Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
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LOOKING FOR QUARTERS
As representatives of the football team, Mark Ely (26) and Brad
Powell (51) contribute to the quarter drive in progress this week to
raise money for the Student Center Activity Team (SCAT). Football
mentor Ray Graves made his own $25 contribution to the cause with
money-collector Marlene Schneider obviously "up" for the occasion.

Taylors Banquet Plans:
f The Show Must Go On

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Alignments Editor
Despite action taken Tuesday
night by the Student Senate, the
Inaugural Banquet will be held
as scheduled tonight at 6:30 in

Spock Speaks Here
On Social Revolution

Dr. Benjamin Spock,
well-known author of child
care books, will speak in the
Uniyersity Auditorium
Monday at 8 pm.
Spock is being brought to
campus by the Union
Program Council Forums
Committee to speak on the
topic "Social Revolution.
After receiving his
bachelors degree from Yale in
1925 and his M.D. degree
from Columbia University in
1929, Spock served as a
pediatric and psychiatric
physician until 1955 when he
became a professor of child
development at Western
Reserve University in
Cleveland.
He retired from this
position in June of 1967.
His most famous book,
Baby and Child Care, was.
published in 1946 and has
sold 22 million copies. He
also collaborated on two
other books, "A Babys First
Year and "Feeding Your
Baby and Child.
Since 1954 Spock has
written monthly articles for
> the "Ladies Home Journal
and Redbook. These
articles were used as material
for two additional books,
"Dr. Spock Talks with

the Rathskeller.
Student Body President Clyde
M. Taylor, discounting Student
Body Treasurer Phil Burnetts
"childish attempts to disrupt
the banquet, said it will be
underwritten by six campus

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DR. BENJAMIN SPOCK
... famous baby doctor
M others, 1961, and
"Problems With Parents,
1962.
In January 1968, Spock,
along with four other men,
was charged and convicted of
conspiring to counsel young
men to evade the draft. The
case is now on appeal.
Spock is currently
speaking nationwide on
behalf of the Civil Liberties
Legal Defense Fund, Inc., an
organization which raises
funds to provide for the legal
defense of conscientious
resisters throughout the
country.

Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 127

INAUGURAL SNACKS ATTACKED
SG And Senate Fight
Over Funds For Food

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senate and the
executive branch of SG clashed
Tuesday over a SSOO
appropriation to help pay for y
tonights inauguration banquet
at ihe Rathskeller.
Opposition at the
expenditure of the money arose
because of a statutory
prohibition against paying for
food or banquets out of student
funds, except when specified as
a line item for that purpose.
The Senate has repeatedly
refused requests by other
campus organizations for funds
to pay for food.
The Senate transferred the
funds from the Student Body
President account and then

organizations.
Florida Blue Key, Sigma Nu,
Pi Kappa Phi, Phi Kappa Tau,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon and Alpha
Epsilon Pi fraternities will split
the banquet bill equally if the
funds are not donated from
some other sources, Taylor said.
He said a full Senate inquiry
was pending into the
appropriation refusal, which
consisted of "half-truths and
political games.
Taylor said the money for the
banquet, approximately SI2OO,
was in two separate accounts
specifically set aside for the
inaugural.
He said Burnett led him to
understand the money could be
used to pay for food as long as it
was on a line-item budget.
"He told me I would have to
get the line-item changed,
Taylor said.
"I said I would that I had
the funds. Burnett said fine, as
long as the Senate agreed.
"He never said he was opposed
to spending the money.
Taylor said Burnetts motive
was political revenge.
"Burnett is hacked off
because his buddies in last years
Accent program are being
questioned about alledged
irregularities in their
accounting, Taylor said.
Burnett was ultimately
responsible for this accounting.
Hes especially mad at Joe
Hilliard, one of the most
respected people on campus, for
questioning old Accent records.
He wants to drag Hilliard down
with him to even the score.
Taylor said the banquet
would go on with or without
Burnetts sanction.
We are going to have the
banquet if I have to raise the
money myself, Taylor said.
And Burnett is still invited.

America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida,'Gainesville

unanimously refused to give it
back to him to spend for the
banquet.
Student Body Treasurer Phil
Burnett told the Senate the
question they were to decide
wik whether or not the same
standards would apply to SG
and other student organizations.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor told the Senators
he was upset and said later that
Burnett had misrepresented to
him the necessity for bringing
the matter to the Senate any
earlier.
The expenditure was opposed
on the floor by Senators Ric
Katz, Steward Hershey, Bob
Blunt, and Charles Harris,
Student Body Vice
President-elect.
John Englehart, Secretary of
Finance in Taylors cabinet,
defended the expenditure on the
Senate floor saying refusal of the
money now would be
hypocritical since it was
already in the Presidents
account.
In another matter concerning
the executive branch for the
next administration, the Senate
approved a change as requested
by incoming Student Body
President Charles Shepherd in
the members of the Presidents
Cabinet abolishing the
secretaries of legal affairs, new
and developing affairs,
information services, and
campus improvement.
New posts created were:
student services, athletics, health
and insurance, minority group
affairs, married student affairs
and student organizations.
There will be 12 cabinet
officers in the Shepherd
administration as opposed to 10
in the Taylor administration.
A request for $525 to pay a
student to act as public relations
man for SG over the summer
was referred to committee.
It was suggested by Burnett

Tickets For Rascals
Selling To Showtime
Tickets to the Rascals Activities Center show will continue on sale
until show time Friday, according to IFC officials.
Today is the last day for sales at the several off-campus locations,
including the Record Bar, Recordsville, Quik Save, Belk Lindsey, and
the Reitz Union Box Office, and the Student Service booth across
from the Hub.
Friday, tickets will be on sale at two locations; the student service
booth across from the Hub, and Gate 3 of the stadium.
Tickets purchased at the service booth from 9 a.m. to noon will be
$2.50. From then until show time, tickets will be $3, and sold only at
the stadium.
Approximately 7,000 tickets have been sold so far, Miles Wilkin,
IFC treasurer, said Wednesday.
Sales have been picking up in the last two or three days, Wilkin
said, but IFC needs to sell at least 2,000 more tickets to break even.
Wilkin said he didnt know how large a crowd to expect, but they
are depending on a large number of ticket sales at the gate Friday
night before the performance.
The profits from Fridays performance will go to the Order of
Omega's coliseum fund.

The

Thursday, May 1, 1969

28521&* f ..JB
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PHIL BURNETT
... tight hold on money
, f t H%m
CLYDE TAYLOR
... upset and misrepresented
that since the Alligator gets
$1.58 per student per quarter
from SG, that they should assign
a person to do this job.
Harris said that the name of
Harold Aldrich, former Alligator
editor, had been mentioned as a
possibility for the post.
The Billy Mitchell Drill Team
was given $78.16 to hold a
Florida invitational drill meet.
Ric Katz voiced opposition to
the move saying that Billy
Mitchell was a U.S. government
organization, as part of the
ROTC. and that it should not be
given SG funds.



t, The Florida Alligator, Thunday, May 1,1969

Page 2

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MILITARY BALL QUEEN CONTESTANTS
... left to right, Debbie Rogers, Suzanne Rogers, Brenda Hill
Profs Predict Evolution
In French Foreign Policy

By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer ¥
UF professors contacted
Tuesday presented similar and
diverging views on the
resignation of French President
Charles de Gaulle Sunday.
Contacted were Dr. John W.
Spanier of the political science
department, Professor of History
Max Kele, and Dr. Rene
Lemarchand of the political
science department.
None of the professors
foresaw any dramatic changes in
French foreign policy. Instead
they predicted an evolution, not
a revolution, in French policy
toward better relations with the
United States.
None believed French policy
vis-s-vis NATO would see any
substantial change in the near
future, v
Spanier emphasized that De
Gaulle was a sympton, not a
cause, of worsening US-French
relations in recent years.
The cause of the problem was
Frances gain in strength which
compelled her to demand a more
active role in the western
alliance, but the U.S. was
unwilling to recognize French
strength or to grant France the
more active role which she
demanded.
Spanier noted optimistically
that President Nixon seems to
have a greater understanding of
the growing importance of
France and of Europe.
A St. Petersburg Times
editorial of April 29 said the
repudiation of De Gaulle by the
French electorate at the polls
this past Sunday showed that
government cannot survive on
promises of glory abroad at the
expense of domestic programs.
Both Lemarchand and Kele
agreed with the statement.
An ambitious foreign policy

"^ntirTfSlfllsT^tfCl?SCTff?7SeTffidrTtudentnewpapCTofthe
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authoss. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given'before next insertion.

combined with a neglected
domestic program was fatal to
De Gaulle, said Kele.
Lemarchand said De. Gaulle
focused his attention on the
domestic scene only after the
French student riots of last May.
Spanier, commenting on the
Times editorial statement,
said that it does not apply to
American foreign policy.
' This country has the
resources, but may lack the
political will. We can be strong
militarily and still respond to
domestic needs, Spanier said.
Lemarchand and Kele both
expressed delight, and a touch of
regret, at the generals
resignation and said Gaullist
grandeur had come at the
expense of the lower classes in
France.
Kele also believed that with
. De Gaulle gone, after some
initial confusion and unrest
there would be an eventual
return to parliamentary
government in France.
But Kele also said, De Gaulle
rilled a valuable function as an
opponent of U.S. economic
hegemony in Europe. In this
respect it is unfortunate that he
is leaving.
Lemarchand expressed
admiration for the man, but was
indignant at De Gaulles
handling of the French student
crisis last May. He warned the
voters that unless they 1
supported him there would be
danger of a Communist
take-over, when in fact he knew
that there was no such danger,
said Lemarchand.
Kele and Lemarchand both
said the French Communist Party
was committed to a
parliamentary course of action.
It is foolish to believe the
Communists will attempt to take

over the government by force,
said Kele. Lemarchand saw a
possibility of a resurgence of
student unrest in France. If so,
the communists would attempt
to take control of the
movement, but they would fail
because the communists are
too moderate for the students.
None of the professors
interviewed foresaw a workable
coalition between the socialists
and the communists in the near
future that would be capable of
controlling the government. But
Kele did predict a significant
shift to the left in the voting
patterns of the French
electorate.
Lemarchand, a close observer
of French domestic politics,
believes Georges Pompidou will
probably win the presidency in
the upcoming election.
However, he sees a
problematic future in French
politics. The French
Constitution divides the power
ambiguously between the
president and the prime
minister. De Gaulle and his
prime minister, Pompidou,
worked closely together. But if
two men of differing ideologies
should gain these position
simultaneously, there could be a
dispute over rightful powers, and
-this would contribute to
domestic unrest in France.
Now Taking Applications
at
Summit JJouse
1700 S. W. 16th ct.
<
for
September
(9-10 & 12 month Leases
available) rates from
1 BR from sl2l
2 BR from $147
Summer Term
Special Rates
376-9668

3 Finalists Vie
For Military Crown

Competition for Military Ball
queen was narrowed from ten to
three Tuesday night.
Either Brenda Hill, Debbie
Rogers, or Suzanne Rogers will'
be crowned queen Saturday at
One of the few formal occasions
held on campus.
Miss Hill, sponsored by Beta
Theta Pi, is a lUC and hails from
Opa Locka. Tau Epsilon Phi is
sponsoring Miss Rogers, lUC,
from Coral Gables. Miss Rogers,
2UC, is sponsored by Army
Sweethearts and comes from
Ocala*
The new queen receives a
round trip ticket for two on the
Shaugnee Airlines to Fort
Lauderdale where she will stay
at the Manor Motel. In addition,
a SIOO gift certificate from Mr.
Anthonys Originals and a 28
inch trophy is given to the
queen. Her sponsoring
organization receives a S4OO set
of Encyclopedia International.
A SSO gift certificate from
Mr. Anthonys Originals and a
$lO gift certificate each from
Donigans and Maas Brothers as

Classical Music Wanted
A petition calling for more classical music on WRUF-FM is being
circulated on the UF campus by students and faculty members.
Howard Altman, a UF German instructor, said the petition is in
response to silent grumblings by faculty members who want
additional classical music broadcast by WRUF and an upgrading of the
popular music played during the day.
The faculty members and students behind the petition want at least
15 hours of additional classical mum; each week.
Bob Leach, operations manager of WRUF, said that WRUF-FM has
added a concert hall program of classical music from 10:30 p.m. to
midnight. *;
FSU Fire Causes Unknown
Causes of the blazes that destroyed FSIPs Westcott Hall, the
administrative building, late Sunday afternoon still have not been
determined, FSUs Flameau reported Wednesday.
An investigation is underway by Tallahassee Fire Chief Earl Levy.
Administrative officials are using the fourth floor of the University
Hospital for offices. Records and files are being kept in the Union.
Student records and files were saved from the fire when hundreds
of FSU students and faculty members formed bucket-brigades to
aid firemen.
A Swinging Dog's Tale
WASHINGTON (UPI) Suburban Fairfax County police told
Wednesday of a burglar who made himself at home at an exclusive
Lake Barcroft residence inhabited only by a complacent watchdog.
The intruder, they said, took a coin collection, two cameras and
other personal belongings worth $350 from William Warfields closet
safe, had a snack of ham and eggs, steak, Metrecal, six small pizzas,
fruit juice and three beers in the kitchen, then took a shower, leaving
a pair of undershorts on the bathroom floor.
Before he left the house, the burglar fed the Warfield family s
2-year-old Labrador Retriever, Chipper, for good measure.
COMlt IN, TEST YOULL SEE WHY.
J* r
Pinna Performance Specialists
615 North Main Street
Gainesville, Florida 32601
- 378-1663

well as a 17 inch trophy goes to
the first runner up.
Second runner up also
receives a 17 inch trophy, as well
as a SSO gift certificate from
Sears.
Last years Military Ball
queen, Candi Dodson will crown
the next queen during the ball
which is sponsored by H
Company Second Regiment of
the National Society 0 f
Scabbard and Blade.
A limited number of tickets
are still available from Scabbard
and Blade members at $4.50 a
couple. The 80th Army Dance
Band from Savannah Georgia
will play at the ball.
UF Choorleading
Complaints Aired
Complaints about the
selection of the UF
cheerleaders have prompted a
Student Senate hearing to be
held today in, room 356 in
the J: Wayne Reitz Union at
3:30 pjn.



