Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
BERRIN

(EDITORS NOTE): This is the first
in a series of articles on Accent 69 and
the problems encountered in finances
and relations between the Accent 69
and Accent 7O staffs.)
By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Executive Editor
Entangled in a web of rumor and
smouldering under a $1,600 defecit
which the Student Senate seems
reluctant to cover, the ashes of Accent
69 are still-smoking.
Much of the problem, outside

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 133

i'jKL.
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TALE OF TWO DUCKS
UF students might take a hint from these two ducks at the Reitz
Union's duck pond. If you're fishing for some good grades maybe it's
not such a bad idea to drown your sorrows every once in a while.

Fraternities Begin All-Out Campaign
To Defeat Proposed Tax Legislation

By NEAL SANDERS
* Alligator Staff Writer
Dissatisfaction has set in with a proposed tax bill which might
threaten the existence of many UF fraternities, and as a result, the
IFC is beginning an all-out effort to either amend or defeat the bill.
HR 238, a product of the House Ad Valorem Tax Committee
originally provided for taxation of churches, rest homes and fraternal
organizations, but churches have since been exempted, and fraternities
willnowbe exempted if the counties wish to do so.
A letter writing campaign is being sponsored by several campus
leaders in an attempt to defeat or amend the bill. The initiators of the
campaign hope to educate legislators to what they call the end of the
most stabilizing influence on Floridas campuses.
Individual fraternities and sororities are being urged to have all
members write letters to state senators and representatives.
If this bill becomes law, IFC President Steve Zack said,
fraternities will be taxed out of existence and legislators will be
around to regret the Greeks demise.

Accent69 Tangled In Web Os Rumors

finances, admittedly stems from bad
feelings between the Accent 69 and the
Accent 7O staffs. Accent 69 Chairman
Larry Berrin strongly opposed the
selection of'Joe Hilliard, chairman of
the Rathskeller, as head of the 1970
Accent program.
Berrin and other Accent 69
. committee members felt that Frazier
Solsberry, assistant chairman of Accent
69, should have been named chairman
of Accent 7O.
The result was wastebaskets stuffed
with needed Accent files and a typed

The
Florida Alligator

OVER $1,600 DEFICIT

University of Florida, Gainesville

OVER JONES TENURE
AAUP Investigation
Continues In Secrecy

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Assignments Editor
The cloud of secrecy, which
surrounded an American
Association of University
Professors sponsored
investigation into the Marshall
Jones tenure denial case at the
beginning of the week, was still
lingering over professorial
closedmouths Thursday.
Apparently the local chapter
of the AAUP was not involved in
the investigation, and neither
were they told anything by the
threeman national organization
team nor did they concern
themselves with the inquest.
At the focus of the orginal
Jones tenure denial was former
UF President J. Wayne Reitz.
The case was inherited by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
when he took office in 1967.
Reitz, and Jones, it was
reported by reliable sources, had
both been called to campus to
be quizzed by the team, headed
by Prof. Frank Kennedy from

The dissatisfaction with the bill comes from the lack of a guarantee
that fraternities will be exempt, even if certified as necessary to the
educational process by the university.
Another facet of the bill, previously not discussed, is that a local
exemptions board may vote to tax only part of a fraternity.
Thus, in an extreme case, with university certification, a board
could declare only a small part of the fraternity exempt, and tax the
rest.
Florida Blue Key president Manny James, who is helping to
spearhead the drive, said Thursday the bill would sound the death
knell for the fraternity system.
As a result, James said, we are organizing fraternities for a letter
campaign to kill the bill or amend it to exempt fraternities.
The actions of the Alachua County Commission, who would rule
on exemptions, has shown that they are not responsive to the needs.of
this campus, he said. The bill would open retaliation by the people
of Gainesville for any grudge against the university.
Advisor to Fraternities Jay Stormer said he too felt there was cause
(SEE 'FRATERNITIES' PAGF ?\

note telling the new Accent staff: May
you rot in Hell and take Manny James
with you ... (signed) Sincerely, Accent
69. Hilliard found the note when he
took over the Accent office.
James, president of Florida Blue
Key, is an influential voting member of
the Public Functions Authority which
elected Hilliard chairman and Vicki
Fagan assistant chairman of Accent 7O.
At the same time, the new Accent
Staff moved the programs offices out
of the Reitz Union and into the back
offices of the Rathskeller where Hilliard

9K
IV-- Hf
MARSHALL JONES
.. .lingering investigation
the University of Michigan Law
School.
But, local AAUP chapter
president Ray Fahien, UF
chairman of chemical
engineering, said he had not seen
Reitz or Jones, although he had
heard they were in town.
One of Fahiens lieutenants,
Robert Berry, a UF law

said it would be easier for him to work.
When the Accent 69 staff returned to
confer with the new group they found
Omicron Delta Kappa honorary using
the offices
There were no communications
between the two groups until Hilliard
went to the senate in April and asked
that they request a financial report
from Accent 69.
But the trouble in Accent lies further
beneath the surface than notes and
(SEE'ACCENT'PAGE 2)


Friday, May 9, 1969

J. WAYNE REITZ
.. .original focus
professor, who had been
designated chairman of a
committee to assist the team,
told the Alligator that Jones was
on campus Monday and Tuesday
and did visit with the team.
Berry said he knew Reitz was
here but did not know if was
specifically in connection with
the inquiry.
However a member of Berrys
committee, H.B. Clark,
agriculture professor, said he
didnt see or talk to anybody.
We were asked to stay in the
wings, he said, and be ready
Jo assist if needed. 1 was not
needed.
Fahien commented that the
local chapter is supposed to
keep out of these
investigations.
During the course of tracking
down what the team did and
who was present during its
sessions, the question of travel
expenses came up.
No plans were made for
anything like expenses, Clark
said.
Berry said he didnt know
who paid Jones and Reitzs way
to Gainesville, if Reitz was even
here for the inquiry.
A check with the Reitz Union
(SEE 'AAUP' PAGE 7)

HILLIARD

America's
Number I
College
Daily



!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9, 1969

Page 2

DISAGREEMENT ON COMMERCIAL NAME
Gator Go Bogged Down In Legal Hassle

Gator-Go*, the high-protein milk drink presently
on sale in campus cafeterias, is now tied up
temporarily in a low-powered tangle over the name
it will bear if and when it is produced off campus.
Private negotiations have been carried on by
Gator-Go developers Robert Cade and Everett Fouts
in the interest of licensing or selling the right to
manufacture Gator-Go.
The negotiations bogged down when
Stokely-Van Camp, which manufactures Gatorade,
notified all parties that it would deem it an
infringement of their trademark if someone else
produced a drink named Gator-Go and would
consider initiating a lawsuit to protect their rights.
The reasoning on the part of Stokely-Van Camp
was that any product with the word Gator would
be a violation because it would easily be confused
with Gatorade.
Well end negotiations regardless of what name
will be given to the drink, said Cade, also the
inventor of Gatorade.
Although Cade did not say when he expected
negotiations to end, Fouts said he expected an end
to the conference sessions to end within two or
three weeks.

OUTSIDE FINANCES FANNING FLAMES
Feelings Running Hot On Accent ( 69

FROM mi OWE J
discarded files. It lurks in the
financial structure of the
three-year-old program.
Under the current structure
of the programs charter, a
line-item budget is set by the
Student Senate which ideally
includes enough funds to allow
for all Accent expenditures
when combined with cash
income collected by Accent.
Any additional funds found
necessary as the program evolves
are tightly guarded by the
money-conscious senate.
Berrin took his requests for
further monies to the Student
Tresurer Phil Burnett. Berrin
estimated in late January that
Accent 69 would exceed its
budget by approximately
$2,000. He said he had
committments from Burnett and
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell that additional
expenditures would be
underwritten. He also counted
on the financial support of the
UF Alumni Association.
Their primary concern was
that Accent 69 should be a
success, Berrin said, because
then-Student Body President
Clyde Taylor reportedly was
considering scrapping the Accent

IFC Starts letter Drive
FROM PAGE OH
This bill certainly doesnt make things look good for the
fraternities and sororites, he said- I dont know that this bill will
help the greek system, and it may do great damage.
Stormer, who works out of the Dean of Mens office, is pressing for
further amendment of the bill, with an eye to the Senate committee
which must consider it before it can be voted upon in that chamber.
The tax measure will affect 19-20 fraternities, and two sororities.
If the fraternities were taxed, an estimated SBO,OOO would be
brought in annually to the county.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florid and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Symposium entirely during the
summer of 1968.
Berrin said his primary
concern was to present a great
program this year to insure the
continuation of Accent.
Burnett backed him and
finances apparently took a back
seat to the programs success.
But once the Accent 69
symposium was over, unpaid
bills and lack of funds gained the
forum and the rumor mill began
to grind out stories of
embezzlement of funds.
Hilliard, faced with an influx
of bills and no funds left in the
Accent account to cover them,
called for the senate to request a
financial report from Accent 69
on April 23.
The senate is the only body
empowered to grant
appropriations to a student
group. Although no formal
request was made to the senate
for additional money to cover
the Accent excesses it appeared
that any such request would be
met by a hostile response.
Berrin held that he had tried
to get together with Hilliard
several times to settle the
situation, but to no avail.
Hilliards request for a
financial report was soon labeled
an investigation, a word both
sides in the controversy
disclaimed.

j DEPTH REPORT I
1 *
im9gegWMogMgWOMMOOMNWtMOOMOOMOOOMKi i >W W : '' ' '
The company that will get the right to produce
it will have to determine whether it wants to take
the risk, Cade said.
If the university leases it to a company Stokely
could sue the university as well as the company
producing it if the company buys the rights
outright, the university will probably tell them they,
have to go it alone and take all the risk.
If the name is changed so that it would not carry
the word Gator, there would be no problem, said
Cade, head of the Department of Renal Medicine.
But I* think theres an advantage to call it
Gator-Go, he said. Its really a valuable name
and everyone would be able to identify the product.
Its received much publicity, and Ive gotten several
phone calls and letters about Gator-Go.
But no matter what the product will be called
when negotiations are ended and it is made by an
off-campus producer, the UF will receive a portion
of the royalties.

Senate President Jack
Vaughn, in a senate meeting
several weeks ago, voiced what
had only been whispered up
until that time ... rumors of
use of funds that may not have
been legitimate.
Berrin and Burnett demanded
specific charges rather than
allegations, but no one wanted
to, or could, come forth with
evidence of misuse of funds.
Hilliard refused to become
involved in the matter, saying it
was not the responsibility of
Accent 7O to settle the finances
of Accent 69.
He was charged by Burnett of
wanted to remain lily-white in
something that was his
responsibility as the new
chairman.
Hilliard ignored the charges
and boycotted two meetings:
one, a meeting of Taylor;
Burnett; Berrin; Vaughn; Jim
Roll, who was then student
body treasurer elect; Barry
Malter, chairman of the Accent
69 finance committee; Alan
Howes, chairman of the Public
Functions Authority; and several
other student leaders, and the
first meeting of the special
senate investigating committee
headed by Jack McEwan,
attorney general of the Honor
Court held the same day.
I feel that my presence
would symbolize an involvement
in Accent 69 an involvement
that did not, does not and will
not exist, Hilliard said in a

TF YOUR PIZZA IS 1
it's pimm I
h h
?HOtU VQUW ORDER AMD PICKUP.,, m

We have offered to give the university a portion
of the royalty rights, Cade said. The Research
Council has been contacted about it and they have
said our offer is a generous one.
Fouts, the professor of dairy science whom Cade
worked with in the development of the drink,
concurred with Cade.
The university will share in a predetermined
proportion of any profit that comes in on
Gator-Go, Fouts said, since the drink was
developed on UF time and at its facilities.
Neither man would elaborate how much the UF
could expect to receive in royalties.
The high-protein, vitamin and mineral-enriched
drink with a milk base hence will not be waylaid by
the furor that hit the quick-energy drink Gatorade
last fall.
Since that time, the Board of Regents has been
claiming the rights to Gatorade on behalf of the
university although the UF had not attempted to
claim any rights before Cade and several associates
sold production rights to Stokely-Van Camp.
The negotiations have approval from both the
Board of Regents and UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, Fouts said.

letter sent to individuals
attending the meeting.
My position as Chairman of
Accent 70 does not carry with
it the responsibility of calling for
the financial report of Accent
69, Hilliard said. He said he
was forced to initiate the senate
action because he could not
carry out the first stages of
Accent 70 without the records
from this years program.
Benin and Burnett protested
loudly that the discussions were
indeed the responsibility of
Hilliard since it could possibly
result in the $1,600 deficit being
deducted from the Accent 70
budget by the senate.
At this first meeting also,
Berrin presented the four-page
financial report Hilliard had
called for. It included Benins
thoughts on the basic problems
confronting Accent and its
finances.
The obvious problem, as it
seems to be evident here, and as
discussed with President Stephen
C. OConnell is the fact that the
new Accent administration
should not be responsible for the
past programs finances or
problems, the report said.
In order for this to be
achieved it is necessary that the
committee immediately finishing
its program be in full charge of
all affairs until they are
completed, it said.
(Monday: What are the
problems in Accent 69
finances?)

Publications
Banquet Set
The Student Publications
Annual Awards Banquet will be
held at 7 tonight in the
Arredondo Room of the Reitz
Union.
Guest speaker will be Reg
Murphy, editor of the Atlanta
Constitution. He will speak on
Politics of Eureka Develop Developments
ments Developments in Southern Politics in the
Past Six Months.
Murphy graduated from
Mercer University and was a
Nieman Fellow at Harvard. He
started covering politics in 1955
for the Macon Telegraph and
News. In 1960 he joined the
Constitution as political editor
and remained in that capacity
until 1965. He free-lanced from
1965 until September of 1968
when he was named editor of
the Constitutions editorial page.
He became editor in February of
this year.
There will be an awards
presentation by Dr. Glenn A.
Butler, Chairman of the Board
of Student Publications. The
outstanding student in
Student Publicatons will be
honored and there will be an
award for the outstanding
newcomer. Service keys and
letters of comendation will also
be awarded. Dave Huskey will
emcee the affair.
Bad Mouth
The salivary glands of the
short-tailed shrew contain
enough poison to kill 200 mice.

