Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Report Condemns Proposed Budget Request Cut

(EDITORS NOTE: The following is the second
in a series of investigative articles on the UF budget
and the state legislative.)
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The Budget Commissions recommended 15 per
cent cut on UFs $217 million budget request would
place the school in an impossible situation.
UFs Business Manager William E. Elmore asked
the Board of Regents, in a detailed analysis of the
recommended cuts effect, to work for restoration
of the requested budget.
Included in the analysis were comments from UF
President Stephen C. OConnell; Dr. Samuel P.
Martin, former provost of the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center; E. T. York, Jr., provost of the Institute of
Food and Agricultural Sciences; and Robert E.
Uhrig, dean of the College of Engineering.

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 130

jk nirflUlMil
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bL ;Bk ~ ....
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iSS.
THE CIRCUS IS COMING!
FSU's flying circus is coming to town. Sponsored by Gator Loan
Fund, the 45-act show will be held at the UF May 17. Proceeds from
the show will be donated to student financial aid where every $1
contributed will be matched by $9 from the federal government.

Focus, Student Senate
Minority Group Formed

BY DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
A minority party has been formed in the Student
Senate whose program and legislation will be aimed
at giving the constituents a piece of the action.
Marvin Sylvest, instrumental in forming the
group, which will be known as Focus Party, said
eight senators are now members and there will be a
continuing push for new members.
Sylvest said the group was formed because of the
past failure of victorious political parties to
communicate with die Student Body.

The
Florida Alligator

LIBRARIES NEED GREATEST

! DEPTH REPORT j
$ ?
The most urgent of all the UFs requests
OConnell said, is the restoration of the sum
budgeted to the libraries.
The UF libraries are in 39th place on dollars
spent for books compared to the institutions of the
Association of Research Libraries.
It is the sad fact, OConnell said, that several
science departments, after paying for their journals,
have had virtually no funds for the purchase of
books.
Because of the dramatically-increasing use of the
computer and the resulting increase in cost,

We are not an anti-First Party group, but rather
a group of students interested first in the wishes of
the student body when proposing legislation or
voting on any issues, Sylvest said.
I feel they had their program planned out when
the campaign began and did not make an organized
effort to find out what the student felt. This was
probabley true ot all the candidates, he said.
Sylvest was a supporter of Issue Party's John
Mica in the recent presidential campaign and one of
the members of the new party is Linda Markus,the
only candidate elected to the Senate under that
(SEE 'SMALL* PAGE 2)

University of Florida, Gainesville

ACKELL ASSUMES POSITION
Health Center Provost
Position Approved

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Editorial Assistant
The Board of Regents
Monday, meeting in Tallahassee,
approved the appointment of
Dr. Edmund Ackell as new
provost of UFs huge, $26
million J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.
Ackell, 43, will take over July
1 from the current provost, Dr.
Samuel P. Martin, who resigned
his $38,000 a year job last
November in the face of
legislative and State Budget
Commission apathy over a lack
of operating funds for the
381-bed Shands Teaching
Hospital, a unit of the Health
Center.
The appointment was
announced Monday by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell.
Ackell is currently dean of the
new College of Dentistry, which
is due to open with a class of 40
students in September, 1971.
I am highly optimistic about
the whole future of the Health
Center, Ackell told the
Alligator. 1 anticipate no
operating budget problems. We
will have a viable annual
budget.
Ackell has been instrumental
in the Health Center $33 million

increases in expenses for instruction and research
are one of the most pressing problems in the
recommended budget, OConnell said.
The present computer is running at capacity
24-hours-a-day and a new machine, to be instafled in
June, is estimated to reach capacity in two years.
There are three reasons for the increase:
An increase in quantified research.
t The uses of the computer in instruction.
The need for teaching computer theory, design
and use.
Salaries for deans, OConnell said, are out of
line with faculty salaries and make it difficult to
recruit deans from among the ablest facuty.
The Board of Regents salary figures are very
conservative and the Budget Commissions figures
are \quite inadequate, he said.
Health Center Provost Sam Martin said the
College of Dentistry received relatively solid support
(SEE 'BUDGET' PAGE 2)

jV si
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HH- S^HH
DR. EDMUND ACKELL
... takes over July 1
expansion program, presently
before the legislature. The state
must furnish $12.7 million in
matching funds. The rest will
come from federal
appropriations.
He said he has been almost
assured by the legislatures
appropriations committees that
the state funds will be pushed
through.
It is highly unlikely that the
Health Center will face such
extreme financial crises which
plagued its operation a little
more than a year ago, Ackell
said. New elements in the
legislature due to
reapportionment have so far
accounted for a new health care
awareness among legislators, he
noted.
When Martin resigned he
placed some of the blame for the
lack of funds with our relations
with Tallahassee. The Health
Center, almost since its
conception, has been bothered
by poor state financial support.
Last year, the Shands
Hospital went through a two and
a half month money crisis, in
which departments were unable
to buy needed medicines and
equipment, without prior
permission. A supplemental

America's
Number I
Collage
Daily

Tuesday, May 6, 1969

/ am highly optimistic
about the whole future of
the Health Center. I
anticipate no operating
budget problems. We will
have a viable annual
budget.
Edmund Akell
.....vw..w.w^Ay.^.v/w.v.v.w. 1
budget request in May was
finally pushed through the
budget commission.
Again this year the Health
Center was forced to ask for
additional funds due to
improper funding at the
beginning of the current fiscal
year. Another crisis was
impending, but the budget
commission came through in
February with the needed
money.
Ackell has been on the UF
faculty since August, 1966, and
is (me of the top dental surgeons
in the nation. He holds both a
medical and a dental degree.
The regents Monday also
approved the appointments of
three department chairmen.
They are:
Dr. Egbert Krispyn, UF
professor of Germanic languages,
appointed the chairman of ttfe
new Department of Germanic
and Slavic Languages and
Literature.
t Dr. James Hamilton
Schaub, associate dean, College
of Engineering, West Virginia
University, chairman of civil
engineering.
j t Dr. Jerome H. Modell,
associate professor, University of
Miami School of Medicine,
chairman of anesthesiology.



i iiu i tin wf/Tuwytty # Jvltty

Page 2

SIOO Million Dormitory Fund Drive Proposed

TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The Board
of Regents heard a proposal Monday to
hire a professional fund-raising firm to
conduct a drive for SIOO million in
private donations and approved in
principle a plan for leasing new
dormitories from private interests.
The Regents also were told a
screening committee hopes to have
recommendations for the June 6
meeting in Miami on the appointment
of presidents for the new state
universities in Dade and Duval counties
and possibly for FSU.

State To Investigate
Fire At Pore Boys

fire officials have
called the State Fire Marshals
office to assist in the
investigation of a fire at Larrys
Pore Boy Sandwich Shop, 1029
West University Avenue,
Thursday morning.
According to a preliminary
investigation of the scene,
officials stated the fire was
definitely set by persons
unknown.
The fire started in the kitchen
area of the shop and damages to
the building were estimated at
SCAT Cancels
Weekly Meeting
The Student Center Action
Team (SCAT) meeting for
tonight at 7 has been cancelled
due to the Tep-Gator football
game.
Another meeting will be
scheduled for next week.

Small Minority Party
Organized In Senate
FROM PA6t OWt j[ i
banner.
This is not a Mica group however, Sylvest said. We want to pull
our support from all segments and are not concerned with who
someone supported in the campaign.
The first project of Focus Party will be the establishment of a
legislative reference bureau to provide students with information on
pending bills before the Senate.
Sylvest said Focuss program and legislation will come after ideas
have been gathered from the area councils and from as many students
as can be contacted.
Orientation for new senators will be held tonight at 8:15 and
caucuses of First and Focus parties will be at 8:45. The Senate will
convene at 9 in Room 349 of the Reitz Upjon.
University Police Chief A.I. Shuler will speak to the senate on
campus disorders.
Senate President Jack Vaughn will be up for re-election to the post.
He said he had heard rumors of opposition but had not heard of
anyone planning to run against him.
SCAT Error Corrected
A story on the Alligator Monday incorrectly reported that
Project SCAT was collecting quarters throughout the campus to
support the Activity Center campaign.
While the SCAT committee is still collecting funds from
student organizations, the campus stomp for quarters ended last
Friday.
! We regret the error.
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
* July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Atugator Will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Adust Using, Manager within (1) one day after the
appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Screening Committee Chairman Louis
Murray of Orlando said after the
meeting the name of Secretary of State
Tom Adams has been submitted for
consideration in the Dade County post
but, I dont know whether hed take
it.
He said the list of names for the
Dade presidency was down to about
four or five and final interviews of the
candidates will be set up beginning next
week.
Adams has been rumored as a
potential candidate for all three

$4,000 and to contents at,
$3,000.
Posts Open
On Seminole
The newly elected editors of
the 1970 Seminole said Monday
that applications for next years
Seminole staff are now being
* accepted.
Ken Driggs, editor, and Jim
Okula, managing editor, said the
staff is being reorganized and
almost all positions are open.
The editors are looking for
students who can work for any
amount of time, Driggs said.
Applications may be picked
up in the Student Publications
office in the Reitz Union.
Students should report to the
Seminole office from 2:30 to 5
p.m. daily to be interviewed by
the editors.