SDS TAKES OVER CLASSROOM BUILDINGS
Columbia Radicals Ignore Court Injunction

By United Press International
Radical students took over
two Columbia University
buildings Wednesday, brushing
aside a court injuction against
such seizures and a handful of
other students who tried to stop
them.
Black students occupied the
presidents office at the
University of Louisville and said
they would stay put until he
meets their demands. Sociology
students carried a building
occupation at Howard
University into its third day.
A spokesman for the
demonstrators at Howard in the
nations capital vowed they
would fight fire with fire,
hostility with hostility, brutality
with brutality, and even, if it
comes to this, bullets with
bullets to win their demands.
Members of Students for a

'Hee Haw Replaces Brothers

HOLLYWOOD (UPI) -In
one of the classic turnabouts in
television programming, CBS-TV
is replacing the hostile humor of
the Smothers this summer with
the bucolic sounds of Hee
Haw.
Hee Haw doesnt
necessarily represent the last
laugh.
But somehow its fitting that
a clean-cut, uncontroversial
musical hour should replace the

U.S. Wins Word War
' ft- 'f.

LONDON (UPI)-Britain
surrendered to the United States
in the war of the words
Wednesday.
The Oxford University Press
issued a dictionary in which ye
olde Queens English makes way
for the American language.
The 1,048-page fifth edition
of the pocket Oxford dictionary
perfers curb and tire in the
Presidents English over kerb
and tyre, old standbys of the
Queenss English.
A publishers spokesman said,
The changes made for the fifth
edition are a reflection of the
social history of English since
1942 when the last edition was
published. It was shortly after
that edition that millions of Gls
began mustering in Britain for
%

THURSDAY SPECIAL
OLD FASHION
STEWED CHICKEN AQa
& DUMPLINGS
FRIDAY SPECIAL
TASTY
BAKED MEATLOAF AQa
IN CREOLE SAUCE
I I 313 W. UNIV. AVE.
mSSS BLOCK WEST OF
mililffyil] FLORIDA THEATER

reoo Snternalional
(I C

Democratic Society (SDS) took
over the Columbia University
mathematics building early in
the day and later occupied
Fayerweather Hall, another
classroom building.
Members of Students for
Columbia University, a group
opposed to disruptive
demonstrations, tried to keep
the SDS members from closing
the doors of Fayerweather Hall
but were shoved aside in a brief
fistfight.
Both buildings were
barricaded by the occupiers. A
university official, using a
bullhorn, read the temporary
injunction to the demonstrators,

strident yammering of the
brothers social satire on Vietnam
racial tensions and all the rest
unaer the disguise of
entertainment on a public
medium.
Replacing the social
consciences of the Smothers is
Buck Owens, a country boy
wno-like many another seeming
yokels-can outslicker the city
boys at will.
Owens is a strapping,

the D-Day landing of June 6,
1944.
On the way to conquer Adolf
Hitler, the Americans also
defeated some English language.
The new dictionary includes for
the first time teen-age,
teenagers, paperbacks,
T-shirts, sacred cow, and
supermarket.
Excellence in Food

and a girl demonstrator shouted
back, Were not going to let
that injunction stop us.
SDS members voted Monday
to take extremely militant and
protracted action in support of
Negro students demands. The
student Afro-American Society
(SAS) wants a black admissions
board and open enrollment for
black and Puerto Rican high
school graduates from the
Columbia area.
At. Louisville, Ky., 15 Negro
students moved into the office
of Woodrow Strickler, the
unversity president, while he was
out to lunch. They said they
would stay until he gives in to

open-faced, blond country and
western singer who is better
known in the boondocks that on
Broadway or Hollywood and
Vine.
Bom in Dallas, raised in
Phoenix, Buck has made his
home in Bakersfield, Calif., for
the past 17 years.
Owens can be as outspoken as
the Smothers boys.
Most of the country music
fans f talked to and 1 think
they speak for millions of others
said they didnt appreciate
the Smothers, Owens said.
Egg Suppliers
Thirteen southern states
supply 38 per cent of the
nations eggs.

' V
rofessional 1
on I
remises p
I
I beach I
(across From Ramada Inn) ORLANDO

their demands, including
appointment of a black student
director from a list of candidates
they proposed.
A student strike hit Rider
College in Trenton, N.J., as
demonstrators sought to win
student control of campus social
rules. The strikers sought the
right to have alcholic beverages
on campus and the abolition of
curfews for coeds.
Columbia was one of seven
camp used in New York City
affected by student unrest. City
College of New York was closed
down for a sixth academic day.

Abortion Bill Clears
House In 61 -47 Vote
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) The liberalized abortion bill finally
cleared the House by a 6147 vote Wednesday but probably will not
reach the Senate floor for about three weeks.
Rep. Don Reeds motion to reconsider Mondays 64-50 approval
was tabled despite the Boca Raton Republicans contention it was
denying a child the right to be bom.
Reed charged that the doctors are anxious to have some law to
enable them not to comply with their Hippocratic Oath.
If were going to do it, he added, we ought to do it on a more
rational basis than is provided in this bill.
The bill allows abortions to be performed by physicians if the
mothers physical health is endangered, if there is strong reason to
believe the fetus is malformed or if the pregnancy resulted from rape
or incest.
The sponsor of the Senate companion bill, Sen. Robert Shevin,
D-Miami, said he expected the House bill to be sent to the Senate
Judiciary Committee and a public hearing probably will be scheduled
in about two weeks before being voted on for floor action.
Shevin said he planned to make an attempt to restore a provision
eliminated by a closed House vote which would have permitted an
abortion to be performed if doctors believed the mothers mental
health were impaired.
I understand that 50 to 60 per cent of the cases in the other states
which have changed their abortion laws have been on the basis of
mental health, Shevin said. Well try to put it back in, if possible.

Thursday, May 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Mayor John V. Lindsay
disclosed the CCNY President
Buell Gallagher had asked for
assurance that police would not
be sent to the campus and that
the assurance had been given.
Abortions High
There is one abortion for
every eight live births in Mexico,
due to ignorance of birth control
methods, according to Dr. Luis
Lenero, director of the Mexican
Institute of Social Studies. He
reported in a study of the birth
control situation.

Page 3



Page 4

, Thu Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 1,1969

we wont letwii
*

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$2.19 ELSEWHERE. 3 2ox BTL
USTERINE *1.09
$1.05 ELSEWHERE. FAMILY SIZE TOOTH PASTE
CREST 614

r"""i
j
| BIG "0" CEREALS k
WITH THIS COUPON ONLY AT
PANTIT PUDE A Qtd STORES.
COUPON IXPIEIS MAY 7. 1969.
LmmmmmmJ

I VALOIS FOR VOMBm
Sj m% tiM 1 m PUMPKIN OR wBMjHSL B"* lil( \ 7 Xl6 WEBS. FIVE 1
I GREEN COLORS
i Lilftltd IBBIU ALUMINUM FOLDING : Swljlf\ A ALUMINUM FOLDING |
| r: nPTjt chairs : i *9mgfe l Chuae,lounge!
I TO YOUR HAPPY I C \ limited 1
$ OUTDOOR LIVING /.. \ \ -;>i QUAhtitib g
|_ .. FLORIDA STYLE! \ T MQ# # # WIOI 7 J
i S* l l MHSINHP 1 1 Hi 1 r 1 >B f| ii r'KSR I nil I I nmMnmlW r ~ Tmiii IMi I 1 Ir

[fVfgyony low PRicti]
W KOUNTY KIST.
I SWEET I
| POTATOES I
I WHOLE & PIECES. BY GiIFFN GIANT
/ $ | J

[ EVERYDAY LOW PRICE']
| KRAFTS
I MIRACLE I
I I
[ 59c J

J everyday tow pb/ce/^
flavors
ROYAL I
GELATIN I
i * 9 ( J

| EVEBYDAY tOW PtlCfi]
| FRISKIES^j
I ASST MEAT FLAVORS I
I DOG FOODS I
I 8 " s S I J

V
Daily Fresh Baked Goods
IvmJ
SAVE lid. FRISK SAKID DAILY 0" PBfl|
PK mm i*.h..3qt
PK9 OF 12. HAMBUROIR OR
HOT DOG ROILS 29<
SAVrtZd.o's. ICED ASSORTED
SWUT BUNS 3/*1
SLR 4ox OIANT OOLDIN
POUND CAKE 89*

Bit low price .'1
HARDWOOD RCOAL
DUETS I
88 c J

COMPARE! WjP-Y
CHIU W/BEANS - 5/SI.OO 5/51.45 45#
DEL MONTE CUT GREEN BEANS >-< 4/SI.OO 4/SU6 16?
FISH STICKS 3/SI.OO 3/51.17 17*
CHOC CHIP COOKIES 4/SI.OO 4/51.32 32*
TUNA FISH < S/jl.oo 5/$1.35 35*
CUT GREEN BEANS > 25* 33* 8*
DEL MONTE GARDEN PEAS > 4/JI.OO 4/SI.OB 16*
FYNE TASTE STRAWBERRY PRES. 58* 69* 11*
mars frozen coffee rich-"** 4/si.oo 4/si.i6 16*
FROZEN BAGELS 4/SI.OO 4/51.56 56*
GEORGIA PEACHES FREESTONE HALVES 4/SI.OO 4/$1.24 24*
JUNE BOY KOSHER DILLS 39* 49* 10*

[ EVERYDAY LOW PRICE! j|f
PACKED BY DEL MONTE %,yW mSbR
I ASSORTED
| VEGETABLES R
H PBIMIUM GARDEN PE AS MI S OR 11 N LIM A S gBBBSBi
AB .0 CJ GBflN 81 an MINION GOLDIN COBN
3 eo, 25 < l
CANS

r=7^7^
| FYNE-TASTE
I Strawberry I
PRESERVES I
[ 58 J

/mm "in thi *" 'N
I m SUCIP WHIT* INRICNn I
I cb Mm mm I
I BSP ioap I
l MMUIVW B J

Bay low price fl
KEEN I
IMAS I
6/i J

COMPARE! Wf-if
FROZEN FRENCH FRIES - 10/sl.oolo/$1.65 65*
LYKES POTTED MEAT *> 10* 2/29# 9#
PANTRY PRIDE FROZEN WAFFLES *< 10/SI.OOIO/$1.45 45*
PANTRY PRIDE COFFEE iu.tun,mt 49# 59# 20#
LYKES BEEF STEW 3/SI.OO 3/$1.17 17#
BUMBLE BEE RED SALMON -<" 99* $1.09 10*
PANTRY PRIDE CATSUP *> * 4/SI.OO $4/1.16 16*
CARNATION INSTANT BREAKFAST A?!L 69* 79* 10*
LONG GRAM RICE '"imh. 39* 43* 4*
MIRACLE WHIP imii 59# 67# 8*
"409" SPRAY CLEANER 77* 79# 2*
YUBAN COFFEE '< 89# 93* 4#

I EVERYDAY LOW PRICED
I
| CREAM I
' PIES I
I I

| everyday low piticm
W FONDA 0" WHITE 1
I PAPER
[ PLATES j
COUNT 99' I
Ml

| EVff?ypAy low man
IhORMEL'sH
I SPAM I
[ 3/i J

[TraYDAyLOWPfilcf/]
m JP. I
I LIBBYS
I DRINKS I
FROZEN LEMONADE, LIMEADE I
I OR ASST FRUIT DRINKS
[ iq< J



PAY TOO MUCH!
mirur tow puces good seyeu days a week. bohus boys good thuksday mu wedhesday, may 7 quantity ugmts usemved

gnus sun g
SS RIB OR Bi
FORNIA
OAST I
I 78s J

f GROUND S ]
I lean FRESH-SAVE up I
I 5 "*1.99 j

| [VERYDAY LOW RRICEn
I
| BEEF
I LIVER I
[ b 39 j

iff
- * Vt
COMPARE!
Western Spareribs W- 49' *><
Pork Loin Chops 5,, - o r"" 68' 79* 10c
Ground Beef $1.99 239 40c
Sliced Beef Liver ma 39' io<
Fryer Combination wrs? 59' e io<
Turkey Drumsticks -krtsk. 29' a* **
Fryer Breasts T.irr'-vn*- 49' *9* 20c
Breaded Fish Sticks B9c i.w-aw
Chrimn $1.49 1.99 so*

[LONG ACRE ||
CHICKEN I
SALAD I
Boz PKG.REG 69< 1

U JUMBO 50 QUART -
POLYFOAM-MOLDED j
C HANDLES FOR EASY STORING COVER |
SCAN BE USED AS SERVING TRAY I
I ICE CHEST
10,99 j

IsOHUSBoyi 1
r &
I AZALEA CHUNK STYLE I
I BRAUNSCH- I
I WEIGER I
[ 49< J

| EVERYDAY LOW PRICE f
I SLICED 1/4
I PORK LOIN
I CHOPS
1 68< J

[EVERypAylow price r]
I V'C l '- golden ripe |
I BANANAS I
KioJ

x\& i
\jSaH v N Jj
30 QUART
POLYFOAM
ALUMINUM HANDLE
BEST SELLER! Mjff
ICE CHEST 6
*...sja9^

[BONUS BUY! 1

PANTRY PRIDE I
PURE PORK
SAUSAGE j
49< J

C sirloinO
IOR BONELESS CTE Alf C I
I SHOULDER 9 EHA9 I
I (SMif I
1 3 ve npi 70uy

rtRYDAY LOW PRICE Z 1
FYNE-TASTE "B
SLICED
BACON
* 59< j

_ __ _ OUR IVIRY PRO*.
COMPARE! *. iv
Beef/Cube Steaks "SM"" 79' 89* ioc
Breaded Steaks G *VEAI OR CHUCKWAGOM 79' 89< IOC |
Fyne Spred Soft Oleo "asr 33' 4 5 < u Cream Cheese skt 29' 39* io*|
Hygrade Cheese Loaf * 59' i<*|
Solid Oleo ,Amnm 11 2/29' as* u |
Sliced American Cheese 69' 79* 10*
Boneless Beef Stew ,rSSL 68' 79* 10*
Lamb Roast Ksr 49' 20* |