Happy Hour
1 Mon Thur 9-10
Beer SI.OO Pitcher ISC Stein



Paragraph Order Changed
In Taylor Cabinet Story

An article about the
Clyde Taylor Administration in
Thursdays Alligator may have
been misleading because of
paragraphs that were out of
place.
The article concerned the
student body cabinet. One
paragraph about the secretary of
organizations, was scattered all
over the page. It should read as
follows:
Serving as secretary of
organizations was Bob Buck and
later, Bob Moore. Under Bucks
term, an organization handbook
was published but, according to
WHATS
HAPPENING
A MERE PENNY?: Tickets
are now on sale for The
Threepenny Opera at the Reitz
Union box office. The Florida
Players production will be
presented May 19-24, at the
Constans Theatre.
CRAZY BOUT THE RED,
WHITE AND BLUE: The
Veterans Club will hold a short
meeting to discuss their new
project, May 9th, 7:30 p.m. All
members and any other
interested veterans should attend
in room 150 C, JWRU.
REASONING AND
RADICALS: Student
Mobilization Meeting for
Campus Crusade for Christ.
Friday, 7:30 p.m., in room 349
of the Union.
EATING THEIR WORDS:
Student Publications Banquet
will be tonight at 7 p.m. in the
Arredondo Room.
BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL:
Afro-American Student
Association Meeting, May 9th, at
7:15 p.m. in C-4 at the Union.
CINDERS AT COLLEGE:
State High School Track Meet,
May 9th and 10th. All high
schools in the state will compete
at Florida Track Field, starting
at 9:30 a.m.
OKLAHOMA IN
GAINESVILLE?: The Union
movie feature Oklahoma
tonight at 6, 8:30, and 11 p.m.
IN HONOR OF CAMPUS
MAINTENANCE: The
Caretakers will be shown at 6,
8, and 10 p.m. in the Union
Auditorium, Sat., May 10th.
MARVELOUS MARILYN
MONROE: The Union Film
Series presents Shoot the Piano
Player at 7 and 9:15 in the
Union Auditorium.
HO LY
TRI NITY
SUNDAYS
89 : 30*ll
ALL KINDS OF
PEOPLE ARE
WELCOME
A 116 NE IST
fjks EPISCOPAL
ik CHURCH

Katz, Secretary of Finance John
Englehardt did all the work.
Another project was the
Inter-organizational Council
which the then Vice-President
Gary Goodrich put together.
Fiijally, Moore planned a
conference for leaders of student
organizations, but it fell
through.
The second part of the
paragraph about the Public
Functions Authority was also
misplaced. The passage should

UF Grad Wins Award

Karen Elizabeth Jerke, a UF journalism graduate, has been awarded
a Southern Regional Training Program fellowship in public
administration, Dr. Coleman B. Ransone, Jr., SRTP Educational
Director, announced today. The fellowship is valued at $4,455,
including a stipend of $3,300 plus tuition and fees.
Miss Jerke is among six who were chosen for training in public
administration at the Universities of Alabama, Kentucky, and

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Maas Stationery
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read as follows:
Another significant
accomplishment was the
creation of the Public Functions
Authority, under the
chairmanship of Alan Howes.
Composed of delegates from
various campus organizations,
the Authority is supposed to
provide a balanced program of
campus activities. ACCENT and
Student Government
Productions are directly
responsible to the Authority.

2 Coeds Assaulted

Using a can of aerosol
repellent, a UF nursing coed
fought off a would be assailant
Wednesday night in the Towers
dorm area.
The coed reported to
university police that she was
returning from the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center at 9:10
p.m. when she was overtaken by
a Negro male, who had been
walking behind her.
She described him to police
as being of average build,
wearing a yellow pullover and
dark slacks.
At 10:35 p.m. Wednesday
another UF coed was grabbed by
a male assailant in the parking
area behind Rolfs Hall.
The coed suffered lacerations
of the leg when she was thrown
to the pavement by the attacker.
She screamed and a UF student
and his date came to her
assistance.
The suspect fled toward
Stadium Rd. and Newell Drive.
In a description given to

Friday, May 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

police, the suspect was described
at 5-foot-10 to six feet ih height
and was wearing a darkqmllover.
Racial origin of this suspect is
not known, although the coed
suggested he might have been a
white male who had been
following her.
Police searched both areas
and interviewed one suspect in
each case. These suspects were
lated released after questioning.
Police are urging coeds to
exercise caution in walking
across the campus at night, or at
any time.
Last Spring, the campus was
the scene of similar attacks on
UF coeds.
In other police news, three
Negro youths were arrested
Thursday in connection with the
extensive vandalism at the UF
experimental farm at Lake Alive.
Eugene C. Aiken, 17, of rural
Gainesville was arrested and the
other two juveniles were turned
over to juvenile authorities.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9, 1969

Taylor Troop Tagged Tops,
Teamwork Ticket To Tact

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the last in a series on the Taylor
Administration.)
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
If the Clyde Taylor
Administration was successful in
many areas; that success may be
attributed in part to the fact
that he assembled good people
and delegated maximum
authority to them.
Sometimes characterized as a
missing president, Taylor was
often absent from his office,
because he was a full-time law
student, and also held an outside
job. Key people in his
"administration often kept the
ball rolling while he provided
leadership from above.
One of the main problem
areas was the Cabinet. Often
poorly administered, it served
for some as a stomping ground
for attaining a major activity for
Florida Blue Key qualifications.
Taylors biggest area of
failure was the Cabinet, said
Vice President Charles Harris.
It was too large and its
members were generally either
too transient or too aspiring.
There were a few exceptions.
Until the final few months when
Ric Katz took over (supervising
the Cabinet) it was poorly
administered.
Student Senate President
Jack Vaughn agreed that the
Cabinet was disorganized, too
large and not very effective.
However, some of the
Cabinet members did come
through with key projects, as in
student representation on
University committees, and
recreation facilities for campus.
Then, too, Secretary of
Athletics, Miles Wilkin proposed
a new ticket policy for football
games.
The Taylor Administration
will more than likely be
remembered for a few key
projects. Student Body President
Charles Shepherd said the
Rathskeller is foremost among
these.
Clyde Taylors
administration will not be an
easy one to follow because of its
tremendous success in a wide
range of programs, he said.v
Probably the most significant
accomplishment was the opening
of the Rathskeller, a project

INSURED
CLASS
RINGS
AGAINST
Loss of ring by
theft, robbery,
1 burglary, or fire
# Accidental breakage
Zat.es
JEWELERS
I GAINESVILLE MALL

which had its beginnings during
my first administration two
years ago.
Taylor carried the project to
fruition,, as he did numerous
other programs which will have
lasting benefit to the students of
this university. Hell be a tough
act to follow.
Another project funded by
SG was Samson, which was
started by Mike Whitman and
later, John Kelso. Taylor called
Samson one of the most
significant projects of his term:
We were able for the first
time to start moving into areas
the UF had not been in before,
into areas of community
involvement.
John Mica, an unsuccessful
candidate for the Student Body
presidency, lauded Taylors
efforts in programs for the
Gainesville community.
I think he did a pretty fine
job. Many things Shepherd took
credit for were accomplished
under the Taylor
Administration. I think Taylor
was the first to take the
initiative on social problems.
However, Taylor said his
administration barely scratched
the surface in problems of race
relations:
We didnt do enough for the
black ( students. At least we
recognized the problem, though
we didnt know what to do
about it.
He also regrets that his
administration didnt make
enough progress in personnel
problems in the Reitz Union,
referring to a perpetual hassle
between students and the
permanent staff of the union
over various matters.
Taylor also expressed dismay
about students attitude toward
SG:
Most students still adhere to
non-involvement in SG. They
fear that SG is a closed system,
full of petty politics.
However, he believes the
accomplishments far outweight
the shortcomings of his term. He
cited SGs new role as an arbiter
in apartment problems, through
the Off-Campus Housing
Authority; the Rathskeller;
increased student representation
on standing committees, and
Student Government
Productions.
We went into far greater

detail and tried to lay out plans
for forthcoming administrations.
None of the projects were
designed for the period of one
administration. We tried to
produce long-range planning of
student activities.
He also cited improved
student relations with the Board
of Regents and the State
Legislature, through an ad hoc
lobby group called Project
SURGE. v
What made the Taylor
Administration tick? Some think
the latitude he gave his people
was a deciding factor.
He didnt try to do
everything himself; he delegated
authority, in direct contrast to
Shepherd, said Greg Johnson, a
former majority floor leader of
the Student Senate.
Rathskeller Chairman Joe
Hilliard cited Taylors concern
with projects rather than issues.
It was a super-constructive
administration, in organizing and
streamlining the bureaucracy
and selecting good people to
work. He tackled some of the
most fundamental problems of
students for the first time, with
the Ombudsman program.
Harris said Taylor did an
excellent job of representing
the students and produced a
generally successful
administration in spite of the
Cabinet and in spite of
oolitics.

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Students Okay Demonstrative Dissent

By GINGER ANDREWS
Alligator Staff Writer
Eighty-five UF students
interviewed by Journalism 301
students generally approved of
student demonstrations if they
were conducted without the use
of violence.
" I believe in the right to
protest but I dont believe in the
illegal occupations of facilities or
other violent activities, said
Buzz Lloyd, 4JM. Sixty-three
percent of the 85 students

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The evolution of Floridas
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The photographic displays
begin with houses dating back to
the yearly I,9th century when
Floridas early settlers built
one-room houses with. porches
on either side. The exhibit
proceeds to trace variations of
this style of housing, including
two-story homes complete with
balcony-type porches.
Photographer Dan P. Branch
says the early builders of these
rough, unfinished and often
log-houses used the resources at
hand. His photographs show the
century-old buildings have

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my
interviewed agreed.
Twenty per cent felt 2 that
student demonstrations were
harmful in any form.
/ I firmly believe that anyone
who interrupts the orderly
process of an educational
institution should be
permanently suspended from
that institution and prosecuted,
said Jimmey Bailey, 4JM. He
also said he felt that student
demonstrations were in direct
alignment will a communist
conspiracy.

survived and many still are
being use for homes.
This primitive architecture
shows a high level of
performance even in the light of
modern technology, says
Branch, associate professor of
architecture at the University.
The builders precise and
detailed knowledge of local
climate conditions and an
understanding of the
performance .characteristics of
local building materials
contributed to the durability of
these structures, according to
the architect-photographer.
The photographs, taken all
over the state, will be on display
at the gallery until May 23.

One coed said she feared that
by the time she was ready to
graduate there would be
nothing to graduate from.
Theyre burning the
buildings. Theyre knocking the
system and they claim to be
speaking for me. Theyre not,
she said emphatically.
I think they (demonstra (demonstrations)
tions) (demonstrations) are the only way to
evoke social change, said one
2UC coed. Thirteen percent of
those interviewed agreed. They
felt student demonstrations were

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essential in any form, including
violence.
Four per cent said they had
no opinion.
These 85 UF students had
mixed opinions on the way
administrators had handled
student demonstrations.
Administrations are doing
all they can to meet the
legitimate demands of the
demonstrators, said one 4JM
student. Thirty-six per cent of
the sample agreed.
Twenty-two per cent had
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Friday. May 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

mixed feelings on the role
administrators have taken.
I feel the administrators
should take a middle-of-the-road
attitude, and handle each
situation the way they feel
best, one coed said.
I think theyre too easy on
them (demonstrators), said a
lUC. Twelve per cent of the
sample agreed administrators
had been too lenient.
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Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9,1969

Page 6

Seminole Here
The 1969 Seminole has
arrived and can be picked up
beginning at 10 p.m. Monday by
independents on the second
floor of the Reitz Union.
Sorority and fraternity
representatives may pick up
members copies at the loading
ramp in the Union parking lot
beginning at 12 noon Monday.
Receipts will be required of
all persons who have previously
paid for their copies.

Students Speak Harshly
In PR Survey On Union

By DENISE VALIANTE
Alligator Staff Writer
Damn legislative guest
house, snorted the student
critic.
This epitomized the general
attitude of UF students toward
the Reitz Union in a survey
presented by Doug Case and
Vicki Darlene Vega at the Board
of Managers meeting Tuesday
afternoon.
The survey, conducted as a
public relations class project,
revealed some interesting
student opinions and suggestions
for improvement.
There is hardly a person on
campus who has not glimpsed

IFC Says Thanks
UF interfratemity Council has extended thanks to several groups
which are not charging IFC for work done for Fridays rained out
Young Rascals Concert.
We are really grateful, said Alan Howes, IFC technical director.
He said they want to thank Physical Plant Division for not charging
for setting up the stage, Arnold Air Society, Billy Mitchell Drill Team
and the Gator Guard for not charging for ushers. Also thanks go to
the Cycerones, usherettes at the concert, for braving the rain.
Howes expressed special thanks to the 25 to 50 students who have
donated their refunds for the concert to SCAT.
He concluded that appreciation goes to Fidelity Sound in
Jacksonville who has reduced its charge for the equipment used at the
concert.
Summer Gator Staff
To Organize Today

Students interested in
working for the summer
Alligator should plan to attend
an organizational meeting in the
Student Publications Office in
the Union at 3 p.m. Friday.
Summer editor Dave Reddick
said many paying positions are
open.
We have positions open
from everything to executive
editor to writers and
copyreaders, Reddick said. I
hope students interested in
furthering their journalistic
ability will join the staff.
. To be a staff member, a

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the massive structure of the
Union stretching up over the
trees.
A beautiful apparition rising
out of the mist?
Not according to students.
Reactions included, Its
foreboding, ... big... ugly
... beautiful for an office
building.
Case said generally, the
students felt the Unions
atmosphere was too antiseptic
and that they had to be too
well-dressed just to go and enjoy
yourself.
Although one of the Unions
most outstanding features is the
fact that its numerous facilities

person must be a full-time
student, and must have a grade
point average of 2.0 or over.

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§5

and activities are inexpensive,
the survey showed that students
want more student-oriented
activities for a lower price.
Suggestions for improvement
were not far behind. They
ranged from a bus system for
students who dont have cars to
get there, to what we need is a
gambling casino.
Despite the fact that the
Union was good for nothing but
housing politicos, all was not
so bad. Students did like a few
things like . .the
restrooms . the
barbershop ... the duck pond.
The board suggested that
individual students direct the
student-oriented activities
requested.
The reaction was typified by
the comment of the student who
said, No thanks. Im a devout
anti-participation student.

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'Citizen* Butler
Represents All
By BRUCE TALL
Alligator Correspondent
Neil A. Butler is a Gainesville city commissioner caught in the
middle between the white establishment and the black militants.
1 never considered myself a black candidate, and 1 dont consider
that Im there to represent the black people. I am a citizen who
happens to be black and representing some 60,000 people in
Gainesville. I even represent those who voted against me, Butler said.

Butler, 41, is the first Negro
to serve on the Gainesville City
Commission since
Reconstruction days. He is quiet
sincere man. One gets the feeling
he believes in Gainesville, as
his campaign moto states.
Butler is a UF graduate from
the Nursing school in 1967. As a
lifelong Gainesville resident, and
now a city commissioner, Butler
said, I think there has been too
much effort made to
differentiate between the
university and the city. I dont
think that should be. I think it
should be looked on as one, the
university in the city, not the
university and the city.

