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The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The Fabulous Rascals Are Coming

m m 2- S JP* Jfl
IK i tMhlHg'--.

The
Florida Alligator

Vol. 61, No. 125 University of Florida, Gainesville

700 TURNOUT EN-MASS

'Rat Hosts Largest
Student Demonstration

By SUE WOYTYCH
Alligator Religion Editor
On Sunday, the Rathskeller,
the campus beer-hall, was the
site of one of the largest student
demonstrations to be held on a
state campus this year.
Some seven hundred students
and faculty packed the
student-operated beer hall to
celebrate a Roman Catholic Folk
Mass offered by the Campus
chaplain, Rev. Father Michael
Gannon. Another two hundred
and fifty people were turned
away at the door.
The mass began with a
welcome by Father Gannon and
an explanation of the origin of
the Folk Mass. Father Gannon
then proceeded to don the
yptments of the Mass in front of

m fKS 4 f I
MMMMF
STUDENT GOVERNMENT ALLIGATOR SWITCH
... Alligator staff gets the best of the bargain

POP RECORDING STARS, THE RASCALS
... to perform in Florida Field May 2

America's Number 1 College Daily

the congregation of interested
students and faculty. As he
donned the vestments, he
explained the origin of each and
the era from which it was
adapted by the Church.
As the Mass proceeded,
tambourines and guitars joined
the singing voices of Les Brown;
Rick and Kitty Oliver; jazz
singer Maureen Shannon, who
led the congregation in a variety
of folk songs.
The Rev. Father Lawrence
Cunningham, Catholic chaplain
at Florida State University, gave
the sermon titled What In
Gods Name Is Going On In The
Universities? Father
Cunningham told the session that
God is not dead on Campus.
He followed with For all the
sanitv and insanity of student

Tuesday, April 29, 1969

radicalism, there is a great deal
of moral passion on our
campuses. There is nothing
anti-religious about religious
criticism. It is very healthy.
This was followed by a
continuation of the Mass by
Father Gannon. After the Mass,
a panel consisting of students
representing the various religious
groups on campus discussed
aspects of Father Cunninghams
talk. Also on the panel were the
Rev. John Talmadge and the
Rev. Dan Beardsley. Following
this discussion, microphones
were placed in the audience for
questions to the panel. Among
those attending the Mass were
President and Mrs. Stephen
OConnell and their daughter,
Maureen.

By STEVE ZACK
Special Events Editor
Everyone agrees that we need a colliseum especially since the
capacity of the gym was cut early this year down to 5500 and the
population of the university has increased to nearly 20,000. Everyone
agrees but few apparently are willing to give little more than lip
service to doing anything about it.
The Intrafratemity Council last year put on the first colliseum
concert with the Beach Boys Show. The show was a success because
the Beach Boys donated $2,000 of their own money, not because of
student response. This year the IFC is bringing to campus the biggest
rock show the UF has ever had.
After a year of trying to get the nations No. 1 vocal group, THE
RASCALS, the contracts were signed about a month ago.
The approximate cost of the show is $23,000 including advertising
and public relations. The possible gross potential is over $50,000 if
the 20,000 seats of the west side of the stadium are filled. The
likelyhood of this happening is doubtful (though possible with
student support).
The production has had the most extensive public relations and
advertising campaign ever used for a concert, with outlets in
Jacksonville, Ocala, Starke, Lake City as well as Gainesville, with radio
and newspaper ads to give maximum publicity to the show.
Student Government, in an unprecedented move, offeree* to buy
(Pleass See RASCALS Page 2)

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NEW FENCE AROUND DANGEROUS TOWER
... scene of fatal fall of UF student child
Seven-Year-Old Dies
By MARC H. GLICK
Alligator Managing Editor
Edward G. Farnsworth, seven, died Sunday of head injuries
received when he fell Tuesday, from an observation tower located on
the football practice field on campus.
He is survived by his parents; two sisters, Lisa and Suzanne, and
two brothers Stephen and Kenneth, all of Gainesville.
His parents are Mr. and Mrs. Edward G. Farnsworth, 2764 Corry
Villiage.
Falling an estimated 30 feet from the tower, the youth had been in
critical condition at the University Hospital.
Wednesday Athletic Driector Ray Graves ordered that a fence be
built around the tower at the expense of the Athletic Association.
Graves also directed that additional security be added around the
band tower and also his tower.
We will try to insure that incidents like this will not happen again
by making sure access to all towers are secured, he said.
Thursday, workmen put up a five-foot chain link fence around the
tower.
There is no record at UF of any other accidents happening
involving the towers.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuaaday, April 29,1969

FBK Taps, Taps And Taps, Only Two Admitted

By THE LIL' GENERAL
Alligator Staff Writer
TAPPING FBK PREVIEW
The tapping Is now in its 12th
week. So far only two new
members have been
admitted Charles The
Puppet Shepherd, and Howie
Rosenblatt this mini-deal was
engineered by next years answer
to Manny James, Harold
Dangle Aldrich.
But since this original deal,
the brotherhood has been
dead-locked. Fortune weeks the
masterminds have been working
on the greatest deal since Pete
Zinober was tapped as a third
chair french horn, but a large
stumbling block has
arisen Manny James has
announced that, as usual, he will
vote his conscience and will not

'Despite Blocks/ SGP
Operating In Black

Lee Terry, outgoing chairman
of Student Government
Productions, said in an interview
Monday the first year of SGPs
operation after abolishing
Lyceum Council made
substantial gains. He cited
increased student participation
as the most significant gain,
stating SGP involved some 12
students compared to Lyceums
one or two man show. Terry
also states SGPs financial
picture was a source of great
pride, in that coming into this
year SB,OOO in the red it could
now show a SI,OOO profit. He
attributed this gain to improved
promotion and overall sound
business management.
Terry said these gains were
made despite certain stumbling
blocks. The main obstacle he
stated was the Public Functions
Office which, attempted to set
SGP policy despite the fact that
it is a 100% student funded
organization. He stated he saw
the PFO as strictly an advistory
department.
Terry said the V.P. Hale or
Mr. Ryan should take a close
look at the leadership of the
PFO to see if it fits the needs of
the office. Terry went on to say
This is not a problem unique to
SGP, the majority of
organizations unfortunate
enough to have public functions
have a great deal of trouble
working with this office. He
stated that if the students and
administration are ever to work
harmoniously together this type
of friction must be removed.
When pressed for specifics
Terry stated he didnt want to
make any specific changes in
public but would be glad to talk
to the proper authorities about
it. This problem is mainly a
personality conflict and if that
personality was removed or was
changed things would probably
work a lot smoother, he said.
He went on to say that many of
the employees in the Public
Functions Office wanted to be

RASCALS
"HOW CAN I
BE SURE

pull down his hand until
Marvelous Marc Glide is
admitted.
This has created a problem.
The TEPS, while recognizing
Clicks brotherhood in the tribe,
nevertheless feel that Glicks
attendance at Hillel has been too
irregular. (Patty Wacks fiance,
Bill Whatshisname, cant see the
logic in this, but what can you
expect from a half-breed?)
But if this problem can be
handled, the deal, as it now
stands is thus:
Allan Brown and Thor will
be tapped from Sigma Nu;
A pack of Marlboros for
Jake Schickel of SAE;
- A free lesson in
how-to-dangle for Mike Moore
of ATO, (plus a promise to
reconsider Tom Blackmans
application next year.);

helpful but the leadership
discouraged major dealings with
students, and persons in such a
position should have great
rapport with these students.
When questioned about
Terrys charges Steve Zack,
president of the IFC stated The
IFC attempts to deal as little as
possible with The Public
Functions Office.

| ODK Sponsors
1 Minifestival
Omicron Delta Kappa,
National Mens Leadership
Honorary is producing a
Minifestival Saturday, May 17th,
on the colonnade of the J-
Wayne Reitz Union.
The Minifestival is an arts and
crafts sale with continuous
showings of W.C. Fields movies,
and open air case, and musical
entertainment.
The' .sale will mainly be
directed toward student buyers
so the majority of the works
should be priced under $25.00.
There will be no commission
charged for any of the works
sold and a prize of $15.00 will be
awarded for the most
imaginative display.
Anyone interested in
exhibiting and selling their
paintings, sculpture,
photography, ceramics, or
craftsmanship are asked to
contact Derek Donley before
Thursday. Phone: 372-5429.

| QUOTE OF THE DAY
:$ "To the Victors Goes the Spoils." S
**
8 You are all down one! Manny James *
the Florida is heoffida^tuden^iewspaperoMhel
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or S3.SO per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

A MID SUMMER NIGHTS DREAM

-An illustrated copy of
Accounting Made Easy for last
years Accent Committee;
-A free $lO gift certificate
to Wig City to John Blue Key
brother of the Year Mica;
A years supply of candles
for Bill Cross;
-A triple-deal letting Joan
Warren and Charles Fulwood in
along with Jimmy Bailey;
- A signed letter of
appreciation to Lee Terry from
Sam Block. (We all remember
Sams parting words at last
years tapping: Ive gotta go to
a reserve meeting guys, dont do
anything foolish while Im
gone.);
A years supply of
Nic-O-Ban for Jimmy Kincaid;
A life-time commission to
UDT for Dan Commando
Honeywell;

Rascals Are Coming
f FROM PAGE ONE
rain insurance for tne show, making sure that students will receive
their money back if it rains. SG has also agreed to underwrite the
show, and give it the full endorsement of the student body.
This is the first time that all areas of campus can join together and
become involved in a project of mutual concern and benefit. The
colliseum project should also be supported by the athletic dept, which
is most directly effected by its completion, but apparently it is not.
The athletic dept, has refused to donate even the profits of the soft
drink sales to the fund.
Lets urge everyone to join together in the support of the RASCAL
CONCERT and come to Florida Field and listen to the great sounds
of the Rascals Groovin and Good Lovin.

Needed at the new law school: 1 can of Black Flag
for all the flies.

