Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
IFC Says Graves 'Skirting The Issue

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
The Interfratemity Council President
charged UF Athletic Director Ray
Graves with skirting the issue
Tuesday concerning the refusal to
donate concessions profits from-the
Rascals concert to the Activity Center
fund.
Our concessions manager, Bill
Squires, was merely carrying out the
policy of the University Athletic
Association Board of Directors in not
turning over profits from the
concessions operation the night of the
Rascals concert to the Student Activity
Center Fund, Graves said.

Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 126

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WORLDS LARGEST GOLF BALL
Is this the world's largest golf ball? A ping-pong ball for the Jolly
Greep Giant? No, nothing that exciting. It's an oxygen tank for the
expanding Health Center operations in that area.
House Committee OKs
Direct Election Pfcm
WASHINGTON (UPI) A House committee Tuesday approved a
constitutional amendment providing for direct election of
presidents, the first step in an arduous process that could lead to the
end of the electoral college.
By a 28-6 vote, the Judiciary Committee voted to throw out the
165-year-old method of electing presidents and vice presidents and
establish a national popular election with a runoff if no ticket got 40
per cent pf the vote.
The proposed amendment, which must be approved by two-thirds
of the members of the House and Senate and three-fourths of the
state legislatures, went further than President Nixons proposal for
election reform. But he has indicated he would back it wholeheartedly
if it wins Congressional support.
It was the first Congressional recommendation ever to abolish the
Electoral College created by the Constitution and altered by the
12th Amendment of 1804 and the first attempt at electoral reform
since the Senate defeated a plan to modify the Electoral college in
1956.
There was no assurance the measure would be approved by
Congress, much less the required number of states, but its backers in
the Judiciary Committee were optimistic.

The comment from Graves was the
result of an Alligator editorial Tuesday,
Who Wants A Coliseum. The editorial
asked Graves to inform the student
body whu he cannot donate the profits.
This policy states the University
Athletic Association reserves the right
to concession income at all events at
Florida Field, Graves said. It was
implemented because it was necessary
to pledge all income from stadium
operation to finance construction of the
stadium.
Steve Zack, IFC president, expressed
displeasure at the reasons given by
Graves.
Where theres the will, theres a
way, Zack said. If the Athletic

The
Florida Alligator

University of Florida, Gainesville

VOTE FINALLY TOTALLED
Students Nix Pass-Fail,
Pass Four Amendments

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
All four of the amendments and most of the
public opinion questions including a question on an
activities center passed in the Student Body election
held Thursday, Bill Modlin, secretary of the interior
said Tuesday.
The amendments, one changing the day of
elections from Thursday to Wednesday, another
giving the Student Senate the power to grant
charters to any student organization, another to
make the vice chancellor of the honor court an
appointed office, and the last one, to revise the
duties of the vice-president, all passed with a 3-1
vote.
Previously the vice chancellors post went
automatically to the justice elected from the law
school.
Students overwhelmingly said they would be in
favor of $5 being taken from their tuition for a
student activities center. The vote on that question
was 4,300-1,259.

Pompidou Friendly To US,
Seen As French President

PARIS (UPI) Former
Premier George Pompidou who
favors rebuilding Frances
historic partnership with
America, won unanimous
nomination Tuesday as Gaullist
party candidate to succeed
Charles de Gaulle as president.
Veteran Socialist contender
Gaston Defferre also announced
he would run.
Far to the right, a third
candidate loomed. Georges
Bidault, 69, De. Gaulles foreign
minister in the postwar years
before he went into exile as a
bitter opponent of independence
for Algeria, +old a news
conference he, >, might run.
But he was written off as a
serious threat to Pompidou.
Centrist politicians conferred,
seeking a middle of the road
candidate, while the Communist
party stepped up pressure on
other leftist groups to agree on a

Department can have a football game
moved from Gainesville to Tampa, they
can do anything.
Graves explained that the Athletic
Association borrowed $2 million for
stadium construction and that the terms
of the loan include the pledging of all
stadium income.
The Athletic Association also
operates on a budget that takes into
account concession profits.
The main point hasnt been met,
Zack continued, The Athletic
Department could see how much money
was made from the concessions sales at
the concert and donate it to the SCAT
fund from another source.
Zacks proposal was designed to have

joint candidate. Defferre has
traditionally been opposed to
having the Communists take part
in a left-center coalition.
The political infighting
wanned up as fears of a financial
crisis eased in the wake of De
Gaulles dramatic resignation
after he lost a nationwide
referendum Sunday.
The price of gold on the free
market dropped from Mondays
all-time record of $49.09 an

Shepherd Seeks Cabinet Chiefs
Student Body President-elect Charles Shepherd is seeking
qualified students to rill a number of posts for his coming term.
Applications will be accepted through Friday at the student
activities desk on the third floor of the Reitz Union.
The following jobs need to be rilled: Secretaries of Interior,
Finance, Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, Minority Groups,
Health and Insurance, Public Functions, Married Students,
Athletics, Legislative Affairs, and Student Organizations.

the Athletic Department make a
donation to the fund by taking money
from one source not restricted by
Association policy.
Graves pointed out the Athletic
Association has not ignored campus
activities other than sports.
We have felt an obligation to be a
contributing member of the campus
community and have, year after year,
budgeted amounts such as $15,000 for
academic scholarships to non-athletes,
SI,OOO for the J. Hillis Miller
Scholarship fund,s2,ooo for Blue Key,
$4,000 for the University of Florida
Foundation, S3OO for the rifle team and
other activities not connected with
intercollegiate athletics, Graves said.

Students voted 5,130-830 to allow voluntary
class attendance, and in a closer vote, 2,884-2,386,
to have voluntary physical education. A question
asking if all classes should be graded on the pass-fail
system was voted down by the students
3,081-2,595.
In a 2-1 vote, 3,611-1,890, students said they felt
the Reitz Union met the needs of UF students. A
majority of students, 3,123-2,571, felt Student
Government should not have complete control of
granting, reviewing and rescinding charters of
student groups.
Most students said they favored the present setup
of the traffic court. The vote on that question was
5,758-731. A majority said they favored the senate
funding student groups for making trips.
Modlin said the reason for the holdup was that
not enough spaces were on the forms that honor
court officials at the polling places were not able to
record the vote totals. This meant Modlin had to go
back and recount all the results.

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Wednesday, April 30, 1969

ounce to $48.66 and the French
franc staged a recovery. The
price of a franc was 4.971; for
one U.S. dollar compared with
4.9735 Monday.
A few hours after Pompidou
announced, Deferre, moderate
Socialist mayor of the port city
of Marseilles, was asked by
leftist parliamentary deputies
whether he planned to run for
president. He replied simply,
Yes.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30, 1969

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RIGHT POINT OF VIEW RANDY BASSETT

Willie Mosconi, world famous pocket billiards
player, demonstrated his skill Tuesday at the Reitz
Union, showing once agains, that although there are

Weed Tar-Retarder May
Lighten Cancer Chances

WASHINGTON (UPI) The
House Commerce Committee
was told Tuesday that a secret
chemical process had been
developed which could reduce
by 34 percent the amount of an
agent in cigarette smoke that is
suspected of causing cancer.
Dr. Perry B. Hudson of
Palisades. N.Y.. who has tested
the process known as Chemosol.
said its developers had begun
serious discussion with
commercial companies about the
possibility of using Chemosol in
manufacturing cigarettes.
At a time when the health
problems associated with
cigarette smoking have reached a
crisis state.. .a practical, less
hazardous cigarette treated with
Chemosol can now be offered to
the millions of smokers who will
never be willing or able to give
up smoking. he said.
Hudson described himself as
an independent researcher and
president of High Tor
foundation, Inc., with no
financial connections whatever
with American Chemosol Corp.,
which produces the secret
process.
Three years of research
indicate that Chemosol acts on
f
benzo-a-pyrene, a tar substance
in tobacco which is generally
recognized within the scientific
community as a carcinogenic or
cancer-causing agent, Hudson
said.
His independent test clearly
established, he said, that
Chemosol reduces
benzo-a-pyrene in cigarette
smoke by 34 per cent. Previous
research had established that a
reduction of only 25 per cent
significantly reduced the
incidence of cancer in tests on
mice, he said.
He added that his
experiments showed an 80 per

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

cent reduction in skin cancer
among mice using
Chemosol-treated tobacco.
Although the formula is
secret, he said, Chemosol is
odorless, tasteless nontoxic and
completely combustible,
reducing to carbon dioxide and
water when burned.
Dr. Benedict J. Duffy Jr.,
professor of preventive medicine
at Tufts University, said
Hudsons findings were
supported by independent

Quarter Drive Begins

Quarter Drive, sponsored
by Student Center Action Team
(SCAT), begins toda} md will
run through Thursday. Booths
will be open from 9 a.m. -1 p.m.
in the Norman Hall area, the
Hub, Walker-Little Hall area and
the library breeze way.
Quarter Drive is part of
SCATS effort to gain student
support and interest in the need
for a student center.
Chairman Ed Boze said, The
drive is based on the idea that
Fish Watching
If youre one of those who
looks at the world through a
fishbowl, the Aquarium Society
of Gainesville invites you to join
them.
The purpose of the 63
members, 50 per cent of them
UF students, is to promote the
tropical fish hobby.
Each week new topics from
the field of tropical fish are
studied.
Meetings are held the third
Monday of each month at the
Unitarian Universalis Fellowship
on Millhopper Road at 7:30
p.m.

several ways of looking at things, some are
inevitably better than others.

laboratory checks he had
monitored.
The committee is considering
whether to extend a 1965 law
which requires a health hazard
warning on cigarette packs but
which prohibits government
restrictions on cigarette
advertising. If the act is not
extended past June 30, the
government vould be free to
order curbs on cigarette
advertising, possibly including
television.

anybody can spare a quarter. If
you can spare a dollar thats even
better. Or even if its only a
dime we need your help if we
want a student center on this
campus.
Another SCAT project is
Activities Day, May 2. The
gymnastics team will perform,
Gene Middleton Band will
provide the music and
refreshments will be sold.
Proceeds from Quarter
Drive, Activities day, and the
Rascals concert will register on
the thermometer in the Plaza of
the Americas. Spring Quarter
goal is $20,000.
There is a SCAT meeting
tonight, 150 G and F, Reitz
Union. Any interested students
are invited to attend.

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FOR FIRE HAZARDS
Gvilles Annual
Inspection Starts
By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesville firemen are looking in on homes looking out for
possible fire starters -as the citys first annual Home Inspection
program attempts to decrease the annual rate of home fires.
Apartment buildings and UF resident facilities are not on the
inspection lists but private home dwellers near campus will find city
fire department teams knocking at their doors during the next few
weeks.
This program is aimed particularly at places which would not
normally get inspected where the homeowner is strictly on his own
as far as safety precautions go, Batallion Chief P.M. Boothby said.
Apartment buildings get periodical inspections and UF residence
halls and buildings undergo inspections conforming to state
regulations.
Last week, all UF fraternity houses on and off campus underwent
their annual inspections. Reports based on the inspections made by
Chief David Laird will be returned to the fraternities, the Dean of
Mens office, and the Department of Housing.
We are going street by street in every city neighborhood and to all
private homes, Fire Chief John Dampier Jr., said.
In the past, we have asked people to call us when they felt their
home needed an inspection. However, we didnt get near the coverage
as we are getting with this program, he said.
Last year, 272 fires took place in Gainesville homes resulting in six
lives being lost and more than $91,000 in property damage.
This month more than 3,000 homes have already been inspected.
We selected April because it coincides with the Spring Clean-Up
Campaign but the entire program will take eight weeks, Dampier
said.
Co-Sponsoring the program with the fire department are the
Gainesville-Alachua County Citizens Safety Council and the City
Beautification Board.
All five city fire stations are conducting inspections between the
hours of 9 and 11:30 a.m. and between 2 and 4:30 p.m., Monday
through Friday.
We make the inspections only during these hours and no home is
entered without the consent of the residents. There is no penalty for
refusing this service except that possible fire hazards will be
overlooked, Dampier said.
We are particularly interested in the number of circuits being used
in the home, Cpt. Doyle Smith said.
Sometimes we find one plug with four different applicances
attached to it, or we find extension cords running under a carpet or
stacks of papers or books piled on top of a heater, he said.
Id rather have you come before than when it is too late, Mrs.
Joseph Arinson, 805 N.E. 9th St., told the inspection team.
I think it is a wonderful idea because the firemen could see things
I couldnt, Mrs. J.G. Harrold Jr., 1309 N.E. 28th Ave., said.
There are refusals but more residents are glad to learn of the
hazardous possibilities in their homes.
Following the inspection tours, the team gives a checklist of
possible hazards to the residents. There are 16 areas of hazards
connected with the kitchens, living area, utility rooms and basements.
We are asking people to help reduce the tragic loss of lives and
homes by making their own home as safe as possible, Dampier said.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR...
Bi THE refresh,ng ne %



Political Powers Unleashed On Alligator

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Student Government officials
had a tongue-in-cheek attitude
Tuesday toward their day as
Alligator staffers Monday, but
they learned a lesson from the
experience.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor, the one-day
editor-in-chief of the Alligator,
tossed off the job lightly. I
could be editor tomorrow. Ive
never had such an easy, relaxing

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job (snicker).
Managing editor Marc Glick
had a new respect for the efforts
of the Alligator staff.
It was an experience that
makes me realize what a pain it
is to have people running in and
interrupting them all the time.
The Alligator is where all
the power is, Ive decided.
Any time the Alligator
needs our help again, we are
available.
I had a good time. I have
renewed respect for the work
that goes into the Alligator,
said Florida Blue Key President

Manny James, who played the
role of executive editor, on
a more serious note.
IFC President Steve Zack had
a traumatic experience when he
made the carbon copy of his
story on the back of his original.
But in spite of his problems,
Zack said he enjoyed the
experience.
Id be glad to write a guest
editorial any time, offered
Zack.
I would appreciate as much
journalistic guts the other 364
days of the year as were shown
Monday, commented Jason

Sears
SEARS, ROEBUCK AND CO.