Through the Lincoln Estates,
Inc. housing development in Gainesville, Butler is working in the state
trying to get non-profit sponsorship for rent-supplement or
low-income housing.
Improvements of the poor has always been an interest of mine,
said Butler, who grew up in a Gainesville slum. At present he is
working on a 10-acre housing unit in Dade County.
When asked, Butler said he left nursing because the salary was low.
At his present job he makes $1,500 more a year plus fringe benefits,
he said.
However, Butler said he has been accepted to graduate school at
the UF and would like to study pediatric nursing.
About his recent election to the City Commission, Butler said he
ignored his political advisers and announced his candidacy three weeks
before the deadline. Butler explained that he wanted anyone who
wanted to oppose him to get his chance. He said, I tried to steer
clear of a racial campaign.
If Im to be effective, the campaign could not have been a fluke. I
could not sneak in the back door. I had to be elected on the basis of
what I was offering. Butlers opponent was a local barber, W.W.
Windy Wilkerson whom he beat by 980 votes.
As Butler talked he was looking over a copy of the Gainesville
Junta of Militant Organizations (JOMO) newsletter called, The
Burning Spear. Frankly I am appalled at some of the material
JOMO distributes and I wouldnt want a kid of mine to even read
some of this, said Butler, the father of five children. (Five members
of JOMO were arrested in Hernando County last week on charges of
transpoting obscene literature and copies of The Burning Spear
were taken into custody as evidence.)
Because of the kind of person I am and my ideals I have to
oppose something like this, he continued, referring to the JOMO
literature. I know that in opposing this I am going to be taken to
task by members of JOMO and the militants. On the other hand, I
cant honestly stand idly by and not say something about this.
Butler said he thinks there are many whites in the community
who feel that his election the commission will cool things down,
and it may be that it will just heat things up because I cant be wholly
used by either group.
1 am going to have to make my decisions based on what I feel is
best for the whole community, he said.
AAUP Probe Secret

Jf*
FROM PA6E ONE J
guest desk and several local
motels drew a blank. Neither
Jones nor Reitz apparently
stayed at any of the larger
motels.
Fahien said, however, that
Kennedy stayed at the Ramada
Inn and probably paid his own
expenses to be written off later
through an AAUP expense
account. The Ramadas
reservation desk confirmed this
and reported that Kennedy left
Wednesday morning.
Fahien admitted that Jones
probably submitted a list of
persons to be quizzed by the

H R
JBB B j| p;.
ppj
NEIL A. BUTLER
... not 'black' candidate

team and that the UF
administration was also asked to
make such a list.
Jones, a psychology
professor, fought for 10 months
last year to gain tenure when the
administration turned his
request down after his
outspokenness on campus
dissent resulted in undue play in
the news media. Although the
administrators said Jones was
not being denied tenure for his
views, Jones said he did not
believe this and later called for
the AAUP investigation.
He has been doing research
at the Hershey Medical Center at
Pennsylvania State University
since April, 1968.


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Friday. May 9. 1969. Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 7



*
I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9, 1969

Page 8

* >
The piorida Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exerc se * responsibility."
Dave Doucette
rWJjjSSr Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor
All
* Carol Sanger Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
umM Executive Editor News Editors
' .... Jit .y
I aM
If .-.*
Class Os 69

Skinners Box***!***^^
Help For The Neglected
wwwwwwwwwwififiMiMwwwvwiMiy Richard M. Krieg

Part II of a two-part series.
The state mental hospital
system is beset by numerous
problems many of which are
inherent in its basic deisgn.
The fact that literally millions
of people suffer daily from
nothing save neglect is
intolerable, and the reality of
poor children being unable to
receive remedy at the start of
life is perhaps the greatest stigma

on American societys
complexion today. It is hard fact that solutions to
this manifold problem will require governmental
attention and assistance.
One type of solution lies in decentralizing
facilities. Such a system might take the form of
rapid treatment community centers. By locating
treatment facilities in the community, greater access
to more people would be derived. In addition, those
requiring help could reside at home and commute to
the center for treatment.
However, even if colleges were to produce
significantly more people trained in clinical work,
there would not be enough to help all of those in
need of assistance.
Dr. Hani Van De Riet, one of the states most
competent clinicians, has suggested that teachers be
trained in meeting emotional disturbances in

Nobody Really likes War, Right?

MR. EDITOR:
Regarding Mr. Allens defense
of the Military intentions, and of
ROTC in particular, in the May
6 issue of The Alligator;
perhaps you are sincere in your
assertion that the Military is
concerned only with Peace
through Deterrence, and indeed

' 1 ilfaf

I doubt that the Military is
composed entirely of fanatical
killers.
However, God, Joe ROTC,
and Mothers aple pie dont run
the wars; people like General
Westmoreland do run them. I
recently read a statement made
by the noble General which may

children. She also thinks that behavioral technicians
should be trained at the B.A. level in order to meet
the expanding demand for skilled clinical workers.
The greatest stress, and the thrust of the attack,
however, must come in the area of research.
Experimental psychologists must be funded and
equipped to carry on the investigation. Men such as
Harvards Ogden Lindsley, who have applied
operant conditioning methods to research in chronic
schizophrenia and other areas, offer a good
example.
If previous research in operant conditioning
techniques had not been supported, the basic
research tool thqf they derived for investigation of
the psychoses would not have been attained.
Therefore, it is vital that all forms of
experimental psychological research, no matter how
distant from the clinical setting, be supported
vigorously.
In the same vein, more psychology graduates
should be compelled to seek advanced training in
the experimental rather than the clinical sphere. For
this is where the challenge lies. Most of the
questions still remain unanswered.
And for those obstensibly interested in helping
the most amount of people for greatest length of
time, experimental psychology is the only relevant
choice.

EDITORIAL
Speak Against Tax

If HR 238 passes the Florida House of
Representatives, nineteen fraternities an
two sororities will be left at the mercy ot the
Alachua County Board of Adjustment in the
current hassle concerning ad valorem tax
exemptions.
The bill would allow this board, which is
the County Commission in the county, to
determine if the houses are essential to the
educational operation of the university and,
therefore, tax exempt under constitutional
law. .
This is fine in theory, but the way m
which the law is written does not say that
the university must certify the houses to be
educational or that the board must accept
the universitys recommendation. And in the
case of the UF and Alachua County, this
could spell disaster for the 21 fraternities
and sororities.
Just last quarter, the commission refused
to waive a SI2OO license fee for Cami Gras
which would have meant several thousands
more dollars for the Gator Loan Fund,
which keeps many students in school.
There were rumors that the commission
refused the waiver because of a county fair

YAF Conservative View

MR. EDITOR:
The May 6 article on Jimmy
Bailey gave consdierable
publicity to Bailey and his
Students for American
Conservativism, but the Alligator
persists in giving the impression
that Bailey and his

throw some light on his
motivations. Speaking about
himself and most of his
colleagues; What true
professional can resist marching
to the sound of gunfire!
Fun and Games. Kill one for
me, General.
WILLIAM RANDALL

Wallace-oriented yahoos are the
only conservative political
oragnization on campus.
Bailey gets a lot of space
because he is a curiosity on
campus, but the more
responsible conservative groups
are seldom even mentioned in
this paper.
This campus has a small, but
active chapter of Young
Americans for Freedom, a
national conservative political
action organization. YAF
represents a responsible,
constructive conservatism and

Starving Babies
MR. EDITOR:
Babies Die For Lack of Food in U.S. Capital, Senators Told.
Thus read the newspaper headline of April 17,1969. Jt seems that the
special Senate hunger committee was told that babies are dying in the
nations capital because they and their mothers are malnourished.
Mrs. Marjorie Harris, speaking in behalf of the citys Food Stamp
Advisory Committee, said the shocking evidence behind her
statement is the fact that the District of Columbia, seat of the most
powerful and richest nation on earth, has been shown in a study
several years ago to have the highest rate of infant mortality in the
country, except for the state of Mississippi.
A few senators, particularly George McGovern, have urged that
billions of dollars be immediately poured into programs to eliminate
the spectre of hunger that grips so many poverty pockets, not just the
slums of Washington, D.C.
But most have decided to ignore Mrs. Harris testimony, because
boondoggles such as the ABM system must be established to the tune
of $6.6 billion a year. And the legislators wonder why the capital s
crime rate is so high.
The Congressmen that ignore the poor that starve a few miles from
the White House are the ones who recently voted themselves a 47 per
cent pay increase. They are the people who laughed down a proposed
rat control bill. These are our legislators, men who cater to the special
interests of the military-industrial juggernaut so that the war machine
might produce more guns, less butter.
And babies continue to die in the nations capital.
DAVID MILLER
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
,4*
'
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitt Union.
Phone 392-1681, 392-1682, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of theij** 0 !}
or of the writer of the artidfe and not those of the University
Florida.

the following week that was sponsored by a
group in which several commissioners had
interest. Local officials also put up a fight to
keep the Rathskeller from obtaining a liquor
license because of the expected loss of
revenues to local taverns.
There is no guarantee that the County
Commission would exempt the fraternities
and sororities out of its love of the UF.
Steps are being taken by Student
Government, Florida Blue Key, the
Interfratemity Council and individual
fraternities and sororities to have the bill
amended to exempt the fraternities and
sororities.
So far, however, the UF administration
has been quiet in this matter. This is strange
since UF President Stephen C. OConnell is a
firm believer in the fraternity system and, in
fact, was a very active member of Alpha Tau
Omega fraternity during his time at the UF.
We urge OConnell to come out in
support of the fraternities and sororities in
this situation and to use influence as
president of this university with the
legislature in Tallahassee to get the
exemptions approved.

works hard to present the
conservative viewpoint on this
campus. Since we dont storm
SDS meetings or yell, Stand Up
For America! in the Plaza,
however, we dont get much
space in the Alligator.
If you must allot such a small
portion of your space to the
conservative viewpoint, at least
let us share it with Bailey. How
about letting YAF or one of its
members write a Speaking Out
column in the near future?
CHARLIE BLACK, 4AS



JUuia
oml
Viiiuit
MARSHALL JONES
... The Matter Has Not Died

Bad Guys Smothers

MR. EDITOR:
I object to the propagandized
UPI news release in the
Thursday May May Ist.
Alligator.
This antagonists article is is
completely slanted against the
Smothers Brothers.
The writer, from the
beginning, tries to prove that the
good guys have finally
triumphed.
The bad guys (i.e. Smothers)
with their hostifc humor and
strident yammering have lost
to a rural paragon who can
outslicker the city boys at
will.

r=The Militant Viewpoint
Minding Black Folks Business
=== '~By Charles Fulwood

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is the first
part of an article submitted by Charles Fulwood of
JOMO. Portions of JOMOs charter were recently
under attack for their alleged racism.)
In order for White People to understand the
Black Liberation Movement they will have to do
more listening than intruding. One of the most
racist things a White person can do is to define for
Black People when they dont even have the vaguest
idea of the Black Colonys real problems.
It will only create contempt and anger for Whites
to criticize and condemn self determination and
Black Nationalism. Black People more than anyone
else know their problem and know how to solve it
because they live it and they have their credentials
of a colonized people.
As a history Black People have suffered a great
deal as a result of White definitions, of what
equality and freedom meant for instance.
If white people want to criticize; then they
should criticize the government and their racism and
their supremacy attitudes. Black People are
struggling for power over themselves and the worst
thing a white person can do is try and define the
method they should or better use.
A perfect example of White Supremist attitudes
is White Liberals during the Civil Rights Movement.
White Liberals control and manipulated the
movement and altered many times the movement s
goals. For instance, when Black People mention
Intergration, and white Leberals thought that
Black men wanted to marry their daughters which
was not true at the beginning of the movement.
Black People wanted to be intergrated in to the
political machinery and economic machinery to gain

Staff Writing
k I *|"| V *' I
I Marshall Jones? No Comment I
By D 6 11 iS e Volioflt sftMftass^

We are here to investigate the Marshall Jones case. I can give you
my name, rank, and serial number, said Professor Frank Kennedy
from the National American Association of University Professors.
We wont deny that theyre here, but theyve asked that the
nature of their mission be kept secret, said Presidential Aide Mel
Sharpe.
I dont know anything, said Dr. Gladys Kammerer, AAUP
representative from UF.
Tigert Hall has always upheld the belief that the students of a
university community should be well-informed as to the operations of
the administration. Why is there now a dark shadow lurking in the
comer in the form of a previously well-publicized and controversial
figure?
Mention the name Marshall Jones and you will be greeted with a
violent reaction in defense of his freedom to express his beliefs in the
good ole American Way. The Boston Tea Party, Patrick Henry,
Thomas Jefferson, and his fellow corpses will be excavated for the
purpose of illustrating our foundations of freedom of speech and
action.
These glorious fathere fought for freedom, but they were also
cognizant of their responsibilities.
Marshall Jones apparently was not.
In the Statement of Principles from the AAUP Bulletin, Academic
Freedom and Tenure, it states:
The college or university teacher is a citizen, a member of a
learned profession, and an officer of an educational institution. When

The only trouble with this
comedy is that its been
presented as factual news.
UPI has also released it
nationwide.
The Alligator was not forced
to carry this article but chose to
do so.
This article is completely
contrary to what Alligator
journalists are taught in JM 118,
201,301.
If the Alligator continues to
exhibit this type of news
judgement its sure to be a
contender for the 1969
Pace wrecker Award.
DEL CAIN

NO THIN PLASTER 1
Dorm Uvina lnteraction

MR. EDITOR:
Now that we have had the opportunity to view
Apartment Living and learn just how much were
missing by staying in concrete barracks, or residence
halls, please allow me to tell sin city dwellers what
theyre missing by remaining off-campus.
Yes, youre missing the bad cafeteria meals, the
fire drills, the dripping faucets. Youre missing the
blarring radios, post-prog hysteria, the wild drunks.
But more than this, intangibly much more, youre
missing a vibrant and vital part of college life.
If you believe, as 1 do, that the purpose of
college is to get an education, then perhaps youre
missing out on a good deal of it in your 16th
Avenue apartment. As much as 80% of the
educational process takes place outside of the
classroom situation. Where is this 80% coming
from?