A free copy to all the
brothers of Steve Hulls latest
hig single, I Just Cant Say
No;
A permanent stool at the
Laundromat next to the Red
Lion for Rob Blue so he can
start making his deals early
enough to win from now on;
- A spleen transplant for
Jack Harkness;
A years supply of Kleen-ex
to Mike Segal;
A lifetime appointment as
technical director of Gator
Growl for Randy Williams or, if
he so chooses, a guaranteed 2.0
average in law school.
This years answer to the
Bobbsey Twins, Ric Katz and
Mike McNemey. get a one year
control of Ira (EYE-RAH!)
Hatchs independent machine.

The Warbler

WILLIE MOSCONI
World Famous Pocket Billiards Champion
Will Give An Exhibition At The
REITZ UNION HRST HOOD LOBBY
Tuesday, April 29,1969
SHOWS AT 4:30 P.M. and 8:00 PJA. f

- A years supply of
experience to the Young Turks:
Jake Schickel, Steve Zack,
Charlie Harris, Ken Howell, Ken
Mingledorf, Ed Tolle. (i.e. Wait
until the appointments come
out, stallions.)
- For Jim Devaney, a letter
of commendation from the IFC;
For Steve Uhlfelder, an
oral promise from Manny
guaranteeing that only good
applications will be considered
and no deals will be made;
- For Joe Hilliard, an
all-expenses paid weekend to
Perry, Fla., with Vicky Fagan as
chaperone.
- And finally for Clyde
Taylor, a permanent
appointment as Director of the
UFs new Afro-American studies
program.

Big Deal
Wo wee
Twas a bleak day twenty five
years ago on a small secluded
campus somewhere in that
beautiful state of Georgia, when
the topic of todays article made
his revolutionary discovery to
solve Joe Colleges most
farfetched dream. This is a
biography of the greatest
wizzard of our times.
Our hero, though 5 feet tall,
acne ridden, buck toothed and
club footed, was the founder of
a tradition that has been the
envy of all men on Americas
campuses. THE GOOBIE GUY
DERBY.
The wizzardry of our heros
ability, to get all the sorority
lasses to wear bowlers for a week
with everything pasted on it
from arrows to anchors, is
surpassed only by the masterful
decision processes of the
Kremlin. Who in their right mind
would ten curvacious
bodies together and make them
walk like a catepillar? Yes you
are correct, MR. GOOBIE GUY
DERBY.
To round out the Masters
dream come true, is the creation
of a parade where these same
sorority chicks dress up in
anything from bikini to burlap,
so they can ride down the street
as targets for water balloons and
ridicule. Perhaps our wizzard has
set a precedent for things to
come- FLY DELT
DERBY-APPLE TOMATOE
ORANGE DERBY-SIGMA
ZOO DERBY- LIZZ ARD
DERBY and so on.



Veep-Elect Harris Plans Complete Shakeup

By EDISON C. KATZ
Alligator Staff Writer
Charlie Harris, vice
president-elect of the student
body, announced Monday plans
to completely revamp the
day-to-day operations of
Student Government.
His sweeping changes include
altering the duties of the
president and vice president,
reorganizing the cabinet, and
restructuring the student body
constitution.
In an interview with the
Alligator, Harris pointed out his
reasons for the proposed
changes, If Student
Accenf Not
'Plaything,
Says Hilliard
ACCENT 7O, Chairman Joe
Hilliard, is seeking to fill
committee chairmanships and
appointments.
When confronted with the
question of political
appointments to the staff of
Accent 7O, Hilliard responded
the Accent symposium is not a
political plaything.
Positions will be filled on the
basis of interest in the program
and qualifications. The
appointments already made to
the staff were based on the
qualifications of the people, not
their political orientation,
according to Hilliard.
He said he plans on choosing
the Accent staff on the same
basis as the Rathskeller
committee was chosen.
The positions of executive
secretary, personnel chairman,
and magazine, editor are filled.
Sharoyn Wani is the new
executive secretary and Janie
Gould will magazine editor.
Hilliard said that Miss Ward
served as personal secretary to
past SG Vice President Gary
Goodrich. Miss Gould presently
serves as a member of the
Alligator staff.
The personnel chairman is
Rusty Skinner. Having served
under Joe on the Rathskeller
committee, Skinner said, I
know that in order to turn out a
good program, we must have
people w ho are dedicated to the
concept of Accent. Interest and
dedication are foremost.
Our interviews are an
attempt to judge the applicants
on these two qualities and we
are not interested in anything
else, Skinner said.
He urged that anyone
interested, fill out an
application. Applications may be
picked up at the Activities desk
on the third floor of the Union.
Interviews will be held this
week, but no appointments will
be made until all applicants have
been interviewed. The deadline
for applications is Friday at 5
p.m.
Excellence in Food

Government is ever going to
truly meet the needs of the
students, its going to have to be
reorganized to involve more
people.
The first step in this area, said
Harris, is to vest complete
control over the cabinet in the
vice president, therefore leaving
the president free to represent
the students to the
administration, the legislature,
and the people of Florida.
Harris said the presidents
duties in this realm will be
particularly difficult this year,
because of the wave of public
opinion against college unrest

everybody seems to be
renting
these days . f..
... la mancha is renting
what the others dont have
PRIVACY! and we throw in a
luxury apt. free
W W APARTMENTS
FEATURES: 914 $W Bth AVE
a private bedroom for each student
luxurious single & multilevel apts.
secluded pool & patio area
located one block behind Norman Hall
fine barcelona styled furnishings
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT SEPTPLEASE
PLEASE SEPTPLEASE CALL 372-2662 or come by our rental office

and higher education in
general.
In past administrations, the
vice president has been chairman
of the Student Senate. This year,
however, the Senate has elected
its own president, leaving the
vice president free to work in
new areas.
But the most important of
Harris proposals involves a
special commission to
restructure Student
Government. Many of the details
of this operation are still in the
planning stages, but the basic
layout calls for a professional
efficiency firm to be hired to

analyze the problems of Student
Government and the Reitz
Union. The report of the
professional study will then be
utilized by a student commission
to make recommendations for
constitutional amendments to
the voters in next falls Student
Government elections.
Asked about his personal
proposals to revamp the student
body constitution, Harris replied
that he felt that students needed
more original jurisdiction in the
areas of student conduct,
student organizations, and
curriculum, adding that,
currently the Student Senate

Tuesday, April 29, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

has only two areas of
importance: allocating student
activity fees and influencing
opinion by passing resolutions.
Harris closed his comments
with a plea for interested
students to take part in Student
Government activities, Its
much easier for students to sit
back and gripe rather than
become involved, he noted,
but the stories about motivated
students being turned away
because of petty politics simply
wont be true in this
administration. If a student is
truly interested all he has to do
is apply for a position.

Page 3



Page 4

L, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 29,1969

Is This All Women Are Good For?

A lot of men will say, yes, this IS all women are good for. But
records from past administrations say theyre good for something else.
Theyve held cabinet positions, headed up committees, donated hours,
and thought, and ideas to many the projects at Student Government.
Theyve been capable, efficient, effective.
But enough of the past. What will women do in Student
Government in the upcoming administration? According to
S |L^
Under Clyde Taylors administration, 1968-69, women held the
following positions:
1. Secretary of Public Functions
2. Secretary of University Relations
3. Secretary of University Committees
4. Secretary of Womens Affairs
5. Clerk of the Honor Court (elected)
6. Vice-President of the Union Board (elected)
7. Secretary of Union Board (elected)
Under Bruce Culpeppers administration, 1965-1966, women held
three Cabinet positions:
1. Secretary of School Traditions
2. Secretary of International Affairs
3. Secretary of Womens Affairs.
Under Buddy Jacobs administration, 1966-1967, women held two
Cabinet posts and worked in various committees:
1. Secretary of School Traditions
2. Secretary of Womens Affairs.

Fifty-three undergraduates and one alumnus
were elected Wednesday to membership in the UF
chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.
Among those elected were Charles Edison Harris,
vice-president-elect of the student body, John

June, 1968 Graduate:
Joseph Lofton Westmoreland
December, 1968 Graduates:
Donald Byron Spangler
March, 1969 Graduates:
Mrs. Linda Jane Wilson Cantrell
Mrs. Merry Lynne Triplett Davis
Mrs. Sandra Parrish Fitts
\
June, August, 1969 Candidates:
David Edward Barclay

Arby's \ L DAYS
G U Ist Arbys 79*
_ 2nd Arbys 69*
r ; 3rd Arbys 59<
V Ijft \ Tuesdc, y & Wednesday s t h Arbys 39*
k \ | \£m \ April 29-30 IB W
Arbys
1405 S. W. 13th Street
Just South of the Underpass

53 Elected To UFs Phi Beta Kappa

Mrs. Susan Ann Bourg Baum
Philip Bruce Bedient
David Ralph Birk
Stephen Overstreet Cole
Jeanne Angela Dammas
James Arthur DeLeonardis
j i
Nancy Fran Dzioba
Farrel Lee Fort
Sandra Sue Fuller
Jeffrey Scott Gerson
Grantolynn Grove
Brian Donovan Hill

tH

Finley McPhail,lll, student commander of the Army
ROTC unit on campus, and James Grier Pressley,
Jr., UF tennis star.
Two members were elected from colleges other
than Arts and Sciences: Karen Elizabeth Jerke from
Journalism, and Richard D. Finlav from Business

i Mrs. Judith G. Los Isaza
Martha Jane Jamieson
Mrs. Jacqueline Jordan
Judith Arlene Kams
Jeffrey Hale Klink
Gerald Louis Knight
Michael David Lack
Barry Leonard Malter
Anthony Shelley Meyer
Renee Dee Millard
Dennis Dailey Murphy
Celia Michelle Newmark

newly-elected Student Body President Charles Shepherd, its up to the
women. Hes willing to hire women for any position for which they
are qualified, without discrimination as to sex. Hes already agreed
that a woman will hold one of the major cabinet positions next year.
The Assistant Chairman for Accent 7O is a woman, and there are
many positions, secretaryships, and plain old working spots still open.
A woman could hold any of them. And typing isnt even necessary.
Call 392-1665 and make an appointment for an intenrtew.
Hb> vi SbJB f
I Si |
H i SH H I JF Jr
V ~ ww .<
jsff 9^^^
Under Charles Shepherds first administration, women were
Secretary of Public Functions and Secretary of Womens Affairs.
Womens Honor Week was also initiated. Shepherd established The
Womens Equal Opportunity Study Commission to determine whether
women were discriminated against in SG.
When the findings were reported at the close of Shepherds
administration, they indicated that more women should be hired.
Shepherd agreed, and passed the suggestion to his successor, Clyde
Taylor, who subsequently hired more women in major and minor
positions than ever before.
Under Charles Shepherds upcoming second administration,
1969-1970, its up to the women what the women will do.