Straight, who regularly writes a
column In the Alligator.
The Alligator staffers who
managed SG Monday came out
much less successfully in the
opinion of Ric Katz.
They came, they saw, they
blundered.
The people in SG learned
that they cant just walk in and
demand a story, but the people
that took over SG had a
play day. They messed up the
place.
We made some fake calls
into SG and they couldnt
handle any of it, Katz said.

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Shop Thurs., Fri., and Monday Nights til 9
Free Parking Phone 378-2531

Wednesday, Aoril 30.1969, The Florida Alligator,

Alligator staff members had a
d' ferent idea. The general
reaction of the staff was, It was
easy.
Excellence in Food

Page 3



l, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30,1969

Page 4

'THE MORE LIBERAL THE BETTER*: ADAMS
UF Doctors Favor Legalized Abortion Bill

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Seven out of nine UF doctors
polled Tuesday voiced approval
of a more liberal abortion law.
Dr. L. E. Cluff, chairman of
the medicine department, had
strong pro opinions.
There is a great need for
legalizing abortions to protect
the mothers health and provide
opportunities to prevent the
birth of a deformed child, he
said, adding he would be
terribly disappointed if the
bill doesnt go through this year.
Director of Clinical
Laboratories at the J. Hillis
Miller Health Center, W. R.
Adams commented, the more
liberal (the law) the better.V
In my heart I think a more
liberal abortion law is right, but
I dont think any doctor should
have the right to personally

Underground Rock
Next On WRUF

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
WRUF-FM will soon be going
underground.
Two WRUF disc jockeys, Dan
Vining and Curtis Jones, will be
hosting a show of underground
music every Friday and Saturday
night from 11 to 1, starting this
Friday.
The show, to be broadcast in
multiplex stereo, will be called
103.7, which is the frequency
of the station.
We are generally sticking
with progressive music, like Jimi
Hendrix, the Vanilla Fudge and
the Cream. There will be some
blues, and maybe some
traditional music that was
responsible for the new trends,
Vining said Tuesday.
We are going to try to bring
in some of the newer groups and
air some of the new songs to give
people a chance to hear records
they dont normally hear.
The program will also feature
songs that appear on albums but
are not released as singles.
If the program gets good
response, Vining said, it may be
extended to longer hours.
Plans are being made for
some features in the future such
as taped interviews with
musicians, taped concerts and
the playing of whole sides of
albums so that people with the
proper equipment can tape the
records.
The style of the show will be
very casual, with few
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vs 11 jjj pPp m JRf
| OPINION i
I POLL i
order an abortion, the decision
should be reviewed by a
committee, resident doctor
Joel Feiss said, but added he felt
he wasnt experienced enough to
give an opinion.
The obstetricians were the
most reluctant to comment. As
one of them explained:
When one of our colleagues
gave an opinion publicly there
were repercussions. There is a
difference between a medical
man who is not an obstetrician
giving an opinion, he said, and

interruptions of music.
Commercials will be limited and
the announcer will do a
minimum of talking.
Vining said he would like any
comments or suggestions about
the format of the program after
it gets under way.

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the opinion of a doctor who
would actually have to perform
the operation.
The case of a doctor in Miami
who was arrested on charges of
performing an illegal abortion
makes the subject a touchy one
for the obstetrician, he siad.
The doctor himself is against
abortion for personal reasons,
but said he saw the need for
new laws, and if a woman came
to him for an abortion he would
not perform one,
direct her to one who could
perform one.
Another obstetrician, who
wished to remain unidentified,
said he was in favor of the more
liberal laws as they were written.
In his own personal opinion the
laws are a step in the right
direction.
The lawmakers represent
society, which says we must
accept progeny whether we want
them or not. There are millions
of criminal abortions that are
criminal because of the present
law, he said.
Associate Professor of
Psychiatry Dr. Sidney Denman
was in favor of more liberal laws,
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but said he thinks there should
be a committee to review an
abortion decision.
Assistant Professor of
Psychology Dr. Donald A.
Dewsbury offered no
comment.
The Director of Pediatric
Clinic, Dr. Franklin Deusk, said
he had no strong feelings about
it one way or the other. This
primarily involves obstetricians 4
he said.
The doctors were questioned

LET'S SEE YOU
PASS THIS ONE UP.
6 AM-11AM EACH DAY
1 EGG ANY WAY £
1 HOT CAKE w W
GRITS
TOAST SPEC|AL good all week
JE Y COFFEE
5{
1225 W. UNIV. WITH ANY j
Vi BLOCK FROM CAMPUS BREAKFAST

while liberal abortion bills were
being debated in the Florida
House of Representatives.
Monday the House passed a
bill which, if signed into law,
would permit abortions when
the child could have serious
mental or physical defects, the
mothers health would be
endangered, when her life would
be threatened if the pregnancy
continued, or when the
pregnancy was caused by rape or
incest.



I
l pom+ pen
sharp hai ptVi
Scaf^s,
o
>lmd 4ne muqqer

mbrella -tip
>r stabbing


Sleep For Money, Or The Snooze Game

EDITORS NOTE: This is the first in
a two part series of the new sleep
laboratory in the NASA building.)
By LINDA MIKLOWITZ
Alligator Correspondent
Few students who passed the NASA
building across from the Hub last
quarter were aware of what lay behind
those walls.
Wrapped up in their own little worlds
on the way to class, they never dreamed
that another student was spending more
than two weeks confined to a
bedroom-sized room, sealed with what
looked like the door to a meat freezer.
Isolated and deprived of any
indications of time, he was the subject
of a pilot study by the new sleep
laboratory which is trying to find
angworc tn miMtinns like Whv do we

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NEW SLEEP LABORATORY
... a pilot study in UF's NASA building

sleep as much as we do? and Why do
we sleep when we do?
Although monitored by
closed-circuit television, he could go to
a private area of the room or paste a
paper over the camera lens for privacy.
He had books, magazines;, and a stereo
and ordered his meals from the menu of
a local restaurant. A stack of Newsweek
magazines from the 1940s someone
gave him held his attention for a great
part of the time.
Communication between the subject
and his monitors was held at a
minimum, but lab workers gave him
almost anything he wanted-except a
television, radio, newspaper, calendar,
or anything else that could give him
time cues during his confinement.
The subject was not exactly being
held prisoner. The set of double doors
to his cell were unlocked, so that he
could end the experiment any time he

Pulling, Pounding, Purse-
Complete Female Arsenal

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Staff Writer
The trim coed finds herself on a darkened
street. She hears a rustling of a bush and
footsteps behind her. But she dares not turn
around. She has no way of contending with the
danger so she leaves herself in the most
susceptible position.
What few women realize is that they can learn
to defend themselves with no greater strength
than they use to do their daily chores.
Attacks on women are usually made by
persons not expecting any skilled defense.
Among the most common, as well as least
effective, methods of defense are hair pulling and
pounding of fists against the attackers chest. But
anything is better than nothing.
Many women who live in dark neighborhoods
make it a habit to carry an umbrella whether or
not rain is forecast. Most have steel tips that can
be effective weapons. A spray can containing a
chemical gas is also being marketed commercially
and can be used to temporarily blind a mugger.
For that matter, any small aerosol spray can
of starch, paint, insect repellent or hair spray
may be of great aid if applied to the attackers
eyes.
There are many reported instances when the
woman has not time to reach into her purse for a
weapon. Biting hard into anyones flesh will
cause the person to grimace. It may give the
victim just the time she needs for escape.
If the attacker comes at the woman from the
front, she can relax long enough in his embrace
to surprise him momentarily of her

chose by walking into the laboratory.
The young man was running on
about a 26-hour day. He slept an hour
more than he normally did and stayed
up an extra hour. His estimates of the
day and time were over two days ahead
of the current date.
Electrodes pasted to his head led to
an electro-encephalograph machine
which recorded his brain waves when he
slept.
The lab opened last June and has
been operating on a $20,000 NASA
grant for the purpose of adding to the
currently mushrooming field of sleep
research. NASA will use this
information in planning space flights
where the normal patterns of sleeping
and wakefulness are disturbed.
Harmon W. Agnew Jr., a young
portly fellow with a Burl Ives beard and
a penchant for trying new ideas, heads
the lab and has been in sleep research

Wednesday, April 30,1969, Ttw Florida Alligator,

willingness. Then with a hard, fast upward
thrust of the knee into the assailants groin, she
will probably have time for escape.
A woman wearing high heel shoes can stamp
her heel forcefully onto her pursuers instep. She
can also use the heel of her shoe as a hand
weapon.
In addition to the groin area, the most
susceptible areas are the molesters windpipe and
eyes. However gruesome-sounding it may be, a
man forced with the reality of losing an eye or
swallowing his tongue will not pursue thoughts
of rape.
Pure fright made visible to the attacker is a
distinct disadvantage. If the potential assailant
thinks he has been spotted or if he sees the
woman reaching into her purse, he may think
she is carrying a weapon and give up altogether.
A womans purse can contain as deadly an
arsenal as the U.S. Air Force. Although it is
illegal to carry concealed deadly weapons, there
are many common articles that can be put to
good use if need be.
The usual lipstick tubes, compacts and bombs
are good in a pinch. But every woman should
make certain to have better weapons at her
disposal than that. A metal fingernail file, large
ball-point and fountain pens, hat-pins and steel
letter openers are most effective.
If an attacker grabs a woman from behind, she
can avoid a choke hold by lowering her chin
firmly against her throat. A hard, sharp chop
with the knuckles on the back of the attackers
hand can temporarily numb it and decrease his
mobility.

since 1962, soon after he got his masters
degree in psychology from the UF.
He worked several years in the sleep
research lab at the J. Hillis Miller Health
Center which specializes in
sleep-connected medical disorders.
Studying the young man in the sleep
room costs sls an hour, $1 of which
goes to the subject who was chosen
after careful screening which included a
550-question computerized personality
inventory.
Even the slightest mechanical failure
can cause th entire experiment to be
scrubbed. Because of this, Agnew
spends much money in securing reliable
equipment- from the best air
conditioning system to the finest
switches.
During his confinement, the subject
did not care to exercise and in the next
experiment Agnew would like to test the
effect of exercise on sleep.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30, 1969

Shopping Center
Full Os 'Bull
Big Sam, the worlds
largest bull, is appearing at the
Gainesville Shopping Center
through Saturday.
Sam is sponored by the
Gainesville Breakfast Lions Club.
Admission is a pair of old
eyeglasses, to be distributed by
New Eyes for the Needy, Inc.,
to those who cannot afford
* them.

DEAN WANTS EARLY RECRUITMENT
Engineers In Shot

By Alligator Services
A UF engineering
administrator, stressing the
shortage of engineers, said
Monday recruitment of potential
engineers should start in junior
high school.
Edward W. Jacunski, assistant
dean of engineering
administration, also put in a
pitch for women in engineering,
saying young women ... girls
no longer can be overlooked.
There are many areas of
engineering where women would
find satisfying careers, Jacunski
remarked. It isnt a mans
world any longer.

Alumni ClubToHonor
Scholarship Winners
By Alligator Services
The UFs Alachua County Alumni Club will conduct its annual
scholarship banquet at 6:30 p.m. Thursday in the Reitz Union
Ballroom.
John R. Harrison, president of the Gainesville Sun and Lakeland
Ledger, will be the featured speaker for the dinner honoring eight
senior class recipients of 1969-70 scholarships to the UF and 93
outstanding 11th graders.
The scholarships, among 60 being awarded by the Alumni
Association this spring to students who will enter the UF next
September, will cover tuition expense for three quarters during the
academic year.
The eight freshmen also will qualify with students selected by
other alumni clubs for a special $ 1,000 scholarship for achievement to
be awarded in June, 1970.
Other guests at the banquet will include parents of the 11th and
12th graders and 10 current University of Florida students each of
whom received an Alumni Association scholarship a year ago. The 10
include Mathew M. Bliziotes, Barbara Bowman, Becky Buel, Sharon
Butler, McGarvey Cline, Susan Hazen, Jeanne Kinser, Amanda Myers,
Karen Paige and Roger W. Sims.
Scholarships recipients and their schools are:
Thomas David Beck, Santa Fe; Iwana N. Dale, P.K. Yonge; Darla
Dee Esposito, Gainesville High School; Dale R. Henderly, Gainesville
High School; David Marshall Pettis, Gainesville High School; Michael
Ryschkewitsch, Gainesville High School; Mack Tyner 111, Gainesville
High School; and John A. Wamick, P.K. Yonge.
The
UNION ART
PRINT SALE
has been
POSTPONED
due to
\ shipment delays
New dates will be announced

DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST
("XiS7l / AIF-PO I %A i/ 111
L. _J v
.Jpl'
v I % ti i < j

Shortage of engineering
graduates isnt an experience
that is peculiar to the UF.
Nation-wide, candidates are in
short supply, and at a time when
engineering is becoming a
necessity to survival, he noted.
Some areas cited are the
reconstruction of our cities, hit
recently by the move to leave
downtown areas and establish
suburban business centers; the
potential danger of suffocation
in wastes, and the need for
pollution controls in the air we
breathe and in the water we
drink.
Mass transportation is in
trouble. Authorities believe

rt Supply
engineering can save the day
there if the technicians and
builders can be found says
Jacunski.
Jacunski, and other observers,
offer no reason for the shortage
of engineering students, except,
perhaps, it is a course of study
that requires genuine effort.
Dr. William H. Pickering, in
the May, 1969, issue of The
Bridge, an engineering fraternal
publication, writes:
Engineering enrollment is
trending downward in the
universities. In 1957, 34 per cent
of the National Merit Scholars
asked to state a career
preference, gave engineering; in
1965, only 20 per cent preferred
that field.
In 1957, 23 per cent of all
freshmen were enrolled in
engineering; now the enrollment
is only 13 per cent.
At the same time, the
demand for new engineers is
rising steadily as the complexity
of our modem society grows.
The demand for new engineers
already is beginning to exceed
the supply, and it is estimated
that by 1972 three years from
now it will increase by about
50 per cent.
Just a walk away
from U.F. campus
1620W.UNIV. I
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Bettes J
qfe -A HAIRSTYLIST.//
Ph. 378-2244

BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION
To celebrate our Ist Birthday, our
ENTIRE STOCK REDUCED 10%
Certain groups of dresses & sportswear
REDUCED 20% & 33 1/3%
Save on your entire maternity wardrobe:
Slacks Girdles Slips Panties
Bathing Suits Tops Bermudas
Sale runs May Ist through May 3rd only
706 W. Univ. 372-3850
(Across from Santa Fe J. C. )
Use y ur Bonk-Americord or Central Charge Card I

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YOUR NEW COLLEGE RING IS INSURED
AGAINST ... Ijj W£
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BURGLARY, LARCENY OR FIRE.
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* ACCIDENTAL BREAKAGE OF STONE.
IREGISTERED CERTIFICATE WITH EVERY RlNgl\ ¥|j|S
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Oysters & clams on the half shell /\
Michelob on draft /
Steaks & Seafoods our Specialty Jk
Visit our Package Store competitive area V/
prices Try our Special package deal t f 1
for Student Organizations. \\\
At the sign of the beacon light. (if
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM
r l~: Harry Lawton, Manager jrSt (
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Picnic's Over
For Fire Ants Bass^ s
***"' ~ M | MHtMvbMtr 1
In Florida assa-* s=£ x ||p§&
The state Dept, of Agriculture is using World War II bombers to "*
prepare for its next military offensive against the fre ants sweeping fA
through Florida. n fcl \
The Navy PVZ bombers will spray poison over a nine-mile strip 'v'x^A
from Melbourne on the East Coast to Punta Gorda on the West Coast
hopefully eliminating 98 per cent of them. T**
While putting a temporary stop to the army of stinging insects the -, /
scientists will try to find out why its poison has not been fully \ 1
effective in the past. I
In 1967 over sl2 million were poured into a two-year campaign to r" ** f
eliminate the ants before they settled in Pinellas, Hillsborough,
Manatee, Hardee, Sarasota, DeSoto, and Highlands counties.
But the ants suffered only about 80 per cent casualties at the most.
Their queens escaped to start new colonies.
The ants occupying Pinellas county have been sprayed twice in the
past year with the pesticide Mirex, and should get a third treatment in
May.

Police
Award
By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
University Police
Departments first Officer
of the Year will be
announced Saturday
afternoon at the Florida
Gator Orange and Blue
game.
Sponsored by the UF
Athletic Department, the award
will be presented to the UPD
officer selected from three
finalists by UPD Chief A. I.
Shuler, UPD Training Officer Lt.
Dudley Goulden, and Athletic
Director Ray Graves.
The three finalists received the
highest number of votes from
their fellow officers in voting
last week.
Finalists are Sgt. Russell
Lamber, 28, Officer Jessie Hugh
Lee, 31, and Officer James M.
Steadman, 26.
The selection is based on the
appearance of the officer in
uniform, his ability to appear
and speak to the public and his
attitude and interest for the
good of the department.
Officers nominated for the
award included UPD officers
through the rank of sergeant.
The winner will become the
UPD liasion officer to the UF
athletic department and will
work with the department
during the football season.
A plaque will be awarded to
the officer and to the
department.
Lambert has been with the
department for almost nine
years.
Lee, a native of Live Oak, has
been with the department for
nearly 3 years.
Steadman, and his wife,
Devra Lynne reside at 1028
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF £O%
THE MALL
376-4552 AurHOmKD
DEALER

RASCALS
"PEOPLE GOT
TO BE FREE

ANNOUNCEMENT
Charles Shepherd, President-elect of the University of Florida Student Body, is seeking qualified
students to fill the following positions in Student Government:

Any student wishing to participate is asked to apply at the student activities desk on the third floor
of the J. Wayne Reitz Union. Preference will be given to those attending the summer quarters.

CABINET
Sec. of Finance
Sec. of Interior
Sec. of Legislative Affairs
Sec. of Academic Affairs
Sec. of Student Affairs
Sec. of Student Services
Sec. of Athletics
Sec. of Health, Insurance
Sec. of Minority Group Affairs
Sec. of Married Student Affairs
Sec. of Public Functions
Sec. of Student Organizations

Now Leasing
FREDRICK GARDEN
APARTMENTS
1 130 S W. 16th Ave. 372 7555

Devaney Not Radical

Defeated student body
presidential candidate James
Devaney denied Tuesday that he
and his party were going to join
radicals to form a student
govemment-in-exile.
The rumors began with a
classified advertisement which
appeared in the Alligator
Thursday and/ Friday which
called upon Devaneys followers

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Wednesday, April 30,1968, The Florida Alligator,

STAFF
Director of Info. Services
Administrative Assistant
Ombudsman
Chrmn. Gator Loan Fund
Asst, for Legal Affairs
Dir. of Housing Authority
Chrmn. of SCORE
Admin. Aides (3)
Executive Sec.

to come to a meeting with
members of the SDS to set up
such a government.
I had nothing to do with
that advertisement, Devaney
said. I dont have any plans to
join such a group. Many of the
radicals are my friends, but they
know that I am not radical in
my ways.

Page 7



Page 8

I, Th Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30,1969

EDITORIAL
Gator Ray Balks

IFC President Steve Zack has a gripe and we think it is a
legitimate one.
Zack is perturbed that the Athletic Department cannot
donate the concession profits from Friday nights Rascals
concert on Florida Field. UF Athletic Director Ray Graves
says the profits cannot be donated because of a loan
agreement which says all stadium income must go to pay
back the loan.
This may be the case, but there are other ways.
If the Athletic Department can have a football game
moved from Gainesville to Tampa, they can do anything,
Zack says.
Graves says they have contributed to other campus areas
such as $15,000 for academic scholarships to non-athletes,
SI,OOO for the J. Hillis Miller Scholarship fund, $2,000 for
Florida Blue Key, $4,000 to the UF Foundation, and other
activities not connected with intercollegiate athletics.
Zack has suggested that the Athletic Department
determine how much money is taken in at the concert and
donate that much money from another fund. This would
accomplish what Zack started out to do.
Graves has not said anything on this proposal, which we
think would be satisfactory to both groups.
Graves must realize that this activities center will be used
by the Athletic Department as well as other campus groups.
He has said previously that the Athletic Department will
cooperate with student groups in raising money for the
center but he does not appear but be helping now.
Zacks idea of determining the concession profits and
then appropriating them from another source in the
Athletic Department is a good idea and appears to be
workable.
For the benefit of the center drive Graves should find a
way for the concessions profits or a similar amount to be
donated to the fund.
It shouldnt be too much trouble.
Good Lovin Rascals
Friday nights performance by The Rascals is the largest
effort to date for the benefit of the proposed Student
Activities Center Fund.
Sponsored by the Interfratemity Council, the show will
give UF students an opportunity to see one of the top rock
groups in the world at a very inexpensive price, and help the
center fund at the same time.
There is no problem with seating or warm temperatures
with this concert because it is being held on Florida Field.
There are plenty of tickets available and the problems that
normally accompany a show of this type in Florida Gym are
non-existent.
We support this effort and urge students, faculty and
administrators to purchase tickets for this show. Even if you
cannot be there Friday night, buy a ticket. The money will
help the Activities Center Fund.

Someone once told me that I should
write more humorous columns. Satire is
definitely not my bag, life is too bleak
for me to satirize it. But, there are some
things that bring laughter into the
otherwise drab chore of existence.
The following joke was originally
printed in Playboy magazine. It was
written by the director of the National
States Rights Party. He lives in Georgia.
I think it is a good joke to tell at almost
any cocktail party, except of corse,
those that Blacks attend:
** Playboys interview with Eldridge
Cleaver reveals why the Negroes will
never amount to anything. Cleaver and
the other Negroes are unable to think
for themselves. Cleaver is only able to
repeat the irrational socialist ideas of
Karl Marx who was not a Negro. At
no point in the interview does Cleaver
express an original idea.
That is a Negro for you. Negroes are

Satire Is Definitely Not My Bag
Larry Jordanss

inherently inferior to people. Cleavers
statements are valuable in one respect.
They show that since his race is engaged
in a fight with the police, every Negro in
America must be disarmed.
Antigun legislation should only be
enforced against the blacks and their
allies. Instead of disarming the police
as Cleaver advocates the police should
be given heavier and more powerful
weapons, such as bazookas and machine
guns, and be ordered to shoot lawless
blacks first and ask questions later.
It is obvious to all mature and
thinking people that we will never have
law and order in America until all the
Negroes are deported back to Africa and
completely removed form this nation
that was founded and build by the great
white race.
The blacks unwillingly contributed a
little sweat but no intelligence, to the
building of this nation so did the

Staff Writings
Magical Mystery Tour
By Richard-McCulloch

Nowadays all roads lead
somewhere. There is a certain
element of adventure lacking.
The best you can do is end up
some place you never heard of
before.
That is what happened
Saturday when I took the
magical mystery tour to urban
San Antonio, Florida home of
St. Leo College with a group
of radical friends who were
protesting the bestowing of an
honorary doctorate of humane
letters on Secretary of Defense
Melvin Laird, and the policies he
is associated with.
The demonstrators were
refused entry into San Antonio.
They were stopped at the city
limits by helmeted members of
the Florida Highway Patrol,
Pasco Sheriffs Department, San
Antonio Police and those zany
St. Leo kampus kops in full
anti-riot regalia. The National
Guard (Green Meanies) was also
on hand, but held in reserve.
This has to be considered a
classic cause of over-reaction by
the police who outnumbered the
200 or so demonstrators at least
two to one.
The several planes that were
flying overhead were rumored to
be ingeniously adapted crop
dusters capable of spraying
mace. Police on the ground
denied this and siad they were
merely spotting for the ground
forces in case flanking
movements through the orange
groves. If They want to get you
youre going to get got.
The demonstration was
organized by the Bay Area
'Co n f ederation, consisting of
representatives from several
Florida schools and religious
groups. By previous arrangement
it was to be held on public
property adjacent to the St. Leo
campus and for a specific length
of time. This hardly seems to be
in violation of law or basic
constitutional rights of freedom
of speech and assembly.
Not that these are absolute
rights. They represent questions

jackasses.
We white men know what the Negro
really wants. He wants our white
women. But we would rather die than
surrender our precious white women to
the black beast. Cleaver clearly shows
that Negroes prefer white women
because black women are ugly and
stupid. Not even the Negro men want
them.
Basically, Cleaver and his race are
sick and tired of being Negroes and are
depressed and sad because science is
unable to change them into white
people. They are jealous of the beautiful
and intelligent white race and ashamed
of their own blade race. The white race
is the superior race, and white
supremacy is Gods law the law of
nature that God created.
Throughout their history, even
though they have been in contact with
white civilization for over 6,000 years,

of degree. The relative character
becomes particularly obvious in
cases like this. Where is the line
to be drawn between legitimate
freedom and a threat to public
safety?
The demonstrators wanted to
make a legitimate protest against
those who they feel have
betrayed the American dream by
placing the sacredness of
institutions above the value of
human life. Being lawful and
protesting are not mutually
exclusive activities. The police
frustrated their attempts.
In this instance, other than
inciting to litter, no laws were
broken. However, in
confrontations like this it is easy
for either or both sides to lose
control and the resulting conflict
is costly both in dollars and
human suffering.
What alternative is offered
demonstrators when they are
denied a lawful forum? Must
they capture an administration
building or clash with police
before they are allowed to be
heard? ""

jjm! m w |
fW Hv I
I
| B
'* nflV

The
Florida
Alligator
'The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Assignments Editor
Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors

the Negroes have always been wild
savages and always will be. Even so,
there is no reason for them to worry
because when the National States Rights
Party comes to power, we will solve the
race problem and have a white Christian
America.
The
Florida
Alligator
Published by students of the
University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of
Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in
Room 330, Rate Union. Phone 392 1681
Opinions expressed in the Florida
Alligator ate those of the editors or
of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.'