T 39* I 1 GALLON
L|#J CAPACITY
ICE
E|jP|BIICKET
gSii gSiigg&
gg& gSiigg& z)f

J EVERYDAY LOW PRICE
w
I r*\VSK WRAPPEO 1
CARROTS I
| a. lo< J

Pantry
Pride
DISCOUNT FOODS

[ BONUS BUY!
I
I CARROT J
SALAD I
[ " 39' J

/>> gUnoniw A
f rKEan radea> 1
FRYERS
I fifmuTj I
J luiniMj I

I EVERYPAy Law ASiCt f]
W BONELESS. .BuGsfjJf I
I BEEF I
I STEW I
I lb JL jEEf I
GROUND Vw JPm >
op pitch WfoJB 9LJB

U4. NO. 1 FANCY SWEET J
ML CORN
EAR JB £ V
J
fmtar]FRANKS lb 69*
l*£!M FRANKS lb 79*

^reshTkkeT"
I POLE I
B |7 S
L 1/( 1

Us i
QUART i
lm*A COOLER i
Sgp WITH ROPE
handle
,jf 77* j

Thursday, May 1,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

GAINESVILLES
LOWEST
FOOD
PRICES!
1349 N.W. 23rd AVENUE
IN AM. FIELDS PLAZA
927 NORTH MAIN AT THE
CORNER OF 10th STRUT

I EVERYDAY LOW PRICE .'1
chuck]
ROAST I
j

igSgjGmtHD IU
-mSrJL- SLICED TURKEY HH
m ZTgB'J AND GRAVY OR
w *: rolls Jh||
I 1.29

§AY LOW PRICE!]
rrrr
ORIDA I
ANGES I
I
_JLJ

INSULATED I
COOLER
CHESTS I
APRICOT AMO AVOCADO-COLORS-AAOLDIO Os f
HIOH DINSITY UNIAR POIYITHYIIIII IN MIR ft
AND OUTIR SHILL ANO COVIR-MIAVY DUTY
COVIR HATCHIS- RICISMD SWINO HAN DUS* |
LI AK PR OOF SPOUT.
32 QUART £ OO i
S9.99YALUI! SOo9^B

Page 5



!. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 1,1969

Page 6

Write About
Internationals
Parviz Karbassi, editor of this
terms International Revue,
needs some help from other
foreign students, Peace Corps
Volunteers, and other
internationally minded people.
In order to get university
students, their activities and
their countries into the news,
Parviz requests that
contributions on the subject of
international activities be turned
in at the International Center.

YOUNG SCIENTISTS SOUGHT
Sleep Lab Wants Students

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second in a series about the
advances of UFs new sleep
laboratory in the field of sleep
research.)
By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Alligator Staff Writer
The director of UFs sleep lab
would like to make an important
change in his department -he
would remove the keep out
sign which has traditionally hung
cm laboratory doors.
Since the research is being
financed with public money, he
feels the man in the street has a
right to see what is being done.
But laboratory head Harmon W.
Agnew, Jr. also has a motive. He
hopes to lure young people into
the field.
What we are looking for are
people who think that they
would like to go into science. We
prefer young scientists.
Agnew got his bachelors
degree in philosophy at Duke
University and today maintains
that a persons undergraduate
major has little bearing on what
field he later goes into. Another
erf his ideas is to begin a
volunteer program in his
laboratory which he says worked
wdl at Duke. Students who are
interested in investigating the
field of sleep research could
volunteer for all types of work
in the laboratory. Agnew is
willing to teach them the skills if
they repay him by practicing on
lab work which needs to be
done.
Some tasks students could do
are computer programming,
equipment building, monitoring
subjects and record keeping.
Agnew also plans a sleep
index for his lab which would
tabulate sleep data and record in
a computer what has been
published all over the world. He
hopes the index, once
completed, would serve other
unifersities, too.
Students with a proficency in
foreign languages could help in
the abstracting.
To complete the index

OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
- Mon. thru Fri
1236 N.W. 3rd Ays
gator I
ads sell I

DROPOUTS
f YOJR KINPfsIESS 1
TO IRVINS HAS
OVERCOME HIS
NxruSM-

(which requires a computer, data
card files, and a copying
machine to reporduce the
original articles) as well as to put
finishing touches on the new lab,
costs money the department
does not have to spend.
The lab is conducting two
other experiments in addition to
the isolation study.
In testing the effects of the
Jet Age on our internal clock,
researchers have found it takes
the body about 12 days to
recover from a flight around the
world.
The lab is also studying
naturally long and short sleepers
to find if the difference in sleep
amount makes any difference.
Five stages of sleep into
which we move back and forth
about 30 times during the night
are known to scientists.
Stages I to IV range from
lightest to deepest sleep. The
young adult spends about 70
minutes in Stage IV. The fifth,
or REM (rapid eye movement)
stage, is the dream state. It
begins 40 minutes after a young
person falls asleep and lasts from
40 to 90 minutes.
Researchers have prevented
subjects from entering certain
stages. They have found that
their sleepers presistently try to
get more deep sleep, although
they take the longest time to
recover from loss of dream time.
The effects of the lack of
these stages are subtle, but even
rafter a week, some experiments
have shown a lack of dream time
to make the subject more
unstable and hupersensitive.
Sometimes deprival of deep
sleep makes the individual
depressed.
Agnew is working with an old
associate, Dr. Wilse Webb, head
of the psychology department,
in his research. Many articles
from the University of Florida
about sleep research have been
published. Original contributions
have been made in several areas,
one of which is stage IV sleep.
In discussing what is known
about sleep, Dr. Webb, has

t c HAS )
PE.VELOPEP AN
ATTACHMENT A
fob.
United f*ut Sndko. I*C-

reached one conclusion. People
should worry less about their
sleep than they do. There is no
good evidence to sustain claims
of health or performance in
school on loss of sleep, he said.

CELEBRATE TODAY
J.
Ek HR
ANNIVERSARY
f - .r
Were two years old today. Come to our BIRTHDAY
party all day long today. Share our cake. It will be
cut at 2:30 in the snack bar. Lots of free BIRTHDAY
gifts. Come see if theres one for you.
LOOK WHAT A NICKEL WILL BUY
' ON THE COLONADE
8:30-11:00 am n : 3<) am-1:00 pm
DOUGHNUTS 2 for 5< HOT DOGS 2 Nickels
-hot from our own machine or one thin dime
COFFEE j us a Ni<;ke | PEPSI one 5 <
2:30 pm 6:45-8:00 pm
FREE Birthday Cake ICE CREAM CONES 5<
to complimentVour coffee full-size scoop
ON THE TERRACE
FREE BAND CONCERT
. 6:45 pm GATOR BAND
''" l ~ l

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
1 private bedroom hr
A I each student one
Mt I A block behind norman
JM i A hall
m%nck ;
|J 1J APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AVE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT-CALL 372-2662

BY HOWARD POST

|ii!ii



rMsSm :
*
miBiM&S,;. :aJgfe>fcJi^MHiMMHMHEl^^^B^^M§^^BHMilLj...
.ggl^MT
dfifeiMp J| f
M M--lliiC
-lliiC- M--lliiC H % 4,..> wf
W .HI
fli IrIIBR ! MK
i; ;
FELIX ATROX
v
jj This ferocious creature, the Felix Atrox, was the granddaddy of*
jjthe big cats. Half again as large as an African lion, it preyed on:|:
j: elephant-like mammoths, mastodons, sloths and other large game ofs
jjthe Ice Ages. It became extinct when they did, 10,000 to 12,OOo5:
j:years ago. The toothy skull is on exhibit here at the Florida State:*:
£ Museum, part of the UF. j;j

Faculty Grants Awarded
To Encourage Research

UF professors will conduct
research this summer on subjects
ranging from C.S. Lewis
romantic love theory to nuclear
energy conversion and sleep
learning in young adults.
This is the twelfth summer
faculty grants have been
awarded on a competitive basis
through the UFs Graduate
School.
The appointments were given
to encourage younger faculty
members to initiate research
studies. Selections were made on
the basis of research proposals
submitted to the Graduate
School, with recommendations
by the Graduate Faculty

UF Selected To Host
IEEE Student Meet

The UF has been selected to
host the 1970 Region 111
(Southeast) Institute of
Electrical and Electronic
Engineers Student Convention
next April.
M.H. Latour, associate
professor of electrical
engineering and faculty advisor
for the universitys IEEE student
chapter, and a five-student
university delegation captured
the convention at the 1969
meeting at Raleigh, N.C.
Latour, who as chairman of
the Region 111 student activities
committee will plan the 1970
convention program, said 37
engineering schools in 10 states
are in the Southeast Region of
IEEE.
Fourteen papers reporting
original research results will be
presented by students here next
year and open forum discussions
will air problems in engineering
education.
University students who
attended the Raleigh meeting
were: Richard Motta and Albert
i, TiC^n-rrwi.
Just a walk away
from U.F. campus a
1620 w UN,V I
V 4 fUNIVERSITY PLAZA $
Bettes \
& harstyust/J
X Ph. 378-2244

Committee approval by the
Graduate School dean and
appointment by the Research
Council.
The 12 recipients, respective
fields and research proposals are:
Dr. David N. Aspy, education,
relationship of teachers
knowledge of subject matter
and classroom performance; Dr.
Larry E. Bennett, chemistry,
electron transfer, and Richard
W. Bowles, music, composing for
small brass ensembles.
Others include Dr. Corbin S.
Carnell, English, C.S. Lewis
romantic love theory; Dr.
William H. Ellis, nuclear
engineering sciences, energy

W. Morneault, both of St.
Petersburg; Carl J. Aiduck and
Kent Swan, both of Miami, and
James Gunter, Vero Beach.
Motta is a graduate student, the
others undergraduates.

HELD OVER BY POPULAR DEMAND
VNS NITE
TONIGHT-G 'Til
All your bar drinks yg
25*
If you don't know what
V -N's night is f show up
tonight for your second chance

PANEL DISCUSSIONS PLANNED
Food & Ag Spotlight Careers

Careers in agricultural areas
of science, technology business
and social science will, be
discussed during the UF
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences Career
Day, May 3.
Panel discussions will be held
in the morning and then the
group will be guests at the
Orange and Blue football game
Saturday afternoon at Florida
Field.
Panelists are Dr. A. H.
Krezdorn, crop sciences,
covering agronomy, fruit crops,
ornamental horticulture, and
vegetable crops; Dr. C. B.
Browning, animal sciences,
including animal, dairy, poultry,
and veterinary science; and Dr.
C. F. Eno, soils and agricultural
engineering.

conversion, and M.J.
Hardman-de-Bautista,
anthropology', study of Jagaru,
Aymara and Kawki in Peru.
Also receiving awards are Dr.
Ward Hellstrom, English, book
on A.L. Tennysons poetry;
Lawrence A. Hetrick 111,
English, study of the traditional
narrative and lyric techniques in
American ballads, and Dr.
Charles A. Hoffman,
anthropology and social
sciences, survey of the peoples
and cultures of the Caribbean.
The others are Max H. Kele,
history, Austrian Nazi Party
during World War 1; Dr. C.
Michael Levy, psychology, sleep
learning in young adults, and
Lynn M. LoPucki, business law,
effects of the proposed uniform
consumer credit code on
business practices.

Dr. H. B. Clark will counsel
on agricultural business and
social science, with emphasis on
agricultural economics,
agricultural education and
extension, and general
agriculture. Dr. R. A. Dennison
will discuss food science.
School of Forestry Director
J. L. Gray will cover forest
resources, including general
forestry, wildlife ecology, forest
products technology,
recreational resources,
management, timber
management, and industrial
forestry.
Dr. L. H. Purdy will talk on
non-commodity agricultural

DIAMONDS
and JEWELRY
SAVE Ejn %
UP TO VV
Roadot S W. 13th

's£s|
f eye-lushes
(We call them 'Fluffy-Full) I
Theyrethelushest,plushesteyelashesaround.
(Weve perfected a sexy, shaggy, 'feather-cut 1
thats the absolute end in eye-lushery.) Yet they §
feel o light on your lids, you wouldnt know Ij
them from your own. What else is new? I
Theyre permanently shaped and curled. Even |
\ water-proof! So you can swim in them. Sleep I
in them. Weep in them. Theyll never wilt. Or J
droop. Or lose their r eye-lush 9 look. f|
From the incomparable collection
of ey elashery by
Revlon
Available at:
Campus Shops and Bookstore

Thrusday, May 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

sciences botany, bacteriology,
plant pathology, entomology,
and nematology.
After the panels there will be
time for informal discussions
with students, so that specific
questions may be answered. The
professors from various areas of
agriculture will be avialable for
further counseling during lunch
and in the
I Miller-Brown I
I I
NORTH OF d OV
THE MALL Mfl
376-4552
I AUTHORIZED
I DEALER |

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, Mey 1,1969

The Florida Alligator
.iiiir" iiL~ "The price of freedom
*s the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Picitaim Managing Editor
All
Carol Sanger Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
Assignments Editor News Editors
A/
JHjF J
* Cross of Lorraine

Staff Writing -
Gator Did Good Job

By Glenda Cohn

Os course Shepherd won the
poll what else can you expect
from the Alligator?
This comment and others like
it have been commonly heard on
campus during the past few
weeks.
Accusations of bias and
poll-rigging have been hurled at
the Alligator not from
politicos, not from people with
evidence, not from people with
journalistic knowledge but
from average students who made
the charges because its the thing
todo.
I am not saying the Alligator
stands above criticism. But
before making a charge as
important to a serious journalist
as bias, the critic should have
...... r
evidence to support the charge.
I worked on the pre-election
pools and I wrote articles about
the candidates. I know the
emphasis that was placed on
objectivity in reporting
campaign news, as in all news.
,i ' . ,_
The polls were completely
random. Every tenth name was
picked from the current student
directory. The person answerine

the telephone was informed that
the call was for an Alligator
survey and asked who they
would vote for. Answers were
talleyed and then reported as
found. .
The Alligator policy for
gathering news from policical
candidates was fair and
objective.. All candidates were
invited to come to the office at
any time to give a policy or
platform statement. All such
statements were printed, space
permitting (this is a necessary
condition for any story; the
amount of space available
depends on the amount of
advertising bought).
Candidates were informed
when ,to come to the office to
answer the Question of the Day;
if a candidate did not appear of
his own will at the Alligator
office or call in his statement,
the statement did not appear in
the Alligator.
The only conditions under
which reporters left the Alligator
office to get a story about a
candidate was to cover a debate
or other public function. All