REGENTS HEAR PLAN

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* UPD OFFICER OF THE YEAR
... annual award sponsored by UF athletic department

V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V. .%V.VV.V.V.\V.V.V,V.V.V.V.V. AV.V. A\V. .V.V.V, .V.V.V.'. , .V.Vi .V.V.V. .Vi .ViV. , .!. , .V.V.V.
EDUCATORS REQUEST RESTORATION
.
Budget Faces Cut-Back

Efroh page one
and the Shands Teaching Hospital situation was
considerably improved in the Budget Commissions
proposals.
Otherwise, the Colleges of the Health Center
fared poorly.
The critical deficiencies in the Budget
Commissions recommendations, Martin said, are
faculty salaries, new faculty, residents and interns
salaries, registered nurse salaries and new positions
at the Teaching Hospital.
Agriculture Provost E.T. York said less than half
of the requested staff were recommended by the
commission.
We have less expense money per individual
faculty member, York said, than we had 10 years
ago, in spite of spiraling prices and increasing cost at

rj^a-tuyi
Luxury Living in a Secluded Surrounding
Now accepting Applications
for Fall Quarter
2919 S.W. 13th St. ~ 372-2200

vacancies but has denied interest. He is a
likely candidate for governor next year.
Regent Fred Parker of Tallahassee
said he hoped all three vacancies could
be filled at the June meeting.
Walter L. Darling, president of the
Chicago-based Walter L. Darling Corp.,
proposed the fund drive, which would
last for three years.
Regent Jack Behringer of Fort
Lauderdale worked up the proposal
with Darling at the request of Gov.
Claude Kirk to look into other options
in fund-raising.

Darling said Floridas public
universities derive only minimal funds
from private donations, while state
universities elsewhere have been able to
raise substantial funds from the private
sector.
The application of private funds can
make the difference between a good and
a great system, Darling said.
His proposal, which was referred to a
committee for study, provided a fee
schedule which Darling said would
amount to about SIOO,OOO per year,
plus expenses.

every level of operation.
The need for additional staff positions in all areas
of the UF is based on the fact that universities now
come under the Federal Wage and Hour Law. The
.UF must increase wages by 15 cents per hour each
year until it reaches the minimum wage.
The UF must either increase the staff or pay
existing staff for overtime services. If the requests in
these areas are not restored, administrative services
must be set back and essential services denied.
Two areas of the budget werent included in the
analysis sent to the Board of Regents auxiliary
enterprises and contracts and grants. Auxiliary
enterprises includes dorms, debt services and
working capital.
The Budget Commission doesnt recommend
decreases or increases in either of these areas since
its assumed they cant operate unless they can earn
the money.

UPD Award
Goes To Lee
UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves, right, preseite a plaque
to Jessie H. Lee, 31, in
recognition of his selection as
UPD officer of the year. The
annual award is being sponsored
by the UF athletic department
and the winner will serve as the
UPD liasion to the athletic
department during football
season.
Lee has been a member of the
UPD for three years and
graduated from the Military
police Academy, Fort Gordon,
Ga. He is a native of Live Oak
and was a member of the United
Nations Honor Guard, Korea
prior to joining the UPD.



Fraulein Ruth Loves Life At The Rathskeller

(EDITORS NOTE: The
following interview was written
before the Rathskellers April 30
decision to abolish frauleins.
Salaries for the girls caused too
much of a burden on the Rats
budget. Several frauleins will be
retained, however, to act as
hostesses rather than waitresses.
Unfortunately, guys, Miss
Hoodwin isnt one of them.)
By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Features Editor
Scurrying behind the counter
to fill up bowls of popcorn and
wash out beer steins on the tag
end of a hectic T.G.I.F.
(Thankgoditsfriday) party at the
Rathskeller, well-tanned quick
smiling Fraulein Ruth Hoodwin
collapsed briefly at the end of a
long table.
Loud clapping and boisterous
singing reach across the
darkened cozily large room.
Fraulein Ruth looks toward the
performer on stage.
She closes her eyes a second,
listens to the sounds, and
murmurs, Oh, I like that song.
An instant later she looks at
you full-faced, searching out
your eyes while at the same time
checking on the goings on
around her. Then Fraulein Ruth
telling you about her job
and the crazy things and people
shes run into (sometimes
literally) while working at the
Rat.
You shoould have been here
last Friday! Hear that 50ng....?
Well last week everybody was
singing and clapping and because
the tables were all cleared out
for a dance that night people
got up and started dancing!
Some of the Frauleins started
a polka and soon the whole Rat
was doing a hora, an Israeli folk
dance, she said.
It was nil kind of
spontaneous thats what I love
about working here, she said.
Fraulein Ruth, a senior in
anthropology, is a hostess and a
member of the special
committee of five who selects
new Frauleins. She, as all 25
Frauleins, works about 15 hours
a week on the average.
Its kind of an honor to be a
Fraulein, now, you know? Miss
Hoodwin said. We look for
special qualities, she explained.
These Fraulein
characteristics are warmth,
genuine friendliness and

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'ALL KIND OF SPONTANEOUS

spontaneity.
As a hostess, Miss Hoodwins
responsibilities include seating
customers at tables, keeping
track of reservations, and
generally making sure that things
are running smoothly.
But she doesnt hostess all the
time.
You end up doing whatever
needs to be done, Miss
Hoodwin said.
They keep wanting to be set
up. Keep filling them up, one
of the Frauleins was telling the
bartender behind the counter.
Short on steins and short on
dishwashers, Fraulein Ruth
hurried behing the bar and
started washing out the steins
that had accumulated.
Hey, Ruth, please fill up
some popcorn for me, another
Fraulein asked.
People keep piling in and
suddenly you become conscious
of the singing and clapping
across the room.
Did I tell you about the
stein trick that our Austrian
friend Hans showed us? she
asked, returning to the table,
while glancing across the room
at some customers.
Grabbing a nearby stein
firmly by the handle, with one
hand she whipped it around her
back. With a wrist flip of a
special sort she swung the stein
around her head like a lasso and
swiftly and deftly put it in the
chug-a-lug position ready for
gulping.
But the trick doesnt always
go so well, she chuckled.
I was showing it to this guy
who was celebrating his 22nd
birthday and well you see how
it has this tendency to tip near
the back... .But he was a good
sport, she related.
Thats another thing I love
about working here we
practically never get a rough time
from the customers. Thats
because were the same age as
most of them and we treat them
like we like to be treated,
Fraulein Ruth said.
And with students as their
bosses, the Frauleins are
encouraged and do make a lot of
suggestions about running things
at the Rat. And the management
usually acts on their ideas.
lts great to see all the
improvements and changes since
we opened in January. And the
Frauleins really make the
atmosphere, she said.

We do a lot of things
spontaneously like singing
before groups and tricks things
that become part of the Rat.
Miss Hoodwin graduates in
anthropology in August and
plans to enter graduate school at
the Hebrew University in Israel
in October.
lts kind of ironic you
know? A Jewish girl working in
a German beer hall to earn
money to go to Israel! she
blurted.
Its really great to do things
you love, she said,;serious f r a
moment.
Fraulein Ruth explained that
she used to be a bookworm of
sorts. She studied aU the time to
maintain her almost 3.5
average.
Last summer, on a spur-of
the-moment decision, she upped
and went to Israel.
I learned more in the three
months I was there than in my
whole education.
And during the past year,
especially since the Rat opened
in January, she discovered her
love of communicating with
people.
As a Fraulein, Miss Hoodwin
is a friend to those who come in
without friends and a smiling,
cheerful personality in a largely
faceless campus.
A professor with losened tie
and grinning, slightly reddened
face follows a Fraulein up to the
bar with his partys check in
hand.
We had a great time, he
said to Fraulein Ruth as she got
up to take care of the check.
And, oh, add 10 per cent for
the ladies.
Thank you very much, she
said, beaming.
Vinos/
Excellence in Food

H H Hi Hi Hi Hi H Hi H H' M M H H H Hi Hi H
| Six ways to say j
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T.G.I.F. was over. Frauleins
were rushing around taking
orders for dinner and the bus
boys were clearing off empty
steins and popcorn bowls.
Come back and see us again,

9BR Hi
ibk| W 1
s*£ Yft'*%?o, j y£t% \ k-W
. v \
m
* _.* i^BF
~ .3B AAaMKlflii* H^^B
: -y x. JmomulW JK
' 4JlKa^%dKi
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H9g£|| j
, -__ ___,, PHIL COPE
ONE LAST SMILE
... Ruth Hoodwin remembers fun as Rathskeller fraulein

Now Taking Applications
at
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1700 S. W. 16th Ct.
for
September
(9-10 & 12 month Leases)
rates start
1 BR sl2l
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Tuesday, May 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

soon, she said.
And she sat down and started
figuring out work schedules,
checking over her reservations
list, and waving and smiling to
departing friends.

