reward. (2t-133-L-p)
LOST! LOOSE LEAF NOTEBOOK,
medium blue, 2 inches thick.
Important! Has all my cjass notes.
Please call Richard T. Speight at
372-9276. (L-5M34-P)
SERVICES |
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible but you'll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station, 378-4480. (M-IMO6-C)
Tennis racket restringing. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19M07-P)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-123-P)
Alter nators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)
TYPING IN MY HOME five
YEARS EXPERIENCE IBM
ELECTRIC Standard TYPEWRITER.
CALL 376-7809. (M-st-131-p)
Disserration, thesis or publication
drawings or graphs professional
graphic artist, Nancy McClelland.
378-4260. (M-st-133-p)
[ The Beatles ]
NOW PLAYING
Bombays most fa
daring manhunt! &
8:30 s fy
ALSO AT 10:20
"WITH SIX YOU
GET EGGROLL"



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, May 12, 1969

ART ANNEX COMING DOWN

Building Nears Destruction

By DIANE FINE
Alligator Correspondent
Building X will soon be
destroyed.
The art annex, a tiny cluster
of wooden frames, huddles at
the west end of Grove Hall,
another temporary building.
Nearby looms the modem Fine
Arts and Architecture building.
Contractors have yet to make
their bids for the proposed
structure, said Calvin C. Greene,
director of the Physical Plants
Division of UF. When the deal is
finally set, however, Building X
will be razed to the ground.
Everyone will be gone by
then.
X has housed studios for
ceramics, sculpture, and
photography. Building C,
attached to X like a Siamese
twin, holds a graduate painting
studio.
All, except for the photo lab,
still remain.
Photographys newly-found
brick home is tucked between
the old engineering college and
the physics building.
The others must move from
s X to Building I, which sits at
the west end of Flint Hall. I is
a green wooden building.
Compared to the old place, the
two-story frame is spacious.
However, it is still only
temporary.
Were just going from one
frame to another! cried one
student. When are they going
to build a place for ceramics?
Most of the transition from
Building X to I will be made
between spring and summer
quarters.
The ceramics, painting, and
sculpture departments will each
make its own unique exodus.
The grad painters, who can
carry their own material, will be
the easiest to move.
For them, its just a matter
"of Pick up your bed and walk,
said Eugene E. Grissom,
chairman of the art department.
The sculpture course won't
be offered this summer, he said
as he sat in his ultra-modem
office. The move will be
leisurely for that department.
Hardest to move will be
ceramics, continued Grissom.
Although the transition will be
ffiinade mostly piece by piece,
pot by pot, trucks will be
needed for the heavy equipment.
The big rush to Building I
will come during the break,
said the chairman.
Building I, now being
prepared for reoccupation, is
unnaturally quiet. Three weeks
t THERE'S MORE OF
The Wide,
Wild World
of New Film
PROGRAM 1
in r MAYI4-1 SUN,ON














.
.




a
\
*,
: :



ago, classes were still being held
there.
Now, only a zoology lab
remains, hidden in a back corner
of the second floor.
As animals stirred behind
glass cages, the instructor
asserted that the vertebrate lab
will stay in I, despite new
occupants.
The lab overlooks the large
ceramics kiln, newly installed in
the enclosed backyard.
Probably, this pottery oven is
the most important piece of
equipment in Building I, said Art
Chairman Grissom.
Although it is unused,
Grissom would rather not call it
new.
Weve had it for an
embarassingly long time, waiting
for a place to put it.
Inside, the building itself is
not ready for occupation.
Partitions have been ripped out
and unhinged doors lean against
the wall.
Scattered everywhere are
desks and chairs labeled
discard.
On one chalk board, some
one had written: Im tired.
The peace symbol is hastily
scribbled beneath it.
While I sleeps, Building X
is active.
The door to the old
photography lab is locked, but
all the others remain open.
Sacks of potters clay are still
piled along the open hallway
between classrooms. At the end
of the corridor, a rusty wire
sculpture is propped against a
garbage can.
Inside the ceramics room,
several students continue to