EDITORIAL
/-.-' ; V :, - r -r \~ : ;*
No Time To Waste

Tonights inauguration ceremonies begin
the second administration of Charles
Shepherd as Student Body President.
His successful campaign to become the
first student to hold the office for a second
term was run on pledges of academic reform
and other promises.
Shepherd thinks the need for academic
reform is the most pressing issue and we
agree. However, there are several other areas
we would like Shepherd to deal with.
Investigate the abolition of University
College progress tests as proposed in his
campaign. Can UC be run without using this
type of testing?
Appoint a student-faculty student-faculty-administration
-administration student-faculty-administration commission to investigate
the racial situation on campus and its
relation to the city of Gainesville. Give the
group a deadline to meet and have them
submit a written report detailing the current
situation, the committees evaluation of the
current situation and suggestions for action.
I Appoint a commission of students to
investigate relations between UF students
and Gainesville merchants. Require the same
type of written report as above.
t Investigate the possibility of starting a
student cooperative -a department-type
store on campus owned by Student
Government.
*. k- -*
t Initiate an investigation into the
charges of widespread cheating on campus.
The many unproved charges by many groups

other information was obtained
during the voluntary
appearances of the candidates at
the office.
Alligator policy was to refuse
publication of any
mudslinging statements by
any candidate. Only policy
statements were allowed.
Not only in seeking news, but
in reporting it, the emphasis was
on objectivity. In a staff meeting
and throughout the. campaign,
the editors diligently reminded
the reporters to remain
objective. All stories, as part of
normal procedure, were checked
by editors to guard against bias.
Many students feel that
because the Alligator endorsed a
candidate on the editorial page,
the news pages reflected the
endorsement. The editorial page
is the responsibility of the
editors* only; the news pages are
separate. It is the right
and duty of every newspaper to
have an editorial policy and to
keep it separate from the news.
The Alligator did an admirable
job of this during the campaign
and will continue to do so as
normal policy.

xisfrjp,^y-/ I i li m
I I 1U Ik
I I iaJLI
JL *- I nr ILyr/pk
#|V% I J |H A
(krfe=^r.i^^sjSL
& 77ie Union TOO Sterile?
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the Univenity of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Phone 39? ? e V;, AdVertssin9 office# in Room 33 . Reitz Uni n
Phone 392-1681, 392-1682, or 392-1683.
>
i _ v
or ISTrZS'Ti the F,or,d Alligator are those of the editors
Florida*" f the articl nd not those of the University of
i r,

need to be verified or stopped.
A re-evaluation of the Honor Court to
determine if it is functioning properly, if the
trials should be open to the public, are the
rates of conviction or acquittal too high or
low, etc.
An evaluation of the Action
Conference proposals and their progress to
date. Did the Conference accomplish
anything substantial or was it just a public
relations tool as several people have charged.
Implement Omicron Delta Kappas plan
for an outside firm to evaluate and study
Student Government for improvements in
economy, efficiency, etc.
There are other situations that must be
dealt with, but we would like to see
Shepherds administration make substantial
gains in the areas outlined above.
Shepherd said he would begin working
for the betterment of SG and the university
one minute after his inauguration. It wont
be too soon.
Senate Paradox
With the Student Senate voting Tuesday
night not to give outgoing Student Body
President Clyde Taylor the funds necessary
to pay for tonights inauguration banquet it
is interesting to us that the senators attended
a cookies and punch reception for
themselves after the meeting adjourned.
The Senate wants to have its cake and eat
it too.



Roles Reversed
MR. EDITOR:
A lot of women would say, yes, this IS all men are good for. But
evidence from the past has shown this to be false.
Men have held the highest, most influential positions in every phase
of government. The only criteria of success whould be to access our
present situation. Let us examine the accomplishments of these so
called leaders of the last century: Two World Wars, Korean War,
Vietnam War, nuclear arsenals sufficient enough to annihilate the
world, tax evasion by millionares while others scrounge for food,
corrupt politics, etc.
I say, this isn t all men are good for. Family roles even now are
beginning to change, with the husband taking over or at least helping
in the area of cooking, cleaning, and bottle-washing. Who knows?
Maybe if this reversal of roles is completed there may yet be hope for
the future.
IRIS GREENBERG 3ED

i
m m
' r -' _; % M
~ jSHKaJfIEBML: "tiSSKS'I
THE IDEAL MAN
... Who Knows?

I l l! I

i Schoolroom Behavior (
By Richard M. Krieg 4

In 1899, William James
stated: You make a great, a
very great mistake, if you think
that psychology, being the
science of the minds laws, is
something from which you can
deduce definite programs and
schemes and methods of
instruction for immediate
schoolroom use. Psychology is a
science, and teaching is an art;
and sciences never generate arts
directly out of themselves.
Although true for some time,
James assertion lost its
relevance with the advent of
behavioral psychology.
Behavioral psychologists are not
interested in the minds laws,
but rather in the experimental
analysis of behavior.
From their standpoint,
learning is merely a form of
behavior and teaching consists of
arranging contigencies that bring
about changes in behavior. Thus,
behavioral laws are directly
applicable to education, and
one versed in their use is
particularly qualified to note the
shortcomings of present
educational design. r
Even the most cursory look
at the school of today reveals

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIII
.it should be
pointed out (as Charles
Fulwood did in his recent
letter) that JOMO does
not wish to foster racism
or hatred, nor instigate
violence. Im not sure the
same can be said for our
Ken Morrisons, Mark
Johnsons and Stephen
OConnells!
iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii

Some Apologies Due To JOMO

MR. EDITOR:
I note with dismay and anger that our campus newspaper, which is
so quick to report racial incidents on the campus and allow, if not
encourage the use of its columns to disseminate the information that
JOMO is either responsible or involved in these incidents, has reported
i the arrest of three persons allegedly for these incidents, but has failed
f to point out that none of these three people are JOMO members. This
I information was available to the Gainesville Sun, and one would
' assume the Alligator could have also used it.
I I feel that Ken Morrison, Mark Johnson and Stephen C. OConnell
not only owe JOMO an apology, as requested earlier this week by
I Prof. Megill, but should retract in print their statements implying
and/or saying that JOMO was involved in these campus incidents.
Aside from the fact that none of their statements were proven at
the time they were issued (which should have been reason enough for
these men to have refrained from such assertions), they have now
been shown to be grossly inaccurate.

pronounced deficiencies. The
amount of information that
students retain is small. Many
teachers are unable to teach. In
addition, all Students progress at
about the same rate through
approximately the same course
material (track systems no
exception). These probelems are
procedural their resolution is
almost assured.
At the present time, however,
a far greater need is apparent. It
arises from the lack of training
in behavioral techniques that
teachers receive and is
manifested in non-implementa non-implementation
tion non-implementation of these techniques in
contemporary schools. For
example, aversive control, which
produces many negative side
effects is used dialy in the
educational system.
If positive reinforcement
measures were applied instead, a
fair assumption would be that
such problems as truancy, the
school dropout, school
vandalism, and apathy towards
learning could drastically be
reduced.
Techniques of, behavior
modification are established and

\ w

quite effective in shaping
desireable classroom behaviors.
In one recent instance, a group
of Michigan elementary school
teachere were instructed in the
use of behavioral techniques.
The results were striking.
Better classroom management
was invariably attained and
problem children, eagerly
participated in the classroom.
Moreover, individual problems
that might have intensified in a
normal school setting, were
alleviated and replaced by
constructive behaviors.
Techniques derived form the
experimental and applied
analysis of behavior will be an
integral component in the
training of future teachers. Yet,
most educational graduates
obtain, at most, only a passing
knowledge of behavioral
methodology.. This r is
deplorable.
The time has long been due
for all teachers to be aware of
behavioral theorys potential and
applicability to their
professions.- For the many
children suffering through this
neglect, time is runnign out.

Sweet Home

MR. EDITOR:
It seems that every once in a
while when student government
elections are pending some of
the candidates seize upon the
plight of the married students on
this campus to further their
ends. Now it seems that John
Mica wants to save us from the
awful destiny of having to live in
Flavet 111 and wants to have
these ugly shacks eradicated.
May I as a resident in this
village for the last four years say
a few words of defense for the
place: What other living area on
campus has as big and beautiful
trees as Flavet? What other area
has a more genuine community
spirit? Where else can married
students get free paint to fix
their apartments to their own
tastes?
Where else can they have only
the university furniture they
want and then have it removed if
they get some furniture of their
own? Where else can they

Nor do I feel the Alligator has performed its function well in
allowing such inflamatory use of its columns, as was typified by Mark
Johnsons a few days ago, but even if one were to excuse this as part
of reporting the news, certainly such reporting should have
included today the information that JOMO was not responsible for
the incidents.
I have heard comments to the effect that this clears JOMO, so
everything is OK now. Such a statement is not only arrogant but has
no basis in reality since JOMO doesnt need to be cleared by the
campus or white community. We indicted them with no evidence. It is
our arrogance with which we should be concerned, and not salve our
consciences by such absurd statements.
Lastly it should be pointed out (as Charles Fulwood did in his
recent letter) that JOMO does not wish to foster racism or hatred, nor
instigate violence. Im not sure the same can be said for our Ken
Morrisons, Mark Johnsons and Stephen C. OConnells!
'.C
NORMA P. MUNN

Discovered Dead

MR. EDITOR:
The body of George was
found in his apartment last
night. Oh, George. You are
dead. I am so sorry. If you
could only know how sorry I
am.
An autopsy is being
performed to
determine'... misuse of
drugs is suspected....
Oh George. You were
unhappy. And no one knows
who died." Your sad
face ... Dead? George ...
A nineteen-year-old Sante
Fe student was found
dead ... A couple years ago
you took your buddies
places, helped them get
liquor, and drank more than
they did. Drank yourself
happy or numb. You would
have liked to have talked with
them but they didnt know
about talking.
i . misuse of
drugs ... found dead ... His
name was George. There was
a gentleness about ydu, a
sensitivity ... and a tragedy.
You were never the rowdy
your were supposed to be.
You borrowed copies of
Nietzche and Dostoevsky
from me when you were in
high school. Your friends
thought you were crazy.
- The body of George was

Thursday, May 1,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

manage to have their electricity
bill amount to only two or three
dollars a month?
Where else are they allowed
to have their own washing
machines or refrigerators in
student housing and have
washing lines where it costs
them nothing to dry the clothes?
And last but not least where can
they get a two bedroom
apartment for only $29.50 a
month?
I believe that for many
students that low rent is
enabling them to stay in school.
Furthermore many students
much prefer to be able to give
their apartments a more personal
look by using old and re-finished
furniture than to be doomed to
live in Sears, Roebuck interiors
for years on end. Lets keep the
destruction of Flavet the
perennial April Fools joke of
the THREE PRESS.
JOHANNA IBARGUEN

found ... An autopsy ...
The body of George. No
longer George. Dead? George,
can you be dead? You found
the ghetto; the ghetto in
transition. If you had been
there in the old days, it might
have been good for you. You
could have talked and read
and even smelled a flower if
you wanted. They would
have let you.
... found dead in his
apartment, An autopsy is
being performed to
determine the exact cause
of death.
But George. You must
have reached the depths of
unhappiness. You didnt
deserve to be that unhappy.
... a nineteen-year-old
student, George ...Who
found you . dead?
Someone who cared about
you? Someone who cried for
you and not just because they
found a dead person? Oh, I
hope so George. Is someone
else sorry that you died?
Misuse of drugs is'
suspected in the death of a
nineteen year old student.
His body was found in his
apartment last night. And
your grandfather probably
doesnt even know youre
dead.
NAME WITHHELD

Page 9



Page 10

at
pu. $ ""we reserve'the
# CM 19 C \
Borden a Assorted Flavors (limit 2) rom ,lor,dal Uttle Riv.r u n ..a.on.d Keefcler Crisp Fresh
Ice Cream ..... << VAC W P Cabbage 49c Vanilla Wafers 'i39 e
V,,m gal. P*~ Flondnl Litth. Siv.r 5.,.d 7 N.hisc. ch~.lt. chip C^*,.
Halved or Sliced Yellow-Cling > 't Swamp Cabbage # F& P Peaches 4?.S*l ... pSCt 41~l
.. ~ Tee, Upton'S
Ch.rn,. 0~.,.. ,.. M|lp ,^ or .. Instant Tea a l K
Hi-* Drinks 4:*1 SS~~
Cocktail ggg g s£* $1 Our
Heinz V C
Tomato Ketchup 29 e P ~ge ... 4>i
Pillsbury Flour £ 49* "'"Z^
Red Heart Iwss, Boot, or Liver FUII6 JUICO e bot 49 trsnn OnMnn
B| AM *V 1.b.1, Ugeld Cut Com m IbOOc
Pog Food B'ST*l Metrecal .. 3 S3 ; fSThTie^T*" I '' ~ B9 <
Giant Bold Deviiecl'crabs
Limit 1 wftfc o*Wr porch. .* $5 .00 or mor. ~.£,£ *.tif* Topping 4 'J** $ 1 Hl#ton'. Stuffy Fill* of
'L