Conservatives Do The Most Damage

Joseph Wehby would probably call himself
pro-capitalist.
Unfortunately, it is people such as he those
who commonly call themselves
conservatives that do the most damage to an
economic system which has created the highest
standard of living in any society, at anytime in
history.
Mr. Wehbys problem is his lack of an ideological
foundation for his support of capitalism-a situation
which puts Klonsky at the advantage almost
immediately. Granted that Klonsky is depraved, but
at least he is consistent in his depravity; he doesnt
jump from premise to contradictory premise in his
advocation of communism. No, Mr. Klonsky sticks
to the first axiom of any statist: man is to be
regarded as a servant of the state.
Now, Mr. Wehby would probably agree that the
above axiom is basic to communist or
facist thought, but if it were implied that he was
in tacit agreement with it also, he would probably
protest violently. Lets investigate his premise...
Current apologetic defenses of capitalism usually
rest on a combination, to some degree, of three
moral bases: religion, tradition, or mans depravity.
Religion as a moral justification of capitalism is
absurd; to use faith as a basis for your side of an
argument implies that your opponent has reason on
his side. (Which, incidentally, Mr. Klonsky does
not.)
The classical concept of conservatism is the
defense of the status quo, regardless of whether it is
right or wrong, i.e. a total support of the traditional;
not because it is good, but because it is ol& It
doesnt appear that the progressive Mr. Wehby fits
this description.
.. .The initial capital accumulation period,
where there is exploitation of the workers.. .our

Long Live The Revolution

Will It Die
At Graduation?
MR. EDITOR:
Students, unite and arise! The glorious
revolution is coming! The oppressed shall join
together in striking a death blow to the totalitarian,
authoritarian establishment and its brutal, repressive
crimes against their comrads.
The patient suffering of the long apathetic
masses shall be ended in one climactic explosion
which shall remove from their necks the yoke of
abuse.
On Sunday, June 15, 1969, a large number of
seniors and graduate students, the revolutionary
vanguard, will receive long-awaited degrees and
diplomas, their tickets of escape from the inanity of
this institution. Coming here a few years ago to get
and education and/or a degree, they subsequently
found themselves infested with and pestered by a
motly crew of opportunists and neurotic
nincompoops.
Politicians who say they are not politicians (we,
the enlightened ones, shall work and fight for
you); immature intellectual-rednecks (we shall
restructure (?) this authoritarian, racist university);
these are well-known examples of those who decry
the apathy of the masses of students who came
here for reasons other than to become involved in
petty squabbles and immature emotional tantrums.
These are the real campus revolutionaries. They
are the ones who are being freed to take their places
in a real world, not an artificial one where
irresponsible juvenile emotionalism prevails.
This real world may not be entirely rational or
free from petty squabbles, but in the struggle for
physical survival adolescent attitudes soon succomb.
Long live the revolution!
i
ALAN TURNER, 2UC

Speaking Out

capitalism is in the advanced stage where workers
also share the benefits...
It appears, from the above quotation extracted
from his letter, that Mr. Wehby bases his defense of
capitalism On mans depravity; he assumes that
capitalism is unjust, but for a shorter period of time
The classical concept of conservatism
is the defense of the status quo, regardless
of whether it is right or wrong, i.e. a total
support of the traditional; not because it is
good, but because it is old. It doesn't
appear that the progressive Mr. Wehby fits
this description.
tiuiiiiittiiiniiimimimiitHttiiifiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiitiiiiimiiiiuniiimmmii
than communism.
He would probably argue that human nature is
such that no man could be trusted to be dictator,
therefore freedom is the only possible answer. The
implication of this theory is that if man were
perfect he would deserve a dictatorship; however,
since man is basically evil, all he rates is freedom.
The above is not an advocation of dictatorship,
its merely an example of conservative idealogy as
it is espoused today. Such is the conservative view
of man.
A true capitalist maintains an exultant view of
man- He doesnt proclaim the exceptions to be
typical of mankind; he regards the Klonskies, drug
addicts, murderers, and dictators of the world as
examples of how low some men can go, not as
examples of the typical man. A capitalist points to
airplanes, anti-biotics, skyscrapers, integrated
circuits, and the myriad other wonders of the
modem world as examples of what man can do.
The vast majortiy of the progress made during
the last two centuries derived-not from altruism,

Proud Os The Greek System

MR. EDITOR:
As a G.D.1., I often find myself
evaluating the actions of our Greek
fraternities and sororities on campus.
From this unaffiliated viewpoint, I
would like to congratulate two of these
fine organizations.
First of all a hat tip to Sigma Chis
for again managing to develop a unique
idea into a worthwhile event. The Sigma
Chi Derby of last Saturday was
undoubtedly a success for the 23rd.
straight year. Creating good old heated
rivalry and resentment, it has topped
beauty contests, student government
elections and cheerleading try-outs for
developing intersorority bitterness.
And a warm thanks to the men of

Alpha Tau Omega for their
presentations of the Gator Olympics.
Including fraternities, sororities,
G.D.l.s, and ROTC departments,
faculty, Student Government, and the
Alligator, the Olympics allowed our
campus to participate in a worhtwhile
cause.
Each of us who participated certainly
appreciated the opportunity to do
something worthwhile; and although we
each didnt receive a trophy or a ribbon,
we got a good feeling out of helping to
send John Samuels to the Olympics.
Lets hope the ATOs will make the
Gator Olympics an annual event; for
once I am proud of our universitys
Greek system.
NAME WITHHELD

WdnNday, April 30,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Daryl R. Mattox

the wish to serve ones brothers-but from
rational self interest. The United States is the only
country founded, at least implicitly, on this
premise. The problem confronting many
conservatives today is the fact that this philosophy
was only briefly outlined in the Constitution.
Thus, conservatives become entangled in
contradictions and inconsistencies while trying to
defend thier view of capitalism-especially while
trying to defend it on religious grounds. (For an
example of this phenomenon, see Pres. Eisenhower's
defense of freedom in a discussion with Russias
Marshal Zukov. N. Y. Times: July 29,1957)
What, then is capitalism? First of all, it is not a
compromise, as is a mixed economy, welfare state,
or even that shade of gray which Mr. Wehby calls
socialistic capitalism (Youre not alone. I don't
know what he means either.) Neither is it merely an
economic system, to be practiced out of the context
of a completely integrated (in both senses of the
word) social system.
Capitalism is based on the recognition of
individual rights, especially property rights, in which
all property is privately owned and controlled. You
will note that this definition leaves no room for
anti-trust legislation, military conscription, or any
other statist concept which has insinuated itself into
the American culture.
Contrary to what liberals say, it is the freedom in
our economy-not the controls imposed by them
upon it-that has fostered the remarkable progress
made by the United States.
One last point. Mr. Wehby intimates that there is
no control of the media in this country today. I
invite him to turn to page 18 of Thursdays
Alligator and witness the liberals latest crusade to
protest the masses.

OPEN FORUM:

jAdoia
omjL
Vi Meat
"There is
no hope
for the
complacent
man
Opinion
Page
LETTERS
In order to appear hi the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 9



Page 10

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30,1969

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Wednesday, April 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE I
Gibson Electric Guitar, perfect cond..
Firebird 3-pickups, $l5O, was $250
new. Call Walt, 376-1474.
(A-st-122-pj
Yashica TL-Super. TTL meter, f 1.7
Auto-Yashinon lens. Mirror lock.
Shutter speed B-l/1000. With case,
$l4O. Ph. 372-3002 (A-st-122-p)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2 l lz acres, pecans
fronting on Huge lots, easy
commute, tefms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20M16-P)
Beautiful Brazilian guitar for sale at
bargain price. Owner has hardly
used. Call 372-6284 after 6 p.m.
(A-3t-124-p)
6O Opel station wagon very
engine very good; new crankshaft &
other parts; passed inspection $250
Call 378-8610 anytime. (A-st-122-p)
8x47 Ventura mobile home. Bay
windows, air conditioned, 7x20
porch awning, 2nd BR made into
study, furnished. $1990. Call
376-0622, 4546 NW 13 St.
(A-lt-121-P)
Get a Mau Mau mongrel. It'll chew
anything from bones to steel.
Champion lines. Pedigree African
barkless Basenji pups. All shots.
376-2630. (A-lot-119-p)
Extra clean mobile home 8x35 close
to campus, nice lot, plenty of
storage. Call weekdays after 5
254-2580. SI3OO. (A-5M25-P)
5 mo. old Ovation electric guitar with
Gibson amplifier in excellent
condition, S3OO. Call 378-9824
Morn. (A-5M25-P)
Fender Bassman Amp. with Lansing
speakers, $450. Gibson EB-O Bass
guitar, burgandy hollow-body. Call
John at 376-7050. (A-3M25-P)
Black Doberman Female Cham Champion
pion Champion sired 9mo old. House broken,
all shots, ears trimmed, 3 Dobes and
4 kids=too much SIOO.OO. Call
376-9020. (A-5M25-P)
Martin D-18 steel string guitar in
excellent condition. S6O case
included S3OO. 1965 Honda Sport"
90 in good condition with helmet
$165. Call Bill 378-4932.
(A-5M25-P)
1967 Honda 50, under 3000 miles,
just tuned, side basket. sllO. Call
376-8322 after 5 p.m.
GIVE AWAY 1968 Honda S9O
$275, bought car need cash, call
HAMMER 372-9353, 372-6162.
Tools plus 2 helmets included free.
(A-3t-126-p)
1967 Hond? CBI6O. Excellent cycle.
Very reasonable. Call Fry 372-9358.
(A-st-126-p)
1964 Honda 50 good transportation.
With helmet and bubble $75 or best
offer. Phone 378-5789 or 392-0472.
Bob Burns (A-st-126-p)
KITTENS. Healthy loving free. Free
home trial. Phone 372-4639.
(A-lt-126-p)
FOR RENT I
Tired of hot, crowded dorms? Enjoy
an air-conditioned spacious apt. for
only $l2O for the whole quarter
(with 3 roommates in furnished
2-bedroom apt.) Come by rental
office, University Gardens Trace, 708
S.W. 16th Ave. Ph. 376-6720.
(B-st-122-c)
SUBLET 1 br. furn. apt. ac tv private
patiio. June thru? Price bargain
378-7196 after 5. (B-3t-126-p)
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to Campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21M15-P)
Peace and quiet is yours for the
asking by living in one of our
secluded luxusious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for an
appointment to see them. Immediate
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, Inc.
Phone 376-6461. (B-22M05-C)
Sublet furn 2 bedroom apt, SW 16th
Ave. $155 mo. Avail June. AC, pool,
carpet, cable TV, draperies, laundry
facilities. Call 376-5818. (B-st-123-P)
1 bdrm OLYMPIA Apt., 1 block
from campus, to sublet for summer
qt. Available in June. Call 378-4277.
(B-5M22-P)

(SWTEIsmnTo, .showing!
"NIGHTS of CABIRIA" fj
- 7 \

WANTED 1
Female roommate Camelot Apt.
Immediate occupancy, rent paid thru
April. Cali 378-9694 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M22-P)
Co-ed Roommate needed immediate
occupancy. Landmark 148. Elaine
378-8731 any pm, Tues. and Thurs.
am. (C-3t-124-p)
3 coeds for summer qtr. at
Tanglewood Townhouse. June rent
paid. Call 372-7882 after 4.
(C-5M23-P)
Two male roommates $41.60
month plus one-third utilities. Call
376-5467 or come by 1105 NW 4
Ave. (C-3M25-P)
Need 1 roommate Fr. Quarter. Fall
~uarter. Share with 3 others. Call
J 92-8263 evenings. (C-st-122-p)
p
Male roommate wanted for Summit
House. Air Cond., pool, cable TV.
$41.75 plus */* util. Move in for May
or June. Call 378-1923. (C-3t-126-p)
1 or 2 female roommates. Summer
qtr. Landmark. June rent free will
accept best offer. Call Sue after 5:30.
378-4481. (C-lt-126-p)
2 roommates for Village Park apt. in
the fall. Share rent and utilities. Call
392-9283 after 5 o'clock.
(C-lt-126-p)
HELP WANTED
v g
Manager, rooming house reliable
senior or male graduate student. Live
on premises, references. Phone
376-6652 after 6 p.m. (E-5M23-P)
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS FROM
TAMPA BAY AREA Career
$600.00 per month, plus expense
allowance for man needed for
insurance agency. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 11702 Tampa, Fla. 33610.
(E-Bt-119-p)
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY for top
executive. Challenging position for
mature, intelligent person with
excellent skills and managerial
ability. Salary open. Call 462-2499.
(E-st-126-p)
Part time waitress. Apply Trail Boss
The Ponderosa Steak House
Westgate Shopping Center.
(E-st-126-p)
AUTOS |
v 3
itt; X*X*X*X*X*X X X X X X X*XX-S!W*X X X-3
1964 Karmann Ghia, radio, w/w
tires. Excellent condition. Call
376-5687 after 5:30. Mechanically
perfect. (G-st-124-p)
V.W. Manx ouggy 1300 engine
53H.P. Red metalflake soft top side
curtains rollbar many extras. Great
for sand, woods, street $1695 or
trade for big motorcycle and cash.
See at 1020 S. Main St. or call
378-0249. (G-10t-119-p)
1965 Monza Corvair conv. auiu.
spyder engine. Power top, radio,
heater, call 372-7659 after 6p.m.
(G-st-126-p)
1960 Bugeye Sprite good condition
body and engine radio convertible.
BRG Call 378-3977 $250.
(G-3t-126-p)
I PERSONAL |
WftO4W9iH9!Q!PXWOCC'X4*>>SS!;?:W
Do you have a cool Mom? a square
Mater? a way-out mama-cat? or an
old-fashioned Mother? No matter
which, we have just the thing for her
Mothers Day gift (May II). Free
gift-wrapping and mailing service.
THE SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ.
Ave. Open Mon.-Sat. til 9:00.
(J-5M25-C)
There are very few seats left for
flights to EUROPE. Reserve today
tomorrow may be too late call
392-1655, Rm. 310, Reitz
Union now. (J-4M25-P)
The UNION ART PRINT SALE Has
been Vpgstponed due to shipment
delays, new schedule will be
announced at a later date.
(J-2t-126-p)
Tired of Ho-Hum fashions? Change
your look with a darrha, a mansouria
or a burnoose. Dramatically beautiful
Moroccan clothes of 100% finest
hand-woven cotton. Just In at THE
SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open Mon.-Sat. til 9:00. (J-st-125-c)
Training in ZEN meditation in return
for participation in psychological
research. Call Mike 378-8625
evenings. (J-lt-126-p)

!, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30, 1969

Page 12

| PERSONAL 1
BTP Whatever you do well love!
Were happy just to be yours.
Michelle and Jackie. (J-lt-126-p)
NEEDED: one atractive coed to help
mend a broken heart. Call Jim
376-5842 after 6 p.m. (J-3t-126-p)
Come early to get your choice of
prints and posters today at the Reitz
Union Art Print sale from 10:00
a.m.-9:00 p.m., Rm 235 of Union.
(J-3M25-P)
SERVICES |
x-x-xaxwx*: aiwawwaww
For Leoy Lettering and Graphical
Presentations for Theses and
Dissertations Call GARNER
DRAFTING SERVICE 372-8008.
(M-st-126-p)
Vivian Woodard Consultant learn
techniques of applying make-up;
quality cosmetics available. Call
Cindy Humds 392-9764.
(M-5M23-P)
NEED A PAINTER? Interior or
Exterior professional painting. Call
after 5 or anytime on weekends.
378-4855 Free Estimates.
(M-10t-122-p)
A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
[~~ RedHn Clmk 1
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PROFOUND AND EXCITING
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BEST ACTOR dQfej)
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'Hard, funny
and sound!"
-RENATA ADLER. N Y. TIMES
NORMAN MAILER'S
ICMinVMI
nttd by GROVE PRESS
May 4 & 5
7 & 9 P.M.
Union Aud.

ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
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allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
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each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3.-00 pjn. 2 days prior to starting day
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Wednesday, April 30, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



l. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30,1969

Page 14

<
j|| 1
ILLUSTRATED STEIGER
on display at Center One
Poetry Review
By KITTY OLIVER
Alligator Reviewer
Last Thursday night at the
Medical Center auditorium and
last Friday night at the
Rathskeller audiences were
treated to something special.
Those on hand received a
concert a poetry-jazz concert
featuring Bob Sokol, Earl
Williams, and Ed Orchester
reading selections of their own
poetry and that of other modem
day writers.
They were splendidly
accompanied by the Ergood
Quartet, a jazz group spotting
Bruce Ergood on clarinet and
flute; Danny Ballack, trumpet;
Charles Bush, guitar; and Charles
Miller on the bass guitar.
Sokol, the concerts
organizer, has performed his
poetry at the Bitter End case
in New York and had his works
published in The College
Anthology of Poetry and The
Campus Thing.
Sokols poetry is, at times,
crude but always poignant. It
speaks of the basics that we lose
sight of in the quest for extras
a lack of brotherhood, mans
inhumanity to man, poverty,
sickness of the soul, and (his
chief topic) children. As with
the creative prompting of the
true poet, his efforts can open
formerly dull eyes, if just for the
moment, to the cares, beliefs,
and apprehensions that unite us
as humans.
Hopefully the attendance will
grow for this type of
presentation as others are
offered in the future, if just to
share the music and companion
words of a prophet of the times
who speaks of the world our
children are growing up in.
Another Poetry-Jazz concert
was presented last fall. The
participants in both
performances offered their time
and talents as a public relations
activity for the Childrens
Mental Health Unit.
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'lllustrated Man Bradbury Misfire

By MIKE SIMMONS
Entertainment Editor
Ray Bradbury,* known as a
creative genius and as perhaps
the most significant science
fiction-fantasy writer of the day,
wields his unique ability with
words to the point that the
sensory images he paints very
literally and poetically leap from
the page.
And yet, the cinema version
of The Illustrated Man, a film
made from a Bradbury
anthology of the same name
now showing at Center I,
somehow manages to lose the
impact and biting stimulation
that an adaptation of Bradbury
could potentially offer.
Not to be mininterpreted,
The Illustrated Man is a fine
film, even lacking Bradburys
touch of poetry. Producers Ted
Mann and Howard B. Kreitsek
have done reasonably well in
retaining at least the gist of the
books storyline and really
scored by casting Rod Steiger,
Claire Bloom (Mrs. Steiger), and
young Robert Dridan in the
films leading roles.
And its true that Jack
Smights direction and an
astounding array of costumes,
sets, and visual effects make this
one of the- most visually
impressive and strangely
suspenseful films of the year.
Special notice should certainly
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responsible for the tatooes
(excuse me, skin illustrations)
decorating Steigers body, the
animal direction, and the design
of the several futuristic and
other-worldly sets that often say
more than the actors or
dialogue.
Steigers name ability have
become almost synonomous
with fine acting. In this instance
he has the task of portraying
four different characters in as
many situations.
Cast alongside her husband
with a complimentary number
of characterizations of her own,
actress Claire Bloom does as well
if not better than she did in
Charly its quite an
accomplishement to stay in
character when cast opposite
your off-screen co-star.
And considerable potential
and present talent is shown in
the several roles handled by
Robert Dridan. You may never
have seen him before, but this
time around take special notice
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lof the very believable fear,
I disillusionment, and anger that
flash in this young actor s
I numerous roles.
This said, it still comes down
to the sad fact that The
| Illustrated Man is only barely a
better representation of the
I Bradbury genius than was the
much-lamented adapation of
Farenheit 451.
Perhaps its too much to ask,
but at least the producers could

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have made their selections of the
tattoo stories they presented a
bit more judiciously. Why, with
the wide range of themes offered
in Bradburys book, did they
choose to spotlight the
comparatively weak and
inconclusive three they
featured?
All in all, the film is fine
entertainment. But if youre
looking for real Bradbury youll
still have to read the book.



Movie Review 'Hell' In Deeper Context|

f By CAROLYN HERRINGTON
gs Alligator Reviewer
1 Despite the rather trite title,
Hell in the Pacific now
Ihowing at Plaza I is not the
Knulti-casted, action-packed war
thriller one would normally
expect. It is a powerful plea
against the inhumanity of war,
giving the word hell a deeper,
more agonizing meaning.
I In a period when pacifism is
gaining increased popularity, a
I World War II war picture would
[hardly seem appealing. But
| Henry Saperstein, the director,
I has employed most dramatic
[argument possible for
| condemning warfare the hell it
I brings to individuals.
Via a method of
simplification and
understatement, Saperstein has
produced a powerful and moving
drama. It is set agianst the
background of a world divided
into two warring camps, intent
on destroying one another. The

Shame Best Flick

By TIM STERLING
Alligator Reviewer
For the American motion
picture audience, Ingmar
Bergmans Shame opening
at the State theatre Sunday, May
4 is by far his best film.
Os course, only a Bergman
fan can appreciate the difference
in this film and the thought
flicks which have dominated his
past creations. Set in the conflict
of war and love, the fate of a
young married couple caught
between two opposing armies
gives this foreign film a
similarity to the American war
movie.
Made on an island off the
coast of Sweden, the film is the
story of a wifes endurance amid
a husbands often stupid brutal
force, Liv Ullman and Max von
Sydow, both veterans of The
Hour of the Wolf, portray the
young husband-wife team.
Von Sydow as Jan is often
quick and immature in his
treatment of Miss Ullman who
tries to be understanding in spite
of his brutality toward her.
Remaining ultimately faithful to
her husband, she is forced to go
to bed with another man in
order to protect the one she
loves.
Part of Miss Ullmans shame
as she protrays the wife is her
failure to have children.

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movie focuses in on two
individuals who quite by
accident find themselves soel
inhabitants of a small island
Lee Marvin and Toshiro
Mifune are these two soldiers,
one American and one Japanese.
There is no vocal
communication between the two
at any time due to the obvious
lingual barrier. Yet their ability
to retain the interest of the
viewer at all times despite this is
comment enough on their acting
performance.
The soldiers are forced to
reconcile the fact that they are
citizens of warring nations with
their instinctive desire for
human love and companionship.
As the movie progresses, they
overcome their suspicions adn
mistrust only to have to return
to the rest of the world again.
The lunacy of the whole
concept of warfare is summed
up in one short scene. Marvin,
following his military
handbooks instructions, has

Although she wants them very
much, in the midst of a bombing
raid she admits to Jan that it is
best they have none. Her female
reference for life drives her to an
emotional sadness when she sees
the death and destruction left
after the bombing.
Both Miss Ullman and von
Sydow are brilliant in their
interpretations of these difficult
roles.
As with many of Bergmans
films, Shame is photographed
in black and white. Picturing
rolling landscape and changing
cloud patterns, the photography
might have been more beautiful
in color. Further, the transition
from one scene to another is not
very smooth.
Characterized as a love story
and interrupted via war and
brutality, Ingmar Bergmans
Shame is a motion picture
worth seeing.
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captured Mifune and tied him
up. It suddenly occurs to Marvin
that he is having to attend to all
of Mifunes needs while he sits
calmly and does nothing. Not
only is it inhumane to enslave
another, but it is also totally
impractical. At that point, they
become friends.
The film is comical in some
instances and at others
extremely poignant as the two
men discover their mutual
humaness.
The ending is shocking and
coldly jerks one back into the
real world he must face when he
leaves the theatre.

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Wednesday, April 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



i. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30,1969

Page 16

THE WALK OF THE OYSTERS. By
Rex Mackey. Fwd. by Charles Goren.
Hilarious Jaunt through 30 years of
Contract Bridge a provocative
perusal of its shadowed origins,
rampant growth, flamboyant
followers, etc. Ulus. Pub. at $4.95
Sale .99
NICK CARTER DETECTIVE. Intor.
by Robert Clurman. Six
turn-of-the-century adventure tales
for whodunit fans of all ages. Pub. at
$4.05 Sale .99
AFTERNOON IN SPAIN. By Marc
Simont. Vivid, dramatic, often
humorous world of the Fiesta Brava,
enhanced by the authors colorful
drawings. Pub. at $3.95 Sale .99
A LAW UNTO THEMSELVES l2
Portraits by C. Northcote Parkinson.
Intimate, glowing gallery of some
very uncommon people who, by
force of their wit or wisdom,
influenced the life of the famous
author-historian. Eric Gill, Sir Arthur
Bryant, T.H. White, Sibyl Hathaway,
others. I Hus. Pub. at $4.05 Sale .99
MAX BRANDS BEST STORIES.
Ed. by Robert Easton. 13 stories
dealing with fantasy, mystery, spy
stories, westerns spaceships, etc. Pub
at $5.00 Sale .99
THREE HEAR THE BELLS. By
Alice Lee Humphreys. Delightful,
inspirational chronicle of the effects
of school on mothers, children and
teachers. Here are the virtues and
foibles of all three, written with a
loving touch by a long-time teacher.
Beautifully bound and printed. Pub.
at $3.00 Sale .99
CURRAHEEI By Donald R. Burgett.
Terrifying, absolutely authenic,
compelling account of the Norman
invasion, told by U.S. paratrooper
like it really was. Combat experiences
from Utah Beach to Nazi heartland
with all the raw blood and guts left
in. Pub. at $4.00 Sale .99
Vietnam THE OTHER SIDE. By S.
Lynd & T. Hayden. Report of the
authors forbidden Journey to Prague,
Moscow, Peking, and Hanoi,
interviewing Communist leaders. Pub.
at $5.00 Sale .99
THE WORLDS OF ROBERT E.
SHERWOOD: Mirror of His Times.
By John Mason Brown. Stunning
biography of the four-time Pulitzer
prize-winning playwright. Pub. at
$6.95 Sale .99
Harold Robbins THE
ADVENTURERS. Big, lusty,
718-page novel that makes "The
Carpetbaggers" look like a tea party.
Violent action, scorching passions
from backwaters of South America
to bedrooms of Hollywood. Pub. at
$5.95. Sale .99
FACING THE An Intimate
Study of C...a Diplomacy. By
Charles Bartlett & Edward Weintal.
Goes behind closed doors to reveal
secrets never published before on
JFK and the Cuban missle crisis; the
big decisions on Vietnam: LBJ and
the "war games" concept of global
survival. Pub. at $5.95 Sale .99
Louis Auchincloss* THE
EMBEZZLER. Scandalous and
pulsating novel of a Wall St.
manipulator. Pub. at $4.95 Sale .99
BASIC PSYCHOLOGY. Lucid,
introductory text. Overy 700
double-columned pages, profusely
illustrated. Pub. at $8.25 Sale .99
John Herseys WHITE LOTUS.
683-page triumph of fantasy
fiction that combines the best of
George Orwell and Ray Bradbury.
Pub. at $6.95 Sale .99
THE WITNESSES. By M. W. Waring.
Huge, panoramic novel of life and
people in St. Petersburg between
1902 and 1917. 695 pp. Pub. at
$7.95 Sale .99
WOODROW WILSON: An Intimate
Memoir. By Rear Admiral Cary T.
Grayson. Fwd. by Bernard Baruch.
,Warm, revealing portrait of our 28th
president the death of his first
wife, the triumphs of World War I
and the tragic aftermath of the

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April 30
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League of Nations, his death, etc.
based on the diaries of his personal
physician and long-time confidant.
Pub. at $3.50 Sale .99
Hiroshima DARK STAR. By
Ronnie Dugger. Provocative story of
Claude Eatherly Hiroshima pilot
whose fateful message caused
200,000 deaths. Photos. Pub. at
$5.95. Sale .99
Pink Tights & Champagne QUEEN
OF THE PLAZA. By Paul Lewis. Life
and times of actress Adah Isaacs
Menken, international symbol of
glamour and wickedness. Wsinburn,
Edwin Booth, hundreds of lovers and
admirers and four husbands
rounds out the cast. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale .99
THE MASK OF MERLIN: Critical
Biography of David Lloyd George.
By Donald McCormick. Fascinating
study and reappraises the Lloyd
George legend. Illus. Pub. at $6.00.
Sale .99
THE PEOPLE OF THE SEA. By
David Thomson. Wonderful blend of
personal adventure, Gaelic folklore
and mysticism tracking down
legends and songs about Atlantic
seals and their relation to man. Pub.
at $4.95. Sale .99
MYRA WALDOS TRAVEL GUIDE
TO EUROPE. Sophisticated, packed
with information you rally need on
most interesting sights, hotels and
restaurants on and off the tourist
track, in every country. 673 pages.
Pub. at $5.95. Sale .99
THE THOUSAND HOUR DAY. By
W. S. Kuniczak. Monumnetal novel
of Poland at war that weaves an
unforgettable tapestry of courage and
cowardice on the battlefield. 628
pages. Pub. at $7.95 Sale .99
Francois Mallet-Joris
UNCOMPROMISING HEART.
Dazzling portrait of Louis XlVs first
mistress, capricious and tormented
Marie Mancini her provocative life
at court, near-marriage to the Sun
King, friction with his royal relatives,
her role as a pawn to powerful
Cardinal Mazarin, her uncle, etc. Pub.
at $5.50. Sale .99
DOWNWIND OF UPSTAGE: The
Art of Coarse Acting. By Michael
Green. Mischievious guide to the
diabolical undoing of dramatic
productions by both actors and
stage-staff. Catalogues many
imaginative misfortunes and dirty
tricks designed to make a directors
hair curl. Illus. Pub. at $4.95. Sale
.99
THE PRIVATE LIFE OF HELEN
OF TROY. By John Erskine. Helen,
in a novel about resumption of duties
as mistress of Menelaos household,
reveals a witty philosophy of love
and life. Pub. at $5.00. Sale .99
Eugene Burdicks NINAS BOOK.
Sex, suffering and self-revelation
scorch the pages of this renowned
novelists blockbushing best-seller of
post-war Paris and Nina a woman
in whom evil and innocence have
been fused in the struggle to survive.
Pub. at $5.95. Sale .99
The "Gay Boys REGGIE. By
Stanlye Weintraub. Affectionate
portrait of Reginald Turner, gay wit
and ranconteur, intimate of Max
Beerbohm, Oscar Wilde, Somerset
Maugham, others. Illus. Pub. at
$6.00. Sale .99
William Faulkner MY BROTHER
BILL. John Faulkners affectionate
reminiscences of the great novelist, as
boy, man, and son of the frontier
South," which he both loved and
hated. Pub. at $4.95 Sale .99.
THE LIFE OF IAN FLEMING. By
John Pearson. Describes his loves,
travels, adventures and careers.
Photos. Pub. at $6.95. Sale .99
NO LAURELS FOR DE GAULLE.
By Robert Mengin. Lively, absorbing
account of de Gaulle's rise to power
during the crucial London years. Pub.
at $6.95. Sale .99
Cornelius Ryans THE LAST
BATTLE. Unfolds the thrill-taut fall
of Berlin in those climactic final days