WONOER HOUSE
14 SW Ist STREET
MON. SPECIAL
K.C STEAK *1 ca
BK. POT., SALAD J \J
BAKED LASAGNA o r
W/ MEAT SAUCE,SALAD
FREE DESSERT
INCOMPARABLE ...
CONTEMPORARY ..
WORTH WAITING FOR ...
\iiifl
R/MNE
Y apartments
1500 Northwest 16th Ave.
NOW LEASING FOR
SEPTEMBER
Ernest Tew Realty, Inc, 376-6961

concentrate on their work.
You can see we need more
room, said one. He gestured
towards the hundreds of
unpainted pots that line the
shelves.
We need more equipment,
more space.
Betty Lindquist, graduate
student was indifferent to her
environment.
Its my contention you can
make a good pot anywhere, she
said with s shrug.
Bill Massey, a sculpture
student, spoke as he worked on
a clay model of a head. He, too,
agreed that surroundings make
little difference to an artist.
The sculpture studio in
Building X is layered with dried
bits of clay and plaster. Old
desks clutter the room.
Bill hoped the new building
wouldnt be too fancy.
Id feel personally
uncomfortable in something
cleaner than this, he said with a
smile. Most artists say Give me
more chaos.
Relic On Display
The mini-skirted secretaries
hurrying through the lobby of
the Missouri Pacific Building
frequently brush past a railroad
relic five times their average age.
On display is a seven-foot,
600-pound model of the old
Rogers, Ketchum & Grosvenor
coal-burning locomotive, used
by Missouri Pacific more than
100 years ago. The model was
designed and partly built by
Henry J. Williams about 1857.
Leoy Bartlett resumed the
work in 1862 and completed the
model in 1866.

TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE! i
I STARKE, 1 FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
HOURS HOURS.
. HOURS. WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
I 5 SHIRTS 99 WITH DRY CLEANING ORDER
(SAVE SK)
2 PANTS -99<
(SAVE 41<)
QUALITY IS OUR MAIN
CONCERN
TROPICAL CLEANRS
402 N.W 13th ST. 209 N.E 16th AVE
CAMPUS TWIG MALL TWIG
1131 W. UNIV AVE. 2552 NW I3th ST.
Bv j|. Ptjmi A
WHAT IS UNISEX?
MP
m m M ,$m mg
JUST A PAIR OF WIDE LEG PANTS
THAT ANYONE CAN WEAR ... AT 9.00



Gators
Netters Love
SEC Foes
By Alligator Services
BATON ROUGE, La.
Top-seeded UF tennis team won
eight of nine Southeastern
Conference final round matches
to swing past second-seeded
Georgia for the conference title.
The tournament win marked
the second year in a row the
fifth-ranked nationally Gators
have won the SEC.
The Gators, pre-tourney
favorite, registered 35 points.
Georgia finished second with 27.
UF and Georgia had players in
all of the finals except the No. 1
singles.
The top-seeded singles player,
Armistead Neely, started things
off for UF by defeating No. 2
seeded Steve Faulk of LSU, 4-6,
10-8,6-3.
Some 1,200 persons showed
up on LSUs Tartan courts to
watch the Neely-Faulk
showdown. Faulk defeated
Neely in the championships a
year ago.
The Neely-Faulk match
lasted for two hours.
Faulk was the only player
other than one from UF or
Georgia in the finals.
Georgias Mike Cmaylo came
out on top in a singles final. He
defeated Floridas Paul Lunetta,
6-3,5-7,6-3.
UF won all three doubles
matches.
FINALS
Singles
No. 1
Armistead Neely, UF,
defeated Steve Faulk, LSU, 4-6,
10-8,6-3.
No. 2
Charlie Owens, UF, defeated
Bill Shippey, Georgia, 11-9, 64.
No. 3
Jamie Pressly, UF, defeated
Norman Holmes, Georgia, 6-2,
6-2.
No. 4
Steve Beeland, UF, defeated
Brant Bailey, Georgia, 6-1, 6-2.
No. 5
Greg Hilley, UF, defeated
Sam Fuller, Georgia, 6-2, 0-6,
6-2.
No. 6
Mike Cmaylo, Georgia,
defeated Paul Lunetta, Florida,
6-3,5-7,6-3.
Doubles
No. 1
Neely, Deeland, UF, defeated
Shippey-Holmes, Georgia, 6-1,
? s No. 2
Owens-Hilley, UF, defeated
Burchmore-Bailey, Georgia, 64,
8-6.
No. 3
Pressly-Lunetta, UF, defeated
Cmaylo-Fuller, Georgia, 64,6-1.
TEAM SCORING
UF 35, Georgia 27, Kentucky
Mississippi State 12,
Tennessee 1, LSU 8, Vanderbilt
Alabama 3, Auburn 2,
Mississippi 1.