K Tin Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 1,1969



- SWIFTS PREMIUM EITHER HALF OR WHOLE
Fully-Cooked
ams {
PRICES ARE EFFECTIVE
THRU WEPNESDAY NOON J&L

Innu M^ r .--
MAY 7,1969
(Our SDept,
Dtlicioui German Stylo
Bologna 79c
Kitchen-Fresh Tasty
Potato Salad ,.39 c
Fresh Zesty Flavored
Cole Slaw Ib 39c
Always A Family Favorite!
Bar-B-Q Fryers b 79 c
~lfrom Our OfreO Seafood £sef)f.
ieofood Treat! Fresh Florida
Spanish Mackerel b 33 c
ieafood Treat! Florida Groan
Small Shrimp (b 79 c
mmsm
B , Bk W g
Pi I o r J
9B3BHES
*[ Monte P >n(ipple-Grapefrwit
Drink 4*l
lel Monte Quality
Spinach 5?..? *1
*' Monte Cut
Sreen Beans ... 5 tV, *1
yke* Hearty
Jeef Stew 49 e
* i,h eo "*r Lykes
-hili .... a lsm $1
can* I
ykes Corned Beef
Hash 3' s *l
cans
yke To *y Vienna
Sausage 5 *1
w 'H's AII-p urpoie
ew< < Oil 4 LV 59*

m

PUBLIX

w . T"-' -
QAINESVICLE mall
2630 N.W. 13th Street
t&nmmsrn***,

\cfrrm (Our fhl 'iiy *'
Blue Bonnet Regular
Margarine \'H:33 C
Publix Corn Oil
Margarine .... 311*: *1
Swift's Allsweet
Margarine 29 c
Pillsbury Delicious
Cinnamon Rolls 9 ?.* oz 31 c
Breakstone's Tasty
Cottage Cheese V*, 59 c
Dairi-Fresh Dalicious
Cottage Cheese .... *,£ 59 c
Wisconsin Choaso Bar Flavorfol
Longhorn Cheese ... b 89 c
Miss Wisconsin Blunt
Medium Cheddar .. '!£ 67 c
Kraft's Individually Wrappad
Sliced Cheese JT69 c
(American, Swiss, Pi manta) A
Florida Fresh
EGGS **>,. 79<
Grade A, Medium
j
O'.
Of)cwn ((produce -OLane
U. S. No. 1 All Purpose
Potatoes
10 lb. bee 59*
Juicy Frtfli Florid
Grapefruit 8 lb. bap 49 e
Large Florida Pa*al
Celery 2 talk*l5 C
Crisp Juicy Mclntosh
Apples 3 b.b- 49 e
Fresh Tangy Sweat
Pineapples 3 89*

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street

r Swift's Premium Delicious Staak,
London Broil ib. s l
Swift's Premium Proten
Chuck Steaks ib.79*
Swift's Premium Proten Bone-In
Pot Roast
*
Swift's Premium Boneless
Imperial Roast ib. 89*
Swift's Premium Boneless English Cut
Beef Roast ... ib.99*
Swift's Premium Beef
Short Ribs ... u>.s9*
Swift'. Premium Tru-Tandar Sliced
Beef Liver ib. 69 c
Swift'. Premium Brabnschweiger or
Sandwich Spread 2 chubs 69 c
Armour'. Star White A Dark Moat
Turkey Roast, (with gravy) pk V *2 89
Armour'. Star All White Moat
Turkey Roast (with gravy) 2 '££' $ 3 89
Copaland'. Ta.ty Stick
Braunschweiger ib. 49 c
~
Tarnow'. Ta.ty 5 01. 10 os. I os.
Sliced Bologna 25 C 45 c 59 c
Ceek-Quik Breaded
Veal Steaks '££' 89 c
Harman'. Orange Band Sliced
Luncheon Meats 3J,y.. $ l
(Pickle Loaf, Oliva Loaf, Bologna)
Swiff*. Premium Pork
Roll Sausage 69 c
(Pla. SO Infra SAH Groan Stamp, with caupaa)
Premium Label All Moat
Swift's Franks p£ 69 c
(Plus 50 Cxtra SJkM Groen Stamps with coupon)
L *~i I- ji

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
Ml. University Avenue at 34th Street
Stores hours: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat
rnmmmmmmmmm, nmiiim

Thursday, May 1,1969, The Florida Alligator,

EXTRA
WITH THtl COMMON *M PHICHAII Os
Swift's Premium Half or Whola
Fully-Cooked Smoked Hams
lb. 59c
1. (Expires Wed. May 7,1969)
EXTRA
MreenStampsn
WITH (Hit COUPON AHi PHiCHAtI OP Btiiol
I Reg. or Menthol
Aqua Velva Shave Lot jn
10 oz. can
2. (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969)
EXTRA P pH^|
WITH THIS COUPOH AND PUtCHAII OP
<
Johnson Baby Shampoo
7 oz. size
1 a
I (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969)
I<
I
i
Johnson Baby Powder ,_J
9 oz. or 14 oz. can
4. (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969)
|g|
Ii
Stouffer's Potatos
Au Gratin
IIV2OZ. pkg.
5 (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969)
EXTRA B^SI
dWGreenStamps |gj
Lambrecht's Pizza
With Sausage & Cheese
14 oz. pkg. j \
\ 6. (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969)
EXTRA PF 5^!
Q
<
>
King Size Lolly Pops
1 lb. pkg.
T
7 (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969) ;
EXTRA
Old Dutch Sweet & ; [
; Sour Dressing ; [
8 oz. bot. ; [
I 8. (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969)
M extra nP p^|
dWGreen Stamps ys*j
1
I Carnation Coffee Mate
| 6 oz. jar <
| 9 (Expires Wed. May 7, 1969) <
EXTRA ¥***%
g
Swift's Premium Pork
Roll Sausage
1 lb. pkg. 69c
> 10. (Expires Wed. May 7,1969)
xeeeeaaesftsefleeikeeeer>nftftreefteeAX
EXTRA |F*W
dWGreenStampsiPJ
I Premium Label All-Meat
Swift's Franks
1 lb. pkg. 69c
(Expires Wed. May 7, 1969)
XftftftfteeemuuuuuuMU>> e>eftftSftaawwiiftneeax
CliPand^
VVTfIESE
aoanaaaas
pil
,-^s|
(jJhteQlvfWityii&F*-Uotunt,

Page 11



n own www u Ofwwtnnwnwfyyinnnweeepeeea
GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE I
Gibson Electric Guitar, perfect cond.,
Firebird 3-pickups, $l5O, was $250
new. Call Walt, 376-1474.
(A-st-122-p)
Vashica TL-Super. TTL meter, f 1.7
Auto-Yashlnon lens. Mirror lock.
Shutter speed B-l/1000. With case,
$l4O. Ph. 372-3002 (A-st-122-p)
Poolside French Quarter Apt. for 4
to sublease for summer $l5O month
378-6039. (B-4t-127-p)
JBL
"Hard, fnnn?
and soon#
-RENATA ADLER. N Y. TIMES
NORMAN MAILER'S
by GROVE PRESS
May 4 & 5
7 & 9 P.M.
Union Aud*
I
jm w*
11 I mRS 113 p 3
JOIN CfNTUVT 0 WKStNTS
TH* MAGUS
A WDHN-WNKK6 PRODUCTION
MKCTfO If JCWNfIAT at
JOHN FCWI£S
ASfO UfON M* OWN MOVCt
FANAMSON* Colf*Fi'CUXi
ALSO AT 10:40
COLOR by Dri-Utf

A Film by NORMAN MAHER L |
presented by Grove Press 1 /|J| IÂ¥ | I
"It has guts, humor, Bgjwd
"Jl series of terrifying and Wlm- ~
fenny confrontations with
murderers gamblers* perverts, J
prostitutes, pimps and
innocents played by a
rare assortment of
professionals including Rip
Torn and Beverly Bentley i
and amateurs like George 1* J
PlimptOn ."-VINCENT CANBY. N Y TIMES M
DONT MISS IT! r&M
THIS SUNDAY!


| FOR SALE I
Beautiful Brazilian guitar for sale at
bargain price. Owner has hardly
used. Call 372-6284 after 6 p.m.
(A-3t-124-p)
6O Opel station wagon very
engine very good; new crankshaft &
other parts; passed inspection $250
Call 378-8610 anytime. (A-st-122-p)
8x47 Ventura mobile home. Bay
windows, air conditioned, 7x20
porch awning, 2nd BR made into
study, furnished. $1990. Call
376-0622, 4546 NW 13 St.
(A-lt-121-P)
N.
Get a Mau Mau mongrel. Itll chev
anything from bones to steef.
Champion lines. Pedigree African
barkless Basenji pups. All shots.
376-2630j > (A-lot-119-p)
Extra clean mobile home 8x35 close
to campus, nice lot, plenty of
storage. Call weekdays after 5
254-2580. SI3OO. (A-5M25-P)
5 mo. old Ovation electric guitar with
Gibson amplifier in excellent
condition, S3OO. Call 378-9824
Morn. (A-5M25-P)
Fender Bassman Amp. with Lansing
speakers, $450. Gibson EB-O Bass
guitar, burgandy hollow-body. Call
John at 376-7050. (A-3M25-P)
Black Doberman Female Cham Champion
pion Champion sired 9mo old. House broken,
all shots, ears trimmed, 3 Dobes and
4 kids=too much SIOO.OO. Call
376-9020. (A-5M25-P)
Martin D-18 steel string guitar in
excellent condition. S6O case
included S3OO. 1965 Honda "Sport
90 in good condition with helmet
$165. Call Bill 378-4932.
(A-5M25-P)
1967 Honda 50, under 3000 miles,
just tuned, side basket. sllO. Call
376-8322 after 5 p.m.
GIVE AWAY 1968 Honda S9O
$275, bought car need cash, call
HAMMER 3 72-9353, 372-6162.
Tools plus 2 helmets included free.
(A-3t-126-p)
1967 Honda CBI6O. Excellent cycle.
Very reasonable. Call Fry 372-9358.
(A-st-126-p)
1964 Honda 50 good transportation.
With helmet and bubble $75 or best
offer. Phone 378-5789 or 392-0472.
Bob Burns (A-st-126-p)
KITTENS. Healthy loving free. Free
home trial. Phone 372-4639.
(A-lt-126-p)
Extra clean mobile home 8x35. Close
to campus. Nice lot, plenty of
storage. Call weekdays after 5
376-8481. SI3OO. (A-st-125-p)
1968 Cheyenne motorcycle. 60cc less
than a year and a half old 1150 miles.
Runs good. Priced for quick sale
$75 or best offer. Call 378-4817 after
4. (A-st-127-p)
Baby boas $5.00 each one four foot
boa $12.00 why not phone the
underground zoo for a bizarre pet
378-8810. (A-lt-127-p)
68 HONDA 305 immediate sale
necessary. Best offer takes it. Phone
392-9990 after 7 p.m. (A-3t-127-p)
German shepherd pups white
father is former sentry dog, mostly
alsatian mother is only known body
surfing dog in Fla. Outstanding pets.
No papers Call Bob 376-4096 after 5.
(A-lt-127-p)
GIBSON GUITAR with t holes, elec
pickup SIOO. Also MAGNAVOX
stereo make offer. Call GARY
378-9385. (A-st-127-p)
Air Conditioner 6,500 BTU 120 V
McGraw-Edison Delux*.
Thermostatically controlled 4 yr.
~ warranty less than a yr. old- $l2O.
Call 378-2214 after 5:00.
(A-3t-127*p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, May 1,1969

Page 12

I FOR SALE |
\.w.v:-x*X'X*X">x-x*xwyx-x*x*x*x*:*vw
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2Vz acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20M16-P)
Tired of hot, crowded dorms? Enjoy
an air-conditioned spacious apt. for
only $l2O for the whole quarter
(with 3 roommates in furnished
2-bedroom apt.) Come by rental
office, University Gardens Trace, 708
S.W. 16th Ave. Ph.' 376-6720.
(B-st-122-c) /
SUBLET 1 br. fdrn. apt. ac tv private
patiio. June thru? Price bargain
378-7196 after 5. (B-3t-126-p)
§ FOR RENT |
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to Campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21t-115-P)
Peace and quiet is yours for the
as'king by living in one of our
secluded luxusious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for an
appointment to see them. Immediate
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, Inc.
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-c)
Sublet furn 2 bedroom apt, SW 16th
Ave. $155 mo. Avail June. AC, pool,
carpet, cable TV, draperies, laundry
facilities. Call 376-5818. (B-5M23-P)
1 bdrm OLYMPIA Apt., 1 block
from campus, to sublet for summer
qt. Available in June. Call 378-4277.
(B-st-122-p)
Must sublet furnished 2 bdrm wood
paneled apt for summer, ac. one
block behind Norman Hall SIOO/mo.
Call 376-0249 921 SW 6th Ave.
(B-2t-127-p)
3 bedroom furnished house. Air
cond. 2 blocks from campus 1319
NW 3 Ave. Call 372-6921. SIBO.OO
per month. (B-st-125-p)
f^^WANTED^I
Female roommate Camelot Apt.
Immediate occupancy, rent paid thru
April. Cali 378-9694 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M22-P)
Co-ed Roommate needed immediate
occupancy. Landmark 148. Elaine
378-8731 any pm, Tues. and Thurs.
am. (C-3t-124-p)
HHSLII NOW!
| f HIS PICTURE
HAS A MESSAGE:
Watch out!
20th Century Fox presents
100 RIFLES
A MARVIN SCHWARTZ Production
JIM RAQUEL
[BROWN WELCH
fnMjTsrirJMrf 1 I
j Trffrw 171 2414 |r 1 f |
| qf~
< *Miss£fean a rodie
STARRING
1 1 Maggie South
Color by Deluxe -PRESENTED 8Y 20TH CENTURY FOX
NOTE... spEC|AL
PRICE FOR PERSONS
UNDER 17, STARTS
;; TOMORROW.(FRO...
I I

WANTED §
One roommate wanted to share 2
bedroom Tanglewood Apt. Air cond.
Pool T.V. Private room 372-7092.
$l2O for Summer Quarter.
(C-st-l 27-p)
Roommate Have your own room
in modern 4 bedroom house. $35
month plus futilities. Call 376-0802.
(C-2t-127-p)
Roommates lmmediate or Summer
occupancy. 2 br. poolside apt.
Tanglewood Manor 372-8041.
(C-st-127-p)
Male roommate for large 3 bdrm.
house near campus. Stereo, t.v.,
dishwasher. $45 per month +
futilities. 1151 S.W. 9th Rd. or
376-9592. (C-2t-127-p)
V
Need 1 roommate Fr. Quarter. Fall
Quarter. Share with 3 others. Call
392-8263 evenings. (C-st-122-p)
Male roommate wanted for Summit
House. Air Cond., pool, cable TV
$41.75 plus V 4 util. Move in for May
or June. Call 378-1923. (C-3t-126-p)
1 or 2 female roommates. Summer
qtr. Landmark. June rent free will
accept best offer. Call Sue after 5:30.
378-4481. (C-lt-126-p)
2 roommates for Village Park apt. in
the fall. Share rent and utilities. Call
392-9283 after 5 oclock.
(C-lt-126-p)