of WWII. Recreates all the horror and
suspense cloaking the last great
obstacle to the triumphant Allies;
portrays leading figures and other
participants on both sides and
describes what they say, felt and
thought. Illus., maps. Pub. at $7.50.
Sale 1.98
Roy Newquists SHOWCASE. Intro,
by Brooks Atkinson. Amazingly
uninhibited interviews by a leading
columnist with 25 actors, performers,
writers, directors, designers, and
producers: Gielgud, Agnes de Mille,
Helen Hays, Gerry Mulligan, Hume
Cronym, Jack Lemmon, Julie
Andrews, Rosalind Russell, Albee,
Robert FYeston, et al. Pub. at $5.95.
Sale 1.98
Arthur Zaidenbergs DRAWING THE
HUMAN FIGURE FROM TOP TO
TOE. Superb, easy-to-follow
approach with step-by-step
instructions and dozens of
illustrations depicting the human
figure in action and repose.
Thoroughly covers anatomy;
techniques of converting geometric
shapes and designs into
three-dimensional body forms;
balance, limb articulation,
perspective, foreshortening, lighting
and shading; drawing from casts,
photographs and models; much more.
Pub. at $3.95. Sale 1.98
MADAME SARAH! By Cornelia Otis
Skinner. Dazzling, dramatic
biography of Sarah Bernhardt.
Recreates her glorious career, many
love affairs, notable friends and
enemies. 28 photos. Pub. at $6.95.
Sale 1.98
VALENTINO. By Irving Shulman.
Stunning biography of the Great
Lover that separates the man from
the myth. Provides a memorable
social a celluloid Casanova
constantly beset by weight problems,
whose two off-screen marriages were
probably never consummated, yet
nurtured a legend for sexual prowess
that has continued long after his
death. Photos. Pub. at $6.95 Sale
1.98
Irving Wallaces SUNDAY
GENTLEMAN. Best-selling author
reveals strange people, places and
things inhabiting his personal
adventures and literary career. 441
pages. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 1.98
POWER AND SAIL. By Constance*
William Lydgate. Excellent complete
guide to the selection, operation and
maintenance of boats from
fishermans out-board to family-size
cabin cruiser. Covers size,
construction, uses, needs, and
adaptablity of each type, with buying
information on new, used, and even
build-it-yourself boats. Glossary of
nautical terms. Photos, diagrams,
maps. Pub. at $4.95. Sale 1.98
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ADVENTUROUS LIFE OF
WINSTON CHURCHILL. By
Geoffrey Bocca. Welcome
Churchilliana, filled with action,
excitement, and over 150 photos,
drawings and cartoons. Shot at by
Afghans, captured by Boers, hacked
at by Dervishes, swept to greatness
on the hazardous path of world
events, Churchill took life as it came,
living dangerously and ricocheting
between triumph calamity. Pub.
at $5.00. Sale 1.9
GRAPHIC PRESENTATION
SIMPLIFIED. By R. R. Lutz.
Practical guide and instruction
course, shows you how to present
facts in their mosi simple visual form;
how to make all kinds of graphic
charts and how to use them. Detailed
info on curve, bar and circle charts;
sector and statistical charts; dot,
tack, and flow maps; use of color,
etc. Illus. Pub. at $6.00. Sale 1.98

ALEXANDER THE GREAT:
Meeting of East & West. By Jacques
Benoist-Mechln. Dramatic story of
Alexander and his amazing conquests
from the Mediterranean to the Valley
of the Indus. Photos, maps, notes.
Pub. at $5.95. Sale 1.98
ANIMALS OF AUSTRALIA. By
Axel Poignant. Exciting text and
picture book on the fabulous
creatures from the land down under.
Over 190 early wookcuts and photos
of the kangaroo, koala, platypus,
black swan, etc. Pub. at $7.50. Sale
1.98
Jefferson to F.D.R. POWERS
HUMAN FACE. By Arthur T.
Hadley. A unique American history
that uncovers the shocking truth
about the public and private lives of
fifteen Presidents and public figures
Jackson, Lincoln, Gen. Sherman,
Teddy Roosevelt, Wilson, Truman,
et. al. Pub. at $5.00. Sale 1.98
VICKY. By M.M. Marberry.
Hilarious, lusty saga of Victoria C.
Woodhull, Free Lover, Suffragette,
and publisher, who precipitated the
great Rev. Henry Ward Beecher sex
scandal. Pub. at $5.05. Sale 1.98
THE CORRESPONDENTS WAR.
By Charles H. Brown. Superb
account of Americas war
correspondents and sensationalist
press during the Spanish-American
War. Ranges from Stephan Crane to
Richard Harding Davis, Hearst to
Pulitzer, recreating the daring
exploits of frontline reporters, their
colorful dispatches and influence in
the last of the pre-teletype wars, the
bellicose competition between
newspaper giants of the time for
higher circulation figures, etc. Many
illus. Pub. at $8.95. Sale 1.98
THE ART OF JAPANESE FLOWER
ARRANGEMENT. By Stella Coe.
Clear, concise introduction to the
basic principles of the Sogetsu
School. 51 photos, 28 drawings, plus
glossary, help explain fully the use of
materials, containers, tools and
techniques. Prb. at $5.00. Sale 1.98
COUNTERPOINT. Compiled and
edited by Roy Newquist. Penetrating
comments on life and living, writers
and writing by 63 leading authors,
critics and playwrights Truman
Capote, Bruce Catton, Tyrone
Guthrie, Harper Lee, Helen
Maclnnes, Emlyn Williams, et al. 653
pages. Pub. at $6.95. Sale I.9ft
JOHN KEBLE. By Georgina
Battiscombe. Well-rounded biography
of the eminent priest, scholar and
teacher, founder of the Oxford
Movement, whose intellectual
revolution made itself felt not only in
the religious world, but in the
political and social life of Victorian
England. Illus. Pub. at $8.50. Sale
1.98
Edwin Way Teales WANDERING
THROUGH WINTER. With 49
spectacular nature photographs.
Triumphant finale to beloved
American naturalists Seasons"
books the record of a 20,000 mile
journey of adventure through the
North American winter. Pub. at
$6.50. Sale 1.98
THOMAS JEFFERSON: Fighter for
Freedom & Human Rights. By Sonia
Daugherty. Warm and rewarding
portrait of the great American
statesman. Illus. Pub. at $4.50. Sale
1.98
The Life of MRS. G.B.S. By Janet
Dunbar. Not only did Charlotte
Pay ne-Townshend tame the
philande ng Shaw, but she succeeded
in fascinating him for 45 years and
this vivid portrait of a remarkable
woman and a remarkable marriage
reveals how she did it. Photos. Pub.
at $5.95. Sale 1.98
FDR & de Gaulle HOSTILE
ALLIES. By Milton Viorst. Close-up
account of the bitter duel between
two giants of the 2oth Century.
Interprets their personalities,
temperaments, motivations. Pub. at
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THE GOLDEN KEY: A study of The
Fiction of George MacDonald. By
Robert Lee Wolff. Confidant of
Lewis Carroll, friend of Mark Twain

and others, his fantasies" inspired
W.H. Auden to call him one of the
most remarkable writers of the 19th
century ... equal if not superior to
Poe." Pub. at $6.00. Sale 1.98
Alan Patons SOUTH AFRICAN
TRAGEDY. This truly great
biography-history mirrors the deep
political conflicts following WWII;
Gen. Smuts, Malan, Hertzog, et at;
and the great light that went out in
the land when Jan Hoffmeyr, the
last hope of South African liberalism,
died in 1948. Photos. Pub. at SIO.OO.
Sale 1.98
Only in France HENRI
ROCHEFORT, PRINCE OF THE
GUTTER PRESS. By Roger L.
Williams. From the Second Empire
through the Dreyfus Affaire his
newspapers exposed every regime,
every scandal, every politician for a
price. In typically French style, he
wound up exposing himself; Photos.
Pub. at $6.95. Sale 1.98
A Dos Passos Anthology WORLD
IN A GLASS. A view of our century
(people, nation, universe) from
outstanding novels of John dos
Passos, including a choice selection
from Manhattan Transfer, the U.S.A.
trilogy, Midcentury, etc. Pub. at
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THE THERMIDORIANS AND THE
DIRECTORY: Two Phases of the
French Revolution. By Georges
Lefebvre. Trans, by Robert Baldick.
Superlative study of events and
personalities during the crucial
six-year period between the fall of
Robespierre and the rise of
Napoleon. Pub. at $6.95. Sale 1.98
SHAKESPEARES SOUTHAMPTON
Patron of Virginia. By A.L. Rowse.
Vivid Portrait of the remarkable Earl
of Southampton. Celebrated as the
Bards patron, this biography reveals
his other facets for the first time,
especially his immense interest in
America and settlement of the
Jamestown Colony. I Hus. Pub. at
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COOKING WITH LOVE AND.
PAPRIKA. By Joseph Pasternak,
sere, for your kitchen, are the
treasured recipes of the famous
Hollywood producer and noted chef
a superb collection spiced with
anecdotes about the food itself and
the celebrities who have smacked
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with Sauerkraut, Veal Paprika,
Goulash and Paprika Cream
Schnitzel; Pot Roast a la Danieli,
Chichek Liver Pilaf, special sauces,
desserts and drinks. Pub. at $5.95.
Sale 2.98
THE GOOD HOUSEKEEPING
TREASURY. Ed. by Donald Elder,
et al. Over 75 years of its best stories,
articles and poems by Sinclair
Lewis, Ogden Nash, GBS, Thurber,
Pearl Buck, Daphne Du Maurier,
scores of others. Includes 64 pages of
photos and drawings; time-tested
recipes;,'vintage letters to the editor,
etc. Over 600 double-columned
pages. Pub. at SIO.OO. Sale 2.98
An American Genius THEODORE
DREISER. By W.A. Swanberg.
Candid portrait of author of An
American Tragedy, Sister Carrie,"
other great novels. New, fascinating
material on Dreisers love affairs,
friendships with Mencken, Anderson,
and Sinclair Lewis, literary and
political battles, etc. 614 pages,
photos. Pub. at SIO.OO. Sale 2.98
THE ADVENTURE OF AMERICA.
Ed. by J. Tobias & S. Hoffecker.
Remarkable anthology, PRESENTED
FOR YOUNG PEOPLE, that
uniquely bounds history and literature
by settlihds,idiers, frontiersmen,
immigrants, leaders from Benjamin
Franklin to JFK. Over 60
illustrations, many in color. Pub. at
$5.95. Sale 2.98
AFRICAN MYTHOLOGY. By
Gteoffrey Parrinder. Gods and spirits,
oracles and divinations, witches and
monsters, wisdom tales, animal
fables, symbolism all the
fascinating folklore, striking
resemblances and differences of the
many tribes and peoples of the Dark
Continent. 147 magnificent