control over themselves; until, however, white
liberals defined for Black Leaders what
integration was.
Thats when the movement began intergrating
public bathrooms so Black Folk could sit on the
toilet stool beside white folk, which didnt have
anything to do with economic equality of Black
iiiuiuHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiiininniiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
It will only create contempt and anger
for Whites to criticize and condemn self
determination and Black Nationalism.
Black people more than anyone else know
their problem and know how to solve it
because they live it and they have their
credentials of a colonized people. As a
history Black People have suffered a great
deal as a result of White definitions, of
what equality and freedom mean for
instance. If white people want to criticize,
then they should criticize the government
and their racism and their supremacy
attitudes.
llllllllllll^lllllullllllllllllll^|||lllllllllllllllll m l |< (||||| | || ||||||| lllll |l| l i l ||,llllllll,l,l,
People. Black People simply wanted to be
recognized as human beings and wanted economic
and political equality. Thats what equality is.
Another most important reason for the white
liberals to have supported and controlled the Civil
Rights movement is that they knew if brothers like
Malcom and Shabazz, who had found out that this
system was corrupt, would have gotten control of
the movement, their economic and social interests
would be shattered which was racist.

he speaks or writes as a citizen, he should be free from institutional
censorship or discipline, but his special position in the community
imposes special obligations. As a man of learning and an educational
officer, he should remember that the public may judge his profession
and his institution by his utterances.
The UF administration deemed fit to deny Jones his tenure for the
reflection his actions and writing brought to this institution.
But the matter apparently has not died. The hush-hush manner in
which the NAAUP is conduction their investigation brings up certain
questions.
If the investigating team decides that academic freedom has been
denied at UF, will this institution be censured, as Professor Kennedy
said?
How will this affect the students?
The fact that there is an investigation raises the point that the
NAAUP is questioning its own stand.
The No comment attituce surrounding the investigation decries
the very basis upon which academic freedom was founded open
communication.
Tigert Hall is not a theatre housing a mystery movie but the core of
the academic freedom so easily tossed around.
Academic freedom includes freedom of research, freedom of class
content, and freedom of speech and the revelation and
communication of ideas and occurances.
Are these basic freedoms to be denied?
No comment.
_ ft

1 )
The most reactionary and racist statement a
white person can make is Black Nationalism is
racist.
Our reason for having all-Black organizations is
different than that of Bull Conner and the Klan.
The same reason why Whites cant join JOMO, THE
BLACK PANTHER PARTY, ACT, THE BLACK
STONE RANGERS, N.E.G.R.0., THE
ALFRO-AMERICAN ORGANIZATION, OF
BLACK UNITY, THE NEW REPUBLIC OF
AFRICA and THE BLACK LIBERATION ARMY is
the same.
Until whites get rid of their racist attitudes we
cant work together. It isnt possible for Black
people to have total unity if we inteigrate our
organizations. Black People know their problem and
they know who is responsible and they know how
to solve it.
White people only know half of the problem, and
hardly want to admit how the problem should really
be solved. Black People are gonna take care of their
own business from now on and get the power
because its entitled to them as Human Beings just
like White Folks. The only thing Whates can do is
work on their racism and supremist attitudes and
organize their own communities, and support our
struggle. Thats where its at. How in the hell can
a white person tell us about our own history and
make us culturally aware?! Just because whites
dont approve of our organizations dont mean
nothing, not a thing! These organizations are
working in the interest of BLACK FOLK and they
. are the ones that will control them. (Somethings
going on and you dont know what it is, do you, Mr.
Jones?)

Friday, May 9,1969, The Florida Alligator,

If you were a resident at one dorm, Hume Hall
there would be much to keep you alert. Residents
have been able to participate in discussion groups on
drugs, attend an in-depth study on human sexuality,
and participate in sensitivity groups, among other
things. Tlmjis, of course, in addition to the vast
experience that comes from living and
cooperating in a group situation.
Intramurals keep the athletically capable
individual happy throughout the year. And if you
desire, there are plenty of free dances and movies to
attend in addition to section parties.
Weve got carpeting, telephones, and in a few
weeks, air conditioning, too. But most of all, weve
got the inter-action of individuals that just doesnt
take place between the thin plaster of apartment
living.
BRENDA GEVERTZ, 2UC

Page 9



Page 10

The Circus
Is Coming
Step right up ladies and gentlemen and see
Sammy Seminole do the famous dance of the
pyramids.
He walks ... he talks and he swings through the
air with the greatest of ease.
Its the Florida State University Flying Circus
coming to the UF campus May 17.
It will feature 45 acts including tight rope
walking, tumbling and daring acts on the flying
trapeze.
Sponsored by Student Governments Gator Loan
Fund, the circus will present matinee and evening
performances. Tickets for the 2 p.m. show will be
$1 for adults and 50 cents for children; the 8 p.m.
admission will be $1.50 and 75 cents.
The circus has been an institution at FSU for the
past several years. It consists of 200 undergraduate
students.
Proceeds will be donated to student financial aid.
Every $1 contributed by the university will be
matched by $9 from federal government.
Step right up ...

*
IT'S THE OLE FLYING LADDER TRICK
... Barbara Craben hangs from the end of a moving ladder supported by Steve Danese.

I. The Florida Alligator, Friday .May 9,1969"

.... ''
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SHE FLYS THROUGH THE AIR WITH THE GREATEST OF EASE
FSU circus features Chuck Rose. Steve Danese, Barbara Craven and Marc Hines.

;, -M - |fift| . v/
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THERE SHOULD BE a BETTER WAY TO SPEND A SATURDAY
... FSU coed lets it all hang out.



Fortas Up Tight On Coverage

BOSTON (UPI) Controver Controversial
sial Controversial Supreme Court Justice Abe
Fortas clamped heavy
restrictions on news coverage of
his speech Thursday night on
dissent and civil disobedience.
Fortas had been strongly
criticized by the press following
publication of a Life magazine
article which stated Fortas
accepted a 520,000 fee from the
family foundation of convicted
industrialist Louis Wolfson, but
returned the sum 11 months
later. .....
Wolfson went to jail last
month for stock fraud. Several
newspapers suggested he

Suspect Arrested
In Child Slaying
TALLAHASSEE, (UPI) A high-speed chase near Orlando ended
Thursday with the arrest of an Ocoee man on charges of murdering
Byearold Camelia Jo Hand, authorities reported.
State Attorney Robert Eagan told newsman State Bureau of Law
Enforcement agents and Orange County sheriffs officers captured
Kenneth Ray Wright, 29, following a pursuit at speeds of more than
100 miles per hour.
The little girl disappeared on her way to school in Ocoee April 10
and her body was found in a shallow grave two days later, Eagan said.
He said the arrest of Wright climaxed an intensive investigation by
state and local lawmen who questioned more than 100 suspects.
Miami Lawmen
Seal Off Suspect
MIAMI (UPI) Police sealed off a five-block section of downtown
Miami Thursday, believing they had a suspect in the shooting of a
motorcycle policeman trapped in the area.
Officers broadcast requests to citizens to get out of the area during
the busy lunch hour and warned that the man they were hunting was
armed with a pistol.
The man hunted was identified as Jesse James Gavin, wanted for
the shooting late Wednesday of Motorcylcle Officer Ronald F.
McLeod during a chase following two holdups. McLeod, 30, was in
critical condition with a bullet in his brain.
Police said people who know Gavin reported seeing him near the
downtown Miami YMCA shortly before noon. Armed policemen
closed in and sealed off the area hoping to arrest the suspect.
FIRST ANNUAL I
GATOR I
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MAY 10 &11 I
jf. FUN RALLY I
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relinquish his seat in the highest
court in the land.
Fortas requested a ban on all
electronic equipment such as
tape recorders, television film
cameras and television videotape
recorders during his speech on
dissent and civil disobedience
at Northeastern University, a
school official said. --
In a letter from his secretary,
the justice said photographers
could take pictures only as he
walked onto the stage and up to
the microphone. He requested
that no other pictures be taken
and declined to hold a news
conference before or after the

speech. He did agree however* to
a brief question and answer
period after the lecture.
Earlier, it was disclosed
Fortaslias refused his $2,000 fee
as part of the universitys
distinguished series but
would accept S6?S for his
expenses and his booking agents
fee.
A spokesman for Fortas said,
for some time, the justice has
either refused fees for speeches
or given them to charity. A
booking agency official said
Fortas had informed them
sometime in the past few days
he would not accept the

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honorarium from Northeastern.
I guess it would be too painful
for him to take it in view of
whats happened this past
week, he said.

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Friday, May 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

CARCABAS
FLORIST AND GIFTS
FLOWERS AND CANDIES
3Y WIRE
CARCABA S a
613 N.W. 16th AVE. 4S#
372-3609

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9, 1969

Israel Now Sixth Atomic Power In Arms Race

MONTREAL (UPI) The
Montreal Gazette reported today
that Israei has built five
20-kiloton atomic bombs and
has almost finished work on a
sixth.

1-Day Truce For Viets?

SAIGON (UPI)-Acting
despite an outbreak of terrorist
activity in Saigon, the South
Vietnamese government and its
allies Thursday night announced
a one-day truce in the war to
mark the birthday of Buddha on
May 30.
We were consulted and we
will observe the 24-hour
stand-down, a spokesman for
the U.S. mission said soon after
the South Vietnamese
announcement. The other allies
will observe the standdown
also.
The truce, if observed by the
Communists, will be the first in
Exchange Club
To Cook Out
Open-grill hamburgers,
home-cooked beans and soda pop
will be the setting Friday
afternoon at 12:15 when the
Gainesville Exchange Club
presents the popular Freedom
Shrine to the Spessard Holland
Law Center on the back lawn of
the law school.
Exchange Club President
Tom Dobson and UF President
Stephen C. OConnell will be the
featured speakers at the
presentation which will be part
of the traditional Brown
Baggers Barbeque attended by
most of the law students.
The Shrine, similar to the one
in the arcade of the Alachua
County Courthouse, consists of
replicas of nineteen historic
documents ranging from the
original draft of the Declaration
of Independence to the
surrender papers following
World War 11.
The SSOO display is the first
of its kind presented to any
college in the University of
Florida. The public is invited to
the presentation.

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MONTREAL REPORTER UNCOVERS BOMBS EVIDENCE

The Gazette bannered the
report over four columns and
credited it to its Montreal-based
special correspondent, Peter
Lust, who has a number of
foreign contacts, including many

the Vietnam war since the Tet
new year holiday period in
mid-February.
Announcement of the brief
cease-fire followed a rash of
terrorist explosions in Saigon
which killed five persons and
wounded 43 others. The worst
blast occurred Thursday
morning when a bomb blast
killed four persons and wounded
19 in the capitals central post
office.
Three other overnight
explosions in Saigon killed one
civilian and wounded 24 others,
including six American
servicemen.

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GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER

in West Germany.
Lusts report, that Israel has
become the worlds sixth nuclear
power, said the bombs existence
was uncovered by a group of
West German journalists. The
West German story will appear
in Der Spiegel at the end of this
week, Lust wrote.
Lust said the Israeli bombs
were similar to those dropped by
the United States on Hiroshima
and Nagasaki in World War 11.
Lust said Israel had not
conducted any test explosions to
date.
Israel denied a National
Broadcasting Company NBC
report in January that a nuclear
bomb was almost ready.
Lust said the NBC report
missed the exact day by only
18 days. The bombs were
completed during early
February, Lust said.
The story said Israel could
presently deliver a nuclear
weapon with its A8 Skyhawl

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jets and, liter, with F 4 Phantom
jets that will soon be
operational.
Lusts account said the
bombs were assembled at Israel s
nuclear test station in the Negev
Desert, near the settlement of
Dimona, and were later rushed
to an unknown destination,
whose location is Israel s best
kept secret.
He said the test station near
Dimona had been one of the
countrys best kept military
secrets, although it was
reportedly discovered nine years
ago when American U 2
observation planes photographed
it.
He said one Israeli plane was
shot down by rockets and the
pilot killed on June 6, 1967,
when it accidentally strayed over
the Dimona site after being hit
by Egyptian ground fire.
Lust said Egypt has been
aware of the bombs completion

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in israei since reoruary when it
was discovered by the Arab
countrys intelligence service.
He said the Egyptian
government asked the Soviet
Union for nuclear arms for
possible retaliation, but the
request was turned down.
The nuclear station was
apparently built with the active
help of the French government
during the years when France
was still Israels friend
and ally, Lust said.
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G A T O R X. L A S SIFIE D S

FOR SALE |
> S'
WM'XX^X^WM'SSS'WWWJJH^xWS'K'iIi
Lost bright carpet colors ... restore
them with Blue Lustre. Rent electric
shampooer SI.OO. Lowry Furniture
Co. (A-lt-133-c)
Guns Guns Guns lnventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading HARRY BECKWITH,
GUN DEALER, Micanopy 466-3340.
(A-ts-104-C)
1964 Rambler station wagon.
Transmission needs repair. $325.8000
BTU air conditioner SIOO. Call
372-3356. (A-3t-133-p)
Express Yourself. Maiya-sekor
1000DTL. 5 months old still under
warranty. Also 500DTL. Both very
reasonable. Brian Goodheim,
376-1701. (A-3t-133-p)
Yammaha 350 Ex. condition.
Crash helmets incl. owner in service.
Low mileage. Call 372-0148 after
4p.m. (A-st-133-p)
1967 PORSCHE 912 5-speed,
chrome wheels, abarth exhaust. Call
or write Mr. John Morton 1735 N.E.
2nd St., Ocala Fla. 6290695.
(A-3t-133-p)
CAMERA! Yashika J-7 Like new!
Built-in meter, fl-7, case, filters,
shoe. Must sell s9O. Call Craig
Goldwyn at 372-9454. (A-3t-133-p)
Inexpensive drinks at the Friday
Afternoon Club this and every
Friday. Sponsored by four graduate
students for the University crowd. At
the Lamplighter from 5 7:30.
(A-lt-133-P)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See '2/2 acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-?0t-l 16-P)
Why pay rent? ] bedroom mobile
home 8X36 with 10x20 paneled
cabana. Air cond., furn., pool and
tennis courts in park. $795.
378-6880.'(A-bt-131-p)
New Ambassadoi AM-FM portable
radio AC-DC power; AFC S3O. Philco
solid state portable stereo SSO.
Guitar and case S7O. Or make offer
on any item. 378-5557. (A : 3t-131-p)
BMW R 26 Excellent condition.
Helmet, spares. $375. Call 378-9456.
(A-3t-131-p)
NOW SHOWING
Hes every inch
a man...and
every inch a
target! f
8:30
12*0* IP
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§
[g| .nMETROCOLOR
~ALSO AT 10:20
DORIS DWTAND BRIAN KEITH
WfTH SIX TOUGET EGGROLL

FOR SALE
NVtV.'.vxov.v/.v.v *
Free Kittens, house broken. Healthy.
Must move. Please help us avoid
humane society. Call 392-9419 or
378-5626 anytime after 1:30 p.m
(A-3t-131-p)
CHEAP, DEPENDABLE
TRANSPORTATION. Suzuki
Scrambler 50cc 1965 Good cond.
Heimet, tools ONLY $95. Call
392-9889. (A-st-130-p)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing machines.
These are nationally advertised
brands which are advertised for
$189.00. These machines can be
purchased for storage and freight
charges for $69.00 and can be paid
for $5.00 per month. See at
unclaimed Freight. 1228 NE 5 Ave.
Gainesville (A-131-ts-c)
8 New 1969 zig-zag sewing mach. to
be sold for storage and freight
$35.00. These can be inspected at
Ware House 1228 N.E. 5 Ave.
Gainesville. (A-131-ts-c)
5 1969 8 track stera tape players to
be sold for storage and freight. These
can be inspected at Unclaimed
Freight, 1228 NE 5 Ave., Gainesville,
Fla. (A-131-ts-c

%_ tues. and wed. only
MAY 14-15 SS
A VICARIOUS TREAT-AN A ($3
ELIZABETHAN TOUR!
LAVISH! BEAUTIFUL! P*
Wanda Hale, Neu York Daily A ews 0
PALACES
OF A QUEEN
IS EXCELLENT! IJJ -a nr ,n
Archer Winslen, New York Post I /% I ,l
ffiTSSjA f\W? A
Narrated by
1 111 111 xsr CJI TEEN
ALL SEATS $2.00 VV UULTi 1
V NO PASSES IN COLOR
Cite-* .twin'll
' jrrriWjraf i 1--- - j*
( iw iti *L / i
open
9:30-; l PERFORMANCES ONLY!
044 'm l The GIANT magical adventure! i
y: *' > J Full-length color cartoon feature! J
SiAkji
isflp
COIQ.
fOOHS & COMEDY
J

C.r /Qsn
1 ""tSMW ISMY! NiiffimftvlJ
WONDERFUL. FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT TWO DISNEY HITS
, IJa wr^Tli
Unusual 18{lwf\ 11
Western mB WvlM* lP& m\ \l
Hero !!!l 0 1- J ::;
Br-~ j%

Friday, May 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator.