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Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 6,1969

Alumni Clubs
Honored Here
UF alumni clubs in
Hillsborough, Leon, Putnam and
Collier counties were recognized
for significant achievements
during 1968 at the Alumni
Associations annual spring
meeting on campus Saturday.
William O.E. Henry of
Bartow, 1968 president of the
association, said appropriate
awards will be presented to club
officials later this year.

SERVICE GROUP DOWN TO ll

Lack Os Members Dogs APhiOs

By DIANE FINE
Alligator Correspondent
William B. Bedard, president
of Alpha Phi Omega a service
fraternity, admits that his
organization has had some hard
luck.
Since its reactivation. last
spring, the Florida chapter of
APhiO has been dogged by
problems, Bedard said.
The worst problem of all, he
noted, is the lack of members.
The chapter has 11 brothers.
We stress service, said
Bedard, who is also an RA at
North Hall.
We dont contribute money
to worthy causes. We contribute
ourselves.
He gave some examples of the
fraternitys service projects.
In the afternoon, APhiO
mans the information booth at
the campus entrance.
APhiO put in the new paths
by the Reitz Union duck pond.
The fraternity and its sister
group, the Phiettes, are helping
UF convert the Maijorie Kinnan
Rawlings home in Cross Creek to
a museum.
The Phi-ettes are also working
with brain-damaged children at
the Med Center.
Bedard said the club has
ambitious plans for the future.
Next year, APhiO will take
over the Student Book
Exchange.
The fraternity is also
considering an Operation:
College Bound.
Our project will be different
from the one the university had
this year, the president said.
We want to reach high
Bilingual Teachers
The University of California is
coo perating with a
Spanish-speaking community
organization and secondary
schools to establish a teacher
education center in the Mission
district of San Francisco.
The center, which will recruit
and prepare bilingual teachers,
will respond to some of the
patricular educational needs of a
large number of Spanish-speak Spanish-speaking
ing Spanish-speaking students. Leaders of the
program hope the Mission
district center will become a
model for training bilingual
teachers and teacher aides.
VETERANS
Be a commercial pilot!
NEW G. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Area's only ipp roved school

DROPOUTS
v therehasn'tbeen K-inlsteap" DFA 1
wTu* Horizon for months, try a orounp
Ijpj|f%- y TO A P/.ANE.
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school students who are
qualified to go to college but
dont think they can.
We want to show them that
anyone can go to school if he
really wants to.
Its pretty ambitious for a
working staff of 10 or 11,

For guys who work night shifts
apill for the day shift.
Nothing can kill a day like a hard night.
Yet every campus has its nocturnal heroes
dedicated to the art of playing it cool.
you a little food for thought. B
can buy without a prescription. And its not xT
With a couple of NoDoz,
workers of the night can fight
M*.
*
>. -- ... ... ... -s, : .... .v.',
I ..... 4 -
*

Bedard admitted.
Lack of manpower, he said, is
the crux of the matter.
Were in competition with
Circle K and Gamma Beta Phi,
the other service clubs, for the
service-oriented people on
campus.

BY HOWARD POST
*~ e i* k, J ~2 S'
mmi STEAK SPECIAL
LONDON BROIL
I 1225 W UNIVERSITY AVI L
Vi BiOCK FROM CAMPUS



Congressional Members Seek FortasResignation

WASHINGTON
(UPI) Members of Congress
called on Abe Fortas Monday to
resign his Supreme Court seat or
answer questions raised by his
acceptance of a research fee
from the family foundation of
an imprisoned financier.
Rep. H.R. Gross, R-lowa,
demanded the initiation of
impeachment proceedings
against Fortas if he does not
resign, but there was no
indication that the House would
act on his proposal. Only one
Supreme Court justice has ever
been impeached, and the Senate

Blacks Occupy University

By United Press International
Gov. John J. McKeithen of
Louisiana called out the
National Guard Monday and
vowed to use whatever force is
required to end an occupation
by Negro students of offices of
Southern University in New
Orleans.
About 250 young Negroes
were arrested outside the
Alabama capitol in Montgomery
when they refused to disperse
after demanding the resignation
of the president of Alabama
State College.
New York City police
arrested 10 students who
blocked gates at Pratt Institute
in downtown Brooklyn. Defiant
protesters kept a blockade
clamped on City College of New
York.
Arsonists and vandals struck
at several college campuses
across the nation.
McKeithen said black
students had taken over the
administration building,
registrars office, personnel

Czechs Celebration
Defies Official Order
PILSEN, Czechoslavakia (UPI) Riot police Monday night
dispersed citizens of this beer-brewing city who displayed American
flags in defiance of official orders to tone down ceremonies marking
the 24th anniversary of its World War II liberation by the U.S. Army.
Several persons were taken away in a police car, including a young
worker who unfurled a large American flag.
The force of riot police, about 100 men wearing steel helmets,
advanced into the crowd with two water cannon trucks.
For two hours a crowd of several thousand people had placed tiny
American paper flags and spring flowers on a grassy square where a
partly finished monument to U.S. soldiers was tom down by the
Stalinist Communist regime in the 19505.
The police ripped out the American flags but left Czechoslovak
banners, flowers and pictures of Tomas Masaryk and Eduard Benes,
the founders of pre-Communist Czechoslavakia.
Authorities were seeking to play down the American role in the
liberation in the official anniversary ceremonies.
r

In th Village Gata

XSlmfei*
Jen)#

failed to convict him.
Sen. Jack Miller, R-lowa, also
called for Fortas resignation.
Sen. Carl T. Curtis, R-Neb., said
it was shocking news that
Fortas accepted a fee of
$20,000 three months after he
went on the bench.- He
proposed a code of ethics for the

office, business office and
switchboard of the New Orleans
branch of predominantly Negro
Southern University.
The governor ordered out
500 guardsmen, placed another
750 on standby alert, but said he
would recall the guard if some
300 students ended their
takeover.
Were going to maintain
control of our college campus,
he said. Were not going to have
a Cornell in Louisiana.
The arrests at the foot of the
Alabama capitol came when the
youths refused a police order
that they break up and leave.
The demonstrators, offering
no resistance, were herded into a
large, wire-enclosed trade which
made three trips from the
capitol to the police station.
Some 200 Negro and Puerto
Rican students defied orders of
the New York Board of Higher
Education and continued to
block entrances to the CCNYs
south campus, which has been
closed for nearly two weeks.
Some classes resumed on the

OR JUSTIFY ALLEGATIONS

Supreme Court similar to one
adopted by the Senate.
From Fortas, who took his
regular post when the Supreme
Court handed down decisions
Monday, there was no further
word beyond the mimeographed
statement he issued Sunday
saying he returned the fee from

colleges north campus but it
appeared most classes were
cancelled due to the failure of
instructors to show up.
The Board of Higher
Education had bowed to a court
order in directing that the
campus be reopened.
CARCABAS
FLORIST AND GIFTS
FLOWERS AND CANDIES
BY WIRE
CARCABA
613 N.W. 16th AVE. fig*
327-3609 V

The blade.
Whatever else theyve done to
it, one thing hasnt changed.
Its still straight.
And your face still isnt.
Its round.
The new Norfelco Triple Tripleheader
header Tripleheader gets around this problem.
We put our unique rotary
blades into three floating heads that
follow your face by going in where
your face goes in. And out where your
face goes out.
This wayThe new .Norelco
gets close enough to shave you as
close or closer than a blade. As found

Its been single-edged,double-edged,
banded, injectored, plastic-coated,
and now electro-coated.
* V
But its still straight.

1969 North American Philips Corporation. 100 East 42nd Street, New York, N.Y. 10017

the foundation headed by Louis
Wolfson, now serving a one year
prison term for stock market
manipulation.
Fortas said the payment was
for research functions, studies
and writings, and was returned
when he found no time to
undertake the assignment.
Most of Fortas congressional
critics were Republicans, but
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy,
D-Mass., called on the Senate
Judiciary Committee to make

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in two out of three shaves in an inde independent
pendent independent lab test.
And you get a comfortable
shave because the Norelco floating
heads curve with your chin, bend with
your neck, and even straighten out for
flr

Tuesday, May 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

itself available to Fortas if he
wanted a public forum to answer
the allegations published in Life
Magazine. Life said Fortas
waited 11 months before
returning the fee, which it said
amounted to $20,000.