Rule Supreme
The Florida Alligato^
MARC DUNN Sports Editor
Golfers Climb Peak
On NCAA Trail
- By Alligator Services
COLORADO SPRINGS, COLO. A rebounding UF golf team
returned to form winning the Pikes Peak Invitational Tournament
championship by six strokes over the weekend.
The Gators consistent play over the windswept Broadmore and
Eisenhower golf courses marked a recovery from their disappointing
second place finish in the Southeastern Conference Tournament.
Runnerup in the Pikes Peak was Brigham Young and eight strokes
behind UF was New Mexico.
Steve Melnyk lost out on his chance at tfie individual title when he
shot a three over par 75 on the Broadmore Country Club Course. His
final total for the 52 hole meet was 221, one stroke behind New
Mexicos Wes Wilkening.
UFs Ron Mahood shot a final round 73 to take fifth place with a
226 total.
Rick Spears and Andy North shot final round 76s to finish at 233,
Dave Barnes had an 80 for a 232 and Mike Estridges 76 gave him a
229.
Oklahoma State finished fourth in the team totals with a 918 and
Houston was fifth with a 926.
Lane Bennett of Brigham Young, who liad been tied with Melnyk
going into the final round, skied to a 76 for a third place finish.
This tournament was a warmup for the NCAA tournament to be
played here June 23-27, and gave the Gators a chance to get used to
the high altitude.
UF, defending NCAA champions, is listed as a strong favorite to
capture its second title on the strength of this seasons showing.
Porsche Belgium Winner

FRANCORCHAMPS,
Belgium (UPI) Jo Siffert of
Belgium and Brian Redman of
Britain, riding a three-litre
Porsche 908, Sunday won the
Santana Wins
Over Ashe
MADRID (UPI) -Manuel
Santana of Spain beat Arthur
Ashe, of the U.S., 9-11, 64,8-6
and 6-1 in the mens singles final
of the Puerta De Hierro Tennis
Club championship here Sunday.
In the final of the womens
doubles: Ana Maria Estalella and
Mrs. Couder beat Ana Maria
Cavadini and Rebeca Mata, 6-1,
7-5.
Ana Maria Cavadini beat Mrs.
Couder, 6-3, 6-2 in the womens
singles final.
MOONLIGHT
BOWLING
9pm Clos
95*
m per game
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA

1,000 kilometers of
Francorchamps auto race.
They covered the 71 laps in
four hours, 24 minutes and 19.6
seconds, averaging 227.241
kilometers per hour.
In second place were Pedro
Rodriguez of Mexico and David
Piper of Britain in a three-litre
Ferrari nearly four minutes
behind, while Britains Vic
Elford and West Germanys Kirt
Ahrens piloted their Porsche 908
into third place.
Siffert and Redman also won
the Prototype category while
Swedens Joachim Bonnier and
Switzerlands Hebert Mueller,
who placed fifth overall,
captured the sports category
in a Lola-Chevrolet.
West Germanys Rolf
Stommelen and Hans Herman
were fourth in their Porsche
908.
NOW POPPIN
KORN KETTLE
GAINESVILLE MALL
v Hay* '"x
Your Generator \%
OVERHAULED Special
$450 j
INC LABOR*
ALACHUA COUNTY
GENERATOR SERVICE
SOI NW Itfc AVI. GAINESVILLE
MON. Fit. I AM-7PM SAT. TIL S PM
371-4011