SSfWTCI st
"NIGHTS or CABIRIA" I
- - -**- \ i i
CLIFF ROBERTSON :
WhflM *ST j
| AetJdflf CMr
: UNIQUE ON-THE-SPOT fi,' Mam l
. COVOA6T
*\nsu£\ ll TONWW
COLOR byDeLUXE Swfil J
*-f
j Downtown OaiMsville |
| 233 W. UnJvonJty Avo. [ J
: JAMIE HAS TO BE i
SOMEBODY...
HHnfWT and he could care less j
J World Wide Pictures presents EwmwiooumJ
Cuff Richard
i Two A Penns ii] i
mTmL
l A DECIDEDLY DIFFERENT EXPERIENCE IN LOVE l
t ~swDORA BRYAN AVRIL ANGERS ?:*

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

I GATOR CLASSIFIEDS §
fSSSI
I Os THE I
T T/nm PANAVISION
I ULUHI COLOR by DtUu
Mm\- I
I JAMES DEAN ^l
JsgAlMj^J



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED I
3 coeds for summer qtr. at
Tanalewood Townhouse. June rent
laid. Call 3 72-7882 after 4.
(C-5M23-P)
Two male roommates $41.60
month plus one-third utilities. Call
376-5467 or come by 1105 NW 4
Ave. (C-3M25-P)
I HELP WANTED I
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY for top
executive. Challenging position for
mature, intelligent person with
excellent skills and managerial
ability- Salary open. Call 462-2499.
(E-st-126-p)
Part time waitress. Apply Trail Boss
The Ponderosa Steak House
West gate S hopping Center.
(E-st-126-p)
Manager, rooming house reliable
senior or male graduate student. Live
on premises, referentes. Phone
376-6652 after 6 p.m. (E-st-123-P)
Desk clerk, Manor Motel. Hours 5
12 PM. Friday & Saturday &
BAM-4PM Sunday. Contact Mr. Bob
Evans between 8 AM & 4PM. Tele.
376-5212.(E-st-127-p)
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS FROM
TAMPA BAY AREA Career
$600.00 per month, plus expense
allowance for man needed for
insurance agency. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 11702 Tampa, Fla. 33610.
(E-BMI9-P)
AUTOS I
_ £1
TR4 for sale. Perfect mechanical
condition needs body work. Very
inexpensive. Call Scott Holloway at
372-9363. (G-lt-127-p)
69 Pontiac Tempest 6mo. new OHC
6 cylinder, stick-shift, radio, heater,
limelight greenAsk for Mike Halton
at circulation dest research library or
Call 378-4554 after 5:30 P.M.
(G-127-10t-p)
1965 Monza Corvair conv. auio.
spyder engine. Power top, radio,
heater, call 372-7659 after 6p.m.
(G-st-126-p)
1960 Bugeye Sprite good condition
body and engine radio convertible.
BRG Call 3 78-3977 >250.
(G-3t-126-p)
V.w. Manx buggy 1300 engine
53H.P. Red metalflake soft top side
curtains rollbar many extras. Great
for sand.Hvoods, street $1695 or
trade for big motorcycle and cash.
See at 1020 S. Main St. or call
378-0249. (G-10t-119-p)
1964 Karmann Ghia, radio, w/w
tires. Excellent condition. Call
376-5687 after 5:30. Mechanically
perfect. (G-st-124-p)
I 1
V o V
The UNION ART PRINT SALE Has
been postponed due to shipment
delays. The new schedule wHI be
announced at a later date.
(J-2t-126-p)
LEAR JET 8 track tape player & 50
wt Monarch solid state amp. 72PK.
Great buy at $135. Homemade
speakers sls. 376-6380 or 372-9307
f no ans. (J-lt-127-p)
Vic, sorry to hear you cant see us
Friday night, but we understand
being weekend chairman comes first.
Best wishes to you and Toby for a
fabulous pearl and congratulations on
a job well done. Your pals, Felix,
Eddie, Gene, and Dipo, THE
RASCALS. (J-lt-127-p)
1307 TOWER A: YoulL need
binoculars for Friday Nights Dimond
Village LOVE IN. Alan, Bruce.
(J-2t-127-p)
The Friday Afternoon Club feels it
may be wasting its ads on you guys,
jou all come to the Lamplighter
b-7:30, Fri., anyway. Live a .little,
proselytize, tell all the girls you know
to come. Our ads bring you help
yourselves spread the word.
(J-2t-127-p)
pirlsl! If campus social life is a little
*ss social than you like, the grad
students of the U. of F. have supplied
t.'laPSwerl THE FRIDAY
Bp I CLUB. Requirements?
social,
ail your friends to the Lamplighter,
3-7:30 Frl. 2 private rooms. Have a
some guys be cool.
(J-2t-127-p)
BTP Whatever you do well love!
e re happy just to be yours.
Michelle and Jackie. (J-lt-126-p)
one atractive coed to help
broken heart. Call Jim
37fi- ,842 after 6 p.m. (J-3t-126-p)
i 1 ' *

Thursday, May 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

| PERSONAL
O* ft
or.w.:^w w*x<.x.x.:.ss*x*x*x.x.x.;s;w:.:*M
Come early to get your choice of
prints and posters today at the Reitz
Union Art Print sale from 10:00
a.m.-9:00 p.m., Rm 235 of Union
(J-3M25-P)
Do you have a cool Mom? a square
Mater? a way-out mama-cat? or an
old-fashioned Mother? No matter
which, we have just the thing for her
Mothers Day gift (May II). Free
gift-wrapping and mailing* service.
THE SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ.
Ave. Open Mon.-Sat. til 9:00
(J-5M25-C)
There are very few seats left for
flights to EUROPE. Reserve today
tomorrow may be too late call
392-1655, Rm. 310, Reitz
Union now. (J-4M25-P)
Tired of Ho-Hum fashions? Change
your look with a darrha, a mansouria
or a burnoose. Dramatically beautiful
Moroccan clothes of 100% finest
hand-woven cotton. Just in at THE
SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open Mon.-Sat. til 9:00. (J-st-125-c)
Training in ZEN meditation in return
for participation in psychological
research. Call Mike 378-8625
evenings. (J-lt-126-p)
JfiW*X-V'NS!ra ;W*X X*X.X'NNSrXv .,
SERVICES |
iw ;W'>>x-:-y-svX'X :-x x*yy^~Xs-:-x-xw
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
For Leoy Lettering and Graphical
Presentations for Theses and
Dissertations Call GARNER
DRAFTING SERVICE 372-8008.
(M-st-126-p)
Vivian Woodard Consultant learn
techniques of applying make-up;
quality cosmetics available. Call
Cindy Humes 392-9 764.
(M-5M23-P)
NEED A PAINTER? Interior or
Exterior professional painting. Call
after 5 or anytime on weekends.
378-4855 Free Estimates.
(M-10t-122-p)
Tennis racket restringing satisfaction
guaranteed free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-I9t-IQ7M>I r
A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)

STOP J!
WTMSS
mimim
BOOK 6 RECORD
*SAL£
APRIL 30
MAY 1 and, 2 yn
A ""rtf v /
bfOr/T
and bookstorefiV/ 111
located in the HUB UV 'O
| t P < , .../ -1-,A. -PP * I
, 4 ,
" l

Page 13

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W. \W \ SPECIALS ||
\ J Lunch and Dinner
Thursday Spacial §ll
I BROILED CALVES LIVER 1
I & ONIONS 1
If FRIED SHRIMP WITH I
H FRENCH FRIES, HOT H
m SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES S
I $1.09 I
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS I
PL OAjNRSVILIEMAIL J||
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with* remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, F10rida,.32601.
Deadline -300 pm. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
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1, The Florida Alligator, Thursday. May 1,1969

Page 14

JBBE§ f ; %
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.. _ \',*
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3*m!aMffiMte M:
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BEYOND THE LAW
.... spots George Plimpton as New York's Mayor Lindsey.

, *i**V*^
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| Kidnap Flick Misses j

By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
The Night of the Following
Day, now showing at the
Florida theatre, is a macabre
account of a two-day, ill-fated
kidnap plan, one which fails not
so much because of technique
but due to the psychological
dificiencies of its perpcutrators.
Marlon Brando, in classic
method sytle, is the films
anti-hero. He becomes involved
in the plot to help a friend.
Also involved as his
drug-addicted girlfriend, Rita
Moreno fears the police and

Young Art At UF Gallery

Museum Purchase Fund
Collection, an exhibition of
twenty-four paintings by young
American artists, will be on
exhibit at the University Gallery
from Sunday, May 4th through
Sunday, May 25th.
This show belongs in the
group of several exhibitions that
the University Gallery tries to
present each year which enables
the public to see current and
vital art by young and relatively
unknown artists. Previous
exhibitions of this nature
include the Corcoran Biennial
and the Florida State Fair Show.

Folk Building Featured

FLORIDA VERNACULAR ARCHITECTURE, an exhibition of
by Dan P. Branch of the UFs Department of
Architecture, will open Friday, May 2, in the Teaching Gallery.
The exhibit will consist of photographs and floor plans of Florida
folk architecture from the past one hundred years.
Included is an essay by Branch which states the theme of the show:
Despite meager resources, primitive people have designed dwellings
that successfully meet the severest clirtiSte problmes. These simple
folk shelters aften outperform the structures of present day
architects.
Branch goes on to point., out that because of present day
technology, the modern architect has become removed from the
direct demands placed upon him by his physical environment. This
has resulted in impressive looking skyscrapers which leak during
rainstorms.
Branch organized the exhibit and took the photographs in the
Florida keys and panhandle. The structures represented serve as
examples of architecture which do meet the needs of the
environment, and do so with materials available in that environment.
The exhibit will be on view through May 23rd in the Teaching
Gallery which is located in the Architecture and Fine Arts Building

hi mnmi ni will mil wan
REPAIRS ___
Good Strvict Starts
crane Imports 'Transit-BECKUM OPTICIANS
. 11 Watt Univnity Av*., teiMivillt, Fla. Fk*M 376-3516

even more is frightened ot
losing Brando.
Jess Hahn fills the role of
Brandos despairing friend -a
man eager to finally make it big
monetarily and attempting
futilely to control this group of
deviants long enough to fulfill
his dream.
But actor Richard Boone
plays by far. the most sinister
and deranged of the quartet.
Portrayed as a combo
masochist/sadist par excellence,
it is primarily throught "his
efforts that the team begins to
have their problems.

Already artists from many
regions have been included, and
many of these have since
achieved national recognition.
Such artists in this exhibit
include Andy Warhol, Larry
Poons, and Ronald Peterson.
These three painters,
representing the schools of Pop,
Op, and California Figurative
Painting respectively, indicate
the wide range of styles in this
exhibition.
Other artists represented in
the 1968-69 selection are:
Richard Anuszkiewicz, Edward
Avedisian, Robert Barry, Rbbert

Mailer Exposes Cruel Cops

Beyond the Law, a film directed by Norman
Mailer, will have its premier in the state of Florida
May 4th and sth in the Union Auditorium, 7 and 9
p.m.
Starring in the film are Rip Torn as Popcorn, a
hippie arrested for murder, and Mailer himself who
appears as a tough detective-lieutenant in this film
of a night at a Manhattan police station.
Mailers biting social comment appears in the
movies portrayal of police routines. Policemen are
shown disregarding all criminal rights and every
psychological ploy to obtain confessions. Beating,
punching, and lying are other blatant violations of
civil liberties that are further characterizations of
this.

Finally, the groups victim
is characterized by young >:
Pamela Franklin, a scared
teenager who eventually falls :
prev to Boone. :
\
Thj? film leaves many if
questions unanswered and it :
would be ludicrous to consider it :
in terms of artistic greatness, j:
yet it does succeed in being
somewhat suspensefull. :
Boone and Miss Moreno :
undoubtedly show the most :j
success in their character :
development. But Brando comes :j
across best when he is silent or :
entirely out of camera range. :

Bechtle, William Copley, Llyn
Foulkes, Sam Gilliam, Gerald
Gooch, Roy Lichtenstein, Hollis
MacDonald, Marcia Marcus,
Agnes Martin, John Mclvor,
Robert Morris, Ben Ndrris,
Douglas Ohlson, Edward
Ruscha, Alexander Russo, Peter
Saul, Edward Stasack and
Stanley Twardowicz.
The University Gallery is
open Tuesdays through
Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m., and Sundays from
1:00 p.m. until 5:00 p.m.
Mondays the Gallery is closed.
Instituded by Gloria
Vanderbilt in 1953, and
sponsored by the Alice Rhonie
Fund since 1966, the Museum
Purchase Fund Collection is
designed to encourage
contemporary artists through
the purchase of their work for a
public collection. The exhibition
is traveling to museums and art
institutions throughout the
country under the auspices of
the American Federation of
Arts.
Annually four paintings are
acquired from artists who are
residents of the United States
artists who, in the opinion of the
museum directors, critics, and
educators who have chosen the
paintings, have not recieved
adequate recognition.
The first two selections were
made in New York.
Subsequently selections were
made in San Francisco, Chicago,
and Boston.

UF Artists Win Cash

The Arts and Exhibits
Committee of the University of
South Florida last
week that the three
awards offered in the 7th
Annual All Florida
Undergraduate Painting
Competition went to UF
students.
First place was taken by UF
senior Marshall New for his
painting Two Icons. Dave
Ross, also a UF senior, received
third place for his kinetic light
relief, Pandoras Aurora. The
winners will'receive $125 and
$75.
378-5724 I
I Dicit Holme/
Jeweler/
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. f
>/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

WONDER
HOUSE
14 SW Ist STREET
BAR B-Q RIBS & BEEF $1.45
POT- -* RGE C
VEAL PARMIGIANA IOC
w/SPAGHETTI, SALAD J
I ROBBIES 1
The Best In
Meals. QWSandwichea
rCOLOR TV & billiards
11718 W. University Ave.
r^OnTheGoldCoasf^
TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
1 STARKE. 1 FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER Iff
- HOURS HOURSWEEKDAYS
WEEKDAYS HOURSWEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

The main theme of the film hints that there is
not much difference between being a successful cop
and a successful criminal. The character portrayals
that Mailer carefully establishes give this theme its
realization.
Beyond the Law ,is done in cinemaverite
methods to establish Mailers sought-for realism.
The hand-held camera shots and the uneven sound
track propose to give the viewer a feeling of
presence in a world of crime, beyond the law.
This film will be the highlight of this years
university Film Committee schedule. Other films to
be presented this term are: Shoot the Piano
Player, New Kinetic Art, Long Days Journey
Into Night, and Treasure of Sierra Madre.