FOR SALE 1
1969 49cc Riverside moped only 250
miles. Must sell. Need money SBS.
239-U Flavet 111 after 5:30 p.m. 2
helmets included. (A-5M32-P)
Best buy! 1968 Saab in top
condition. Only 8750 miles! Deluxe
model, pirelli tires, radio with rear
speaker. S2IOO. Call 378-6792 now!
(A-3M32-P)
ROBERTS 1719 4Tr Sterio Tape
Recorder; Only 4 mo. old, slightly
used; $l6O or best offer. Call
378-3876. (A-3M32-P)
SCM portable electric typewriter,
model 110. Like new, 1 yr. old,
hardly used. Must sell for S9O. Need
cash. Call 378-3709. (A-5M32-P)
1968 Vandyke 12x52,
airconditioning. Located Varsity
Villa, $650 down* $81.9_2/mo. Call
376-6555 after 6 p.m. (A-5f132-P)
Evening formal jacket, size 42;
burgundy with black silk trim.
Madras sport coat, white, blue-green
pattern; size 42. Both by Saks Fifth
Ave, Like new: $35 & $25. 372-2592
Ed. (A-3M32-P)

Page 13

FOR SALE
4 Michelin X tires 155-14 plus tubes.
Gone less than 2000 miles $125 or
best offer 378-7103. (A-3M32-P)
12 ft. heavy duty Aluminum boat
and s>/ 2 hp motor $250. Suzuki 90,
$225. Package deal both for $450.
Call 378-7778. (A-2M32-P)
Honda 50 first SSO takes it. Must
sell, must be cash as is SSO. Call Bob
Burns 378-5789. (A-4M30-P)
COMING










m* I #

A

: v: : m V

J ; *,
STARTS MAY 14


lACADBIY AWARD
BEST ACTOR
( ISSEr IBsHMswTslq
I Uniitrsi i yiU!"| |
DOUBLE HORROR!
1 DRACULA
IAS
RISEN YOU
CT_ CAN
JR TAME
IL.
Ti Jgs' r CHAMBER
#Pr w HORRORS
TECHNicot-Qw* j iwamoaum

use uur handy
mail ?n order
form.

vX.Nv.svww-wooorafrxwixwcw-x-x-fr
| FOR SALE |
1964 Lambretta 125 cc runs great
good transportation and economicai.
Luggage rack inci., tires like new.
$75.00 Call 378-8072 after 6:00.
(A-5M32-P)
FREE COLLIE PUPPIES! Mother is
a collie, father unknown. Puppies are
six weeks old and cute as buttons.
Choose from 1 to 4 free. Also will
consider giving mother free to the
right family. L.A. Lowry. Ph.
372-4247 or 376-5526. (A-3t-132-C)
aox OFFICE OKH I: FAL 1
SHOW TIME 8:30
SCHELL McCAMBMDGE I
H| R -*- --
IIVI IWfl
pALUZZILOM cocoa
1 FLUS "VIOLENT ONES" COLOR 1
2 FERNANDO LAMAS J



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR RENT |
*. ,%
>ix*wwxw*:*x*x*X'C*:X*sS-'rS i K*x*xx*x*:NS"!
Private A/C rooms, linens, maid
service, located one block from old
law school. Male students only. 1 and
2 Bft A/C apts. in same area.
50 trailer with 40 closed-in cabana 2
bedroom, AC, pool, tennis arts, VB
CT etc., 4 minutes from campus
SBS/month avail, for sum. qrt. Call
378-0748 nite. Also looking for
roommate when I return for fall.
(B-6t-133-p)
Sublet for summer. New beautiful 2
bedroom apt. A/C Rent open. Call
378-0996. (B-lt-133-p)
Rent free private rooms for the
Cocktail party at the Friday
afternoon club. Sponsored by four
graduate students for the university
crowd. At the Lamplighter from
57:30. (B-lt-133-p)
SUBLET 2 bedroom upstairs apt.,
available June AC, 1 block behind
Norman Hall 376-5509 S.W. 7 Ave.
(B-st-129-p)
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to campus. Air. Pool. Also
rentin, for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21t-115-p)
Williamsburg 1 bedroom poolside
apt. to sublet for summer quarter.
Call 378-0291. (B-st-131-p)
APARTMENT small, convenient
apt. one block form Tigcrt. Sublet
for summer, option for fall. Contact
Perry at 117 S.W. 12 St., Apt. 1.
(B-3t-131-p)
Village Park Apt. to sublet for
Summer Quarter, 2 Bedroom
furnished A/C, Poolside Call
378-0864. (B-st-129-p)
POOLSIDE Williamsburg apt. 2 bdrm
townhouse central air
dishwasher Bar-B-Q Available
from June 15. Call 378-4732.
(B-st-130-p)
Sublet for summer, Landmark Apt.,
Kitchen utensils and linens. Call
372-5041. (B-2t-132-P)

The Wide, wild World
Os New Film Is Coming
e eeee
e* ' e
eeeee e e f. A
*
*2 * \
A UNIQUE 3-PROGHAM SERIES OF 26 NEW FILMS FROM 9 COUNTRIES
x-atfeaturing
LONDON POP SAN FRANCISCO PSYCHEDELIC
JAPANESEDADA LATERNA MAGIKA
I C First U.S. showings of the worlds most outstanding creative
111 a short films ... black comedy and drama of the absurd ...
J!U continental wit and lyrical humanism... animation and
jjj* collage graphics ... electronic color and surreal sound
*nfTl f .. science-fiction fantasy and documentary realism
L VERSAILLES
Paris. Albert Lamorisse
( f \ BAKVICKARNA
Germany
f¥' 1 OD San Francisco
\ PgQ WHY DID YOU KISS ME AWAKE?
J J MARIE ET LE CURE
vHilr ALL MAKE LOVE
'jkX | IN LONDON
with Michael Came. The Rolling Stones,
Others
J I J
Coming Next Week
Program #1 May 14-15; #2 May 18-19
#3 May 21-22
------- - - -

f FOR RENT 1
vw-wx-:; wic iio i i JM.SMU >twS
Sublet VILLAGE 34 Apt. lbdrm.
furn. AC Close to campus $lO5
monthly plus utilities. Avail. June.
Call 378-8256.(8-st-129-p)
Looking for a place to live this
summer? Room available to sublet.
One block from campus. Call Donna
352-1700 after 5 P.M.
Available for summer qtr. or longer.
Furnished apt. for 2. Air cond., pool,
etc. $95/month. Also looking for
male roommate summer Call
378-3447. (B-st-129-p)
Must sublet immediately new section
Summit House. Must be married. Call
378-0942 for further information.
(B-3M32-P)
Enjoy summer living at Landmark
Apt. Pool with free health gym and
sauna bath. Call Mike, days
378-1413, or nites 378-0674.
(B-3M32-P)

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
J private bedroom for
<#4 / each student one
TojrJ block behind norman
\jM ift hau
ij M APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT CAU 372-2662

I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9, 1969

Page 14

I FOR RENT |
? ft
Sublet one bedroom Summit House
Apt. E-26. Pool, air cond. $134
monthly. Availalbe June 1. Call
378-6784 after 6 p.m. or contact
office. (B-5M32-P)
Moving Must sublet June 1, Beautiful
new furnished 1 br apt. overlooking
pool at Summit House 378-9734.
(B-st-132-P)
Sublease, for summer, 2 bdrm A/C
upstrs, corner apt. Tanglewood.
Poolside, custom bar. $175/mo. You
keep sec. dep. Call 378-7212 after
4:00. (B-3t-132-P)
Landmark Phase II Apartment to
sublet for summer quarter. Corner
apt., ac, dishwasher, good deaf on
rent. Call 378-5016. (B-IM2B-P)
X;-;<-;-Xfrfr^
i WANTED I
iX'XfrWWXttftX
Two female roommates for summer
quarter in French Quarter Apt. no.
96. Call 372-5246.
y i: Wi Ci i Xl! :
I WANTED |
Male roommate for 2 bdjrm apt at
Summit House. Immediate or
summer occupancy. Air. conditioned
s4l montk. Call 372-7732,
7:30-8:30 a.m/>%6 p.m., 12-2 a.m.
nite. (C-4t-132-P)^ v

[n.w. i3h no
'' £ '' x~ w^gfttegifojp'":
fillip
I jIM BROWN WELCH
KMM[- 1
Telephon. 378 2A34 Ir ) ] I T | 3 Afl
AN IMPERTINENT, DELICIOUS LITTLE SATIRE!
There is an enormous amount of raw vitality.
Wonderful performances by a cast of fresh and
inventive young actors. Few big budget ctTTTP)
movies contain as much wit and purpose! Vx'*
I VERY MUCH ADMIRED GREETINGS!
* ff AN OVERGROUND SEX-PROTEST FILM! fC
Archer Winsten. New York Post I I
;lv '^K'-''%^B
.- ';-;v-;c;'y *** . >y i v?;iyg
. w .;"'W
I A *r l y f* 1 *" j* *HMA PRODUCED BV CHARLES HIRSCH ( V P flns imdf 16 if
to RELEASE D COEOR^* not dmittd I

Use our handy
mail In brder
form.

.NNNSSVVA^^^Avv^XrI-^V-^.X.K.SSS^WXr
WANTED
Ww:4w*w WALL-TO-WALL FLOOR! INDOOF
TOILET! WANTED: SUMMEF
ROOMMATE. Your own bdrm witl
double bed; air-cond, cable TV
large sharp 2 bdrm duplex in quiet
wooded area. 372-6598. (C-3t-131-p



CLASSIFIEDS
&

WANTED §
Male roommate for summer qtr. at
Summit House. SIOO for entire qtr.
including utilities. Call 378-4242.
(C-7M29-P)
COED roommates for summer.
Village Park poolside 2 bedroom apt.
MONETARY CONCESSIONS. Call
378-7272 or come to VP 56.
(C-st-133-p)
The university crowd over 21 for the
Friday Afternoon Club. Cocktail
party sponsored by four graduate
students at the Lamplighter this
Friday from 5-7:30. (C-lt-133-p)
Male roommate 60.00 per month Air
conditioning 1105 NW 4th Ave. no
utilities. Private bedroom 376-5381.
ext. 308. (C-st-133-p)
Male roommates wanted for Summit
House apt. Air cond, pool, two
bedrooms, cable. $41.75 plus V* util.
Call 372-5552. (C-3t-133-p)
Need 2 coed roommates or persons
to sublet 2 bdrm Landmark apt for
sum qtr with option to renew lease
Ca 11376-2129. (C-4t-133-p)
Roommates, 1 or 2. to share 2 bdrm.
Village Park Apt. for summer or
more. Desirable location, low rent. If
no response will sublet.
376-7439.(C-3t-133-p)
Such a Deal! S9O each for summer
qtr. Need 3 male roommates or
sublease apt. 2 bedroom, fireplace,
AC, cable TV, dishwasher, disposel, 2
pools, gym, sauna bath, laundry
room, many extras. No. 9 Landmark
378-9844 anytime. (C-st-133-p)
Two roommates wanted for 2
bedroom French Quarter apt.
Immediate occupancy or summer
quarter. Call 376-0613 after 5:00
p.m. (C-st-133-p)
Male: Have three part time openings
for evening cashier. Also two
openings at 11-2 daytime. Apply
Kings Food Host 1430 S.W. 13th St.
(C-133-ts-c)
Male roommate for Butler Garden
Apt. starting June 14, W-To W
carpet, ac, pool, Call 376-4323 after
5 p.m. S6O month & V 2 utilities.
(C-st-131-p)
1 fern for 2 bdrm apt sum qtr
possibly longer. Very large newly
painted, AC. Ideal location, low rent.
Grad stud or sr. Call 376-4758 after 4
p.m. (C-st-132-P)
:.wx-x-xxx*x.w.;;ss-;x:-xx<*xc-x-xxet
I HELP WANTED |
wx x*x*x<<<<x*w;ss*w x x xxixws?
Summer employment foi student
with layout, newswriting and typing
experience with interest in
performing arts for publicity
assignments. Minimum pay,
maximum experience. Send
background resume to: P.O. Drawer
E, Sarasota, Fla. 33578. (E-st-129-p)
Experienced tractor driver;
knowledge of cattle operation;
fencing; worming; etc. Afternoons
and/or Saturdays your convenience.
Phone 376-6339 after 7:30 p.m.
(E-5M29-C)
WOODYS male student, part time,
no exp. req. Good pay and hrs.
flexible. 378-2900. (E-3t-132-p)
AUTOS
' * ** ,, *****r*i ""************o*^ ,^*j*^**********#*#*#**#*, # ? *
63 VW Microbus, excellent
conditon, new paint, 2 new tires,
$895, 378-4260 or 376-7812.
(G-st-133-p)
66 Pont. Temp. Custom 2 dr. HT.
AC, R & H, 3 Speed Hurst Tran.
41,000 mi. Getting married, must
s eH. $1,500. Call 378-5645.
(G-5M32-P)
Corvair? Stabilizer bar for front,
1965 and later: sl2. Spyder?
Exhaust insulation kit for 15 extra
h P sls. Both never used. Ed,
372-2592. (G-3M32-P)
fiat 850 Coupe 1967; White, red
interior, 16000 miles clean. Make
offer. Call 376-2998 evenings or
392-1637 before 7:00 p.m.
(G-3t-131-p)
1966 Chevelle 55396 2-door
4-on-the-floor, radio, heater, In
excellent condition. Call George
Cappy at 372-4492. (G-3t-131-p)