Alexander Stephens Nicholas
John Bryan Page
John Craig Peterson
Stephen Roger Ranck
Fred Paul Rice, Jr.
Martha Elizabeth Rupp
Halley David Sanchez
Paul Frederick Schippnick
Terrance Alan Smiljanich
Anne Young Swing
Brian Pennington Tague

Administration.
The Phi Beta Kappa Creative Achievement
Award was assigned to Michael L. Mahoney, a
senior, for his work as editor of the Florida
Literary Quarterly and as director-actor in the
Florida Players.

Daniel Albert Toole
Stephen Craig Tracy
Joanna Marie Veldhuis
Anthony R. Whittemore
Gregory George Wilkins
Walter David Zimpfer
Donald Duane Zussy
Mrs. James Manny's
been bad
he ate all the pie

79*
69*
59*
49*
-v
39*



Honor Court Tries Over 100 Cases A Year

By DEE DEE HORNE
Alligator Features Editor
Approximately 120 students
are brought before Honor Court
each year.
The last years records
indicate that about 61 per cent
of these were for cheating, 33
per cent for stealing, and four
per cent for plagiarism.
Os the cheating cases 25 in
the last year were convicted and
21 were dismissed for lack of
evidence. In 10 of the stealing
cases the defendant were
convicted, six dismissed for lack
of evidence, and some are
awaiting trial.
Penalties in each of the cases
varied in penalty hours, loss of
credit, or extra homework
assigned.
There are two basic
proceedings the full trial for
the students who plead not
guilty, and the summary trial for
those that do plead guilty.
In both cases the chancellor
of Honor Court presides. Two
justices, members from each
college who operate on a
rotating basis, determine with
the chancellor what the penalty
will be if the student has been
tried and convicted.
Elliot Zack, current
chancellor, said, Penalties
reflect the individuality of the
offenses. Judgement is based on
whether the student has had any
other offenses against him, the
extent of the offense, if it was
premeditated, and if there are
any extenuating circumstances.
Jury trials are operated on
the same format as government
courts. Jurists are selected
randomly from lists comprised
in the registrars office of
students who are maintaining a

Stock In Students?

For the first time since the
Gator Loan Fund came into
existense, originally called
Dollars for Scholars, it will
now be possible for
organizations, businesses, and
individuals to own stock in
students.
The stock will be sold for $lO
a share, and the money raised
from the sales will be ptt into a
matching fund with the federal
government and used for
students who need to take out a
national defense loan.
The benefits received bv

TUESDAY SPECIAL
LARGE PORTION DBJdOUS
BAKED CHICKEN &
YELLOW RICE 58<
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
ITALIAN STYLE A
VEAL Y
wfajm DINNER
| 313 W. UNIV. AVE.
Vi BLOCK WEST OF
gSUBOSiI FLORIDA THEATER

2.0 average in upper divirion.
These names constitute the
venirenen, the panel from which
the jury is chosen. The venirenen
is a much larger number than the
six jurists and one alternate
which are finally picked to serve.
The function of the alternate
is to sit with the jurists. In the
event that something happens to
one of the members during the
trial he fills in. The alternate
does not deliverate on the
decision if all six original jurists
are present.
Seven names are drawn from
a hat. Additional questions are
then asked them; such as, do
you know the defendent, are
you related in any way to any
person involved in the case, and
what do you know about the
case? The attorney general and
the attorney for the defense
challenge each juror. In event
that any are found
objectionable, the juror is
dismissed.
The UF honor court is a
tremendous aid to students who
are accused of cheating, Zack
said. In other schools they are
brought before the dean and
arent given a chance to defend
themselves. Students here are
given the same opportunity to
clear themselves as the person on
the outside who may be tried for
a criminal act.
Each student is entitled to a
defense attorney, either a court
lawyer or one of his own
choosing.
This is something most
students arent aware of in the
honor court system, Zack said.
He added that this is a great
safeguard for the person falsely
accused.
Facts of the case, any

those who purchase the Gator
Loan Fund stock will be half the
value of their purchase in tickets
to every Gator Loan Fund
production brought to UF.
Some of the productions
involved are such as the
Camigras 69, FSU Flying Circus,
Summer Frolics, and many
more.
So far, there has been
promised participation from
both organizations on campus
and from Gainesville
businessmen.

aggravating circumstances, and
recommendations for penalty
are presented by the attorney
general.
The defense attorney is given
the same opportunity to then
dispute any facts, explain the
reasons for the act, present any
mitigiating circumstances, and
recommend any penalties. These
are usually less sever than those
suggested by the attorney
general.
Then the accused student is
asked to bring forth his record
from the dean containing his
past academic average, any
mention of previous disciplinary
measures, and if the student is
receiving any loans or
scholarships. The names of the
guilty are printed in the
Alligator.
Students dont seem aware
that their names are published in
the Alligator, Zack said. This
was decided in a student
referendum.
This and the fact that letters
are sent to the students parents
before they are tried appear to

RASCALS
"PEOPLE GOT
TO BE FREE

0
WHERE
ft ACfION
FEDERAL SCHOOL REPORT says: The Philadelphia
public schools are engaged in the most dramatic revolu revolution
tion revolution in a city school system in the post-war period.
Reform in Philadelphia is more widespread and far farreaching
reaching farreaching than in any large school system in the country.
DR. MARK SHEDD, Superintendent of Schools, says:
I will continue to support teachers who are able to
examine, in a mature way, the gut issues of our day
war, sex, race, drugs, poverty. If we divorce school sub subjects
jects subjects from the guts and hopes of human beings, we can
expect students to find them gutless and hopeless.
W RICHARDSON DILWORTH, President of the Board
of Education, says: The city is where the action is. Its
Where the challenge is. Its where we are facing the great
moral issues of our day. If you want action, come teach
mm in Philadelphia. If you dont, teach in the suburbs.
WE SAY: Come join our school revolution as a teacher.
Get in on the action. Teacher salaries are rising rapidly.
So is our school system. See our recruiter on your campus
or to the
fIHIHIHHI Office of Personnel-Recruitment (Telephone 215-448-3645).
SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PHILADELPHIA
21st STREET AND PARKWAY, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19103

be more of a punishment that
the decided penalty hours.
We ask the accused to
inform their parents of the
forthcoming trial, so, in case
they are found guilty, it wont
come as too much of a shock.
Another effect of being
found guilty that most students
are unaware of is that a notation
is kept on his personal record in
the registrars office, and a
permanent record is kept in the
Deans office.
In his last quarter of school,
the student may petition the
registrars office to remove the
notation from his record. In

I ROBBIES I
Best In Stoaks^^
OVdandwichei
[COLOR TV & BILLIARDS]
11718 W. University Ave.
L^Q^TheGoMCoaet^J

Tuesday, April 29,1969, Tha Florida Alllfator,

most cases this request is
granted.
As for the Deans records,
they are closed to anyone except
persons who would normally
have access to any other private
records in his office, Zack said.
I 378-5734 I
f Dick lioiMcs
JIWILiM j
I CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY ?
I REPAIRS I
I TROPHIES-ENGRAVING X
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 1
g Vi BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

Page 5



Page 6

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 29, 1969

Print Sale
Off Tuesday
Vice President of the Union
Program Council, Janis
Mohrbacher, announced that the
Print Sale scheduled for
Tuesday, Wednesday and
Thursday will be set for a later
date.
The prints, which should have
been in last week still have not
arrived and a tracer has been
placed on the missing shipment.

Some Like It Hot At Y.T.s

By RUSTY SKINNER
Alligator Gourmet Editor
For those of you who arent aware of it,
Gainesville has one of the most unique eating
establishments in the state.
This is none other than Parkers Barbeque.
Located on Fifth Ave., Parkers provides one of the
most tantalizing treats that your taste buds can
imagine. u
While located in a building that needs repair,
Parkers provides one of the most filling and
economical meals that you can buy in Gainesville.
He offers a menu of beef, pork and chicken that is
flavored to suit your own tastes.
His barbeque sauce ranges from the mild to the
fantastically hot, super-duper saber jet. The
ingredients of the various sauce mixes, Y.T. keeps as
a trade secret, but there is little doubt that one of
the prime ingredients is cayenne pepper.


11 jtf
look aTbwt
... For a 'hot' meal you can't beat it

Applications For AWS

Applications are available for
all women wishing to run for
office in the Association of
Women Students. They may be
picked up at the Student
Activites Desk in the Reitz
Union or from the area AWS
representatives.
Applications are due
Thursday. All applicants should
attend AWS meeting, that
evening at 7:30 in room 346 at
the Union.
The offices of president, Ist
vice president, second vice
president, recording secretary,
corresponding secretary, and
I Now Taking Applications
at
Summit House
1700 S. W. 16th Ct.
for
September
(9*lo i, 12 month Leases
available) rates from
1 BR from sl2l
2 BR from $147
Summer Term
Special Rates
376-9668

DROPOUTS

I WJ
,_ T A9 y.-ir In' W VEAH.it 1. h
[M J a // I sivesme ' / >X\ :
' {
> fcT Uei **4 fmm w Sf*t*H. lee. / fb*r

treasurer are open.
Representatives from the senior,
junior, and sophomore class will
also be elected.