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
A private bedroom for
/ each student. one
£§tl P block behind norman
JR Ifi mi
WA
JJ 15 APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT-CALL 372-2662
LEROYS SIMONIZING
SPECIAL NOTICE
MOVING to new location
1215 N.W. sth Ave. Mon 12th
For the best in car waxing,
motor cleaning, upholstery
cleaning
Call Leroy or Mose
Auto Repairs
Phone 376-8771
Pick up A cUtivry ALLWORK GUARANTEED
NEW AND USED CAR
SALES
DEPARTMENTS
OPEN TO
8:00 PM.
5:00 P.M. Saturday, Closed Sunday

AUTHORIZE
OCALCR
Miller-Brown Motors, Inc.
STUDENTS FACULTY
If you come by to
see me and my capable
employees say Im not
there, dont be surprised
Im in class. I became
one of you A STUDENT.
Thanks to you,
Billy Gouge
Billys Shell Service
If you don't know where it is, then this
isn't for you.

Monday, May 12,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, Tha Florida Alligator. Monday, May 12,1969

GLOVEMEN FACE OLE MISS

Gators Clinch Division
And Then Some More

NASHVILLE, TENN A power-packed UF team
socked Vanderbilt for 35 runs in a three game series
to wrap up the Eastern Division of the Southeastern
Conference.
The Gators jumped on the Commodores leading
pitcher Friday in the first game of a doubleheader.
Ray Jones was socked for nine hits as UF clinched
the eastern division with a 6-2 win.
In the second game the Gators, led by Guy
McThenys five hits, scored 14 runs on 14 hits to
Vandys five runs.
On Saturday Rod Wright, Skip Lujack and
McTheny hit two home runs each in the same inning
to complete the shellacking of Vandy 15-5.
The Gators go into the playoff for the SEC title
Wednesday at Oxford, Miss., when they face
Mississippi in the first game. The second game will
be played in Gainesville Friday as will a third if it is
needed.
AH the home runs came in the seventh as the
Gators exploded for nine runs on nine hits to
complete a sweep of their last three SEC games of
the season.

Pro Footballs Realignment
Shocks, Disturbs Avid Fans

* NEW YORK (UPI) The pro
football establishment from
the owners on down to the
coaches and players was
trumpeting the virtues of the
games realignment Sunday but
many of the National Football
League fans who buy the tickets
were shocked and unhappy over
the move.
The fans in Baltimore and
Cleveland the teams who met
for the NFL crown last
year were especially disturbed
at moving to the 13-team
American Conference in the new
setup. The Pittsburgh fans who
have never had a winner in the
NFL, took the news a bit more
calmly.
The switch of Baltimore,
Cleveland and Pittsburgh leaves
End Os Era
Last season the major leagues
marked the end of an era for
baseball. Because of expansion
of 24 teams, the majors are
playing in four divisions this
year, instead of two. To the end
of this historic period, there is a
new 16 mm color film developed
for the majors by Investors
Diversified Services.
Free group showings are
available on written request to P.
O. Box 1414, Minneapolis,
Minn., 55440. Organizations
should state the date when the
film showing is planned, and list
an alternate date.
INCOMPLETE XEROX|
| OFFSET FACILITES |
Specializing in
Thesis and Dissertation $
!* Reductions and
i Enlargements
§ Open Til 11 P.M. t
5 Highest Quality $
We Guarantee it! :£
f! days |
| QUIK-SAVE §
| University Plaza |
i| 1620 W. Univarsity |
| 378.1001 1