1...
WAVS

I AUTOS |
frWWfTOWfItH j 0 0 1 L J
VW 6 8 Sedan AM/FM excellent
condition. White good tires 378-3304
between 6-7 p.m. Ask for Bill.
(G-4t-130-p)
1964 Crv Monza 4sp. 110 hp good
cond. radio heater good tires $450 or
best offer. Call 376-3417. Ask for
Tony. If not in, leave number.
(G-4t-130-p)
1969 MGB Army forces sale. Call Lee
Klein at 372-9404. (G-st-132-P)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen Dealer, 4222 N.W. 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-130-ts-c)
1965 Sunbeam real clean good tires.
Real good shape mechanically and
low mileage. Call evenings 372-7971
up to 11:30 p.m. (G-st-133-p)
69 Pontiac Tempest 6mo. new OHC
6 cylinder, stick-shift, radio, heater,
limelight greenAsk for Mike Halton
at circulation dest research library or
Call 378-4554 after 5:30 P.M.
(G-127-10t-p)
| PERSONAL
Would you like to be a member of
Maas Brothers 1969-1970 College
Board? Apply now any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15t-129-c)
THEYRE HERE: Silver rings from
Mexico. Many unique styles. THE
SPANISH MAIN 105 W. Univ. open
Mon-Sat till 9:00. (J-st-131-p)
* 1 i
CAR WASH May 10 behind Jennings
Hall $.75. Proceeds going for a dance
May 30. (J-2M32-P)
Photography your bag? Enter the
Reitz Union Photo Contest. Cash
prizes offered. For rules & info, go to
Rm. 310 Reitz Union. 392-1655.
(J-5M32-P)
KATHIE: Happy 21st & Ist Mothers
Day! Marty & Chuck say you
FIDDLE around all you *?.at
SUNDAY. (J-lt-133-p)
Come eat pie with the BETAS on
BETA THETA PI day May 17.
(J-3t-133-p)
BRIDE-to-BE? Size 10 Jordan Marsh
dress; floor length mantilla worn 3
hours. Cost $125, will sell for $75.
Call 376-9091. (J-133-3t-p)
.r Summer comes, can Fall be far
behind? Be ready for it! Were selling
out the last of this Winters ponchos
and ruanas at 30% off. THE
SPANISH MAIN 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open Mon. Sat. til 9:00..
(J-l 29-3 t-p)
ExSledd G Guys Thanks for the
groovin' times. Keep up the good
work. 4lh Floor Horcor. (J-3t-l^-p)

REITZ UNION THEATRE admission 4(w
1
hfei- ROBERT POLIY I JOAN JANIS DIANE
Sflr BERGEN! CRIP PAGE McBAIN
.-a- "EM: OsL fT ttOo-(BailfiaDOaiPffi
2tl> Ceu. *Fv with every scan*, / RICHARD RODGERS OSCAR H AMMERbTEIN II .<*..;*- ~S!&"33 3WMWigMW.KftrMMtSMII AIM SI CUMR BADBAM BMHUt RC6f R! VAJGHN >..- ifc'V SUSAN OLIVER
everyeongi ARTHUR HORNBLOW,Jr FRED ZINNEMANN T'HENRYF.GREENBERGh*ubaruch. v jerrypw?ismimhwwrkwkhm BARTLETTiiw!lb*is
FRIDAY MAY 9 6;00 8:30 11:OOP.M. SATURDAY MAY 10 6:00 8:00 10:00

I PERSONAL |
Girls!! If campus social life is a little
less social than you like, the grad
students of the U. of F. have supplied
an answer! THE FRIDAY

AFTERNOON CLUB.
Requirements? Be social, female, &
over 21 Bring all your friends to
the Lamplighter, 57:30 Fri. 2
private rooms. Have a drink, meet
some guys be cool. (J-lt-133-p)
Happy Birthday Happiness. Now
Kern. RIGHT NOW. Sam, Barb,
Lynn. (J-lt-133-p)
M. Fogos Congrats on new home
for 1970! May love and peace reign.
Love Queen Rat. (J-lt-133-p)
Anti-Semitic JEROME: Happy 21st
Mazel-tov! Love from your Jewish
roommates. (J-lt-133-p)
Congratulation to the new brothers
and officers of AEPi Love The Little
Sisters of the Golden Lion.
(J-lt-133-p)
Old Time Movies FRI. and SAT. at
the Bent Card The Immigrant and
Trip to the Moon." (J-1M33-NC)
SKS: Remember what has been said.
Make up your mind and hurry back.
Miss you much. Me n B. (J-lt-133-p)
The Friday Afternoon Club feels it
may be wasting its ads on you guys.
You all come to the Lamplighter
57:30, Fri, anyway. Live a little,
proselytize, tell all the girls you know
to come. Our ads bring you help
yourselves spread the word.
fJ-lt-133-p)
:;?-x*x.%nw.%%v.y.v;sv;v>x*x*x-x*xx<*xx.:j
| LOST & FOUND |
!y>; ;*x*x # x*i*x;.;.x.vv.v.v.v;*x # x # X*x X'X # v*'
REWARD Lost one tan female
puppy with black muzzle. Answers to
name of Princess. Rumored near
Jennings. Call 378-6675. (L-st-130-p)
Lost: small gold box containing
watch, bracelet, ring. Left at Hort.
greenhouses, late Tues. Call Eleanor
372-9510. Reward. (2t-133-L-p)
Lost: one pair of military-type
sunglasses on Tues night, Apr. 29, at
Robbies. Reward offered; please call
Bob at 392-7924, after 5:00.
(L-lt-133-p)
.-XvXvX'X'X-V.vXYX-XX-X'X'X-X-VX'.V^j
SERVICES |
*i*X.X!SVX X X X XXVVi ; X X*X<*X*XNS i*-!*
Dressmaking Alterations fittings
in dorms if desired Dress prices
start at $4.00. Call Betsy Stippich
481-2628 for more information
(M-lt-133-p)
ip
I
JLI J j

SERVICES
TYPING IN MY HOME five
YEARS EXPERIENCE IBM
ELECTRIC standard TYPEWRITER.
CALL 376-7809. (M-st-131-p)
Disserration, thesis or publication
drawings or graphs professional
graphic artist, Nancy McClelland.
378-4260. (M-st-133-p)

The Beatles!
ffTTiiw Yellow ; Submarine^
,/ V NOTHIN!. KK! \i

IE Vy \ SPECIAL ||
Wk \ \ FRIDAY ||
FRIED 1
§ SHRIMP I
H WITH FRENCH FRIES, 11
m SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES |j
I $1.09 I
i MORRISON'S I
§ CAFETERIAS |
|>4 GAINESVILLE MALL j||

Friday, May 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

1 SERVICES
A %
*#
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
A Iter nators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service. 603 SE 2 St.
378-7330. (M-ts-132-C)

Page 15



i, Tuc FiufKi Friudy, fVfay S, 1989

Page 16

University Laundry Lauded For Labors

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Contrary to popular belief,
the sheets and towels provided
for students in UF housing do
not miraculously appear from
heaven, nor do little leprechauns
labor all night to prepare the
linens.
The 43 employes of the
University Laundry are the ones
to thank, plus a new $48,000
machine that irons, folds and
stacks sheets at a rate of 1000 an
hour.
Few people have ever even
heard of University Laundry'.
But it annually deals with 3.5
million pounds of linens, coming
mainly from the J. Hillis Miller
Health Center, Shands Teaching
Hospital and university housing.
The laundry used to be a
small concern, but several years
ago it expanded to meet the
needs of the growing hospital. In
1967 it moved into a new
building that cost over
$250,000. Recently some new
equipment was bought to
increase the speed and efficiency
with which the linens are
finished.
Manager of the laundry
Shutterbug's
Contest Nears
UF shutterbugs can earn up
to SSO for their work in the
Reitz Union Photo Contest.
Pictures will be judged on
photographic skills, originality
and print qualify, and any
student, faculty member or staff
member is eligible to compete.
Photos may be either black
and white or color and must be
accompanied by an official entry
form, available in room 310,
Reitz Union. Deadline for
entries is 5 p.m., May 23.
There is no limit on the
number of photographs entered.
For more information, call
392-1655.
I I
I SEASON I
I LE I
I RUANAS I
I AND I
I PONCHOS I
|30% OFfI
I ON ALL STYLES I
I I
I JJI-
I 106 W. UNIV. I
OPEN MON-SAT TILL 9:00

Nathaniel Parker, who has been
doing UF laundry since 1949
and for the Navy since 1929, is
enthusiastic about the new
machine.
When we run this thing, it
really turns out the sheets.
The new machine presses and
triple-folds sheets at a rate of
1000 per hour, where the old
machine could turn out only 85
per hour and only folded the
sheets once.
It needs only two people to
feed the sheets into the machine
and one to remove the finished
sheets. The old equipment
required four to feed it and
three to finish folding the sheets
and stack them.
The presser-folder, patented
in Sweden and handled by only
two companies in the United
States, took seven days to
install because of its size and
complexity. During that week,
laundry employees had to work
double shifts to keep the
hospital and dorms supplied
with linens. But the extra work
was well worth the effort; the
new machine is making the job
easier for the workers.
The $48,000 spent for one
machine sounds like a lot, but

1
GO!-FOR THE FURY,
FORCE AND FUN OF if_
A movie so brilliant, so special that
it's dangerous to write about if_
I'll be talking about if_forever._LooK
ANGRY, TOUGH AND FULL
OF STING
WILL PROBABLY BE THE
BIGGEST MOVIE ON COLLEGE
CAMPUSES SINCE THE
GRADUATET-VU.GEYOCE
a
LET IT SUFFICE TO SAY THAT
iflS A MASTERPIECE,
reason enough to rank Anderson
among cinemas major artists.-PMyeoy
THE MOST INTERESTING
FILM SO FAR THIS YEAR...
A superb job... if_is a brilliant
and disturbing film. vogue
IF YOURE YOUNG, YOULL
REALLY DIG if- If youre
not so young, its more reason than
ever to go see what its ail about!
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the laundry does not always
spend that much on its
equipment.
Nine small pressers used for
ironing lab coats and uniforms
sit to one side of the building,
steaming profusely. Cost sO.
Parker found them seven years
ago in a government surplus
store in Starke. The owner of the
store let Parker have the pressers
for free. He put them in working
order and he says, Theyre good
for 20 more years.
Three large washing
machines, that are still doing a
good job, were purchased for a
total of $55. Parker fells the
Runaway Cards
The runaway pennant
victories by the St. Louis
Cardinals in 1967 and 1968 are
the only two times in the past
13 years that the National
League baseball has not been a
bitterly contested battle down
to the wire.
NOW POPPIN
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GAINESVILLE MALL

story of how he got them: a
lime-rock company had bought a
World War II ship from the
government. The owner told
Parker about the complete
laundry in the ship and invited
him to see it. Parker took one
look at the three brand-new
washers and said,lll take all

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three.
The University Laundry, with
its strange combination of new
and old, is nonetheless a good
one. Parker, who has seen quite
a few laundries in his 40 years of
experience, says about it, This
is one of the best-set laundries
Ive ever seen.



Group Vying For Spouse Benefits

By RICHARD McCULLOCH
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government
Insurance Commissioner Bob
Mandell is currently trying to
gain student support for a plan
to include non-studnet families
of UF students under an
infirmary care and services plan.
SG has a responsibility not
only to single students, but to
married students and their
families as well, Mandell said.
Married students represent over
twenty per cent of UF student
population.
Mandell feels the immediate
family should have the same
health service available as UF
students, and says it will take
widespread organization and
seriously considered demands to
accomplish the health reforms.
Jeff Warren, who has been
acting as under-insurance
commissioner has proposed a
plan wher non-student family
members would pay the same
sl2 per quarter or $36 per
academic year for infirmary
sponsored health services as UF
students. Student fees are
deducted from tuition monies.
Student families are already
covered under the optional
student health insurance plan,
Warren said, but non-student
members have to be treated by
local doctors at a much higher
fee rate. Mazimum benefits are
soon expended in cases of
serious illness and the families
have to pay the balance.
Chief opposition to the plan
comes form the County Medical
Society whose members oppose
the university takeing business
from local doctors and feel it
can not be reasonably justified.
The local doctors say that
authentically indigent patients
are already being treated free.
However they have never been
shown any finalized proposals.
There have been previous
efforts from within the married
community attempting to get
adequate medical services
provided. Periodically the
Married Village Council (MUC)
passes a resolution with its
general objectives calling for
health service reforms.
Jerry Yakatan, current
chairman of the MVC, admits a
concerted effort has been
lacking.
The villages elect officers
eveyr six months, he said. A
continuity of effort has not been
provided. It seems as if we start
all over again every election.
Our goal is to make some
sort of fee arrangement which
would allow for non-student
family members to be cared for
by the University Health
Services (UHS) and for the
infirmary to provide some
family planning service, he said.
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IN INFIRMARY CARE AND SERVICES