LETS SEE YOU
PASS THIS ONE UP.
6 AM4I AM EACH DAY
1 EGG ANY WAY
1 HOT CAKE ) W
GRITS
TOAST SPEC|AL good all week"
COFFEE
5t
1225 W. UNIV. WITH ANY
Vi BLOCK FROM CAMPUS BREAKFAST

He opens in the late afternoon and stays open
until the wee hours of the morning, for those
who have that midnight craving for good food. Yet
the food is not the only thing that Y.T. is famous
for in Gainesville. Anyone who has met him will tell
you that he is the friendliest person that you could
ever meet. Always greeting you with a smile and
ready to crack some of his unique humor.
If you are bored with the regular aspects of
Gainesville, a visit to Y.T.s will move you into a
realm of Gainesville life, that you will find a relief.
You are not bugged with the gripes that you get
from the other local merchants at Y.T.s. He runs
his place with a rustic friendliness that is missing in
most places in the city.
At Y.T.s you move into a cordial, informal
atmosphere that only compliments his food. So, if
you are interested in some good barbeque, a
relaxing atmosphere, and anxious to meet one of
the friendliest people in the world, goto Y.T.s.

RASCALS
"GROOVIN

BEER
sl/PITCHER 8-10 PM

t \
M : B
TO
TAMPA
2 1/4 Hours I
Lv. Gainesville : 4:05 AM, I
9:15 AM, 12:30 AM I
via Interstate 75 I
plus 4 addl trips daily I
New! Daily Thru I
From Gainesville (via Tallahassee) to 1
Montgomery, Jackson, Dallas, I
Atlanta, Chattanooga, Nashville, St. I
Louis.
TRAIL WAYS I
V 527 W. Univ. Ave. 372-632 7/ I
Mums
easiest travel on earth ~
527 W. Univ. Av*. 372-6327 I
J

BY HOWARD POST



' J
/rfaad ffiwt/ieu
GAINESVILLE MALL
f
r <
SHOP MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10 A. M. TIL 0:30 P.M.

Tuesday, April 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 29, 1969

EDITORIAL

Who Wants A Coliseum ?

Something has come to our attention that
is quite disturbing, to say the least. We hope
it is just a misunderstanding, or maybe just a
rumor. .
The IFC and Student Government
recently approached certain people in the
Athletic Department to request that profits
from concession sales during the upcoming
Rascals Concert be turned over to the
Coliseum Fund, along with any of the gate

Garni Gras : Reflection

The second annual Garni Gras was a
financial success dispite the fact the fact the
Gainesville City Commission charged $1275
in licensing fees. Preliminary reports have it
that some $1,600 will be realized from the
fair. This would mean an additional $14,400
in matching government funds for the
Gator Loan Fund.
A sincere thank-you is in order for many
people who helped make Cami Gras 69 a
financial success:
The men of AEPi Fraternity; Mr. Robert
Overton; the men of Phi Delta Theta; Griff
Me Swine and Ed Floyd (Co-chairmen); the
men of TKE Fraternity; Dean Stanley and
Paul Vames; the ROTC Department; the
University Police; and expecially the 13 local
businessmen whose sincere concern for
students, as witnessed by their out-of-pocket

Watch out for the Warbler, for he knows all!
Watch out Manny James ... stay away from
Bethune; the only people youll recruit for law
school are Conchs, and they aint Black.
As for the biggest pseudo-lackey of them all, Mr.
Jason Holmes: man, who are you with this week?
The JOMOs or the Klan, or perhaps James on the
links...
Chuck Shepherd, you must be nuts to take office
again...
They say old Harold Aldrich resigned as Alligator
editor for reasons of health and grades. So how
come Happy Harold could play politics with Chuck
and Manny for 24 hours a day for the past three
weeks? Maybe he wants to be a star!
Hey, who writes OConnells speeches anyway?
Heard the I.F.C. is sweating out the upcoming
Rascals Concert... the Zacker and his large lackey,
Froggy, the big TKE, are so worried they went to
S.G. for some help. Seems their pal, Fat Clyde,
agreed to help out with rain insurance. Sure hope
they dont bomb again; that would not be too slick
after the Fudge fiasco (remember that one Greeks?).
Warble, warble, warble. ..
Have you seen the ex-Chancellor of the fabulous
Honor Court lately? Im speaking of course of Pistol
Pete Zinnoblubber... hes the new chief library
assistant (such a fitting job). Pete says if you law
students have any problems at all, just come see
him; he knows a lot about your new library. Keep
up the good work Pete.
Then there is mister excitement, Phil Burnett!!!!
He went to New York, everyone bought exciting
new style shirts; Phill picked-up 3 White Gant
button-downs, and three blue ones. Wow, Phil...
Say, old Willie Cross, the permanent 3rd floor
administrative lackey, sure wanted cheerleading
tryouts to go OK this year. Seems he had enough
excitement last year ... dont worry Bill, Chuck
will see to it your office lights get turned on soon.
Guess the campaign record of two years ago,
when Charles Shepherd ran with only the big bad
Sigma Nus for a few weeks, and ultimately beat the
Bloc, will stand for another year or so
Speaking of the Sigma Nus: they hold their
meetings in the Union now. Things are so plush over
here the Nus were amazed; you know, things like
chairs, lights, air-conditioning, rugs, etc. Stuff their

proceeds. THEY WERE TURNED DOWN!
WHY?
We know some people are tight, but this
is ridiculous. Will Big Bull Gator please
inform the student body why he cannot
donate just the profits from his soft drink
sales on the night of May 2, to a project the
students initiated and one he has cried for,
namely a decent Coliseum?
Athletic Department, we want an
answer. . .if you want a Coliseum!

donations of SIOO per man, enabled
Carni Gras to pay the city fees.
Unfortunately the actions of some people
in the city were not as commendable; in fact
they were rather disappointing.
One Jaycee member connected with the
fair apparently felt CamiGras was going to
hurt the big city fair the following week.
He certainly raised enough complaints about
Cami Gras, both to students and President
OConnell. As a recent graduate of the UF,
one would hope he would be more helpful.
Perhaps next year things will be better
expecially since Cami Gras obviously didnt
hurt the City Fair.
We were most disappointed with the
actions of the County Health Department.
They have a reputation for being tough on
health standards. Certainly this is

WARBLINGS

house never had.
Then there was Click, the perpetual politico.
Heard he bagged some Chives from the Ist Party
victory celebration Thursday night. He said it was
the FIRST time hed ever fudged a bit with the
goodies. Sure, Marc!
Os course Glick also wanted someone to double
check his records as First Party treasurer. So he gets
Manny (Mr. Legitimate) James to make sure
everything was OK. Amazing, simply amazing.
Seen Mannys new boat? His father-in-law
wrecked it this week-end; Manny likes his
father-in-law!
They say Jason Straight can change his clothes,
colors, or political beliefs faster than a speeding
bullet. Could he be Superman in disguise? or
perhaps pseudo-man?
But what about the TEPs? Word has it they may
not get anyone tapped into FBK this time. Seems
some of their stars went into the Coast Guard for
awhile. Too bad.
Hear Mike Moore, the cool ATO (so he says)
wants to run for S.G. president next year. Hell
probably follow Bill Mcridge down the path of
defeat if he doesnt stop threatening certain
Blue-League houses ... for they have some loyal
friends who could squash Mike like a fly! Whoop,
whoop, whoop ...
Hi Jake S.: how about $23.00 for the Gator
Loan Fund? And dont tell us you cant swing it.
You can always swing the Es behind you. Warble,
warble, warble.
Speaking of next years S.G. race (isnt it the
thing to do?): there appears to be four traditional
candidates at this time. They are: Big Mike Moore
(the dangler!); Steve Super Jew Zack (IFC Prexy,
and a good one); Joe Rathskeller Hilliard (new
Accent Chairman); and of course our new S.G.
Veep, Charles Harris (watch him run all year). Then
again, there is always Charlie Shepherd (ho hum).
then theres the Union, nearly without funds,
and certainly without student support ...
And who could forget Mrs. Roberts, down in
Public Functions... shes still trying to run
everything in her own, sweet way, like scheduling
shows for Sunday afternoons but printing the
tickets and advertising for Sunday nights! Have fun
Alan Howes and S.GP.
Guess Dean Adams is still busy in his office

The Florida Alligator
CLYDE M. TAYLOR, JR.
Editor-in-Chief
MARC H. GLICK
Managing Editor
Manny James
"Facts are the Executive Editor
Enemy of Truth.
ALLIGATOR STAFF WRITERS
RUSTY SKINNER BILLMODLIN
SUSAN WOYTYCH CARON BALKANY
LEE TERRY ALAN HOWES
JASON STRAIT CHARLES HARRIS
EDDIE FLOYD MANNY JAMES
STEVEN ZACK JACK HARKNESS
MIKE DAVIDSON SAM BLOCK

commendable, providing it is a consistent
policy.

Carni Gras was required to bring in a
special trailer and park it next to the
cotton-candy stand (for sanitary
facilities). .. yet nothing of the kind was
apparent next to any of the numerous food
stands at the city fair. And certainly there is
room to question the cleanliness of more
than one of those food booths, if eyesight
has anything to do with it.
Hopefully some of these petty antics of
our local friends will not be repeated next
year. There is room for both of these worthy
fairs. And certainly both the city and the UF
need each other on many occasions.
Lets co-operate, not antagonize. C. M. T.

trying to get his way on disciplinary cases, without
too much regard to basic student rights. A word to
the wise student: if you get called to the good
Deans office, check with the Honor Court or
Ombudsman regarding your rights... sometimes
Frank forgets to inform you of all of them.
And what about Pres. OConnell... hes still
looking for a veep and an admin, assistant. Could be
hes also looking for a draft for the governors race,
or even Hollands senate seat if it opens up. He sure
would be a great candidate with his great voice,
distinguished record and looks, and dont forget,
hes popular with state politicos.
Wonder if Pres. Shepherd will keep a trusty deck
of cards in his office like C.T. did. They sure come
in handy when the B.S. in S.G. starts to fly ...
Also heard that Chuck was given a new pair of
buckle-up shoes to replace the ones he word(??) out
stomping all those dorm sections, all ten of them!
And what about Megill? He becomes a star (in
some circles, however small) because of Tom Slade.
How pathetic! Two have-nots picking at little issues
and little people, and look who gets the attention of
the two ... big Ken ...
Who said the Sigs voted only 47 per cent in
Thursdays election?
Has anyone noticed that Veep Hale has been
gone for a month or so? ... No? Oh well, just
wondering. Hope hes enjoying his little world trip.
Oh! If anyone sees Gary Duvan around in his
new V.W. bus (yuk, yuk), please tell him I said
there s a boiler room that needs cleaning ... and a
kid named Quimby will help him.
Hi A.B. Say hello to Thor for me ... Well so
iuch for the Warbler for now ... but Ill be back.
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
_Rejtz_Union 1 Phone 3921681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions express in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.