The purpose of the
competition is to provide an
opportunity for student artists
in Floridas 15 fQur-y ear colleges
to participate in competitive
exhibits on a state wide level.
VETERANS
Be a commercial pilotl
NEW G. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Area's only approved school
3 7 8 2 646



Thursday, May 1, 1960, Tha Florida Alligator,

Hbbbi Bl
ills * OIBS **th iHhkfe. 11
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iBPl \ *^..,^'.4iy f | y -IM^iiFrv 1 1 I t B < f I | |
MR \ -- -.-^v::.J^^BPgaly-' .*^^^Ba^***^Hr
1 I | -' l
111 l||
xs-.v '_^ mMMoool^^^^^^ w m I
| This famous, fine quality dinnerware at a never before low price
LOOK FOR THIS .f
mark of quality Ni^ll^^-1^)
such an Offer
of the
Granada pattern MM
.nenteH by (he just-right decorator color avacado green, enhances every BB
So durable lasts even
And remember, all Sheffield dinnerware carries the Good Housekeeping Guar- |
antee. Start your set today. Each place setting piece just 290 with every $3 A
on our the plan. Theres no limit ... get 2
each
Round Vegetable Bowl ..$2.29 $1.49 I 1" W I Mos /\P
Covered Sugar Bowl $1.99 $1.49 c q
gii-:::::::g g HOSTESS 1 ***.i
iS^ : ::Sll IS -. h I*L ; jLuU 1 O,WWER pIATE I 29c
Salad Plates $1.99 $1.49 1 unubuy. Y reCe V wnu U <^7 19 secono e ** A# withvry
2 Soup/Cereal Bowls ..$1.89 $1.29 1 P ,ece V r prt ificate." When you # l|> j\ )| week DESSERT DISH 6 9? 29C $3 purch.*.*
Covered Casserole $5 99 $3.99 1 "Bonus C Q a beautiful <\ ... if AHL
E l '* w vy^Sr>t * cofke cup % 29c
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Covered Butter Dish ....$2.99 $1.99 1 ]| I ~ V(§ fifth Bread & Butter Reg. aa. with .vry
Round Serving Platter... $3.49 $2.49 1 T week PLATE S3 purch.
Pitcher ..*. .^T! 1 $4 99 ss!b9 -J i <3r The above items will be sold at thase special
2 Jumbo Mugs!!.!!! !$2!29 $1!49 | prices only in the weeks they are featured.
11* Platter .$2.99 $1.99 1 Excluding: toUccr, liquor and liquid daily products.
Large Vegetable Bowl ...$2.99 $1.99 1 OiHljaHinteniitaMlCocF.
2 Utility Bowls $2.79 $1.4

Page 15



Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, May 1,1960

What are Florida Product Days? It is the time to shop Home Grown. To spend a little extra to
m show our people in this state that we are proud of their products. Winn-Dixie in by using
their stores as a distribution headquarters, for over Fifteen years. The' Florida Products Week
A f \ is marked by home-grown meats, produce and staples in abundant display at the 289 Wiim Wiimil
il Wiimil II Dixie Supermarkets across our state.
/ II i II llf H> t We're just a small part of the fantastic progress which our state has enjoyed.' Florida citrus
eC^v
.9l* 1 W TOP VALUE STAMPS ;111 iI TOP M jBHI %.
SOUTHERN ca A.
iBHf J iHil -r::::: i-lb Mb |hL
:if|T|yEXTw^.;jn7T?fex^w/%l; Ll|r| can
:| Ullj TOP VALUE STAMPS ; 111 V V TOP VALUE ST AMPS BRH PL r
* TWO J ONE OR MORE !W "U'
1 ARTIC CIRCLE USD* CHOICE RONELEM , I. ..
. mmmr white Acre Peas ; Beef Roast ; Limit lof your choice with $5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarettes
COCO THRU MAY 7 GOOD THRU MAY 71
USDA CHOICE BEEF
Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon Moy 1-7
J winn.Dixie eTONes-copYiomCreee USDA CHOICE W D BRAND CORN FED CHUCK / W-D BRAND LEAN BEEF SHORT
Q. :.. STEAK 69* RIBS .59*
> r wmmpt£ ROAST.. 79* STEW .. 39*
(% ROAST.;. 89* CHUCK ...r 9
steak t beef 3-*r

BRAND
ROAST Kft
W D BRAND GRADEAQUICK FROZEN Lb. Bag or 10-oz. Link TARNOW WHOLE HOG I
BAKING HENS 43* SAUSAGE 69* 1
8-oi BORDENS SUNNYLAND. SMOKED II" LINK
CREAM CHEESE. 37* SAUSAGE 79*
5-oz. IAR KRAFTS OLIVE PIMENTO. PINEAPPLE OR Half or Whole FRESH
PIMENTO CHEESE 37* PORK HAMS 59*
14-oz. PALMETTO FARMS FRESH BOSTON BUTT
PIMENTO CHEESE 59* PORK ROAST.... .49*
SUPERBRAND COTTAGE TENDER SLICED
CHEESE 2a-59* PORK LIVER ,29*
W-D BRAND MILD DAISY STYLE 808 WHITE THICK SLICED
CHEDDAR CHEESE 83* BACON 2 $1.29
10-0. CRACKIN' GOOD FREEZER QUEEN BREADED
CAN BISCUITS ...6/49* VEAL STEAKS 79*
1-Lb. SWIFT PREMIUM TASTE O SEA BONELESS PERCH
ALL MEAT FRANKS 65* FISH FILLETS .39*
12-oz. COPELAND 2'A-Lb. FRENCH FRIED HEAT 4 SERVE
ALL MEAT FRANKS 55* FISH STICKS 99*
FRESH FLORIDA PRODUCE
STRAWBERRIES 3/1.
FRESH FLA. WHITE or YELLOW
FANCY CORN 10-59'
YOUNG TENDER FLORIDA
POLE BEANS 2 39
't u.S. No. 1 SWEET JUICY FLORIDA GRAPEFRUIT or
Cs? ORANGES 5 49'
2 Lb. Cello Bag YOUNG CRISP FLORIDA LARGE FRESH HEADS
CARROTS 25* LETTUCE 2/49*
CHERRY RED / U.S. No. I RUSSET BAKING (5-lb. bag 490
RHUBARB 2=49* POTATOES 10 79*
LARGE FIRM HEADS FLORIDA UrS. No. I REGULAR (10-lb. bog 59 i)
CABBAGE 6* POTATOES 20-99*
Pkg. RADISHES OR HEADS ESCAROLE OR JUICY SUNKIST
ENDIVE 2/29* LEMONS.... 11/49*

1 PRICES COOP ALL WEEHI

SHOT rUMiUM S...HS
HKMS '3 B
FROZEN FOODS
HI-ACRES FLORIDA ORANGE...(I2 oz. con 2/790.6 oi. 5 lb. FROZEN FRENCH FRY
JUICE 6/$1.19 P0TAT0E5....... 89*
BANQUET ITEMS . DIXIANA Poly 800 MIX. VEG. CUT CORN, STEW VEG. OR
COOK-1 N-BAG4/sl. GR. BEANS. 2/sl.
REG. SIZE MORTON ALL FLAVORS MEAT HOWARD JOHNSONS CHOCOLATE, COCONUT OR
DINNERS 2/89* ORANGE CAKE 79*
B_ozJJBBYS LIMEADE OR . LAMBRECHT (CHEESE 2Pock 79<)...(PEPPERONI 2-Pk
LEMONADE..: 8/sl. PIZZA PIES 89*
lOoz. ASTOR 12-Pk. ESKIMO ICE MILK
GR. PEA5.....6/sl. DONUTS 59*
8-oz. OCOMA CHICKEN, BEEF OR TURKEY
MEAT PIES6/sl.
Half Gallon THRIFTY MAID ALL FLAVORS
ICE MILK 2/sl.
Quarts BIRDSEYE
COOL WH1P...2/Sl.



World's oranges, more than 90 percent of the World's orange concentrate, and 80 percent of THRIFTY MAID Or
the World's total processed citrus products. Florida is also first in the winter production of DIXIE CRYSTAL
snap beans, tomatoes, cabbage, sweet corn, cucumbers, egg green peppers, radishes,
watermelons, and second in celery produced for the fresh market. Florida dairymen averaged II 'W
a higher milk production per caw the producers of the other thirteen Southern States. We 8118 B If;
have grown because you our packers and H H HB
Yes, Thanks to of you, we can proudly say that we are "OF FLORIDA BY FLORIDA FOR mB
-i-IB(i(Bli p ___ k ilV w B-
| S your
cigarettes
TWfoYo Plf 1 Coke Mixes3/SI.
I
lX Iri r7 \ Margarine 5/sl.
I I i- M \ PIK 3/sl. 8EAN5....8/sl.
.fORK l lvV-O O \ TISSUE4/sl. BEANS 10*
A- 1 \ SAUCE 6/sl. 8UL85........89*
V ALL PRODUCTS OF FLORIDA \ CHICKEN..... 99* PLATES 69*
Quantity Rights ReservedPrices Good All Week Wed. Noon thru Wed. Noon May I -7
WINN DIXIE STORE!COPY niGHT_I...
o**- SOUTH t-Lb. ASTOR Electro Perk, Re*., Drip or Fine . Limit 1 w/$5. or mot* purchase ad. cif.
39* 0 Coffee 39*
O Jumbo WHITE OR ASSORTED ARROW PAPER <*. BLUE, WHITE or COLD WATER ARROW . Limit 1 w/$5. or more percheee axel. cl*.
Towels.... 4/sl. CEU? Detergent... 39*
2O-Lb. BRIQUETTES 12-ox. Can ALL FLAVORS CHEI^^
Charcoal 99* oDrinks.... 15/$ 1.
CssJuice 4/sl. oJelly 3/sl.
m 46-ox. THRIFTY MAID PINEAPPLE GRAPEFRUIT or L.C. ORANGE ProdllCtS of
<*. l LJDrink 4/Sl.x j a sonville
pinebreezeJ /kjwEL ISrSr*? '.T \ srsHErstt 1
medium ('Beef Stew3/sl.
VI fcI^IVITI V No. Vt Con LYRE'S VIENNA # % I (F|TlW ls *"/% I
As 9 i JL m MI If TOP VALUE STAMPS :
EGGS T&? Sausage...s/sl. \ If .Ilf \
No. 303 Con STANDARD L" x
AAoTomatoes/sl. >
No. 303 REAL SOUTHERN WHITE M
2 O# Acre Peas 4/>l. \
, Half Gal. BLEACH... Limit 2 w/$5.00 or more purchase excluding cigarattas / B
2oz. VITALIS (SAVE 30<:) -W tV hair tonic it \JCJClorox 29* I
King Sire ULTRA BRITE (SAVE 190 9 9 9 AB 4r
TAATUD A CTE AOC Al>. 20-ox. dixie darling large family
0!!:;;; OLoaf Bread...l9*
PEACHES 29* J
LIMIT THREE WITH Lawn I I* T
more I ... ... M A 111
No 21J i RJjTtop i
CAN jfi LownChoir !KM CW"W / BWMLI H1 |
jTpJ GOOD THRU MAY 7 I y6|

Thursday, May 1,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday. May 1.1968

W PP
BL .jL..
1 Pm '*

Msports letters*
X % x,l w k
SCAT Day Support Urged

MR. SPORTS EDITOR:
Recently a group of en enthusiastic
thusiastic enthusiastic students at the
University of Florida joined
together, under the name of
SCAT (Student Center Action
Team), to help build an activities
coliseum at our university.
The students involved with
SCAT believe it is a disgrace that
a school of the size (20,000) and
renown of the University of
Florida should still have the
obsolete facilities it has today. It
an undeniable fact that
Florida needs a modem complex
** which would house a concert
hall- coliseum, recreational
facilities, a swimming pool and
track facilities. SCATS purpose
is to initiate programs that will
bring about the construction of
such an activities coliseum as
soon as possible.
It should be emphasized that

Tep Tops Orange
Tau Epsilon Phi captured its second Presidents Cup in three years
Tuesday as it reached the finals of Orange League tennis defeating
ATO in the semis. The TEPs have now amassed a lead of 215 points
over ATO and with 200 points still to be determined in track and
softball, the TEPs have mathematically eliminated all teams from
competition.
The TEPs won the title in much the same way they did two years
ago by securing the title with two sports remaining to be played.
The TEPs have reached the tennis finals on overall strength.
Tuesday they combined doubles victories with a number-two singles
win to take the match 3-1.
Mickey Ross and Neil Levine combined to win the first doubles
match 4-0-1 and Alan Trumpkin and Lee Borden also trounced their
opponents, 4-0-1. In a decisive bit of strategy, the TEPs dropped their
number one single player Jim Stark down to number two singles
where he defeated the Os Joyner.
The only ATO ttin came when Richard McClellan defeated TEPs
drop singles player Bob Rosenblatt, 4-0-0.
TEP must now face SAE who defeated Pi Kappa Phi in the other
semis match. Riehsrd Trapp and Camden French provided singles
victories in tha second and third slots and Bill Stephens and Ander
Crenshaw combined.for a big doubles win.
Bill Buedgier and .Ron DHaeseker and Mike Hill combined for
singles and doubles-victories for the Pi Kaps.
In the Blue League the Chi Phis saw their latest streak come to
end in tennis as the Theta Chis beat them 2-1.

the efforts of SCAT are not only
being supported by sports
enthusiasts. SCAT realizes that
not only have Florida athletic
teams in basketball, track and
swimming been denied adequate
facilities in which to participate
but cultural events have often
bypassed the University of
Florida due to poor facilities.
Therefore, the construction of a
multipurpose coliseum-concert
hall for the performing arts is /
vital to the cultural future of the
University of Florida and its
students.
Speaking on behalf of the
Florida Lettermens F Club
and the University of Florida
Student-Faculty Athletic
Council, I would ask that all
interested persons support SCAT
and its efforts to help build a
student activities coliseum at the
University of Florida. We must

HP
gif' >*, JB
1 Hr k
isgf m a
s y^,'H j/F''
/

Gator skier Pat Boutchyard takes a spill from her
slalom during practice Wednesday. Pat, along with
the rest of the team, was getting ready for the

make this long sought dream of
an activities coliseum a reality if
the University of Florida is to
maintain its place as a great
institution of learning.
GENE PEEK, PRESIDENT
FLORIDA LETTERMENS F
CLUB %: STUDENT FACULTY
ATHLETIC COUNCIL

MR. EDITOR:
SCAT is the beginning of your
new coliseum. It is the students
working together to raise the
funds for the initial planning.
Give a quarter to SCAT. A
quarter isnt much ... but
20,000 quarters is a beginning.
There will be booths around
campus on Tuesday through
Thursday to allow you, the
student, to show you want a
change. It was hot during the
Supremes concert, wasnt it?
EDWARD BOZE
CHAIRMAN, QUARTER DRIVE

Coeds Not Putting Out In Sports

By BETH GRAVES
Alligator Correspondent
Participation in girls intramurals is lacking.
Matches and meets have not only been won by
forfeit, but cancelled by double forfeits, by both
sororities and independents.
Competition in the independent tennis matches
has been scattered out among Southeast and
Southwest Broward, Rawlings, and Yulee, out of all
entries in both leagues. Others such as Village Park
and Northeast Broward have been declared winners
by forfeit.
Sorority golf in the Orange League has been
active to date with Kappa Alpha Theta and Zeta
Tau Alpha facing each other in a final round. In the
Blue League Phi Sigma Sigma beat AOPi in the first
round and was then declared the winner by forfeits
from Phi Mu, Delta Phi Epsilon, Alpha Chi Omega
and Delta Gamma.