Now Leasing
FREDRICK GARDEN
APARTMENTS
1130 S. W. 16th Ave. 372 755 b

your cheeks. Automatically. And with without
out without a nick, pull or scrape.
The new Norelco has a hidden
trimmer that pops out for sideburns,
and a push button for easy flip-top
cleaning. It also comes in a recharge rechargeable
able rechargeable model that gives almost twice as
many shaves per charge as any other
rechargeable.
We cant seeyou changing
the shape of your face.
But we can see you changing
to Ndrelco.
Norelco
you cant get any closer

Page 5



; Tn Florida AHigator;Tue3day,-MayS,l9S9-

Page 6

The Florida Alligator

\*\ /
PiO/kiiuA/
All
AmJMJM

The Dissenter

Capital Rules

The defenders of the faith of capitalism and its consequent ethos
are somethimes illogical, sometimes fanatical and an invariably blind
lot. They scream and rant and rave about the virtues of free enterprise
while damning the left and sucking out the life blood of their black,
white, brown and yellow brothers.
Does it fail to strike the staunch supporters of capitalism as odd
that the people on the bottom of the hierarchy do not parade around
extolling the virtues of their oppressors, i.e., the corporations and the
great middle class?
This seeming incongruity does not seem to make a dent in the
assertion that laissiez-faire means freedom. Freedom, yes freedom.
Workers in the captialist system are free to work for a living until they
drop. They are free to produce more and more goods from which they
derive no benefit. The benefit accrues to those who put forth no labor
at all.
The concept of freedom has come to mean the freedom to exploit
labor and life by any m&ans whatsoever, so long as it is economically
productive. How is a man to be free to develop his talents, his
capabilities, his humanity, if he must continually produce for the
market?
And what of the economically well off, the oppressed and the
oppressing vast middle class? Our culture has become permeated with
the ideology of the material as the ultimate good, to which all must be
sacrificed. What does a man want out of life? A new car every two
years, a color TV. We are told that to be happy we must consume
more and more. We are free, free to spend more, want more, buy
more more more. The ethos of the tin commodity has corrupted and
defiled our humanity.
The fundamental misconception of this ethos is that capital should
employ labor. We have been persuaded that capital is real, something
to which we must subordinate ourselves. We deify it glorify it, and
worship at its temple. Thus man has become alienated from his labor
and himself.
The worker is producing not for the furtherance of his positive
value, but for the accumulation of capital which is returned as profit
to the owners of the means of production or is placed into
production of more goods. Accordingly, the worker has become
subjugated and is producing not for himself, but for things.
As for the appeal to rationality and individual property rights so
often inveighed by the apologists for capitalism, it is the argument of
a blind man or a fool.
Man is not an essentially rational animal; he is quite capable of
hate, discrimination, and of cutting his brothers throat. And when
property rights are valued above human considerations, cut his
brothers throat, he will.
We have become* isolated beings striving for individual gain, having
no sense of community with our fellow man. Our greatest good is
economic. Things rule the world. There is no middle ground in the
struggle. Either you are against things and for man, or you are not.

All Or None Greek Loyalty

MR. EDITOR: ~
The Greek system at the University of Florida
has concerned me for a long, long time.
On this campus, Greeks have many advantages
over non-Greeks. In the fraternity and sorority,
there is more of an opportunity for social life. There
are the Greek files that each house keeps of past
tests that have been givin by various instructors.
There is a chance for a larger say in student political
affairs of the university. And most of all, there is
the closeness in brotherhood that the Greek system
promotes and demands.
This writer once subjected himself to the
activities of the Greeks and found he could stomach
none of the advantages listed above but one. The
Greeks are undoubtedly interested in manipulating
people, and therefore to be a Greek is to be
obedient to away of life. I am interested in politics
and thus in manipulating people but not as a Greek.

"The price of freedorft
is the exercise of responsibility."
*
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor

Carol Sanger
Assignments Editor

Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors

By Lee Hilliker

Recently, a Greek, a sorority sister, accepted the
task of typing up names for a class public opinion
survey. The girl didnt have the time to do the work
or claimed she didnt. She created a pledge project
and gave the names to a pledge to type. Although
this is probably not the first example of what the.
Greek call loyality and brotherhood, it would
appear that this Greek did not fulfill her
responsibility.
If Greek responsibility only extends between
other Greeks and not to non-Greeks, either the
University of Florida should make an allout effort
to become a totally Greek institution or there
probably should be no Greeks at all.
If the Greek system is to be represented by the
kind of irresponsibility mentioned above, then, in
my opinion, it does not belong on the University of
Florida Campus.
TIM STERLING, 3JM

EDITORIAL

Forget SCAT Refund

Rainy weather has a depressing effect
upon people and Friday nights rained out
performance of The Rascals has caused the
Interfraternity Council to become
thoroughly depressed.
Because it rained enough Friday to cancel
the concert, but not enough for the rain
insurance to cover the costs, the IFC stands
to lose approximately SB,OOO in expenses
that have to be paid.
The IFC is discouraged about the event
because they, and many other people,
worked for almost two months in arranging
the benefit only to have the rain wipe it out.
With proceeds from the crowd at the
stadium Friday waiting for the show the
Student Activities Center Fund would have
been bolstered by some $5,000, but now the
IFC stands a chance to go deep into the red

Speaking Out

ROTCs Responsibility

As an Air Force ROTC cadet,
I would like to comment on a
few of the statements made by
Mr. John Sugg in the May 2
edition of the Alligator
concerning ROTC at the UF.
First, he states that, It is almost
universally held (except by the
military) that war is a cancerous
disease.
Here he would like us all to
believe that the military is
composed entirely of
blood-thirsty sadists whose chief
pleasure in life is to go out onto
the battlefield and Kill, Kill!
In my military classes all
emphasis has been placed on
Peace Through Deterrence.
Deterrence, Mr. Sugg,* the
prevention of war by being
strong enough to discourage
agression.
You seem to be against,
acting like automations on a
drill field, Mr. Sugg. In case
you havent noticed, ROTC is
now voluntary at the UF. YOU
no longer have to worry about
being subject to a little
discipline, maybe even a little
responsibility for an hour every
other week.
YOU need no longer suffer
the indignation of having to
obey orders from someone
placed above you, Mr. Sugg. (Is
this your complaint about the
authoritarian structure of the
military Mr. Sugg?)

You talk about academic
freedom Mr. Sugg. You wish to
be free to major in an area of
your own choice and to plan
your own career. You seem to
have no qualms about denying
this right to others whose choice
of a career field happens to
disagree with yours.
You seem to be saying, I am
fully in favor of my own rights
and freedoms, as well as I am
unalterably opposed to violence
done to me, and to any military
service to which I am subject.
(Draft, mandatory ROTC, etc.)
Mr. Sugg, you give the
impression that you are not only

II InaHi
First LBJ, Now DeGaulle Two Os The Finest Noses In
The World.
t The Florida Alligator
, Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union.
Phone 392-1681, 392-1682, or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of
rionda." i
__ j

for nothing but a lot of hard work.
Refunds on the tickets are being given
out this week to students who wish to pick
up their money. It would be a good gesture
on the part of UF students if they did not
pick up their refunds and let the IFC keep
the money to put in the center fund.
This cancellation has discouraged the IFC
somewhat from trying another venture of
this sort. Other groups may be affected the
same way in the future.
This rain out of the show is a perfect
example of why the UF desperately needs an
activities center-coliseum as soon as possible.
If students would not pick up their
refunds it will be encouraging to the IFC,
the campus, and the entire state that UF
students really do want this center.

By Robert Allen

opposed to the Vietnam war in
particular, (for which you may
be drafted) but to all war in
general. SO AM I! I am not
especially eager to go into
combat myself, but
unfortunately, there happen to
be individuals and nations in this
world who would not hesitate to
enter world conquest if they
thought they could get away
with it. It is the job of the
United States military to make
sure no one tries.
It is indeed unfortunate that,
human beings being what they
are, it is not yet feasible to beat
the swords into plowshares.



}Am A Liberoly
But You Were Right
MR. EDITOR: W
I consider myself a liberal, though quite often I find myself
engaged in bitter arguments with some of my more liberal (radical?)
friends over means to ends. I say campus changes can be effected
within the system. I say reasonable people will communicate. .. .and
isnt real communication the answer? My philosophy, as I learned last
week, might NOT be sure-fire method I believed it to be.
As a concerned student, I felt that the recently announced nine
week summer quarter was the straw that broke the camels back. In
moving from semester to trimester to quarter, and now to a shortened
quarter, the University of Florida has gone from an eighteen week
term to a nine week term, without an appreciable decrease in course
load. Students realize this, though most administrators seem oblivious.
Being from the College of Communications, I grew quite fond of
former Dean Ray Weimer, now special assistant to President
OConnell. Weimer is a communicator, a man who realizes the
problems of this University and is determined to make some sound
changes.
I was invited by Mr. Weimer to communicate my thoughts on the
abreviated quarter to the Council of Deans meeting last week. My
more liberal friends warned me I was wasting my time. No, I said.
Lines of communication were being opened.
At the meeting I was greeted warmly and allowed to make my
presentation. I will not be here, I told them, but many students
have voiced concern about having courses crammed down their
throats. I cited two cases in which professors flatly refused to reduce
course loads, one because he felt a responsibility to cover certain
material.
Another of my concerns was that a University calendar should
revolve around its students and not the states high school teachers.
(One main reason for beginning the summer quarter late was to allow
public school teachers the opportunity to come to UF for certain
required courses in the College of Education.) In addition, I noted the
total lack of logic in lengthening the Fall quarter by one week to
make up for the shorter summer term.
As I concluded I asked for the reactions of the Deans present. At
this time, Vice President Connor thanked me very much and added
and get this added that the agenda was quite heavy and that.the
issue would be discussed amongst themselves and deferred to the
proper committee!
Here the Registrar (Mr. Whitehead) interrupted and announced
that students traditionally take fewer courses over the summer. Before
I could reply, I found myself standing in the hallway, congnizant that
the Council had already moved on to something new.
To you, Mr. Whitehead, yes, students do traditionally take fewer
courses during summer terms. They do so because fewer courses are
offered, because there arent enough faculty members to teach them,
because there isnt enough money to keep the faculty on.
To my more liberal brethren. .1 tried to communicate through
the channels and failed. You were right.
808 MAYER