By The G.T.W.



MR. EDITOR:
I am usually guilty of the sin of non-involvement
in the affairs of campus, political or otherwise.
However, after reading Miss Warrens statement in
support of JOMO, calling it a responsible
community organization, in no way racist and
throwing the support of Liberation party behind it,
I believe the University community deserves to
know just how this so-called responsible
community organization represents itself and its
goals to the Black community.
A few excerpts quoted from BURNING SPEAR,
a JOMO publication being circulated in the Black
community, should convey the flavor of JOMO
much more accurately than anything I can say.
Under the heading What JOMO Believes are
included such statements as:

jDk I ..
1
r aH
WHY IS INK MAN SMILING ?
r "i
HYPOCRISY?
$ i
S MR. EDITOR: g
| l
$ For one who is so sensitive to investigations himself, >:
:J Mr. Megill shows a remarkable lack of reservation in :
:j suggesting an investigation of Mr. Morrisons £
:: apparently imprudent and unprofessional >
:: conduct. .. f :|:
* !
:: It makes one wonder if Mr. Megills interpretation :
* of free speech and academic freedom >
: encompasses only those ideas with which he is in ;j:
: accordance a viewpoint which Mr. Megill ascribes to ::
y. his detractors. $
I I
S DARYL R. MATTOX IUC : :
>: :
V.-.v.% w ...- j ............m.wa.vawava^aIv.VAV.VAV.V. , AW.V A AVAWV..V.

MR. EDITOR:
Larry Jordan in Black Voices states about the
recent campus attacks:
More police protection is not the solution to the
problem. An elimination of many of the basic
inequities that exist on this campus and in this
community may well be the only answer to our
problem.
Ridiculous!
Eliminating inequities will not stop a razor from
cutting your face whether the attackers are black,
white, or green. I suggest you repeat your statement
to the victims of these slashings. They know what

Reply To Black Voices

ARE THEY FOR REAL ?

All Black people in U.S. prisons and jails are
political prisoners and not criminals. America is a
criminal society which historically and
traditionally made it her unspoken and unwritten
policy to wipe this earth of all non-white peoples
she comes in contact with.
Under What JOMO Demands Now come
statements such as:
The American Racist has taken part in the
slaughter of 50,000,000 Black people: therefore
we are demanding that we be paid with land and
money for this act of naked genocide, which will
enable Black people to build a homeland of their
own.
An article concerning Gainesville merchants says:
You cant steal nothing from a white man, hes
already stolen it, he owes you anything, even his

inequity is.
If, as you say, you fear an open clash between
Blacks and Whites on campus, you should favor
increased police power. You should also support the
police ( which are both black and white) as they do
their job. Because, for those who want improved
black-white relations, these attacks are certainly not
helping.
However, should the police arrest these people,
Im sure you and others will create such a furor that
theyll be released ... and, the way things are these
days, theyll put the cops in jail.
B. W. MASTERS 4EG

'On My Honor As A UF...

MR. EDITOR:
The fact becomes increasingly
obvious that the cherished piece
of baggage known as the Honor
System does not work. One
source of its ineffectiveness
arises from questions such as
those raised in the recent
student government election.
If, in fact, regimented
cheating occurs on the UF
campus (as one presidential
candidate suggested), this could
in no way be construed as an
indication of student support.
However, another violation of
the Honor System has been
taking place for quite some time,
and as it involves hundreds of
students daily, I would like to
bring it to the attention of the
Honor Court and other
guardians of the truth.
Many students are annoyed
and amazed by the fact that
they are forced to be frisked
every time they leave the
Graduate or Main Library on
campus. This procedure becomes
particularly bothersome when
one is in a hurry or is carrying a
large number of books.
However, the issue is not
primarily one of inconvenience.
The person who is doing the
checking is saying, in effect, We
dont trust you, so prove to us
that you have not stolen
anything.
Members of the library staff
would counter by citing
statistics on book thefts in the
two libraries when the system
was not in use. Why is it then,
that other campus libraries, such
as the College of Agriculture
Library and the Chemistry
Library do not require proof of
innocence before passing beyond
their doors? Are our agricultural
brethren more honest than those
in the arts and sciences?
If frisking students is a
necessity, let us not decieve
ourselves with the reality of an

life. All the stores are open .... if you say the
magic words. The magic words are: UP
AGAINST THE WALL MOTHER ER.
This responsible community organization is
nothing more than a blade version of the Klu Klux
Klan, and deserves no more recognition than its
white counterpart. At best it will widen the gap
between the White and Black communities, and at
worst it will serve as a catalyst triggering lawlessness
and riots.
JOMO is an organization of hate mongers
capitalizing on the misery of the poor Blacks in this
country, and how anyone Black or White with the
least bit of social conscience can support such a
group is beyond my powers of comprehension.
JOHN L. AVERY 3LW

Honor System on this
campus. If a students integrity
is honored in Walker Auditorium
during an exam, so must it be
honored in his library when he is
ready to leave.
Until the solution is found, I
offer the following remedy to

Dont Quote Me, But...
.v.v.v.*. A .*3Svww?.v.v.v.v.w.v.v.v.%v MARC H
The most frustrating thing I have ever engaged in at this university
is trying to improve the J. Wayne Reitz Union, or the mausoleum as :
I have reverted to calling it. :
I dont mean to say that the Union doesnt meet student needs, i
but.
I have serious doubts as to whether the Union is really for the j
students or for outsiders.
The Union administration has not moved one inch toward making :j:
the students more comfortable in the campus living room. The :j;
Union is about as comfortable as an operating room which its stark ;j;
white walls resemble. :
The argument is forwarded look at the games room, and the |
student activities center on the third floor but that is as far as it :j:
goes. Little more than 20 per cent of the structure addresses itself to
student needs.
Let me take you on a tour of Rions folly as it is alsoknown.
Imagine taking a helicopter and landing on the Unions roof. As we ij:
walk down to the sixth floor we behold the low-ceilinged luxury of:j:
the guest rooms halls. >;
These rooms are for the use of student and university guests, but >;
dont try to reserve one unless it is in slow season. Otherwise you will >
find that the union director has blocked off large segments of rooms $
even before the March 31, date after which reservations are open for:
football season.
As we continue our journey stepping into the elevator with haste \
so as not to get clipped by its quickly closing doors we pass the fifth \
floor which is the same as the sixth. :
*
The door of the elevator opens to reveal the majesty of the fourth*:
floor which is fit for the throne room of the director. The opulent but j;
seldom used Arrendondo Room is just to your right with two dining j;
rooms but still no evidence of students. :<
The poorer cousin the third floor reveals evidence that some i<
students do use the union, but a special breed roams the halls there :<
and no place is available for the student who wishes to participate in \
unorganized activities or just relax. ||
Heading toward the elevator to descend to the second floor, we pass \
one of the unions famous statistics posters which go even further ;j
toward making the student feel he is nothing more than a statistic for
Union directors surveys ... signifying nothing.
The second floor is even more pathetic. The gallery is for the most j;
part more sterile and frigid than any other part of the Union and, \
except for movies on Saturday night, is rarely frequented by students. \
On the first floor we find the plush offices of the union ij
administration, the cafeteria, three lounges two closed to student j
use and, low and behold a television set which should be set on a
higher platform so the people watching in the last row can see.
As we walk down the grand staircase to our right we find the games
area which is the most used part "of" the building, except for the
bathrooms, as far as students are concerned.
Well that is all of it, I find it hard to believe that in a 5.5 million
Union for a state university with 20,000 students more facilities are
not available for the campus community.
All this really wouldnt be so bad if the Union administrators
cared. But they dont. Their attitude can be interpreted only as
anti-student and it seems their primary interests are self perpetuation
of their special interest, the student be damned. Not to mention
featherbeding.
I have questioned the viability of the union with many others for :
well over fourteen months and not an iota of progress has been made.
Maybe it will take another fourteen for some progress to be made. Or
maybe just maybe there will be a change in personnel.
Amen.

Tueeday, April 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

anyone bothered by this display
of mistrust: When the person at
the door asks to check your
belongings, just say On my
honor as a Florida student, I
have stolen nothing from this
library...
RICHARD M. KRIEG

Page 9



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE |
Beautiful Brazilian guitar for sale at
bargain price. Owner has hardly
used. Call 372-6284 after 6 p.m.
(A-3M24-P)
'6O Opel station wagon very clean,
engine very good; new crankshaft &
other parts; passed inspection $250
Call 378-8610 anytime. (A-st-122-p)
Gibson Electric Guitar, perfect cond.,
Firebird 3-pickups, $l5O, was $250
new. Call Walt, 376-1474.
(A-st-122-p)
Yashica TL-Super. TTL meter, f 1.7
Auto-Yashinon lens. Mirror lock.
Shutter speed B-l/1000. With case,
$l4O. Ph. 372-3002 (A-st-122-p)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2Vi acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20M16-P)
Sale a Martin guitar and case, good
condition SIOO. Call Frank Farrey
378-4104. Leave name and number.
(A-3M23-P)
8x47 Ventura mobile home. Bay
windows, air conditioned, 7x20
porch awning, 2nd BR made into
study, furnished. $1990. Call
376-0622, 4546 NW 13 St.
(A-lt-121-P)
Get a Mau Mau mongrel. Itll chew
anything from bones to steel.
Champion lines. Pedigree African
barkiess Basenji pups. All shots.
376-2630. (A-lot-119-p)
Honda 350, perf. cond., 2000 mi.;
best offer over SSOO. Call 372-7942
after six. (A-3M23-P)
Borg-Warner 8 track stereo tape
player table model with detachable
speakers. Like new, $75. Call Hugh at
378-3301. (A-5M21-P)
Gibson 12 string 825-12 N with vlnyj
case. $125 firm. 376-8007 after 6.
(A-5M21-P)
Extra clean mobile home 8x35 close
to campus, nice lot, plenty of
storage. Call weekdays after 5
254-2580. SI3OO. (A-5M25-P)
5 mo. old Ovation electric guitar with
Gibson amplifier in excellent
condition, S3CO. Call 378-9824
Morn. (A-5M25-P)
Fender Bassman Amp. with Lansing
speakers, $450. Gibson EB-O Bass
guitar, burgandy hollow-body. Call
John at 376-7050. (A-3t-125-P)
Black Doberman Female Cham Champion
pion Champion sired 9mo old. House broken,
all shots, ears trimmed, 3 Dobes and
4 kids=too much SIOO.OO. Call
376-9020. (A-5M25-P)
10 gallon aquarium complete
including fish. sl2 Ph. 378-3426.
(A-lt-125-P)
For "a Job well done feeling clean
carpets with Blue Lustre. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO. Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-125-C)
Martin D-18 steel string guitar in
excellent condition. S6O case
included S3OO. 1965 Honda Sport
90 in good condition with helmet
$165. Call Bill 378-4932.
(A-st-125-P)
Mr-
SUBURBIA
DRIVE IN IJRJ
rUMOEE I
ADS