IS THE WATER WET?

Greats To Play
For SCAT Fund

Tau Epsilon Phis football
match with the former Gator
greats has been rescheduled for
Tuesday at Florida Field starting
at 7 pm.
The game is being played to
raise money for the Activities
Center Fund. It was originally
scheduled for Saturday May 10.
The re-scheduling was to
Netters Up,
Neely Down
UF Tennis team easily
defeated Rollins College 8-1
Wednesday as the Gators
number one player lost his first
home match in four years.
Senior Amri Neely lost to
Rollins Ron Vangelder in
straight sets, 64 and 7-5.
The Gators now have a 18-1-1
won anjl lost record, and have an
11 -game winning streak going.
UF faces Georgia Tech Friday
at 2:30 pm. on the varsity
courts for the last home match
before Tuesdays SEC
championship play-offs in Baton
Rouge, La.

-
" :J '; > ...
;%*m**/ '
*. '?
.
. -s-ss
PHOTOS BY TOM KENNEDY

Spring Intercollegiate Water Ski Tournament
Saturday.

Spring fever is most likely the problem, but it
should be the solution. Clear weather and sunny
days call for getting out, and a late afternoon tennis
or golf match is usually a good excuse (besides
wasting more study time). Yet the turn-out has been
poor for this schedule of competition.
Witty trophies still up for grabs though, Monday
will bring new events for both independents and
sororities. Independents will try their hand at the
par 3 golf course, at Broward Field, while both
leagues of sororities will clash in a swimming meet
at the Womens Gym pool.
The golf will be handled in the usual tournament
style, covering several afternoons, each day starting
at 4:30 The swimming meet will last one day and
include the following events: 25 yd. free-style; 25
yd. backstroke; 75 yd. individual medley; 75 yd.
medley relay; 100 yd. free relay; 1 meter fancy
diving. The teams may consist of anywhere from
one to ten juris.

accommodate all the players.
The TEPs, fraternity Orange
League football champions for
the last four years, are led by
Miami Beach products Rick
Perillo, end, and Ira Pollack,
quarterback. These two have
played together since their
freshman year, both are now
graduate students.
The Gators team, which
consists of former football
greats, are captained by fullback
Tom Christian. Also playing will
be Heisman Trophy winner and
San Francisco quarterback Steve
Spurrier, Buffalo. Bills
flankerback Richard Trapp,
Atlanta Falcons running back
Harmon Wages, Detroit Lions
draftee Jim Yarbrough, and San
Diego Charger draftee Larry
Rentz against the highly
organized TEPs.
The Gator team also includes
linebacker Tom Hungerbuler,
end Bill Gaisford and tackle
George Dean.
The TEPs beat the Gainesville
Jaycees, winner of Gainesvilles
mens rag tag football league,
last fall.



a\ i n
Who Explains Ihe Expfqnqfions? j

Scene: Office of Bull Gator
Ring, ring, ring.
Yes, this is Coach Gator.
Coach, this is Gilbert Greek,
the leader of the blocs. We are
planning to have a concert on
campus featuring The Imps.
We would like to use Florida
Field for the show and donate
the proceeds to the Activity
Center Fund.
Gilbert, we want to
cooperate with all student
projects to make the
construction of a sports, 1 mean,
Activity Center a reality.
Cool coach, but can we use
Florida Field?
I think it would be a fine
idea. Yes, it will be OK for you
to use the stadium on that night
for the concert.
What will it cost us?
Well, it takes a lot of work
to open up the stadium. The
gates must be opened, the
turnstiles set up, the stadium
cleaned up afterwards for use
the next day, the police must be
on hand- to handle traffic,
electricians must be on hand, the
lights have to be turned on and
it will take coordination with
our stadium manager.

Cycles Race Sunday,
AMA Sponsors Event

The Gainesville Gators
Motorcycle Club will sponsor
five-class motorcycle road races
Sunday at the track located
north of the Gainesville
municipal airport.
The event is sanctioned by
the American Motorcycle
Association and national
sportsman points, as well as 15
trophies, will be awarded.
The competitive classes will
be 0-125 cc, 126-175,176-250,
251-500 and 501-open.
Admission fee is $2 and the
races are open to all riders. Each
rider, however, must wear a
leather jacket, helmet, leather
boots and must have number
League Winner
The American League record
for most consecutive games won
during a season is 19, achieved
by the New York Yankees in
1947.

GAINESVILLE
AUTO PARLOR
SPECIALIZING REPARS
/INTRODUCTORY! £
in ad f offer J TUNEUPS
CAR c FREE f on
BEAUTY i WAX l Volkswagen
DEMUI T I V AUTOMOBILES
NEEDS ) JOB \
MAJOR J BUSES
I TUNEUP OR REPAIR f
504 S.W. 4th Ave.
(NEXT TO GREYHOi |Mn STATION)

You know all this takes a lot
of time and effort, which our
people don't mind putting out
for a worthwhile cause.
Yeah Coach, but you all
have all the money anyway, So
Im sure you wont charge us
will you? After all it is for your
sports coliseum, I mean Activity
Center.
We will be glad to cooperate
with any student group on a
worthwhile project to raise
money for the Activity Center.
OK great, heres what we
will do. We will take care of the
cleanup ourselves, if you foot
the bill on everything else.
I guess that would be
cooperation on our part. After
all the students are our biggest
supporters and they want this
Activity Center.
Last year the concert at
Florida Field only drew 3500
students, but it will be different
this time.
We will be happy to be a
part of this endeavor.
Listen coach, could you do
one more thing? Donate the
profits from the concession
stand to the fund.
No.

plates on his bike. Practice will
start at 10:30 a.m. with heats
beginning at 1 pm.
Featured ihotorcycles will be
a 350 Yamaha Road Racer,
capable of speeds over 140
m-p-h., and two 250 Yamaha
Road Racers. Gary McGom, a
former Daytona winner, and Jon
Ciener will drive these machines.
B&ES3SI
MODELS
NEEDED-FRI6PM
EVERY FRIDAY
'DANDYLION

1
Click. Bzzzzzv
Scene: Bull Cators office a
few days later.
In the interim the*campus
newspaper has run an editorial
asking for an explanation from.
Coach Gator about his refusal to
donate the concession profits to
the fund.
Bull Gator says it is against
that bylaws of the Athletic
Association, but Greek isnt
satisfied.
Ring, ring, ring.
Yes this is Coach Gator.

&
BIRTHDAY HAPPENING A
A VACATION IN EUROPE
You ,111(1 vnur jnion will jet to Europe's rApitals vi.i TWA. Tor I" Him filled (l.tvs. You'll svvinj: (hrotiitli l omlon.
Ijris, Koine .md Mdilriil. You'll sljv in some of the world's most lie.iuliliil hotels .mil dine in ltim|x> s most esiitinK
rest.iur.inls. Travel arrangements made through Wilto Travel Agi-my. Lexinjtlon. Kv.
Ist PRIZE
P 0 J mi GOLF CLUBS ( mplcte Sot lovelwmo lated irons
l'hl ftuHoi M.ilg.inv iinivhfd W.mkJ-. (I 4
Ml: ft-, 2nd PRIZE
l -w Vm f* WESTINGHOUSE "SOLID STATE"
PORTABLE STEREO
Two lull sound in detachable wings for wider
stereo separation Deluxe, pull-down spring shock-mounted
4-spced automatic changer with h" turntable and automatic automaticrecord
record automaticrecord intermix Dual sapphire styli 45 RIM spindle
Automatic last record diut-oft Dual t*nc control Two
loudness controls
3rd PRIZE
l V ) r WESTINGHOUSE CARTRIDGE
V TAPE RECORDER
Snap in a cartridge, push a button start to record Great to/
\ s r meeting. im?cno-> Plays up to I*/> hours per
VfT cartridge Capstan drive l7 IPS Electronic speed control
REGISTER EVERY WEEK
Wi M i J f TEN FREE chicken dinners will be awarded every week in every Jerry's.
These weekly winners will be eligible lor the three prizes and the grand
prize. There's nothing to buy, just stop in and register. Employees Jerry's,
and their advertising agency, not eligible.
"40 YEARS YOUNG AND GROWING"
2310 S.W. 13th 1505 N.W. 13th c

Yeah coach, Gilbert Greek
here. About that refusal of yours,
to donate the profits from the
concession sales/ to the fund.
Well, are you iure there isnt
some way you could donate
SQme thing to me fund?
:< Gabcfl ,i we want to
cooperate with all the students.
But I think there is something
you are overlooking here.
listen coach, we arent the
violent type nor do we go in
much for demonstrations. But if
something concrete isnt done

Thursday, May 1, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

soon to show that the Athletic
Department is behind the fund
drive then we are going to bum
the gyntdpwn.
We appreciate the endeavors
of all students tp support the
Activity Center arttL we will
cooperate in any way possibje to
make that construction
reality.
TV First
The U.S. Open golf
tournament was first televised in
1954, when it was won by Ed
Furgol.

Page 19



l. The Florida Alligator, Thuraday, May 1,1969

Page 20

Cdr^.
* ** :
*
iinil
* ~ _* .. ... .

"Super-Right Western SIRLOIN or Full Cut ROUND
ppsM -'BK

t* i-\
Extra Special! (Limit 1 w/$5 or more order excl. cigarettes)
BOLD detergent^49<
Breakstone Cottage
CHEESE 2 £ 53<
Special! Timberland Brand Briquets of (packed in Fla.)
CHARCOAL 20^89<
Extra Special l
DEXOLA OIL 69<

Look for this Label on
I yffilf Specials.
IPV NO LIMIT I
Be sure to GLI P This Weeks GtFTv'CHEK Specials
THIS COUPON
TTTTTTTJ super.righT" PORK SAUSAGE Mb. Bag 49c
3 / "SUPER-RIGHT" SKINLESS FRANKS 1-Lb. Pkg. 65c
t 4 j fresh celery hearts ce,, bag 45c
t \ J ANN PAGE PEANUT BUTTER 24-Oz, Jar 75c
{ nmmmwTffmTmmmT
E i CERTIFICATE I 5 y ann page sour or butterscotch bails 100-ct. pEb- 59e
Tj GOOD TOR ONE ;2 y klear floor wax 27-Oz. Can - 99 c
\ CMVT^CUEK j | REGULAR OR LEMON PLEDGE 7-Oz. Can 89c
: WITH THIS CERTIFICATE ;
E AND A PURCHASE j J y GOLD MEDAL FLOUR Plain or Self-Rising, 5-Lb. Bag 63c
1; 0F ,7 ' o 0R M j 2 y PICKLE PATCH SWEET CUCUMBER CHIPS 22-Oz. Jar
M $
baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa* For each GIFT/CHEK special purchased, you will receive,
copyright 1969 gift/chek inc. one GIFT/CHEK at checkout.

Grade 'A' Fla. or Ga. Fresh /
JS WHOLE £~
5 FRYERS >
y- 29< >
c v

r - : .1
Extra Special h
EIGHT OCIOCK
COFFEE
1 49(
3-$1.45
Limit 1 Bag with $5 or
more Food Order

"Super-Right" Full Cut /
e CHUCK
-> ROAST ?
V B 4B< >
(Bone In)

U.S. no. 1 Round White
POTATOES 10 £ 49c
Fresh Yellow Cooking
ONIONS 3 2 25C
Fresh, Juicy
PINEAPPLE 3£51.00
Jane Parker Reg. or sandwich white
BREAD 2 r 55C
Jane Parker Delicious Peach
PIES 24ozSize 49{
Jane Parker Light Tender Angel Food
m
@UQK|i
PLAID i
WIHITHU CCU*OM ** MMCMMt 0* 4 STAMPS 1
French Inst. Mashed Lmmw j
Potatoes 69c*i
GOOD THROUGH MAY 4 5.3.69 |
If unable to j&lai
purchase any | STAMPS
advertised French Inst. Mashed FWtffW
item, please Potatoes 6V p£? 35c Jax
request a rain OOD THROUGH MAY 4 5^*69
check! Prices 1
in this Ad are
Good through
Tuesday, May {fScKli I'anifi pLA | D
6, except our S mmi COU,OH I STAMPS IS
' .. 1 Lysol 14-Os. !£
Bakery items } JL, <,
which are i Disinfectant $1.39
good through GOOD THROUGH MAY 4 5-3*69 \
Sat.; May 3. mm
WEBffiBS
J n rail coo row wncn*W C 0 STAMPS l
1 House & Garden Spray MfIMH
staid "& $1.39 £ j
| GOOD THROUGH MAY 4 5-3-69 j