Illustrations, many in color BV2"xll.
85.00 value. Only 2.98
Charles Neiders MARK TWAIN.
Masterly revelation of the novelist,
humorist, and social critic
[passionate, bitter witty and
[mysterious Samuel Clemens.
Penetrates to the core of his complex
character, explores in depth the
virtuosity and variety and his
achievement, including all major
works, travel books, short stories,
sketches and essays, tittle-known
pieces, previously suppressed
material. Pub. at $6.50. Sale 2.98
TRADITIONAL BRITISH
COOKING FOR PLEASURE. By
Gladys Mann. All the mouthwatering
favorites, including recipes for roast
beef, hams, Yorkshire Pudding,
jugged hare, scones, pie, chutneys,
home-made wines, etc. I Hus. in color.
BV2xll. Speical Import 2.98
Chemistry in the Kitchen THE
SAUCE COOK BOOK. By Peter &
Nancy Kranz. Step-by-step,
taste-by-taste, this exciting volume
covers the process of creating a great
taste by concentrating a diffuse
natural flavor; why and how to make
stock (from beef through veal to
venison); different ways to thicken;
and, finally, the creation of, and
recipes for, the miraculous sauces
themselves. Includes a first-of-its-kind
glossary on sauce-making. Ulus. Pub.
at $4.95. Sale 2.98
THE ART OF VICTORY: Life and
Achievements of Field Marshall
Alexander Suvorov (1729-1800). By
Philip Longworth. Magnificient and
authoritative study of one of
history's greatest and most
unorthodox generals, now
permanently deified in Russian
folk-myth. Carefully documents his
triumphant campaigns in Poland,
Turkey, Italy and Switzerland, his
revolutionary ideas on strategy,
training and physcial fitness, welfare
of his men, much more. Illus., and
maps. Pub. at $7.50. Sale 2.98
THE FIRST MASOCHIST. By James
Cleugh. Intriguing biography of
Leopold von Sacher-Masoch whose
incredible demands for sexual stimuli
gave the term masochism" to
posterity as one of the two extremes
in mans emotional makeup. Pub. at
$6.95. Sale 2.98
THE WORLD WE HAVE LOST. By
Peter Laslett. Pioneer study of the
contrasts between pre-industrial
England the largely rural, familial
society of Shakespear, Cromwell and
Newton and the England of today.
Eating habits, wedding customs,
classes, political motivations,
tnAi and crafts of the past are
eonpHKd With large-scale, industrial
ana Vban society of our own
cxperHMse. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 2.98
THROUGH INDIAN EYES A
Journey AfQMk the Tribes of Guiana.
By Colin Anthropoligists
chronicle of 1 sojourn among the
Amerindians the coastal region
and remote jungles. Fascinating
descriptions of the Halleluja cult that
combines paganism and Christianity;
native myths, songs, sex customs. 28
exotic photos. Pub. at $6.00. Sale
2.98
INDIAN MYTHOLOGY. By
Veronica lons. Treasury of ancient
epics, legends and fables, the basis of
Buddhist and Jain religion, literature
and art. 24 color pages, over 100
photographs of India's fabulous art.
BV2..XH". $5.00 value. Only 2.98
PHYSICAL SCIENCE. By D.S. Allen
& R.J. Ordway. Well-researched text
on the basic concepts of physics,
chemistry, astronomy, geology,
meteorology, energy, gravity,
motion, electricity, atoms, molecules,
radioactivity, weather, fossils, time
and space, the Solar System, etc.
providing an easy-to-follow path to
updated physical knowledge for the
intelligent layman. Profusely illus.
825 pp. Pub. at $8.75. Sale 2.98
Bunker Hill to Vietnam
UNCOMMON VALOR. Ed. By James
M. Merrill. The American soldier
private to general speaks his piece,
via letters, diaries, field reports, etc.,
about army service in peace and war.
Unmatched accounts of combat,
victory and defeat, POW camps; roles
in exploring and mapping Americas
West, Indian fighting and settler
protection, aiding victims of disease
and natural disaster reflecting
unparalleled toughness, courage and
dedication 512 pp. Pub. at $6.95.
Sale 2.98
THE CONSCIENCE OF INDIA:
Moral Traditions in the Modern
i r,d By Creighton Lacy. Compares
old India with the new, evaluating
Hindu ethics, the British Raj, child
marriage, widow burning, thoughts of
L.handi l Neru, Tagore, et al. Pub. at
$7.50. Sale 2.98
OCEANIC MYTHOLOGY. By
oslyn Poignat. Thrilling, richly
illustrated work, recreating the myths
' the Polynesians, Micronesians,
vieianesians and other South Seas
Peoples. Over 120 striking
U nn ations 20 in color 8V 2 xll.
$5.00 value. Sepcial 2.98
THEODORE ROOSEVELT: The
an As | Knew Him. By Nicholas
osevelt. Revelations about TR at
f ne rgetic leisure; with close
r ,!. s > romping with children,
ain?,H ridin 9> shooting, reading
__ v* Quoting poetry, playing tennis
m^ rawn from diaries, letters and
S t r ry by a close kinsma.. of the
tc Q P r s,dent Many photos. Pub. at
$5 -95. Sale 2.98

RAPHAEL. By Luciano Berti. Lively
portrait of the man, his times, and his
works. 44 plates in full color. Pub. at
$5.05. Sale 2.98
THE STORY OF AMERICAN
LETTERS. By W.F. Taylor. A
definitive history and important
critical evaluation of our literature
considered as a fine art. Traces the
development of a national expression
and style from the 17th century to
the writings of Hemingway and
Faulkner. Pub. at $5.00. Sale 2.98
Art Text by Valentino
Criveflato. Brilliant study of the 18th
century Venetian painter. 44 plates
in full color. Pub. at $5.95. Sale 2.98
BARCELONA. 180 photographs by
L. Waldman & M. Busselle. intro, by
James Morris. Brilliant portrait of the
capital of Catalonia, the people and
landmarks of Spains most explosive
and intriguing ciyt. 8 1 /2 xll'. $5.00
value. Only 2.98
PARIS City of Lights. 175
photographs by Andre Martin. Intro,
by Andre Maurois. A vibrant portrait
of the many moods of Paris and her
citoyens. Les Halles, Monmartre, the
Tuileries Gardens, cases and much
more, captured with art and
sensitivity. Special $2.98
ESQUIRES BOOK OF BOATING.
By Robert Scharff, et al. Complete
guide to the art and joys of yachting
for all boating buffs. Chapters on
seamanship and traffic rules,
navigation, weather, signalling,
racing, sports, cooking and
entertaining at sea. Full illustrations
and diagrams, including color
sections on code flags, cloud
formations, visual navigation aids,
etc. Bound with flexible, waterproof
cover and end sheets. 7>/2 xll 1 /2.
Pub. at $12.50. Sale 3.98
Ivan Sandersons BOOK OF GREAT
JUNGLES. Magnificently illustrated
book that takes you on an
unforgettable journey through the
great jungles of the world. Provides a
rare blending of natural history,
travel, and adventure from
prehistoric times to the sea voyagers
of the Renaissance, the 19th century
empire builders, to todays scientific
explorers. Over 140 photos,
engravings, maps and drawings. Pub.
at $9.95. Sale 4.98
VIEW FROM THE COCKPIT. By
Robert N. Bavier, Jr. 87 photos.
Tense, dramatic account of the
12-meter yacht race between the
USAs Constellation" and Englands
Sovereign" to win the coveted
Americas Cup by the helmsman
who steered the Constellation to
victory. Pub. at $12.50. Sale 4.98

A
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ROLLING STONES
WOODY GUTHRIE
CHARLIE BYRD
THE ANIMALS
ASTRUD GILBERTO

COLLEGIATE WORLD ATLAS &
WEBSTERS NEW WORLD
DICTIONARY. Two. Vols. Perfect
for home or office, here is a
magnificent full-color atlas and a
modern thumb-indexed, illustrated
dictionary both as accurate and
up-to-date as one of Americas
leading publishers of refrence books
can make them. The 896-page
dictionary contains over 100,000
entries, each carefully edited to meet
professional standards of exactness,
conciseness and legibility. The atlas,
in 412 pages, including a 202-page
map section, embraces major
countries, cities, regions, and even
the Solar System. Chronicles in text
and illustration past and present
political and economic divisions;
climate, population, geographic
divisions of race, language, culture,
etc. Includes many tables and charts.
Finely bound and printed,
handsomely boxed, BxlOV2. Very
Special 8.95
Arthur Daley & John
Arlott PAGEANTRY OF SPORT.
144 per?od illustrations in b & w, 16
color plates. Colorful, lavish,
breathtaking history of great sports
in England and America from the
12th to 19th Centuries archery to
tennis, skittles and stoolball to
bear-baiting, cock-fighting,
fox-hunting, cricket, fisticuffs,
racing, Rugby football, etc., etc.
Includes lively, authoritative
selections by famous writers of each
period: Roger Ascham, Izaak Walton,
Hazlitt, Nimrod, Mark Twain,
Dickens, et al. 15/2x10V2. Pub. at
$25.00. Sale 12.95
Henry James THE AMERICAN
SCENE. Intro, by Irving Howe.
Penetrating impressions of the raw,
potent, new America James
discovered on a return visit to his
homeland in 1904-05, after an exile
of twenty years an America of
explosive material growth, vast new
fortunes and an awkwardly
awakening interest in the arts,
backdropped by the hectic pace of
commercialism, the collapse of old
values, and the impact of European
immigration. 50 rare photos. Pub. at
$7.50. Sale 3.98
David Douglas Duncans YANKEE
NOMAD: A Photographic Odyssey.
A lifetime of adventure, war
coverage, bizarre assignments from
LIFE . the 500 most dramatic and
historic shots, 130 in color, by one of
the worlds foremost photo-journalist
with over 100,000 words from his
journals. Pub. at $23.00 Sale 4.98

SONNY & CHER
PETE SEEGER
RAY CHARLES
STAN GETZ
RIGHTEOUS BROTHERS

ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE ARTS.
Consulting Editor: Herbert Read. So
tremendous in size, scope and
authoritativeness that it encompasses
* thirteen separate dictionaries.
1 0,2 5 0 ENTRIES, 3,550
ILLUSTRATIONS, 79 FULL
COLOR PLATES, 984
DOUBLE-SIZE PAGES. A
one-volume education in
Architecture, Ballet, Biography, Film
Graphics, Literature, Music, Opera,
Painting, Photography, Philosophy,
Sculpture, and Theatre. Contains
thousands of up-to-date entries not
to be found in the most expensive
general encyclopedias. Biographies,
titles, styles, movements, technical
terms, techniques and materials.
BV2 ,, xllx2Vfe". thick, bound in
library buckram. Orig. $35.00.
Sensational at 14.95
DICTIONARY OF ITALIAN
PAINTING. Ed. by Fernand Hazan.
246 reproductions in full color, 280
authoritative articles by leading art
scholars. Complete biographical
information and basic criticism of
every major painter from the 12th
century to the end of the 18th.
6xBV2", printed in France. Pub. at
$8.95. Sale 4.98
Art NouveauTHE BEST OF
BEARDSLEY. Ed. By R.A. Walker.
The stangely beautiful drawings of
Aubrey Beardsley more than 100
plates from the cover designs of The
Savoy and The Yellow Book, the
elaborate illustrations for Oscar
Wilde's Salome, etc. Pub. at $4.95.
Sale 3.98
Aerohydrofoil THE 40-KNOT
SAILBOAT. By Bernard Smith.
Calling all speed, sea and ship buffs!
Here, at last, is an exciting new
application of airfoils and hydrofoils
to replace speed-limiting elements of
hull, sails, and ballast a
revolutionary development in sailing
craft that breaks the 5,000-year-old
speed barrier, making possible speeds
never before attained by any sailing
vessel. Profusely illus. 8V2xll. Pub.
at SIO.OO. Sale 4.98
MOMENT OF LIGHT: Clara
Sipprells Selected Photographs.
Splendid tribute to a great woman
photographer. 152 studies, executed
only in natural light, of the famous
and obscure King Gustav V of
Sweden, Grandma Moses, Langston
Hughes, Stanislavsky, children,
African natives, many others. Pub. at
$12.95. Special 4.98

WES MONTGOMERY
DAVE VAN RONK
CHAD MITCHELL TRIO
JIMMY SMITH
THELONIOUS MONK

Wednesday, April 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

THE ANATOMY OF
MELANCHOLY Complete and
Unexpurgated. By Robert Burton.
Ed. By Floyd Dell & Paul
Jordan-Smith. Legendary bedside
book over 1,000 pages of wit,
wisdom aqd biting satire not only
on the causes and cure of morbid
depression," but on every
"forbidden subject known to
classical scholarship. With the Latin
passages translated into modern
English for the first time. Only 5.95
COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM
SHAKESPEARE. The famous
Shakespeare Head Edition of the
Oxford University Press, prepared by
the noted Elizabethan scholar,
Arthur Henry Bullin. An attractive,
extremely legible volume containing
all the Comedies, Histories an;
Tragedies 37 immortal plays, plus
the Sonnets and other poetry; of Life
of Shakespeare; glossary. 1,280 pages
in all, handsomely bound. Only 6.95
THE HISTORIANS' HISTORY OF
THE UNITED STATES. Ed. by
Andrew S. Berky & James P.
Shenton. Two-volume pageant of
American history ranging
chronologically from the landing of
Columbus to the aftermath of WWII.
Included among the illustrious
contributors of every political,
sociological and economic persuasion
are Francis Parkman, Bruce Catton,
Allan Nevins, Henry Steele Cammager,
Charles Beard, William Allan White,
Arthus Schlesinger, et al. 1,384
pages, slipcased. Pub. at $16.95 the
set. Sale 9.95
DEVILS, MONSTERS, AND
NIGHTMARES: The Grotesque and
Fantasticin Art. By Howard Daniels.
Describes and reproduces over 250
haunting works by Bosch, Breughel,
Callot, Cranach, Goya, Munch, Kley,
Kubin and other masters of the
disordered imagination. B*/2xll.
Pub. at $12.50. Sale 4.98
ART & ARCHITECTURE OF
MEXICO: 10,000 B.C. to the
Present. By Pedro Rojas. 130
ILLUSTRATIONS, 42 IN COLOR.
Stunning visual record of Mexico's
artistic triumphs, reflecting the
exhuberance, richness and
individuality of Mexicos creative
drive, and also the diverse influences
on her culture and civilization, form
earliest Central American history to
the conquering Spaniards in the 16th
Century, Baroque and Rococo
influences down to Diego Rivera.
Comprehensive text, lavishly
illustrated by art, artifacts and
architecture representing all styles
and periods: carvings, sculpture,
pottery, paintings, murals, temples,
palaces, public buildings, etc. Speicla
Import 9.95
Victor W. Von Hagen's ROADS
THAT LED TO ROME. 64 full-color
illustrations, 150 in b & w. Vividly
presents the fruit of the Roman Road
Expedition, led by the author, a
renowned archaeologist. Covers its
five years' research through
thrity-four countries that followed
the course of more than 30,000 miles
of ancient Roman roads providing
the first systematic study of the
Roman road system since the third
century, when Antonius Agustus
prepared a military itinerary for the
Emperor Caracalla. Outlines endlessly
fascinating trails over snow-covered
Alps, through deserts, bogs, and
moorlands, the arid Atlas mountains
and the vast sand seas of
Africa. . .spanning 800 years of
Roman history! PUb. at $10.95. Sale
5.95
CYCLOPEDIA OF MAGIC. Ed. by
Henry Hay. A to Z treasury of
mind-boggling, eye-defying feats of
legerdemain by the worlds
formejpost magicians from Kolta
to Thruston. 400 PHOTOS AND
DRAWINGS reveal the secrets and
techniques of the professionals so
that you too can perform their
amazing tricks. Orig. pub. at $6.50.
Now 4.95
MANNERS AND MORALS IN THE
AGE OF OPTIMISM. By James
Laver. Brilliant study of the
paradoxical, rapidly changing period
between 1848 and 1914 when
prudery and excess flourished side by
side in Europe and America. Dissects
the conditions of life, pleasures and
dissipations of both rich and poor,
from Victorian brothels to the
beginnings of jazz. Copiously
illustrated. Pub. at $9.95. Sale 4.98
TREASURY OF GRAND OPERA.
By Henry W. Simon. New and
enlarged edition contains Don
Giovanni; Lohengrin; La Traviata;
Faust; Aida; Carmen; Cavalleria
Rustica; Pagliacci; la Boheme with
piano transcriptions of principal
numbers, singable translations,
summaries of plots, more. Nearly 500
large pages and 54 illus. Pub. at
$12.50. Sale 7.95
LAROUSSE ENCYCLOPEI DA OF
MODERN HSITORY. Ed. by Marcel
Dunan, et al. Fwd. by Hugh
Trevor-Roper. Huge brilliantly
written reference guide to world
history from 1500 to the present,
including a comprehensive recqrd of
mans achievement in the arts. Over
500 remarkable illustrations, 32 pp.
in color. 8"xll*/2. Pub. at $20.00.
Sale 9.95
ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF
MODERN PAINTING. By Frank
Elgar and J.E. Muller. Traces the
history of painting' since Manets
historic Olympia" with up to two
thirds of each page devoted to fine
color reproductions, and a brilliant
text by two world-famous critics.
258 illus. 9>/2x12V2. Pub. at $12.50.