;:~x-x x*x*xxx;xx*xw<-x*xxxw x < 'J'£
FOR RENT
Jr ft
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to Campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21M15-P)
Peace and quiet is yours for the
asking by living in one of our
secluded luxusious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for an
appointment to see them. Immediate
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, Inc.
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-c)
Available for summer qtr. Trailer,
12x60, 3 br, IV2 bath, air cond.,
washer completely furnished. $l2O
monthly plus utilities. Call Hugh at
378-3301. (B-5M21-P)
3 bedroom house air cond., 2 blocks
from campus, 1319 NW 3 Ave. Call
372-6921. (B-5M25-P)
Sublet furn 2 bedroom apt, SW 16th
Ave. $155 mo. Avail June. AC, pool,
carpet, cable TV, draperies, laundry
facilities. Call 376-5818. (B-5M23-P)
1 bdrm OLYMPIA Apt., 1 block
from campus, to sublet for summer
qt. Available in June. Call 378-4277.
(B-st-122-p)
I' WANTED *1
Female roommate Camelot Apt.
Immediate occupancy, rent paid thru
April. Call 378-9694 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M22-P)
3 coeds for summer qtr. at
Tanglewood Townhouse. June rent
paid. Call 372-7882 after 4.
(C-5M23-P)
Co-ed Roommate needed immediate
occupancy. Landmark 148. Elaine
378-8731 any pm, Tues. and Thurs.
am. (C-3t-124-p)
Two male roommates $41.60
month plus one-third utilities. Call
376-5467 or come by 1105 NW 4
Ave. (C-3M25-P)
Need 1 roommate Fr. Quarter. Fall
Quarter. Share with 3 others. Call
392-8263 evenings. (G-st-122-p)
Ride wanted to Jax. Thurs. afternoon
May Ist. Call 378-4348 ask for
Camle. (C-2t-124-p)
HELP WANTED
Manager, rooming house reliable
senior or male graduate student. Live
on premises, references. Phone
376-6652 after 6 p.m. (E-st-123-P)
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS FROM
TAMPA BAY AREA Career
$600.00 per month, plus expense
allowance for man needed for
insurance agency. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 11702 Tampa, Fla. 33610.
(E-Bt-119-p)

111 \ TUESDAY SPECIAL 11
l" FRIED 1
I CHICKEN I
M all you QQa m
|| CARE TO EAT M M \ ||
M WEDNESDAY SPEOAL ||
1 CHICKEN STEW 1
8 DUMPLINGS 49{|
1 MORRISON'S 1
1 CAFETERIAS 1
|BL OAWESVim MALL j|
1

Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 29, 1969

T 9 w. Fx* *, a
AUTOS I
** v
*****"**
v 1964 Karmann Ghia, radio, w/w
tires. Excellent condition. Call
376-5687 after 5:30. Mechanically
perfect. (G-st-124-p)
1967 TR Spitfire excellent shape,
good tires (radials), 2 extra tires & 1
wheel extra, radio, luggage rack,
29,000 miles, br. racing green. Tim
767647. (G-5M21-P)
V.W. Manx buggy 1300 engine
53H.P. Red metalflake soft top side
curtains rollbar many extras. Great
for sand, woods, street $1695 or
trade for big motorcycle and cash.
See at 1020 S. Main St. or call
378-0249. (G-10t-l 19-p)
57 Ford, very good six cyl std.
Excellent transportation, must sell.
Best offer. Also Honda CBI6O. $175.
Call 378-8477 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-121-P)
PERSONAL 1
Iwwawwiwo;; w Do you have a cool Mom? a square
Mater? a way-out mama-cat? or an
old-fashioned Mother? No matter
which, we have just the thing for her
Mothers Day gift (May II). Free
gift-wrapping and mailing service.
THE SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ.
Ave. Open Mon.-Sat. til 9:00.
*(J-st-125-C)
RIDE WANTED to ATLANTA leave
Thur. May 1 anytime. Return Sun.
May 4. Please call Carol 392-9790.
(J-lt-125-P)
There are very few seats left for
flights to EUROPE. Reserve today
tomorrow may be too late call
392-1655, Rm. 310, Reitz
Union now. (J-4t-125-P)
Don't partake of weekend joys if
thats what you think of Wooglins
Boys. (J-lt-125-P)
Come early to get your choice of
prints and posters today at the Reitz
Union Art Print sale from 10:00
a.m.-9:00 p.m., Rm 235 of Union.
(J-3M25-P)
Tired of Ho-Hum fashions? Change
your look with a darrha, a mansouria,
or a burnoose. Dramatically beautiful
Moroccan clothes of 100% finest
hand-woven cotton. Just in at THE
SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open Mon.-Sat. til 9:00. (J-st-125-C)
Tired of hot, crowded dorms? Enjoy
an air-conditioned spacious apt. for
only $l2O for the whole quarter
(with 3 roommates In furnished
2-bedroom apt) Come by rental
office, University Gardens Trace, 708
S.W. 16 Ave. Ph. 376-6720.
(B-st-122-c)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message. Any time day or night.
Message changes each Wed. LET
FREEDON RING, 16 NW 7th.
(J-st-121-P)
Interested in travel and/or study in
Europe, Asia or the Mid-East? Want
to buy or rent a car to use there. Call
392-1655 Rm. 310 Union.
(J-12t-114-c)

PERSONAL
:*x*x*xx*!*xx*x*x*x*x*x-x-x*n>%v;s*x*x*£
I NEED A RIDE to U of Ga. MAY 9!
If you are going, please call Sandi at
378-4376 or 378-2078 after 5:30.
Let me know soon. (J-3t-123-P)
Electronic music studio, if interested
call Richard Reynolds 378-6908.
(J-3M23-P)
SERVICES I
X-X-X-WX-WX-X 8 a 8 B'BWWIB 800 BIIBMW
Vivian Woodard Consultant learn
techniques of applying make-up;
quality cosmetics available. Call
Cindy Humes 392-9764.
(M-5M23-P)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14M23-P)
NEED A PAINTER? Interior or
Exterior professional painting. Call
after 5 or anytime on weekends.
378-4855 Free Estimates.
(M-10t-122-p)
A Iternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)
I MCGUEErMI
I BULLITT I
Bwww.
l ALSO SWIEY POmER ROO STEIGER I
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Tore HOT OF HE MIGHT |
8:20
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WINNER
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t *" kh f CMr
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masterpiece of the supernatural
ebb ft \
jSVEIBEE %
;ehire Jmfc*
IHOE/ m\
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lUUSTREfEDHIBM
...and tnen,
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*sometimes for some very
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hbrju

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Debaters Finish Season On Winnina Note

University of Florida debaters
ended their debate season with a
flourish by winning the Georgia
Southern Invitational Debate
Tournament on April 25 and 26,
in Statesboro, Georgia.

OUR PROMISE -PRIVACY
d private bedroom hr
|4 I each student one
C block behind norman
JN Isl <
1J 15 APARTMENTS
914 SW Bth AWE
NOW LEASING FOR SEPT-CALL 372-2662
ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Don't use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are requiredJMinimum charge is SI.OO for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -3:00 pjn. 2 days prior la starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE
* K> n
ll l| l| £
* 2 ? ? S 2 £
~ < S 5 2
___ ifl'niS r
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5
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R R R £
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The Georgia Southern
Tournament consisted of several
events: varsity and novice
debate, Oral Interpretation,
Oratory, After-Dinner Speaking,
and Impromptu Speaking. The

winners of these events were
given individual awards, plus
point values towards the
Sweepstakes Trophy the
tournament championship. For a
total point value higher than
that of any other squad at the
tournament, the University of
Florida squad was awarded a
fine trophy for First Place
overall in the tournament.
Dave Rouse, varsity debater,
led Floridas squad in the
individual events. He was a
finalist in the three events he
entered: Oral Interpretation,
Impromptu, and After-Dinner
Speaking. Steve Rosin, varsity
debater, won the Impromptu
Speaking event, and was
awarded a trophy for this First
Place. He was also a semi-finalist
in the Oratory Competition.
On the novice squad, Dee
Scarr was a finalist in Oral
Interpretation and David Beers a
semi-finalist in Impromptu
Speaking.
Novice negative debate team
of Dee Scarr and Bess Roberts
was the First Place negative team
with a 5-1 won-loss record. They
were awarded a trophy for this
distinction. They defeated the
University of Tennessee, Fort
Valley State College, Furman
University, the University of
North Carolina, and Augusta
College. Their only loss was to
the Citadel, the undefeated first
place novice affirmative team.
Floridas novice affirmative
team of David Beers and Richard
Sasser had a 4-2 won-loss record,
defeating Georgia Southern
College, Furman University,
Fort Valley State College, and
the University of Tennessee.
Every one of Floridas
debaters was one of the Top Ten
Speakers in his division: in the
English Prof
Plans UCRA
Professor Melvyn New of the
UF English Department plans to
form a Florida chapter of the
University Centers for Rational
Alternatives (UCRA), an
organization designed to use
rational inquiry as the governing
purpose of a university.
The UCRA plans a
nation-wide lobby for rational
thought and academic freedom
within the university community
and an organization of faculty
members who use reasoned
discussion instead of extremist
d octrinalism.
Charter members include
such scholars as Eugene P.
Wigner, Nobel physicist from
Princeton and Zbigniew
Brzesinski of Columbia
University.
The UCRA is not connected
with the university
administrations, and has taken
stands against administrations
considered detrimental to
academic freedom.
''Hard, fanny I
and sound!"
-RENATA ADLER. N Y. TIMES
NORMAN MAILER'S
VWWNi VI
tiftfd by PROVE PW£BB
May 4 & 5
7 & 9 P.M.
Union Aud.