The Movement Left

In Wednesdays Speaking Out column, a Mr.
Daryl Mattox presents us with a view similar or
identical to the amusing philosophy called
objectivism. This view is chiefly advocated by the
objectivist prophet, Ayn Rand, whose sole claim to
philosophic training seems to have been an
introductory course in Aristotle which. she
apparently failed.
At any rate, I will agree that Mr. Mattox is more
interesting than most local conservatives (Bailey,
Hollis). But before we rapturously embrace
laissez-faire captialism to our bosoms, let us
examine hiS arguments.
The freedom of Mr. Mattoxs captialism is
defined in terms of property rights. These types of
rights are negative rights and signify a negative
concept of freedom. In other words, freedom is
thought of as the lack of interference in ones
activity. Congress shall make no 1aw5....
Now, since with capitalism, it is property rights
that are protected, we must assume that those with
the most property have the most rights. A person
with no property has no rights. So it would be
under Mattoxs ideal captialism.
But even in Americas bastardized system, the
same principle holds. Since laws are based on a
negative approach to freedom, no one is encouraged
to participate in exercising any freedom but merely
guaranteed that no one will interfere if one exercises
these freedoms within the law. Since the law is
based on property rights, one must have
considerable property before one can engage in any
significant exercise of freedom.
For example, the Black Militant, who represents
a largely unpropertied and colonized race in
America soon finds out he has no rights and no
freedom. Laws are made and twisted to repress him.

Our Task, Freedom From Capitalism

On Your Nose. 'Gator!
* .<3

MR. EDITOR:
Regarding the Gator Did Good Job speel of
May 1 in which Miss Glenda Cohn was heard to
eloquently moan about the sterling objectivity of
Gator during the last election, I would like to
make a suggestion. Perhaps Miss Cohn would turn
her empty head around from her typewriter in the
Alligator Office and survey the pinups of the
coverage of each candidate.
In squinting her eyes, she may see that the
coverage alloted to the First Party (and to its
paramount pinup, Shepherd) was, in terms of space
given alone, equal if not greater than the coverage
given to all other candidates combined.

MR. EDITOR:
I wish to comment on Iris
Greenbergs letter in which she
portrayed the woman as the
innocent bystander who had
nothing to contribute to the
mess were in today.
The typical American woman
is determined to wear the pants
in the family and because of
this, the children have suffered.

Right of dissent can only be exercised by those with
a vested interest in the current structure white,
affluent Americans and who have no interest in
really changing society.
This is so-called responsible dissent. Dissent by
other groups is tolerated until there is a chance one
might succeed and then dissent is crushed.
For an alternative, there are concepts of human
lights and positive freedom. Rights are not
determined by nonhuman material objects but by
the positive encouragement of all diverse elements,
of society to develop creatively.
It is not that material goods mean so much (as
with Mattox) but that, in a society so productive as
ours, they sould mean so little that everyone has
equal access to material goods and equal control
over the means of production.
Mattox often uses the ward statist referring to
one who advocates loss of personal liberty to the
state. But is not the state those who rule society?
Who would be the state who is now the state
under capitalism? Those who own property and
the means of production.
In America today, choice over societys direction
is in the hands of the military-industrial comples,
those who control the most property, i.e. power.
Under Mattoxs impossible dream, I presume the
facade of government acting for the People would
be removed.
Who then is the statist? He who would encourage
all men to engage in society, with all people having
the means to do so, or he who would use property
rights to enable a small group of parasites to live off
the productivity of the masses, ruling the masses
through control of property.
Mattox links National SDS Secretary Mike
Klonsky with drug addicts, murders and dictators

Family Peace, Then National Harmony

Any child who sees that his
father is subjected to the will of
his mother will not respect his
father nor authority in general.
Japan has demonstrated this
fact since because of the
position of the woman in a
Japanese family, Japans
juvenile deliquency is practically
nil compared to ours.
I should hope that the

and gives credit to capitalism for airplanes,
anti-biotics, skyscrapers...
Consider the abject degradation of labor in
America during those days most closely
approximating Mattoxs ideal. Americas
productivity was built on the backs of the poor who
have had no share of this productivity. And may I
ask which society produces moe drug addicts and
murderers and supports more dictators than ours?
Which society, through inanities of the mass
media drugs its people into fearful complicance and
murders tens of thousands in imperialist wars? Ours
- built on capitalism! (Mattox might claim his
system would be different, if pure, but our society
is but a logical and final conclusion to capitalism.) A
competitive, captialist system necessitates waste of
human potential through a requisite lower class and
surplus labor pool.
On the other hand, a revolutionary country,
China, which at one time was divided for
exploitation among imperialist countries and is even
now oppressed by the two great superpowers, has in
twenty years stopped the opium trade, eliminated
most disease (including one we cant, syphillis) and
stopped the flooding of its great rivers (which we
also can't do, probably because it would be
unprofitable). China seems to be solving human
needs, America satisfies the profit motive.
In conclusion, we can first reject Mattoxs
analysis as rather absurd mutterings. (Check your
premises, Mr. Mattox.) Our task, then is to free
ourselves from captialism.
I will not here suggest any particular form of
socialism but rather submit that in a revolutionary
society, based on concepts of human rights and
positive social freedom, mankind is quite capable of
working to build true dimity and greatness (without
the false carrot of profit dandling in front of it).

Tuesday, May 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

The people of this university might like to know
that the then First Party controlled Student Senate
voted down a provision calling for equal coverage in
the Alligator and which would have prevented the
Alligator from endorsing a particular candidate.
It was proposed on the basis that the money to
run the Alligator comes from all the students, not
just those who support any one party or candidate,
i.e. First Party and Charles Shepherd.
So take a look around you, Miss Cohn; the
evidence is right on the tip of your keen journalistic
nose.
C.E. NUCKELS 111 3AS

woman will soon realize what
she is doing and will be willing
to resume her proper role in the
family household as a mother
and wife rather than a
domineering, conniving female.
Once we have peace within the
family, then maybe well be able
to get the peace we want for our
country.
I
MRS. JAN OLIVER 4BA

By John Sugg

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Floride Alligator, Tuesday, May 6,1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Campus Calendar

Tuesday May 6
Unitarian Student Forum
Meeting, 150 A Union, 12:00
noon
Baseball: Univ. of Fla. vs.
Jacksonville, 2:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 P.M.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Painting for fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Alpha Delta Sigma Informal
Rush, 122 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept: Faculty Concert,
Chamber Music. University
Aud., 8:15 p.m.
Rathskeller, Tolbert Area Night,
9:00 p.m.
Wednesday, May 7
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
English in Action: Between One
American Volunteer and One
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00 p.m. 8:00
p.m.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Music Dept Twilight Concert,
Symphonic Band, Plaza of
the Americas, 6:45 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Young Democrats Meeting &
Elections, 357 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 355 Union,
7:30 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, Flavette Rec.
Hall, 8:30 p.m.
Rathskeller, Greek Night, 9:00
p.m.
Thursday, May 8
Agriculture Council Scholarship
& Awards Convocation,
McCarty Aud., 10:00 a.m.
Florida Cicerones Luncheon,
Rathskeller, 11:45 a.m.
English In Action,
Conversational English
Between One American
Volunteer and One
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00 8:00 p.m.
Rugby Club Practices, Fleming
Field, 5:00 p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Executive
Meeting, 150 Union, 7:15
p.m.
Assoication of Women Students,
355 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association, C-4 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Rathskeller, Joe Walen Quintet
wtih Fran, 9:00 p.m.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION ._ f ~ : :
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... J ff yZ7
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon Mackerel, /
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangemenis for your
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole rfc
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! w

Friday, May 9
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
- 11:30 a.m.
English In Action,
Conversational English
between One American
Volunteer and One
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00 8:00 p.m.
Union Movie, "Oklahoma",
Union Aud., 7:00, 8:30 &
11:00 p.m.
Rathskeller, Joe Whalen Quintet
with Fran, 9:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Tickets
are on sale for: Football,
, Brothers of "TEP" vs. The
Fighting Gators". $.50.
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 6, at
7 p.m. in Peabody 101,102 and
112.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 6, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202 205,
208 or 209.
CBS 263 PROGRESS TESI
will be given Tuesday, May 6, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, ro 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Little 109.
CLC 142 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CLC 143 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, May 7,