Page 17



Page 18

t. The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30,1969

SEVENTH GATOR CHOSEN
Tannen In Piaskin

l y tBrjL OB jf
J| 11 a
> ji **^ ,, *'*!!~*' - >; w *&~*** **
TANNEN RETURNS PUNT
.. .touchdown against Air Force
Ray Graves Quiet
On SEC Football

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Ray Graves, head UF football
coach, was in a pensive mood
Saturday as he mulled over the
topic of how good the 1969
Gator team really is.
Hed just watched a
sophomore-studded Blue team
beat his more experienced
Orange squad, 42-10, in the
Lettermans Club game.
Well probably be a
sophomore-inspired club next
fall, Graves said. I think our
spring objective of finding
personnel and reaching built-in
depth is possible to realize.
However, he continued, I
still dont know how good this
team is. Its tough playing our
SEC schedule with as many
sophomores as were putting on
the field.
Graves termed Saturdays
game ragged and lacking in
team execution. He pointed to
a serious need for more work on
blocking, both in the offensive
line and backfield.
At least three starting
positions are up for grabs and
this Saturdays Orange and Blue

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game looms as a proverbial
stepping-stone for several
players.
Coach Graves has now rated
quarterbacks Jack Eckdahl and
John Reaves as virtually even
going into the Orange and Blue
fray.
At tailback, sophomore
Tommy Durrance has ably taken
up the slack since junior Jerry
Vinesett severely sprained his
ankle three weeks ago.
The starting nod will
probably hang in the balance of
performances by Durrance and
Vinesett throughout pre-season
fall drills.
Hard-running soph Mike Rich
and Garry Walker, who saw
action last season, are splitting
time at the No. 1 fullback slot.
The Gators, preparing for
Saturdays climax to six weeks
of spring practice, run through
light drills today.
Last Yankee
Roger Maris is the last New
York Yankee to win the
American League home run
championship, winning the title
in 1961.

Preview
By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
UFs defensive halfback Steve
Tannen confirmed rumors
Tuesday that he has been
selected to the 1969 Playboy
Pigskin Preview All-American
team.
Playboys Anson Mount
annually selects 22 collegiate
football as
All-Americans, UF has placed a
member on the pre-season squad
for the last six years in a row.
Tannen was one of three
defensive backs chosen for the
squad, Mount also picked three
linebackers.
The six-foot-two senior from
Miami has been moved to
offense this spring along with his
defensive duties.
Starting in 1964 the Gators
Larry Dupree, fullback, was first
to be named to the Playboy
team. Dupree is the third leading
ground gainer in UF history.
The 1965 Playboy pick was
Bruce Bennett, who holds the
record for career pass
interceptions, 13,
UFs 1966 offensive captain
Bill Carr was the next Gator
selection^ by Mount. Heisman
Trophy winner Steve Spurrier
was bypassed in 1966 for
Purdues Bob Griese.
Larry Smith was tapped for
the Playboy squad in both 1966
and 1967. In 1967 Smith, UFs
leading ground gainer in history,
was joined by offensive tackle
Guy Dennis.

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Bishop Predicts UF Win
Os SEC Golf Tournament

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
Despite the toughest Southeastern Conference
golf championship battle in recent years, UF Golf
Coach Buster Bishop said he feels the Gators will
win it over the likes of Tennessee, Georgia, LSU,
Alabama and Auburn.
UFs defending SEC and NCAA Golf Champions
start on another possible championship trail this
Thursday, Friday and Saturday as the fighting
Gators leave in quest of first place in the tough SEC
tournament.
But the Gator linksters besides facing the stiff
competition of their SEC foes, must play over the
long rugged 54-hole, par 72 Athens, Ga. course,
home of the Bulldog golfers.
The big question is, Can the UF win the SEC
Championship again?
Were gonna win, said UF Golf Coach Buster
Bishop, in reference to the big question. But, he
adds, its going to be tough.
In last years SEC championships the UF just
nipped Tennessee on the final round putting on a
finishing rally to win by just two strokes.
Tennessee returns this year with another strong
contingent to challenge the Gators, including
Tommy McGinnis, who flashed second in the SEC
last year behind the UFs All-American Steve
Melnyk.
The Volunteers have also added depth to their
squad with George Cadle and Jim Rusher, two
transfers from college golf power Houston, plus
gaining a years experience.
Auburn has their 1968 team, which finished a
surprising third in the SEC tournament, back and

r M I
THE FOLLOW THROUGH!
UF's Womens Golf Team member Tammy Bowman, above, took
third place at the Florida Intercollegiate Women's Golf Tournament at
Sanford. She had rounds of 82 and 78. The women's team finished
second behind Rollins.
_ | 7
H 1 >
v OGJAM COUNCII f
DR. BENJAMIN SPOCK
MAY sth 8:00pm
UNIVERSITY AUDITORIUM
Students SI.OO Public $1.50

ready to go. Tigers Bill Lovett and Bucky Ayers
placed third and fourth respectively in leading
Auburn to this unusually high spot. With their
years experience the Tigers should be tough too.
LSU with their ace Johnny Laponzina and the
merit of their second place finish in the recent LSU
Invitational against such powers as Houston, Baylor
and Texas going for them have a good chance to
knock off the Gators.
Alabama, who edged Ole Miss for fifth in the
SEC last year, is hitting well with newcomer Don
Blanton as their number one man. Also the Crimson
Tides Joe Terrell, number five man in the SEC in
6B, is back to help round out the Tide attack.
The darkhorse of the SEC, Georgia, is up and
battling with All-American Allen Miller leading the
Bulldogs way against the Gators.
Last Saturday the Gators got a preview of
Georgia and their home course, which is where the
SEC tourney will be held, as the Gators defeated the
Dogs 17-10 in a dual match.
The Gators likeable Coach Bishop cautiously
warns that it wont be the Gators against one team,
as in dual match play, but that the SEC will be like
one team (Gators) against a pack of wolves.
If we play the same kind of golf we played last
Saturday, Coach Bishop said, then we will win. I
was very pleased with our team play on this specific
course.
The Bulldogs home course has been the site of
previous SEC tournaments and also the site for the
Southern Intercollegiate Tournament.
It is a golf course that pays dividends on
accurate shots, Coach Bishop said in evaluating the
Athens course.

I I II II II


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and JEWELRY
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WHERE
THE
ACTION
IS
FEDERAL SCHOOL REPORT says: The Philadelphia
public schools are engaged in "the most dramatic revolu revolution
tion revolution in a city school system in the post-war period.
Reform in Philadelphia is more widespread and far farreaching
reaching farreaching than in any large school system in the country.
DR. MARK SHEDD, Superintendent of Schools, says:
I will continue to support teachers who are able to
examine, in a mature way, the gut issues of our day
war, sex, race, drugs, poverty. If we divorce school sub subjects
jects subjects from the guts and hopes of human beings, we can
expect students to find them gutless and hopeless.
RICHARDSON DILWORTH, President of the Board
of Education, says: "The city is where the action is. Its
where challenge is. Its where we are facing the great
moral issues of our day. If you want action, come teach
in Philadelphia. If you dont, teach in the suburbs.
WE SAY: Come join our school revolution as a teacher.
Get in on the action. Teacher salaries are rising rapidly.
So is our school system. See our recruiter on your campus
on or write to the
Office of Personnel-Recruitment (Telephone 215-448-3645).
SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PHILADELPHIA
21st STREET AND PARKWAY, PHILADELPHIA, PA. iO3
\

Wednesday, April 30,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Wednesday, April 30,1969

Gators Break Seminole Streak, 9-4

TALLAHASSEE (Special to
the Alligator) The Gators
broke a 44 deadlock with five
runs in the top of the ninth
Tuesday to defeat Florida State
and snap a 21-game Seminole
victory string.
The UF won the game with a
barrage of singles and three
errors by FSU Xll-American
third baseman Mike Easom.
The victory broke a
four-game win string over UF
the Seminoles kept alive Monday
night, 3-1. Nationally
ninth-ranked FSLPs record now
stands at 30-5 and the Gators are
21-12.
UF grabbed a lead early when
Leon Bloodworth lifted a
sacrifice fly to score Guy

Bacheler Runs, Runs, Runs I
bBBBBaeBBBBBBBaBBPBQaBBBHBaeBy Caldwell Tumec

Everyone is getting used to
hearing of the successful
endeavors of graduate student
Jack Bacheler in tha higher
echelons of the distance running
world. He is currently the
leading American in the mile,
two mile, three mile, six mile,
and is second in the
steeplechase, an event which he
says he doesnt like very much
anyway.
But his winning effort in the
Drake Relays six mile run
deserves more than just Oh, so
Bacheler won again, eh?
First of all, his time of
27:29.9 was a meet record. But
then again, Van Nelson, a
fellow US Olympian was also
under the meet record in the
same race. Jack beat him by 400
yards. As a matter of fact, Jack
lapped everyone in the field but
Nelson, and the Held made up of
almost entirely world class
performers. Jack finished the
race and had nearly a minute to
walk around and shake hands
before the second place finisher
came across the line.

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McTheny in the first inning.
The Seminoles scored two in
the bottom of the second and
led in the fifth, 4-3.
The Gators knotted the game
at 44 in the sixth inning on a
Ronnie Williams RBI. This set
the stage for UFs ninth inning
rally.
In the ninth, Jim Courier, the

Two years ago his time would
have made him second in the
world. Only Australias Ron
Clarke covered the distance
faster, and that was a world
record. In last years
phenomenal pre-Olympic
running, his time would rank
him seventh in the world, first in
America. Only two Americans
have ever run faster, 1964 Gold
Medalist Billy Mills and
Olympian Gerry Lingren.
Now, just for a second, try to
comprehend how fast one has to
run to get that kind of time. The
SEC record for three miles is
14:00 flat. Jack had to run
13:45 twice in a row for his six
mile feat. He had to run each
mile in 4:35.
Look at the results of a high
school meet in the paper
sometime and see how many
times the mile goes faster than
that. He had to run each of 24
laps under 69 seconds each. The
only way to get any
comprehension of the enormity
of this feat is to take a watch
and run just one lap in 69

DOBIES, LUJACK PACE ATTACK

Gators leading pitcher who
entered the game in the fifth
inning to play right field, lead
off with a single. He was
eventually knocked in by Tony
Dobies to score the winning run.
The action wasnt over,
though, as Easom booted two
ground balls and three away
another. His errors were

seconds, then, if youre still on
your feet, imagine 24 laps in a
row at that speed.
Jacks time is the fastest in
the world for this season and is
only seconds off the American
record of 27:12.
All this and the day before he
had run his best three mile ever
in 13:25 for another win. For
his two outstanding
performances Jack was named
the meets outstanding athlete.
Says Jack, when asked what
big meet hell run in next, Any
one I want to.
He says it with a grin, but
hes only half kidding.
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compounded by singles by Mike
Ovca and Williams and before
the Seminoles could retire the
side, four more runs had scored.
Glen Pickren got the victory
in relief of Mike Jacobs, his third
straight win after three early
season losses.
Gene Ammann started for the
Seminoles and he was relieved
by John Ferguson and Jeff Hill,
who was the victim of UFs hits
and Easoms miscues and took
the loss.
Monday nights action saw
the Gators finally end a
29-inning scoreless string against
FSU when Lujack, who went
four-for-four, singled in Dobies
in the seventh.
After Lujacks RBI, the UF

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loaded the bases on successive
hits by Rod Wright and Ovca.
But pinch hitter Jim Gruber
grounded into an inning-ending
double play before the Gators
could further close the 3-1 FSU
lead.
David Kahn, who walked five
Seminoles before being relieved
by Courier in the third, took the
loss and saw his record even out
at 3-3. George Lott weathered a
two-out Gator rally in the ninth
to go the distance and win his
seventh game against one loss.
The Gators return to action
next Friday and Saturday with
away games at SEC rival
Auburn. UF currently leads the
Eastern Division with a 9-3
mark ED PAVELKA