pro football with two 13-team
conferences starting in 1970
with three divisions in each
conference.
Cleveland and Pittsburgh are
in one division with Houston
and Cincinnati. The Baltimore
Colts and New York Jets the
rivals in last years Super
Bowl are in a second division
with Boston, Buffalo and Miami,
and Oakland, San Diego, Denver
and Kansas City are in the third
division.
The competition of the three
divisions of the remaining 13
teams in the National
Conference remained undecided
at the marathon 36-hour
meeting. The owners will
reconvene in June to decide
that.
Cleveland fans, who were led
to believe that owner Art
Modell was a staunch opponent
of the Browns move, were
stunned by the move. Modell
claims hes very happy with
the move and says the fans will

Four-door convenience... room for the whole family...
full reclining front seats... 4-speed smooth synchromesh
gear box... 4-wheel disc brakes... compact engine
economy.
Fiat 124 Family Sedan
flB : >
jffijfljjjjflji St wKfe-jyJBl ft'r^
, . B W Jw flftfrll
>.-.. -jariflMpTn
CRANE IMPORTS
506 EAST UNIVERSITY

Vandy jumped off to a 1 -0 lead in the second on
a solo homer by Jim Armistead, but that lead was
erased in the Gator third when Tommy Blankenship
tripled and scored on a single by Mike Jacobs.
Jacobs advanced to third on two Commodore errors
and scored on a ground out by Tony Dobies.
UF picked up two more runs in the fourth when
Wright was safe at first on a fielders choice, went to
second on another fielders choice advanced to third
on a single by Mike Ovca and scored on Jacobs line
drive single. Ovca also went home on Jacobs hit.
Two was the magic number in the fifth as Dobies
tripled and scored on Rod Macons single. Macon
went to second on a wild pitch, stole third and went
home when Ovca bounced into a fielders choice.
UFs wild seventh, in which 14 men batted,
featured the homers by Wright, with Macon on base,
McTheny with Jacobs on base, and by Lujack, with
Macon on base again. Macon had two singles into
the inning and was aboard for two of the round
trippers.

support it but the first reaction
wasnt too favorable.
Bob August, sports editor of
the Cleveland Press, said, my
first reaction is that I dont like
it. Its a real shock and hard for
me to believe. Its hard to take
such a move when the Browns
had such a strong and successful
franchise in the NFL.
1$ Baltimore, which probably
has the most fanatic fans in the
NFL, the main reaction seemed
to be speculation that owner
Carroll Rosenbloom was
influenced by the money
involved. There was speculation
that each of the three teams that
moved received compensation in
excess of $2 million.
One compensation for the
Colt fans was that they are now
in the same division with the
Jets, who upset the Colts in the
Super Bowl. The clubs will now
meet twice a year and the Colts
fans figure that after 1970, Joe
Namathwill never make it to
another Super Bowl.

pMOffi
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgale Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
I ROBBIES I
Best In
Meals. Qlgandwichea
[COLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.
1 l On The Gold Coast 1 I
Gator PAWN SHOP
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
DIAMONDS
J GUNS
BUY SELL TRADE
"W specialize in Gator-Aid"
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575
Pizza lan
Now... .you can enjoy America's
favorite pizza, Pizza Inn B
Pizza... .prepared from a secret \
recipe, flavor baked to BWm. \
perfection... .served fresh, hot / ljeV 1
and delicious! Your choice
of cheese, olives, WrILM
mushrooms, peperoni, sausage,
hamburger or anchovies. I
8 in, $1.15 PIZZA, SALAD ( j j
Small Beverage /
II A.M. 2 P.M.
keg. $1.65 now only Q O JL
OFFER GOOD MONTH OF MAY
Open 7 days a week Dine in or take out
Phone Orders Ready in 20 minutes
316 S.W. 16th Ave. 376-4521
America's Fastest Growing Pizza Chain
Owned & Operated by Lowell W. Albertson