BLUB BULLETIN

at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 8,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CHN 253 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 8,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;Sto
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CEH 133 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 13,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9, 10,11, 12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5, 7,18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CPS 123 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 15,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G

Administrative Notices

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10, 11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112;Sto
Walker Auditorium, T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
Thursday, May 15, at 1:30 p.m.
in Room 235, Tigert Hall.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the speech screening
requirement before being
admitted into the advanced
professional sequence or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block.
English and speech majors do
not take the test as SCH 201 is
required in all their programs.
Appointments are now being
made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.

|| SPECIALS H
gp TUESDAY SPECIAL ||
1 FRIED I
I CHICKEN I
§1 AUYOU OOA W
|H CARE TO EAT 77y ||
H WEDNESDAY SKOAL S|
1 CHICKEN STEW W
I DUMPLINGS 49< I
I MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for June and August
graduates unless otherwise
indicated.
MAY 6: RING, MAHONEY
AND ARNER Acctg.
ATLANTIC NATIONAL
BANK Bus. or Lib. Arts.
RETAIL CREDIT CO. Bus.
Ins., Econ., Mkt., Fin., Lib. Arts.
MAY 7: SCHOOL DISTRICT
OF PENNSYLVANIA Detail
of specific vacancies not
available.
MAY 8: DAVCO
MANUFACTURING
CO. Sant. Engi.
COURSE AND TEACHER
EVALUATION: Applications
are now being accepted for staff
positions in Course and Teacher
Evaluation. Students with
interests in organization, public
relations, publications, research
and general office activities are
reeded. Applications may be
picked up at Student Activities
Desk, third floor, Reitz Union.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

f FOR SALE j
HARK! 2br house trailer 46x10 with
a/c shed awning & washing machine.
Nice lot, good neighbors. Abailable in
June. ;2'jn. Call 378-6792 NOW!
(A-3t- Z
SOUPS on, the rug that is, so clean
the spot with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-130-c)
j
66 Honda 65. In excellent cond.
Only 7000 miles driven. Price is only
SIOO which includes helmet. Call
Brad at 392-8729. (A-3t-129-p)
I RED PIN
BOWLING
8 to 10 p.m.
WIN FREE GAMES
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
COMING










* # %

a ;
, a
#
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a a a
/; : .* :
:*v :
IstARTS MAY 14
]l'M final
2 days
NOW SHOWING
joth ctNTuy-roxrsiTs
T-HS MA6US
nmAS&r coiorsy oaux*
ALSO AT 10:40
FRANK SINATRA
I THE DETECTIVE
\UJgi ADVENTURE V
W jVi YEARS
4 COVERING 2SJM MIS iQ'jAT
4*mwi#*nciuMs m LTj/jP
X^FRiEan^if
A Love Story
*yr That Begins With V
t y an incredible
/ Experiment!
SsTECHNICOIO^^?^^?
raa j
T SWINGS! OBVIOUSLY
AIMED AT TODAYS YOUNG PEO-
PLE. Some on the far side at the
generation gap are going to leave
j
COLOR

| FOR SALE j
>
1967 Honda 50, under 3000 miles,
Just tuned, side basket. sllO. Call
376-8322 after 5 p.m.
GIBSON electric guitar S2BO.
Cherry red hollowbody two pickups.
Must sell going to Europe! Come see!
Call Philip 372-9200 Room 245.
(A-st-128-p)
1967 Honda CBI6O. Excellent cycle.
Very reasonable. Call Fry 372-9358.
(A-st-126-p)
CHEAP, DEPENDABLE
TRANSPORTATION. Suzuki
Scrambler 50cc 1965 Good cond.
Helmet, tools ONLY $95. Call
392-9889. (A-st-130-p)
Mobylette motor bike used J
months. Perfect condition originally
S2OO. Will sell for S6O with helmet.
Call 372-3502 after 6 p.m.
(A-2t-130-p)
CAMERA! Yashika V-7 like new!
Built-in meter, f 1.7, case, filters,
shoe. Must sell s9O. Call Craig
Goldwyn at 372-9454. (A-3t-130-p)
Honda 50 first SSO takes ti. Must
sell. Must be cash as is SSO. Call Bob
Burns 378-5789. (Alt-130-p)
Ampeg amp. 12" speaker and 3
pickup guitar both $l2O or will sell
separately. Call 392-7966 or
378-0470. (A-2t-130-p)
Masters cap anu gown. Cap size 7.
Poplin gown size 47. sls. Phone
376-5409. (A-lt-130-p)
7 in. Sony TV battery-car-ac.
External car ant. Great for beach or
travel. Sell or trade for Pierce
Simpson CB radio. 376-9971 after 6.
(A-3t-129-p)
Upright Frigidaire freezer 14.5 cu. ft.
8 yrs. old. Good conditon. 376-9971
after 6. (A-3t-129-p)
GIBSON GUITAR with F holes, elec
pickup SIOO also MAGNAVOX
stereo make offer. Call GARY
378-9385. (A-st-129-p)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2V2 acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20M16-P)
FOR RENT I
toiWWKWBiWWWWMSWS'WWICCMMw
Village Park Apt. to sublet for
Summer Quarter, 2 Bedroom
furnished A/C, Poolside Call
378-C864. (B-st-129-p)
Sublet VILLAGE 34 Apt. lbdrm.
furn. AC Close to campus $lO5
monthly plus utilities. Avail. June.
Call 378-8256.(8-st-129-p)
Looking for a place to live this
summer? Room available to sublet.
One block from campus. Call Donna
352-1700 after 5 P.M.
Available for summer qtr. or longer.
Furnished apt. for 2. Air cond., pool,
etc. $95/month. Also looking for
male roommate summer. Call
378-3447. (B-st-129-p)
French Qt. Sublet entire summer for
$125. Many added extras built in
bookcases. Extra bed. Call 378-7778
or come by Apt. 12. (B-st-129-p)
Sublet two bedroom ac furnished
apt. for summer quarter. June rent
paid. One block behind Norman, call
378-6756. 921 S.W. 6 Ave., upstairs.
(B-3t-129-p)
SUBLET 2 bedroom upstairs apt.,
available June AC, 1 block behind
Norman Hall 376-5509 S.W. 7 Ave.
(B-st-129-p)
nsss&w
iiliWEH I ENDS
In w t Jth ii ** i "J j
1 TODAY
100 RIFLES
STARTS WED
BEFORE WINTER
COMES
DAVID NIVEN
7 NOW!
AN OVERGROUND
SEX-PROTEST FILM!
- New York Post /
GreetNs

Tuesday, May 6, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

1 FOR RENT \
Poolside French Quarter Apt. for 4
to sublease for summer $l5O month.
378-6039. (B-4t-127-p)
SUBLET 2 bdrm Village Park apt.
$l5O mo. Available in June. Call
378=9325 after 5. (B-3t-130-p)
POOLSIDE Williamsburg apt. 2 bdrm
townhouse central air
dishwasher Bar-B-Q Available
from June 15. Call 378-4732.
(B-st-130-p)
2 bedroom apt. walk to Med center &
campus, pool. air. from June 1,
renting or subleasing. Summit House.
378-7373, after 5 p.m, (B-130-7t-p)
Sublet 1 br. furn apt. ac. TV private
patio.' June thru? price bargain
378-7196 after 5. (B-3t-126-p)
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21t-115-p)
3 bedroom furnished house. Air
cond. 2 blocks from campus 1319
NW 3 Ave. Call 372-6921. SIBO.OO
per month. (B-st-125-p)
Landmark II poolside 2 bedroom IV2
bath, extras. Sublet for summer
beginning June. Call 376-1943 or see
apt. 113 during the day or night.
(B-2t-130-p)
Gatortown Apt. need one roommate
grad student. Move in now. 3-BR
apt., AC, pool $52.50 per mo. Call
John 378-1165. (B-3g-130-p)
WANTED
Roommates lmmediate or Summer
occupancy. 2 br. poolside apt.
Tanglewood Manor 372-8041.
(C-st-127-p)
2 male roommates wanted for
summer quarter June rent free
Landmark Apt. 33 call anytime
before noon or after 5 PM. 378-7543.
(C-3t-128-p)
Need 2 coed roommates 2 bedroom
twonhouse, poolside Williamsburg.
Summer quarter. Call 376-2129.
(C-sg-128-p)
One roommate wanted to share 2
bedroom Tanglewood Apt. Air cond.
Pool T.V. Private room 372-7092.
$l2O for Summer Quarter.
(C-st-127-p)
Male roommate for summer qtr. at
Summit House. SIOO for entire qtr.
including utilities. Call 378-4242.
(C-7t-129-p)
2 male grad. stud, for 2 bdrm. apt. at
Williamsburg. Air-conditioned,
stereo, good food! Pay only utilities
for May. Call 378-8782 after 6 P.M.
(C-3t-129-p)
Swimming Instructors: YMCA and/or
USI, current or recent. Part time.
Excellent pay. For further
information and interview call
378-5662.(C-3t-130-p)
Wanted: Female roommates for fall
quarter to share new 2 bedroom
apartment. Call Sharon; 378-9974.
(C-3t-130-p)
.^X": >X'N*x*x.x.:.sv.Ns :s W":*;*;*i :-x*>:*x-x
| HELP WANTED
Summer employment for student
with layout, newswriting and typing
experience with interest in
performing arts for publicity
assignments. Minimum pay,
maximum experience. Send
background resume to: P.O. Drawer
E, Sarasota, Fla. 33578. (E-st-129-p)

jfll V.
Lovely Candice Bergen stars
with Anthony Quinn, Michael
Caine and Anna Karina in The
Magus," 20th Century-Foxs
suspense drama filmed on the
island of Majorca. Now playing
at the Suburbia Drive In
Thgatt?,