I DEPTH REPORT 1
v

The Student Health Advisory
Committee handles negotiations
between the infirmary and
Student Government. It meets
four times a year, but meetings
can be called more frequently
when there are pressing issues to
be resolved. Members include
Dr. Samuel P. Martin, provost of
the J. Hillis Miller Health Center;
Wilmer J. Coggins, director of
Student Health; Dr. Dora A.
Hicks, professor of physcial
education; Dr. James Kessling,
assistant professor of Math; and
Mandell. There is no
representation form the married
villages.
Through the efforts of this
committee, family planning
services are to be provided for
the wives of some UF students.
This group will be small
with the services similar to those
provided by the County Board
of Health for Alachua
residents, Coggins said. The
group will be small and carefully
screened to include only the
wives of students who do not
have sufficient resources for
private medical care.
Dr. Carl Clarke, director of
the Marriage and College Life
Project on campus, has surveyed
the married student situation on
cmapus and compiled some
useful statistics.
Thirteen per cent of UF
undergraduate students are
married and 54 per cent of the
graduate students. This amounts
to 21 per cent of the university
population overall, Clarke said.
There are 3,000 couples in
which only one of the partners is
a student.
Most colleges and universities
today assume an educational
responsibility for the student as
a whole person. School
consideration of the family as a
whole has lagged behind, he said.
Many institutions have
failed to come to terms with the
family unit. This has resulted
form a feeling in the past when
married students could be
suspended or denied the right to
participate in a variety of
student activities, Clarke said.
Their marriage was considered
an irresponsible act and it was
felt they had a bad influence on
other students. Now married
students are accepted as a
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normal part of campus life, but
there has been a lag providing
services appropriate to his
marital status.
Clarke feels the university has
an opportunity to enrich the
marriage experience and help
couples with their adjustment
problems. One of the most
frequently mentioned
difficulties is the lack of
adequate finances.
On campuses where the
married populations are sizeable,
some attention needs to be given
to the establishment of a group
medical plan which will provide
low cost readily available
medical service to families of
married students, he noted.
We have done this for the
single student.
Such a plan would not only
insure better medical attention,
but would provide an invaluable
educational opportunity for
teaching young families aobut
health care and family
medicine, he said.
Stephen J. Pritz, business
manager for Student Health
Services, points out the
significant financial problems

SUNDAY
MAY 11
AT
7:00 and 9:00 P.M. I
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Coming Next Week
Program #1 May 14 l5; #2 May 18 l9; #3 May 21 22

that would have to be resolved
before the health services could
be extended.
Treatment of student family
units by UHS seems to be
worthwhile, but recognition of
the need and the impetus for
change must come from within
the student body, Pritz said.
The Infirmary is operating
at capacity now. We are not in a
position at this time to provide
additional services. Additional
staffing would be required
especially in the areas of
pediactrics and obstetrics.
If both out- and in-patient
care is to be provided, additional
space requirements would have
to be met. The present building
is not designed to accomodate
increased health services, Pritz
said.
Mandells proposed plan

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Friday, May 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

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would provide only the money
for operating expenses and not
money for the expansion that
would be needed.
s
All the people directly
concerned see a need for support
from the married community
and the student body if the
existing problems are to be
resolved and Student Health
Service reforms instituted.
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Page 17



I. The F lor Ida Alligator Friday

Page 18

1969 Florida Folk Festival-May 2-4

y 4k9H' W 'mr 1 ' tt ~
sf ns I- -JPiwl -JPiwl
- -JPiwl SEMINOLES
Indian concessionaires pause to discuss sales of their
authentic beadwork.

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Stand-up bass, banjo, mandolin, and country-western music offered
by a family group from Georgia.

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17 Annual
Pickin And
Singin Fest
This years meet at
White Springs hosted
talent from all over the
nation lowa to New
York. Friday to Sunday
the music flowed out to
an enthusiastic audience
that payed a minimal
admission charge and
included many UF and
FSU students.
The event takes place
the first weekend in May
each year and is
sponsored by the
Stephen Foster Memorial
Commission.
Photos
By
Dave Mathews

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But Thats His Business S)
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Joe Mark, UF art student on guitar and harmonica
with "Mon Urai Destin/

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CHI OMEGA-Chi Omega
Weekend was the kick off to an
action packed quarter for the
sorority. Festivities were held at
the Holiday Inn, where Delta
Tau Deltas Rick Horder was
named 1969 Owlman. The
sorority spent the next day in
fun at Crescent Beach.
Sisters included in the Pike
Dreamgirl court were Jan
Adams, Cyndi Griswold and
Susan Trones. Margie Dekle was
Lambda Chi Alpha Sweetheart
and Pat Manning was included in
their court.
New fraternity Little Sisters
include: Kaki Rogers, Sigma Phi
Epsilon; Mary Amann, Delta Tau
Delta; Sherry Goodman, Delta
Upsilon; and Merrilyn Craggs
and Marry Mac Ward, Kappa
Alpha.
Chi O president Cathy Bennet
was named to Mortar Board for
her outstanding leadership and
scholarship. Pam Williams and
Brenda Hill were named as
cheerleading alternates, and
Brenda Hill is one of three
Military Ball Queen finalists.
SIGMA ALPHA
EPSILON Preparations are
being made for the SAEs formal
weekend Black and
White to be held on May 16.
Recent elections found these
men in the fraternitys
leadership positions for the
upcoming year: Ed Cimino,
president; Robert Flemming,
vice president; Keven Devey,
secretary; Wayne Nellums,
treasurer; and Lee Sasser,
correspondent.
New members of the Grand
Council are Gary Bayette, Kevin
Devey, Bob Glenn, and Fred
Johnson. p
PHI KAPPA TAU-During
their recent Dreamgirl weekend
the Phi Taus chose pinmate and
Little Sister Michelle Demeree as
their 1969 Dreamgirl.
The Phi Tau Silver Bullett,
designed by brothers Bill Weir
and Dana Kopher, won the most
original entry award in this
years Gator Gras soapbox
derby.
Phi Tau officers for the 1969
season include John Cosgrove,
president; Larry Handley, vice
president; Dave Simmons,
recording secretary; Denis White,
treasurer; Roger Harmon,
assistant secretary; Bob Garvin,

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pledge master; David Lampp,
corresponding secretary; and Jay
Heckler, alumni secretary and
poet laurete.
TRI DELTA Using the
Flintstones as their cartoon
character theme, Tri Delta won
the trophy for overall champions
of Sigma Chi Derby. Tri Delta
captured two first places after
two weeks of training under the
leadership of Derby Daddies,
Jerry Hoover, Jim Devenny and
Derby Baby Steve Hairston. The
Dec-A-Sig Trophy was awarded
to Tri Delta, as well as the title
of Sigma Chi Derby Queen to
their entry, Sharyn Keller.
Wald a Williamson was
selected to reign as this years
Engineering Fair Queen, and
Sharyn Keller was chosen to be
in the court. First runner-up this
years Miss Gator Gras Contest
also went to Walda.
Two Tri Deltas will help
compose next years varsity
Gator cheerleading squad. Susan
Englemann and Janis Biewend
have earned this honor.
Kathy Pierce and Janet
Brooker have been selected for
Army Sweethearts, while Jean
Thibault and Susan Englemann
have joined the ranks of Angel
Flight.
Sheryl Swan was chosen as
first runner-up in the Miss
International Contest, and Janet
Brooker brought home the
trophy as second runner-up in
the Miss University of Florida
Contest.
Kathy Young gained the Tri
Deltas state recognition by being
chosen Florida Citrus Queen.
Karin Ostlund and Walda
Williamson were selected as
members of the court.
Pi Kappa Alpha awarded
Susan Englemann the honor of
PIKE Sweetheart, and Dotty
McCurry was selected for the
court.
For fraternity little sister, the
KAs selected Nancy Carlin and
Judi Colbert. Kathie Hubener
was chosen by Delta Tau Delta
and Jan Ray for Phi Kappa Tau.
President Jan Dickens is the
newly elected president of
Savant. Jan was also recently
tapped for Mortar Board, along
with Joan Bradbury. Joan has
been elected as the upcoming
Mortar Board treasurer.
In Alpha Lambda Delta,
Kassy Beers will serve as
tra p irer and Mary Palmour as
hi' .orian for next year.

By MIKE SIMMONS
Entertainment Editor

With this quarter well under
way, the Tri Deltas are looking
forward to the busy weeks ahead
and especially Tri Delta
Weekend to be held May 9 and
10.
SIGMA NU-The Sigma
Nus elected a new commander,
Jim Clark, to succeed Dave
Cheshire for the 1969 calendar
year.
Lieutenant Commander Russ
Butler, injured in the fire, is
recovering nicely at his home in
Sarasota. He hopes to return to
Gainesville in the near future to
work on plans for a new house.
The Sigma Nus will build
their new house at their present
location. They are hoping that
the house will be completed by
the second or third quarter of
next year.
Congratulations are to be
extended to the Sigma Nu
tug-of-war team that took first
place at the matches during
Camigras.
The men of Sigma Nu would
like to extend their thanks to
Jay Gebheardt, Ike Ganey and
all the alumni who put in
many hours of hard work after
the fire.
DELTA CHI-Miss Debbie
Adams, an AOPi sorority
SAPs k
LITTLE SISTERS
OF MINERVA
CRUSH I
ATOs I
MALTESE MAULERS I
This Sun. afternoon
May 11 I
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member and a Delta Chi Little
Sister, was crowned Sweetheart
for 1969-70 at the annual White
Carnation Ball and Banquet last
weekend. Others receiving
recognition were Mark Baker,
best athlete; Rick Berard, best
pledge; Fred Leonhardt, best
brother; and Jim Almand and
Robert Fobes, outstanding
service to the fraternity.
The chapter initiated 7 new
brothers and 25 new Little
Sisters. Initiated as an honorary
Little Sister was Mrs. Donald
Mott, wife of the assistant dean
of men and a logic teacher at U
of F. Dean Mott became a Delta

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Friday, May 6, 1969. Tha Florida Alligator,

Chi brother last quarter.
Delta Chi was announced as
the winner of the IFCs Blood
Drive for Blue League and
overall number of pints. The
pledge class has painted the
Gainesville Boys Club. Plans are
now being made to institute a
"big brother system between
several ghetto children and
brothers in the house.

Page 19

B
h
I '
i j
V I ;
i.
{!'



Page 20

I, the Florida AlTigator, Friday, May a, iy&!r T

Gators Sail To Shipwreck Commodores

' By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
Its showdown weekend for
UFs baseball team.
The Gator nine is in
Nashville, Tenn., for a crucial
three-game Southeastern
Conference series with
Vanderbilt.
If the UF can take one of the
games, Coach Dave Fullers
squad will repeat as the SECs
Eastern Division champs and win
the right to face Western
Division winner Mississippi for
the conference crown.
Vandy, currently mired in the
Easts celler with a 3-9 record,
may appear an easy target for
the first place, 104 Gators, but
Fuller has cautioned his team
against overconfidence.
Vanderbilt has improved
constantly, he said, and they
have been playing good ball
against everyone lately.
Fullers respect for the
Commodores is shown by his
selection of mound ace Jim
Courier to start in the first game
of todays twilight
double-header. The senior
left-hander currently leads the
SEC with a 9l record and a
1.44 earned run average.
We want to win that first
game and get the pressure off,
Fuller said. The last thing we
want to do is fool around up

Top-Seed Gators Byed
In Rainy First Day Play

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
Armi Neely won the only UF
match played of the
rain-plagued Southeastern
Conference Tennis Tournament
Thursday in Baton Rouge, La.
All six Gator single players
and three doubles teams drew
first round byes because they
were seeded no. 1.
Neely was forced to play
Alabama's no. 1 player Steve
Bloomberg after Bloomberg won
his first match in the morning.
The UF All-American made
quick work of his opponent
winning in two straight sets 6-1,
6-2.
The tournament was delayed
several times during the
afternoon due to scattered
showers which persisted.
Seeding the entire Gator team
first came as a surprise to Coach
Bill Potter. Another surprise was
seeding all but one of the
Georgia team second.
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there and wind up with our
backs to the wall.
Regardless of the first games
outcome, Fuller will use either
Mike Jacobs or Glen Pickren in
the night encounter and follow
SEC Standings
, EASTERN
SEC ah Games
Florida 10-4 .714 23-13 .639
Tennessee 9-5 .643 19-15 .559
Auburn 7-8 .467 17-13 .567
Georgia 7-8 .467 13-12 .520
Kentucky 7-9 .438 15-19 .441
Vanderbilt 3-9 .250 19-15 .559
WESTERN
Mississippi 11-2 _846 21-10 .667
Miss. State 8-7 .533 17-10 .630
Alabama 6-8 .429 22-14 .611
LSU 3-11 .2J4 10-22 .313

The top-seeded Gators could
run into trouble though if any of
them should lose their first
round match. A team gets one
point for winning each match. If
a Gator wins his first match the
team gets two points, but if he
should lose the team gets
nothing.
According to the seeding the
final round play should be a dual
between UF and Georgia,
barring any upsets.
Not since the 19305, when
Tulande did it, has a team been
seeded no. 1 and taken the title.
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with Larry Sheffield Saturday.
Vandy will retaliate in one of
the encounters, probably the
second according to Fuller, with
the SECs strikeout artist,
Elliott Jones.
Jones, a righthander, has
fanned 83 batters in 86 innings
while compiling an B2 record
and a 1.77 ERA. He has shown
some wildness, as his 41 walks
attest, and last season he walked
nine and hit two in a contest
against the Gators.
The Vandy team, as a whole,
lacks experience with three
freshmen starting in the infield.
First baseman Jim Armistead is
the only upper classman and the
only Commodore hitting near
.300.
The Gators are cuttently
being paced at the plate by
outfielders Will Harman (.321),
Tony Dobies (.266) and Guy
McTheny (.293). First baseman
Skip Lujack is sticking at .300
even, as is third sacker Rod
Wright, and Tommy Blankenship
is at .367 since becoming a
regular at mid season.
Should the UF defeat Vandy,
the Gators will then travel to Ole
Miss next Wednesday for the
first game of a best-of-three
series to determine the SEC
championship. The second game
and the third, if needed, will be
played on Perry Field the
following Friday and Saturday.