varsity division, Rosin took Certificates of Excellence at
fourth place speaker and Rouse Georgia Southern College.
seventh place; in novice division
Beers, a transfer student from
UCLA who had never debated
for Florida, was second place
speaker, Sasser, debating in his
first tournament, was sixth place fVHH
speaker, Scarr was seventh place, tl[rrJ[]B
and Roberts eighth place. HjTPHj
Certificates of excellence were Uufl
awarded to all. Aal
Said the fifth to the quart,
"look who's talking."
. ..
- :; f Jr s <
f.SW S' <, t<, xW-itiL :i
\1
It will feed a family of 900
for a day.
A Volkswagen Station Wagon has enough room
to carry:
848 double-cut pork chops... 636 pkgs. Frozen
Chicken wings . 5,088 kosher franks, plus all
their r 0115... 1,272 lbs. of Gravy Train.
And when youre not loading it up with hundreds
of pounds of food, you can load it up with hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of pounds of people.
A Volkswagen Station Wagon comfortably
seats seven 250-pounders.
Or if you have even more mouths to feed than
that, you can get one that seats nine.
And now that you know how big a Volkswagen
Station Wagon is, you should also know how
small it is-.
About 3 feet shorter than the average station
wagon.
And about half a grand less.
Miller-Brown $
Motors, Inc. -=
4222 N.W. 13th St

Tuesday, April 29,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



I, Tha Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 29,1999

Page 12

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR -m- -w- -7- ' "%~W~ TT T I Tis I 1 I"IV1
ggzxsszssss, BLUE BULLETIN

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, April 29
a
Student Senate Meeting, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 D Union,
7:30 p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Scabbard & Blade Military Ball
Queen Contest, Final, Union
Aud., 7:30 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting, 363
Union, 7:30 p.m.
SCAT Meeting, 150 G & F
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Music Dept Florida Baroque
Ensemble, University Aud.,
8:15 p.m.
Rathskeller Dorm night. Towers
A & B, 9:00 p.m.
Wednesday, April 30
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Music Dept Twilight Concert.
Plaza of the Americas, 6:45
p.m.
Florida Speleological Society,
Meeting and Slide Show, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m^
Orthodox Christian Fellowship
Meeting, 118 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Young Republicans Meeting,
346 Union, 8:00 p.m.
Center for Latin American
Sutdies Colloquium, Lat
Amer. Colloquium Rm.
College Lib., 8:00 p.m..
Speakers: Profs. Robert
Bradbury and Antonio
Goyoso.
MENSA Meeting, Winnjammer,
9:00 p.m.
Rathskeller, Greek Night, 9:00
p.m.
Univ. Films Committee Meeting,
150 B Union, 7:00 p.m.
Univ. Films Committee Movie:
"My Little Chickadee,"
Union Aud., 7:00 & 9:00
p.m.
Thursday, May 1
Reitz Union Birthday Party,
Union Colonnade, 8:00
a.m.-closing.
Contemporary Poet Series, Larry
Hetrick, 122 Union, 4:40
p.m.
Rugby Club Practices, Fleming
Field, 5:00 p.m.
Gainesville Section of the I.E.E.
dinner meeting, Dinner at
7:00; Speaker: Dr. T.S.
George, 8:00 p.m..
Reservations: call 392-0904.

GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION I
y ouref a f l iS *" r
Gainesville you can fish lake, ocean or gulf. Think of it... rt iff
Bass, Bream, Trout, Redfish, Ladyfish, Tarpon, Mackerel,
King or perhaps even a Sail. Make arrangements for your /
fishing rig at the CAMPUS CREDIT UNION. The whole r* V /
thing...boat, motor, trailer and accessories! u 1 JV

Music Dept: Twilight Concert,
Reitz Union Terrace, 6:45
p.m.
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Phi Chi Theta Meeting, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 361
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Alpha Kappa Psi Meeting, 363
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Rathskeller: Harold Teller,
Flamenco Guitar; Janis
Burton, Folk Singer.
Friday, May 2
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
SCAT Activities Day, Plaza of
the Americas, 2:00 p.m.
Veterans Club Meeting, 150 B
Union, 7:30 p.m.
IFC: 'The RASCALS", Florida
Field, 8:00 p.m.
Florida Players: "FOUR BY
BECKETT" Constans
Theatre, 8:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
"RASCALS TICKETS":
$2.50 per person; Union
Movie, "Beyond the Law,"
SI.OO.
GENERAL NOTICES
MILITARY BALL QUEEN
CONTEST: The semifinals of
the Military Ball Queen Contest
(May 3) will be held Tuesday
night, April 29, in the Reitz
Union Auditorium. Scabbard
and Blade, military honorary
fraternity, is sponsoring the
contest to which everyone is
invited.
COURSE AND TEACHER
EVALUATION: Applications
are being accepted for staff
positions in Course and Teacher
Evaluation. Students with
interests in organization, public
relations, publications, research
and general office activities are
needed. Applications may be
picked up at Student Activities
Desk, third floor, Reitz Union.
FLORIDA BLUE KEY:
Applications for membership in
Florida Blue Key can be picked
up at the FBK Office, or the
Student Activities Desk, third
floor, Reitz Union, or the Dean
of Men's Office, Tigert Hall. All
applications are due back in the
FBK Office by 4 p.m.. May 2.
POETRY READING: Mr.
Lawrence Hetrick,
Comprehensive English, will give
a poetry reading Thursday, May
1, from 4:40 to 5:30 p.m. in
lounges 122 and 123 of the
Reitz Union.

Administrative Notices

PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 29,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CSS 113 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 29,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Qto Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
MS 102 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday April
30, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
v/ MS 204 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, April
30, at 7 p.m. in Little 101 and
109.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 1,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
MS 302 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 1 at
7 p.m. in Little 101, 109, 113,
121 or 125.
MS 303 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 1,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; M-Z to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117.118 or 119
CBS 261 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 6, at
7 p.m. in Peabody 101, 102 and
112.
CBS 262 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, May 6, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202 205,
208 or 209.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

CBS 263 PROGRESS TESI
will be given Tuesday, May 6, at
7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4. 5,6, 7,8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; Sto
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18, ro 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CLC 141 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. in Little 109.
CLC 142 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CLC 143 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, May 7,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6. 7,8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; Sto
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
CHN 251 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 8,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CHN 253 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 8,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121 or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,

116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Q to Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for June and August
graduates unless otherwise
indicated.
APRIL 29: HEADQUAR HEADQUARTERS,
TERS, HEADQUARTERS, ARMY AND AIR
FORCE EXCHANGE
SERVICE- Retail Personnel,
Food Mgt., Acctg., Mgt., Eng.,
EE, ME, personnel services. Must
be sophomores or juniors
seeking full-time summer
employment. THE
TRAVELERS INSURANCE
CO. bus. ad., lib. arts., IE.
BURROUGHS WELLCOME &
CO. any major will train.
APRIL 29-30: THE BELL
SYSTEM all business, arts,
and sciences majors. FIRST
RESEARCH CORP. Bus. stat,
econ., mkgt., bus. ad., real
estate.
APRIL 30: STONEROCK,
HOLLINGSWORTH &
SIMONET acctg. FOREMOST
DAIRIES OF THE
SOUTH- usually interviews for
management trainees in the field
of dairy science. JORDAN
MARSH-FLORIDA bus. ad.,
home econ.
MAY 1: AC ELECTRONICS
DIVISION OF GENERAL
MOTORS EE, Math, Physics.
MAY 1.2: OKALOOSA OKALOOSAWALTON
WALTON OKALOOSAWALTON JUNIOR
COLLEGE Master's or
Doctorate with experience.
SPEECH SCREENING FOh*
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the speech screening
requirement before being
admitted into the advanced
professional sequence or
Enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block.
English and speech majors do
not take the test as SCH 201 is
required in all their programs.
Appointments are now being
made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.



___ 4 w I Ml l
The Florida Alligator
EDDIE FLOYD SLIBiI'
Alligator Sports Editor

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(M-; irr'Bf'i Wl.
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REAVES GETS ANOTHER PASS AWAY
'Blue Day For Orange

Everyone knows the outcome of the Orange
and Blue game, and the following pictures are
some of the reasons for the 42-10 upset.
After an exchange of punts in the first
quarter, sophomore fullback Tommy Durrance
bounced off several tacklers and fell into the end
zone on a brilliant 20-yard scoring run.
Eric Taggarts kick made it 7-0.
Charley Hoods dive from the one proceeded
Rich Francos kick, and at 6:28 of the second
period the score went to 7-7.
Alvarez TD snag of a six-yard Reaves floater

jHt OfeTljilf'v
BLUE "GANG TACKLE" LED BY PALAHACH
'Wilt Holds MfTCTVn B|^^B
Scoring Record HMmKmI|M
Wilt Chamberlain holds the
National Basketball -
Associations single m O%fJ fii HBBBJBBBBHBHBH
pumping JHIHHBBBHUIfIIiiI
4,029 points in 1961-62 while mmmmmrn^^Kmmmmmm^m^mmmmm^mmmmmmm^H^^a^mm
playing with Philadelphia. TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
Old Invitational
The National Invitation MWM £ I
Tournament is college E#
basketballs oldest post-season i
- S7l
* I STARKE, FLORIDA '^WM
"SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
Be a commercial pilot! Hi
NEW G. I. Bill pays for HOURS
FIHMit Training Call WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
Si'w.r.ill-1 SATURDAY BAM-IPM
378 2646 GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

over Tannen made it 14-7. Franco tightened it to
14-10 with a 29-yard field goal as the half ended.
The second half was no contest.
While the active Blues defense completely
stymied Jackie Eckdahl and Co., the Reaves-led
offense crossed the goal four times with seeming
ease.
Mike Richs one-yard plunge sent the score to
21-10. Rich again ran 16 yards and the Blues led,
28-10.
Mark Ely raced 77 yards with a punt, making
it 35-10, and finally, Reaves 39-yard bomb to
Maliska capped the scoring, 42-10.