Page 9

HELP WANTED
vx^x^ccc.r.x.Nss-x^i-i-x-i-r-x.x-x.NXivx^x*;*
Experienced tractor driver;
knowledge of cattle operation;
fencing; worming; etc. Afternoons
and/or Saturdays your convenience.
Phone 376-6339 after 7:30 pm.
(E-5M29-C)
Several attractive girls to work
promotion May 7-10. Rate $2.00 per
hour can split 9-6 with another girl.
Call Humble Oil & Ref. Mr. Wheeler.
372-0218. (+-129-2t-p)
Part time waitress. Apply Trail Boss
The Ponderosa Steak House
Westgate Shopping Center.
(E-st-126-p)
TEACHERS wanted entire wesi ana
SW and Alaska; Free registration
Southwest Teachers Agency 1303
Central NE Albuquerque N.M.
87106. (E-3t-128-p)
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY for top
executive. Challenging position for
mature, intelligent person with
excellent skills and managerial
ability. Salary open. Call 462-2499.
(E-st-126-p)
Desk clerk, Manor Motel. Hours 5
12 PM. Friday & Saturday &
BAM-4PM Sunday. Contact Mr. Bob
Evans between 8 AM & 4PM. Tele.
376-5212.(E-st-127-p)
AUTOS f
W IP
1965 Monza Corvair coriv. atuu.
spyder engine. Power top, radio,
heater, call 372-7659 after 6p.m.
(G-st-126-p)
We buy & sell clean used cars.
Miller-Brown Motors, your
Volkswagen Dealer, 4222 N.W. 13th
St. 376-4552. Mr. Whitehead.
(G-130-ts-c)
VW 6 8 Sedan AM/FM excellent
condition. White good tires 378-3304
between 6-7 p.m. Ask for Bill.
(G-4t-130-p)
1964 Crv Monza 4sp. 110 hp good
cond. radio heater good tires $450 or
best offer. Call 376-3417. Ask for
Tony. If not in, leave number.
(G-4t-130-p)
MUSTANG 1965 V-8 very good
condition automatic transmission air
conditioned SI2OO or best offer. Call
3 78-0002 after 5:3 0 P.M.
(G-3t-129-p)
1963 Volvo, 2 door, 4 speed, radio,
27 mpg, heater, whitewalls, bucket
seats, asking $1099 (Getting new car
for graduation) Call 378-0727 after
5. (G-2t-129-p)
69 Pontiac Tempest,, 6mo. new OHC
6 cylinder, stick-shift, radio, heater,
limelight greenAsk for Mike Halton
at circulation dest research library or
Call 378-4554 after 5:30 P.M.
(G-127-10t-p)
VW 1969 Sedan, only 3,000 miles,
completly new, SIBOO. Call
378-9833 after 2 p.m. (G-3t-128-p)
PERSONAL |
If Summer comes, can Fall be far
behind? Be ready for it! Were selling
out the last of this Winters ponchos
and ruanas at 30% off. THE
SPANISH MAIN 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open Mon.Sat. til 9:00..
(J-129-3t-p)
Would you like to be a member of
Maas Brothers 1969-1970 College
Board? Apply new any day after
school or all day Saturday at our
special College Board Desk in the
Junior area. Deadline May 26, 1969.
(J-15M29-C)

A FILM All IHflril* siarn livullmannl
from maxvonsydow
INGMAR llllHlvllviriV GUNNAR BJORNSTRAND
! x :MAX mu state
y v 3.5.7.9
OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
A private bedroom hr
fl each student one
C block behind norman
xM [ft hall
JJ 1J APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT-CALL 372-2662

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

PERSONAL
$ :
wx;?w< x*x*x*x*x.:;!X*:*x*x*x*xMiw x*>B?
TO B.J.C. FROM J.C.L. You know
that it has been coming for a long
time. This is to let you know that it
will arrive soon. (J-lt-130-p)
Hung up Heads: Hanff on. Call
378-0148 from 7p.m. to 12p.m.
After 12 call 378-8138. (J-3t-129-p)
Training in ZEN MEDITATION in
return for participation in
psychological research. Call Mike,
378-8625, evenings. (J-2t-129-p)
Thank you UofF and professors you
completed my college ed. at 3 years
without a degree I am learning
Vietnamese for Sam Didi Min Pfc.
U.S.A. (J-lt-130-p)
1 LOST & FOUND I
v >j
&xx*XX*x*xx-:.%%nw.v;s*x*x*x*x*xx*x*>*'
REWARD Lost one tan female
puppy with black muzzle. Answers to
name of Princess. Rumored near
Jennings. Call 378-6675. (L-st-130-p)
SERVICES
V ?
, x*x*x*:*:4*:*wi*i i w*xx*x*xxwwh
NEED A PAINTER? Interior OF
Exterior professional painting. Call
after 5 or anytime on weekends.
378-4855 Free Estimates.
(M-10t-122-p)
Tennis racket restringing satisfaction
guaranteed Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19t-107-p)
A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
For Leoy Lettering and Graphical
Presentations for Theses and
Dissertations Call GARNER
DRAFTING SERVICE 372-8008.
(M-st-126-p)
IrSScliSii
Os THE I
I T TATfT PANAVISION
I Jblttll 1 COLOR by PcU |
I BAMDOLEROr^I
JAMES DEAN M |
JfliliH
tVilHil



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 6,1969

'Dregs Os Society Cause Nations Unrest

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
With the sureness of the facts
behind his voice, Jimmey Bailey
spoke of those who were trying
to wreck the world he knew, and
the one for which his father had
worked.
On his hand resting over his
knee was a silver ring
embellished with an American
flag and the initials USA. It was
two and a half hours past noon.
The chairman of the students
for American Conservatism
(SAC) is in direct opposition in
hippies, yippies, and the Junta
for Military Organization
(JOMO).
Theyre bent on destroying
society as we know it, theyre
the reason for the nations
unrest, Bailey said.
Dismissing as utter
nonsense the arguments of
those students crying for more
participation in university
decisions, Bailey compared the
plea to one for turning
kindergarten over to the kids.
The administration should
be making all of the decisions,
they are the only ones with
know-how and experience, he
said.
If control was given to
students, the school would cease
to exist in six months, he
predicted.
Bailey places little value on
the exchange of ideas at the
university. The university is no
place for that, he insists.
After graduation, the
students bossman wont give a
damn about his ideas.
Theyre not gonna want
somebody who cares or even
knows about what the other guy
feels about the Vietnam War.
All the hippies are going to
turn into staunch conservatives
after middle age, he said,
adding that it was an
historically proven fact.
He sets a great deal of faith in
facts.
He summed up his view about
what kind of students a
university should be turning out:
This is a consumer-oriented
society.
Bailey found it difficult to
pinpoint when his interest in
politics began.
As soon as I started to read,
I guess. He read newspapers,
saw how things worked, and
studied government books.
By the time 1 was a high
school sophomore, I realized the
Constitution was being
violated.
The sophomore became the
biggest Goldwater supporter,
while a high school junior.
new T3T
Hawaiian
Village |||
Now leasing for Sept.
3461 S.W. Second Ave.
PHONE 378-5905
Next to Westgate
Shopping Center
Townhouse & Flats
Swimming Pool
Recreation Hall
Wall to Wall Carpet
Air Conditioned
Dishwashers & Disposals
Private Patios
Master TV Antenna
1 & 2 BR., 1, IV2, 2 Baths
MODELS OPEN DAILY 10-5
Hotpoint Appliances