Besides Neely the Gators
competing will be Charlie
Owens, Jamie Pressly, Steve
Beeland, Greg Hilley and Paul
Lunetta. The doubles teams are
Neely and Beeland, Hilley and
Owens, and Pressly and Lunetta.
Play will continue at the SEC
tournament today and Saturday.

ur THIS
STUDENT
discount r: 1 SAT.
CAR & DRIVER
$230
l St ANNUAL GATOR SPEED WEEKEND
FEATURING
% "run what 'cha brung" classes
SL Each UF entrant receives 2 points; 1 for every winning round- 3
points for class win
GIANT INDIVIDUAL CLASS TROPHIES ~
GIGANTIC ORGANIZATIONAL TROPHY
5fC BE THERE TO REPRESENT YOUR FRAT, SORORITY OR
ORGANIZATION
ALSO!! see full racing program with Fire Breathing Super
Stocks, Record Holding Stocks Chevy Gassers Modified
'orvettes Altereds
a-. ** t,mc ais
RA c E B s P B M 3O
3V2 Miles north of Municipal Airport on State 225 / **** 0.0 \J

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50 states plus
Spain,
Mexico, Italy, Canada, £ flBE| SHKjK
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Germany, Israel, HH|||H|\i/AQ|r iKir^
Egypt, Japan, Holland,
Czechoslovakia, Austria, ww <. :t
Poland, Switzerland,
ar c m 2 urE E1 Salvado interesting People?
THE FIOMDaTuIGATOR



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That's what TEP Sam Harris and Gator Bobby Downs thought as
each went up for Ira Pollack's pass during the TEP-Gator flag game
Tuesday. But both were wrong as the ball slipped from their hands to
be an incomplete pass.
Morton Sets Sights
on3rd Straight Win

UFs John Morton hopes to
join an elite group of former
Southeastern Conference track
greats next weekend when he
performs in the 37th annual SEC
track meet in Knoxville, Tenn.
Only three athletes have won
two events three consecutive
years since the conference meets
began in 1933. Olympic star
Glenn Hardin of LSU won the
440-yard dash and the low
hurdles in 1933, 34, 35; Millard
White of Tulane captured the
shot and discus in 1938, 39,40;
and Tulanes Paul Bienz swept to
victory in the 100 and 220 in
1948,49, 50.
Morton, a 6-5, 245-pound
senior from Miami won both the
shot and discus in 1967, 68 and
will be hoping for this third
consecutive dual win.
Morton recently set a new
school record in the discus with
a heave of 1894-1/2 at the
Texas Relays. He holds the SEC
record of 180-2 set in 1967.
It would be a great ending
Ejmm ~
MORTON
T puts the shot

to a great collegiate career if
John can capture the two events
at the SEC meet, said track
coach Jimmy Carnes. We are
hoping for the record breaking
performance from him in the
discus.
Mortons toughest
competition will come in the
shot. Currently he is ranked
fourth in the SEC with a toss of
54-7. Tennessees Chip Kell leads
the shot putters with a throw of
554-1/2, seven-and-a-half inches
further than Morton.
Four UF
Athletes
Honored
Four UF athletes have been
selected for inclusion in the
1969 edition of OUTSTAND OUTSTANDING
ING OUTSTANDING COLLEGE ATHLETES OF
AMERICA.
The four are football
All-American Larry Smith,
swimming All-American Andy
McPherson, track star Mike
Burton and tennis ace Jamie
Pressly.
Outstanding College Athletes
of America is sponsored by the
non-profit Outstanding
Americans Foundation. It is an
annual biographical compilation
featuring the accomplishments
of approximately 5,000 young
athletes who have proven
themselves outstanding in sports,
campus activites, and
curriculum.
Nominations for this awards
publication are made by the
athletic departments of colleges
and universities throughout the
country. Criteria for selection
includes an athlete s sports
achievements, leadership ability,
athletic recognition and
community service. Publication
date for the book will be July,
1969.

Christian Aims For Spot
On Bengals Backfield

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Tom Christian, Gator tailback
in the 1966-68 era, assessed his
chances of winning a position in
the Cincinnati Bengals backfield
this summer as the fans filed
into the Florida Field stands
prior to Tuesday nights
TEP-Former Gators game.
Christian signed a one-year
contract and received a bonus
for signing with the Bengals of
the NFL back in February.
Ive see Paul Robinson carry
the ball, and hes fantastic. While
I dont believe anyone can beat
him out, Ill just have to wait
and see what the rest of their
backfield looks like.
Robinson, who won the
National Football Leagues
Rookie of the Year title and the
NFL rushing title in a surprising
double-coup last fall, probably
has one of the starting cincy
running-back positions locked
up.
Christian wants the other.
1 should be fast
enough Ive done a 4.6 in the
40-yard dash and at 215
pounds I should be heavy
enough, said the muscular
Christian.
Passed-up in the January pro
draft, Christian had five teams
interested in obtaining his
ball-carrying services.
Since 1 didnt get stuck with
one team, the case had 1 been
chosen in the draft, 1 was able to
make my own deal, Christian
revealed.
Im very happy with the
contract, and am real anxious to
get to summer camp, he added.
The deeply-tanned tailback,
who romped for 513 yards and
four touchdowns on 112 carries
last fall, wilj report to the
Bengals rookie camp in
Wilmington, Ohio on July 12.
Hell be given a shot at the
setback position. The setback
lines up even with the fullback,
about three yards behind the
quarterback, in the pro-type
offensive alignment.
Gatorade Used
Virtually every National
Football League team now uses
the lemon-line flavored blend of
water, salts and glucose. Called
gatorade, it is consumed by
players on 12 pro baseball
squads, eight pro hockey teams,
II major league baseball units,
by more than 300 collegiate
teams and more than 1,500 hich
school squads.

Theta Chi Win Blue Tennis

Theta Chi advanced to within 80 points of the
Chi Phis in Blue League fraternity action as they
captured the Blue Tennis title with a 2-1 win
over Phi Gamma Delta.
Tom Richardson was the singles winner for
the Thetas as he defeated Bob Lightfoot 4-1,4-6,
4-2. James Dexter and Brian Goodheim won in
doubles 4-1,5-7,4-1.
The lonewinner for the FIJIs was Bob Tharin,
who won two easy sets 4-1,4-1.,
In Orange League action, the TEPs showed
the form that made them the number one
athletic house on campus this year as they

With All-American Larry
Smith as running-mate, Christian
ran for 713 yards and five
touchdowns in his three-year UF
career.
Last season when the Gators
went 6-3-1, the St. Petersburg
product racked opposing
defensive lines for 4.5 yards per
carry. This total was topped

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. . the line for a few extra yards
MVP West Backs
Teammate Wilt
NEW YORK (UPI) Jerry West, the MVP winner in a losing cause,
asks everybody to please get off Wilt Chamberlains back.
West made his special plea in behalf of his Los Angeles Laker
teammate Thursday upon receiving a new car from Sport Magazine for
being named the outstanding player in the National Basketball
Association playoffs between the Boston Celtics and the Lakers.
West tried every possible way he knew to convince his listeners that
Chamberlain was being unfairly criticized as a chronic loser.
I know a lot of people are calling Wilt a quitter and a loser, but
that is completely unfair, West said with all the earnestness he could
muster.
He contributed a whole lot to our team. People simply dont
understand him and when they make comments like that, 1 dont
appreciate them.
When it was suggested that West, who scored 42 points in the
Lakers 108-106 loss to the Celtics in the finale, was going out of his
was to defend Chamberlain, who had to leave the game near the end
with a leg injury, he emphatically denied that.
Im not trying to defend him, West said. Im only trying to tell
you what is so. We won more games this year with Wilt than we ever
did without him. He made an enormous contribution and anyone who
says hes responsible for what happened simply doesnt know what
hes talking about.
West brushed off his own selection as MVP in the final game as
almost insignificant.
Its probably the thing Ill be recoginzed more than for anything in
my career, he said. But Ive had better playoffs.

, Friday, May 9, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

stormed over SAE in tennis 3-0.
Jim Stark eased over Mark Hulsey 4-1,4-1 in
the toughest match of the day. Lee Viscount and
Alan Trumpkin stormed over Camden French
and Fred Johnson 4-1,4-1. Neil Levine and Bob
Rosenblatt also won easily over Bill Stephens and
Ander Crenshaw 4-0,4-2.
In track, the TEPs just barely got their entries
in one time. Pi Lam, Beta, AEPi, Lambda Chi
Alpha, and Kappa Sig werent so lucky. They will
receive no entry points in track. Orange and Blue
league softball starts Monday and Tuesday.

only by Smith, who rushed for
4.6 yards per carry.
Christians top game came
against Tulane last year. In a
tight battle with the lowly
Greenies, he showed power and
open-field speed in dashing for
two scores from more than 40
yards out. UF won, 24-3, in
jacking its record to 4-0.

Page 21

F



Page 22

: Thq Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9, 1969

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... signs prospect

Gators Prime Challengers
To Vol SEC Track Hopes

By Alligator Services
BIRMINGHAM, ALA The ten Southeastern
Conference track teams are priming themselves for
the 37th annual SEC Meet, which the University of
Tennessee hosts May 16-17, in various methods.
SEC champion Tennessee competes against Ohio
University and Kent State at Athens, 0. this
weekend while Kentucky participates in the Ohio
State Invitational at Columbus. Challenger LSU
hosts the Houston Striders at Baton Rouge while
Alabama faces Florida State at Tallahassee,
Vanderbilt visits neighboring Tennessee Tech in
Cookeville and Georgia tangles with traditional rival
Ga. Tech in Atlanta.

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Indiana All-Star Heads South

By Alligator Services
The UF has signed high
scoring guard Tony Miller of
Garrett, Ind., to a basketball
scholarship Gator Basketball
Coach Tommy Bartlett
announced today.
Bartlett announced Thursday
the signing of 6-foot-7 West
Palm Beach Junior College wing
player Earl Finley.
Miller scored 1,321 points in
three varsity seasons, capping his
career with 545 points this past
season, 54 in one game.
Tony is an excellent ball
handler and an outstanding
outside shooter, Bartlett said.
His quickness and size make

Auburn, UF, Ole Miss and Mississippi State have
all left Saturday open to allow injuries to heal and
to concentrate on the spots where a little
improvement can score unanticipated points for
them.
Tennessee is expected to win the SEC
championship for the sixth straight time, with UF,
runnerup for the past two seasons, the chief
challenger. LSU could break in as the leading
challenger, with Auburn and Alabama also pushing
for a spot at the top. Kentucky and Ole Miss are
stronger than last year, and possibly Georgia. MSU
and Vanderbilt have improved since the season
started.

GATORS SIGN TWO CAGERS
1

him difficult to defend against.
Miller, who was a four-sport
athlete in high school, narrowed
his choice to come to the UF
from over 100 college offers.
Finely, who averaged 18.1
points a game last year and 15
rebounds for WPBJC will enter
the UF in September and will be
eligible to compete next season.
Earl has developed since he
left high school, Barlett said.
He is now a player we think has
the capability to play in the
Southeastern Conference.
The Gators lost a pair of wing
players, Boyd Welsh and Mike
McGinnis, off this years team
and Finley is considered to be a

key prospect to fill the vacancy
at wing.
Earl should be a big help to
us next season, Bartlett said.
Hes a good all-around
basketball player who can shoot
very well.
Finley and Millers signings

Two UFers Hall Os Famers

All-American Guy Dennis and
7-foot-0 high jumper Ron
Jourdan of the UF have both
been nominated to the Pensacola
Sports Association Hall of Fame.

Climb aboard
/The S.S. Winnjammer h
Y : Luncheons served from 11:00 A.M.
ff Dinners to 12:00 P.M. jJ
BcrniC Shor at the Organ \\
on r)
Thursday, Friday & Saturday \j\
Oysters & Clams on the half shell
Michelob on draft m?
Steaks and Seafoods our specialty ul
Cocktail Lounge til 2:00 A.M. r|
Reservations accepted
1 I Harry M. Lanton, Manager VA/
Closed Sundays

mark the fifth and sixth players
Bartlett has signed for next year.
Previously signed include
Mark Thompson, Mt. Pleasant,
Ohio; Bill Nagel, Bellevue, Ky.;
Tim FLetcher, Evansville, Ind.;
and Ken Van Ness, Seminole
High of St. Petersburg.

Dennis, an offensive guard
the past three years for the
Gators, is a native of Walnut Hill
outside Pensacola. Jourdan went
to Pensacola Senior High and is a
junior at UF.



UFGA Open Golf Tourney
Honors Departing Rehling

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
An open golf tournament
honoring departing UF golf
course professional Conrad
Rehling is scheduled for
Saturday, May 17, at the UF
course.
The 18-hole Calloway format
tournament is open to all UF
students, faculty and club
members.
Sponsored by the UF Golf
Association, the tournament will
feature the awarding of trophies
to winners, plus a gift ceremony
honoring the veteran Rehling.
Rehling leaves the UF this

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summer to assume golf coaching
duties at the University of West
Florida in Pensacola.
An outstanding instructor,
Rehling sent former UF link
stars Doug Sanders, Frank Beard
and Tommy Aaron into the pro
ranks while UF golf coach.
Buster Bishop became Gator
golf coach when Rehling stepped
up to the newly-created pro
position in 1963, the year UF
bought the course.
An entry fee of $2.00 plus
greens fees for non-members of
the club, will be required.
Players should make their own
foursomes, and call the pro shop

for assignment of starting times.
Tee-off times will be from
8-11:30 a.m. Players must be
signed up before May 11.
Players without partners will
be assigned to foursomes on the
day of the tournament. They
should still call for a starting
time before May 11.
A Long Night
The longest 0-0 night game in
baseball history was finally won
1-0 by the Houston Astros over
the New York Mets in the 24th
inning in 1968.

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SAND IN YOUR SHOES
Roy Brewer, FIJI, takes the long jump event in the annual Orange
... and Blue fraternity track meet. Brewer, from a Blue league house, was
the winner over all competition with a jump of 20-feet-9%.

Friday, May 9,1969, The Florida Alligator,

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Mustaches are in ... theyre
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Blonde or Brown 7.95.
Maas Toiletries

Page 23



Page 24

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, May 9, 1969

jliiP 1
An Arby's Never Goes To Waist fauovl \
% f m.
PLAYER of the WEEK
of Arbys* 1968. Arbys ..
'STOP!
Mike Ovca textbooks textbooksm,Re
m,Re textbooksm,Re wvca NEW AND USED
sgfc ARCHITECTURAL
Perhaps baseball captain Mike Ovca needs to get EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES
JflfelfiiSlr beaned every now and then. He celebrated his return to *pj ri ipni irr
the Florida lineup following such an accident by AKI rH.ltb
f) slamming six hits in eight trips against Auburn last
(k&a weekend. STUDY LAMPS
For this feat Ovca has been named as Alligator Player
f ee < s P*' t against Auburn on the road was a GYM OUTFITS
key win for the Gators as they nudge closer to the SEC
Eastern title. One win in the last three conference games SWEATSHIRTS
will sew up the championship.
Ova was beaned in the Kentucky game April 19, COLLEGE PETS
missed several contests and since his return has managed
/mlkn'l%Fvl KroSt eight hits in his 12 trips to the plate, raising his batting I CflC CCA I
it* average from 210 to 253 for the season COLLEGE SEAL
£sM?h\~| John Morton and Woody Bozelle, double winners CT AT| AMCD Y
pl;l against FSU in track last Saturday were also strong rf\f\o\~\J Ijl Ml Iv/ntlv
_|3| : |: -rfe\j:H3S I candidates for the Player of the Week honors this week. ___ ___ _
yg | | FILM AND DEVELOPING
NOW
PHi ON SALE AT BOOKSTORE
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a^^SSs M uBTE S R B R 0 A 0 N K EA T N 0 a E RcuL BRANCH STORES-MEDICAL CENTER, BROWARD,
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