Tuesday STEAK SPECIAL
ION PON BROIL
97
Jr V I BLOCK FROM CAMPUS
I 4TTi 41 \
l > lil Pi l 4 iH" l!
STOP 1
PONT MISS
OOR THREE Ms
BOOK RECORD
.SALE /
APRIL 30
MAY 1 and 2 ZffTS
Cl \l/ J
m f M LrfJr
and Dookstor efflz/ ll
located in the HUB 11/ ((j

TuMday, April 29, 1969, Tha Florida AlHprtor,

Page 13



I, The Florida Alligator. Tueaday, April 29,1W9

Page 14

A*
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t ?' Ifr^iil^HHHl^^^^BS 7 -. j| pHHHHHmpK
*&(&-**>&, ~ : t. >* A \
' c A, v'' l y : wv ;..-. MARKELY MAKES GOOD RUN FOR BLUE

* Red Light
Tackles Taylor
By GRIFF MCSWINE
Alligator Automotive Expert
Gainesville dragway will
become the scene of the hottest
match race rivalry in the nation,
as Bob Red Light White takes
on noted Ex-political lackey
Clyde G.T.W. Taylor, for the
title of Mr. Gasser.
Taylor in a rare show of
humility vowed to clean Whites
clock.
Other noted automotive
experts such as Steve Big Slick
Zack observed. With as much
wheel spinning as student
government does, Taylor doesnt
have a chance.
Action will commence May
10, at 8 pjn. at Gainesville
Dragway.
Gator Soccers
SquashSpyders
Paced by the hot foot of
Manuel Wills, the Gator soccer
team squashed the Jacksonville
Spyders this weekend, 5-0.
Heading the Gator attack,
Wills scored four of the five
goals, the other one coming
from the talented toe of George
Corfield. This weekends
performance caps a brilliant
season for the team, with 11
wins three losses, and one tie.
Also cited for their
outstanding performances were:
George Corfield, Carrlle Florri,
Jay Stormer and Hector
Camberos.
Club elections were held
re-electing Mike Schikkor as
President. Co-captains for the
coming season are Keven
Sufferin of New York and
Manuel Wills of Honduras.
Faculty Advisor Alan C.
Moore gave out the following
awards for the 1968 season;
High Scorer, Manuel Wills, Best
Halfback, Kevin Sufferin, Most
Improved, Jay Leimback, Best
Wing, George Corfield.
Also receiving awards were:
President Mike Schikorr, and
Co-Captain Jay Stormer. Carlle
Fllori was presented with a
plaque in recognition of his
leadership in the 1961-62
seasons, when the team went
undefeated.
I Miller-Brown I
ONEMILE
NORTH OF /D1
THE MALL W
3764652 AUTHOKaEO
DEALER

Gl mm
G Ml (Kb
'**"*'* Its exacting. Competitive.
mim fs) fiffl H demands your utmost,
w Go ahead and do your thing.
But it better be good ...
A better product,
A more useful service,
Or a more sustaining vision.
The System adapts itself to new ideas
And makes itself a little better in the process.
But the System is far from perfect.
Its vicious at times. Hypocritical.
Still, its the only system we have.
And the only way you can beat it
Is to make it better.
Thats what the System is all about.
We hope you realize this. Because
You are our life insurance.
\ I Phoenix /
\ 1 Mutual /
\ mm 3 life insurance company /
\ MIS MA TrOW> CONNECTICUT /

mtm v iHfcS
& *§ nuyui b |
p jl Ldjfl
ORANGE'S TED HAGER BROUGHT DOWN BY JOHN FAIX



Rebels Following Last Years Gator Tracks

ATLANTA (UPI) The early
line from the Southeastern
Conference spring training
camps indicates the Mississippi
Rebels are the best bet for next
falls gridiron campaign.
True, the Rebels, who used to
win SEC titles with almost
tiresome regularity, havent been
on top since 1963. But, they
have 16 starters and 27 other
lettermen back from the 6B
Ski Spills
Scheduled
For May 3
The UF has scheduled its
annual Spring Intercollegiate
Water-Ski Tournament for
Saturday, at Lake Wauburg from
8 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Nine of the top collegiate
teams in the country have been
invited to challenge the Gators,
winners of last years tourney
and current national
Intercollegiate champions.
Featured in the tourney will
be a battle for ind ; vidual honors
between former World
Champion Alan Kempton,
representing the University of
Tampa and Jacques Poetry in
Motion Tillement, current
French overall and European
trick champion, who will be
leading the Gators.
Jacques is fresh from a
stunning victory in the South
African Olympics where he
bagged two gold medals and two
bronze medals in winning the
overall title and in defeating
such standouts as Mike
Sudyeshoud, who is the current
Worlds Champion and holds the
world record for jumping.
Other Gators skiing in the
tourney will be: John
Bedingfield, Dick Hawkins, Vem
Dodd, Derek Honour, Ed
Aigiltinger, Jim Cleveland, Bob
Pilmore, Bill Halback, Pat
Boutchard, Kim Antor and
Margaret Blowers.
Since several schools are
giving full athletic scholarship to
skiers, the competition will be a
lot tougher for the Gators this
year and they will need all the
student support they can get to
win this yean team trophy.
However, no weak-stomached
spectators will be allowed during
the jumping event since skiers
achieve speeds over 60 m.p.h.
going off the ramp and some
spectacular falls are bound to
occur.
Yanks Win
The New York Yankees hold
the record for most league
championships won capturing
29 American League titles.

aj>s I

Liberty Bowl champions and
the word is that SEC coaching
dean Johnny Vaught has a real
winner for his 23 rd trip around
the league.
Situations elsewhere in the
SEC strengthen the line on
Mississippi, Georgia, Tennessee
and Alabama-1-2-3 lasi year-are
all rebuilding this spring while
Auburn and Louisiana State are
having to completely revamp

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FAST FDD/E WHO?
No, its not Fast Eddie, its Willie Mosconi, world famous pocket
billiards player, and he will be giving an exhibition at the Reitz Union
Tuesday. Mosconi will give two exhibitions, one at 4:30 p.m. and one
at 8:00 p.m. Tom Graham, campus pocket billiards champ, and Krista
Hartman, campus female champ, will compete against Mosconi. The
exhibition is free, sponsored by the Union Program council
Recreation Committee and the Games Area.
ART PRINT SALE
TODAY rA
UNION
BOAIO^
10AM To 9PM r
Room 235 Reitz REITZ UNION
OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru Fit
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave

their offenses because of
wholesale losses.
Florida, just about
everybodys pre-season favorite a
year ago, blew what may have
been its best chance. Kentucky,
Mississippi State and Vanderbilt
simply dont figure to have the
manpower to best the Rebels.
The schedule, the factor
which made Florida the favorite
a year ago, leans to Ole Miss this

year. The Rebels meet Georgia,
Louisiana State and Tennessee
all in Jackson, Miss., after having
to play those three toughies on
the road in 6B.
Whether Mississippi lives up
to expectations this fall boils
down, to a great extent, on the
sort of junior season turned in
by quarterback Archie Manning.
Manning was outstanding as a
sophomore, passing and running
for 1,716 yards despite being
sidelined several times by
injuries.
Georgia suffered a major
blow when All-America safety
Jake Scott decided to turn pro

WONDER
house:
14 SW Ist STREET
BAKED MEATLOAF SI.OO
MUSHROOM SAUCE, SOUP, SALAD,
POTATO
Veal Parmiganni $1.35
w/Spaghetti, salad
Being with each other, doing things together ... know knowing
ing knowing that your affection is growing into precious and
enduring love. Happily, all these cherished moments
will be forever symbolized by your diamond engagement
ring. If the name, Keepsake, is in the ring and on the tag.
you are assured of fine quality and lasting satisfaction.
The engagement diamond is flawless, of superb color,
and precise modern cut. Your Keepsake Jeweler will
assist you in making your selection ... He's in the yellow
pages under "Jewelers." Rings from SIOO to SIO,OOO.
Illustrations enlarged to show detail.*Trade-mark reg.
A. H. Pond Co., Inc., Est. 1892.
___ _. REGISTERED
Keepsake* I
DIAMOND RINGS
H HOW T 0 p LAN YOUR ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING I
Please send new 20-page booklet. How To Plan Your Engage- I
ment and Wedding" and new 12-page full color folder, both for I
only 25c. Also, send special offer of beautiful 44-page Brides Book, j I
I m
I Name I
Address 11
KEEPSAKE DIAMOND PINQS, BOX 90, SYRACUSE, N. Y. 13201 JI

Tuesday, April 29, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

instead of playing another year
for the Bulldogs. Georgia also
will be without the services of
All-America defensive tackle Bill
Stanfill.
CRANE IMPORTS
SALES-SERVICE SALES-SERVICERE
RE SALES-SERVICERE PAIRS
i^TwuMPtr
Good Sorvico Starts
at
CRANE IMPORTS
506 E. Unlv. Ave. 372-4373

Page 15



t, The Florida AHifetor, Tuesday, April 29,1969

Page 16

==--"== , ~ i.
,_._a__.i j . K If - 1 M MJ: IJ\ 7 Xl4_l 1/ .A A
I Mi
&
There are only four more days
for you to buy these.
Dont be sorry you missed a
once in a lifetime show.
Tickets are nowon sale at.. Belk-Lindsey,
Reitz Union Box Office, Recordsville,
Quik-Save Records, the Record Bar
and the Hub.
P.S.- Tickets will be $3.00 at the
gate....if there are any left.