My father was well versed in
constitutional government, he
believed the same as I do now,
he said.
A building contractor,
Baileys father, now deceased,
had worked hard enough to
retire at 37.
The capitalist, as Bailey
calls himself, admires hard
workers like his father. He
criticized the government for
taking from the haves and
giving to the have-nots.
Regarding the unemployed in
the country as a liability, he
advocated bringing back the
public works program of the
New Deal. He cant see paying
his money out to those well
and fit for gainful employment.
Let em pick up paper, cut
grass... they will still be getting
their money, but theyll earn it
this way.
Dependent children should
also be cut off from government
funds. Giving them money just
encourages them to have more
and more children, he said.
But he is for Medicare. I will
help the disabled and the
elderly.
Baileys organization, SAC,
promotes the conservative ideals
of government, based on the
constitution as written, not
interpreted. The members are
writing letters to congressmen
asking them to push through
bills which would given them
back the constitutional powers
Bailey says they have lost.
He leans his head back and to
one side, narrowing an eye, and
tells of the peaceful, and
orderly demonstration SAC
plans for Dr. Benjamin Spock.
who will speak at UF Monday
nighty
Were going to state that we

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if FUN RALLY I
Sat. May 10 11:00 AM I
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BAILEY ON THE OPPOSITION

think criminals ought to be put
in jail, he said.
In addition to his other
activites as SAC chairman,
Bailey is also chairman of the
UF American Independent Party
on campus supporting Wallace.
The club is a little inactive
now he explained, but its just
laying low until 1972 when
Wallace runs again.
Bailey is sure Wallace will run
1 M Kt
. .-* BR
JIMMEY BAILEY
... campus conservative
MODELS
NEEDED-FRI6PM
EVERY FRIDAY
'DANDYLION

again because he talked to him
last month.
In 1970, Bailey is going to
run for Florida House of
Representatives and if all the
pieces fall into place, Ill be
running with Wallace in 1972 for
United States House of

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Representatives.
Meanwhile, Jim Bailey sits
back waiting for the hippies to
turn staunch conservatives in
their middle age, while 'the
country sits in a socialistic
blunder which is getting worse
all the time.



Experienced Tep Challenges Gators
By MARC DUNN 1

Alligator Sports Editor
High scoring offensive football thrills are planned
tonight for Florida Field at 7 when the Orange
fceague Flag Football Champs play an All-Star Gator
team.
The game, which features the return to Florida
Field of Steve Spurrier and Richard Trapp, is a
benefit to raise funds for tthe Student Center
Action Team (SCAT).
Tau Epsilon Phi fraternity has won 25 straight
intramural games over the last four years.
The game will be played under intramural rules;
that prohibits tackling, blocking and limits running.
Passing and catching make up the offense.
The Teps believe they have an unbeatable
combination in quarterback Ira Pollack and receiver
Rick Perillo. The two have played together for three
years.
The Gator team also will include Tom Christian,
Hannon Wages, Larry Rentz, Jim Yarbrough, Tom
Hungerbuhler, Bill Gaisford and George Dean.
The key to both defense and offense in tonights
contest will be quickness.
Each team has seven players, including a rusher
on defense. His job is to limit the quarterbacks time
with the ball and not let him get by.
Since all the players are eligible for passes the
entire defense should be downfield covering
receivers. If the quarterback should get by the

Skiers Leave State In Wake,
Tillement Sets World Standard

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
The UF Water Ski Club won
its own Spring Intercollegiate
Ski Tournament at Lake
Wauburg Saturday, defeating
four Florida foes in copping
both the mens and womens
team championships.
Spicing the competition were
stellar performances for UFs
Jacques Tillement and Allen
Kempton, University of Tampa.
Both set world intercollegiate
records.
Tillement set his world
standard in winning the mens
slalom over Kempton, the 1967
world champ in the event.
In mens jumping Kempton
soared 133 feet to break the
previous world standard of 128
feet. Competition was from, a
five-foot takeoff.
In other mens competition,

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Tillement captured the trick
skiing event in another stiff
battle with Kempton.
In event standings, the UF
men won the slalom and trick
titles, losing to Tampa in the
team jumping.
UFs Pat Boutchyard
dominated womens
competition, winning both the
slalom and trick titles. In
addition, the Gator girls won
team honors in both events in
jacking the combined UF mens
and womens totals to a
meet-winning 838 points.
Tampa finished a distant
second in the meet with 658
points, followed by the
University of South Florida with
542. Florida Atlantic was fourth
with 396 points.
The Gator skiers will defend
their national championship at
Cypress Gardens in July, in the
National Intercollegiate Water

IN FLAG FOOTBALL

POLLACK ROLLS ...
... Tep QB eludes rushers to throw ball
rusher he will have an open field.
The rusher must lineup five yards behind the line
of scrimmage, but it is illegal to block him on the
way in.
The Gators, virgins in flag football, will not be
pushovers by any means. Great athletes have a
knack for all sports and are able to adapt to any
condition.
Offensive action will steal the show tonight. The
experts rate the outcome a tossup.

Ski Championships.
This weekend the skiers
journey to Cypress Gardens to
compete in the Southern
Intercollegiate Ski Tournament
UF is defending champion in the
meet.
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DATE: WED., MAY 8
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Tuesday, May 6,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, May 6, 1969

Chargers Want Heavier 'Thin Man

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Larry Thin Man Rentz,-
Gator quarterback during the
1966-68 seasons, is a busy
athlete this spring.
Hes playing softball and
running track for his fraternity,
Phi Delta Theta, while also
lifting weights and engaging in a
crash weight-gaining diet.
Rentz wants to play big-time
football next falL
Signed last week to a
one-year contract by the AFL
San Diego Chargers, hell report
to summer camp on a small
college campus outside Los
Anglees around the first of July.
Im real happy with my
contract, said Rentz Saturday,
but since its not a no-cut pact
Ill have to report in good shape
and try just to make their
ballclub.
Rentz didnt disclose terms,
saying only that he inked a
five-figure contract. He also
received a bonus for signing.
Suffering fractured ribs, the
then-145 pounder missed UFs
final two games last season,
against Kentucky and Miami.
The ribs have healed,
Rentz said. Weight and speed
pose the main problems now.
Im going as a defensive back. It
takes speed to stay with a
pass-receiver and weight is an
asset in tackling those big, tough
pro ball-carriers.
When the former Coral
Speed Weekend
Starts Saturday
The First Annual Gator
Speed Weekend will begin
Saturday with a Fun Rally
meeting at the Track Parking
Lot at 11 a.m., and a special
drag race at the Gainesville
Dragway at 5 p.m.
The drag race will feature
special rates for UF spectators
and racers. Trophies will be
awarded to individual race
winners and the organization
winning the most points.
The Gym Khana, an obstacle
course race, will conclude the
activities Sunday at 9:30 a.m. on
the Plants and Grounds Parking
Lot.
Students and organizations
may pre-register for any of these
events in room 310 of the Reitz
Union, or call 392-1655.
GDI Handball
Sign Up Near
The last day to sign up for
independent handball is
Wednesday at 5:00.
Four men are needed for a
team. Call 392-0581 or come by
room 229 Florida Gym.
MG LINE
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LARRY RENTZ
... the "Thin Man"

TEP Challeng es Gator Greats j
& Students
Football Game Tues. May 6th
at 7 P.M. Florida Field
t ~
Blue beat Orange
TC p c Jets beat Colts
arS Teps will beat the Gators
>
OrGots
k 4000 : SOM r
W mHK # If M
All Campus Quarterback |flfe n| lf|
All Campus
65*68 RECORDS s,^spur,..,
TEP 25-0 ,h G or __
GATORS 28*131 Tom Christian ;
Harmon Wages -F^plypjMk
Larry Rentz W.
Jim Yarbrough w lUMdr Wf-
Tom Hungorbuler IK
T rn% r\ i i Bill Gaistord
Tickets Can Be Purchased George Dean
Rathskeller At The Gate T
Richard Trapp
Record Bar Stag A Drag
Gator Shop Quick-Save BH
Union Box Office Greshams I T i
Be There
. ... i

RENTZ NEEDS WEIGHT. SPEED

Gables High star came to UF, he
recorded a very fast 40-yard
dash time, around 4.6.
I cant say how fast I am
now, because I havent been
timed in a while, Rentz noted.
Im concentrating on improving
my speed. If youre not big, you
gotta be fast in their league.
Now 6-1, 160, Rentz has
orders to report to summer
camp at 170 pounds. He believes
he can do it, having reached 168
during one previous summer.
In his only stint at defensive
safety, the Thin Man made
All-SEC as a sophomore in 1966.
Rentz is optimistic I think
I can make it but revealed
that hes unfamiliar with the
Chargers present defensive
alignment alignmentlll
lll alignmentlll have to wait until July to
see how good my competition
is, he added.
Rentz expects to be a familiar
face on the UF campus for
several academic quarters to
come, regardless of his pro
football future.

By the time he journeys to
California to begin scrimmaging
against the pass-receiving
establishment of Lance
A1 worth, Jacque MacKinnon,
Garry Garrison and Co., Rentz
will still lack hours to complete
requirements for a degree in
Marketing.

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The former Gator QB was the
17th round draft choice of the
offense-minded Chargers, a team
in need of defensive help.
The San Diego club has been
known to tally 30 to 40 points
with its volatile offense, yet still
lose. :