Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
The
Florida Alligator

Vl 61. No. 124 University of Florida, Gainesville Monday, April 28, 1969

SG TOTALS OFFICIAL

Vote Recount Needed
On Opinion Questions

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer

The Student Government
election returns are now official,
but there will be a recount of
the votes on the constitutional
amendments and public opinion
questions today.
We are not sure of the
accuracy of some of the results,
Secretary of the Interior Bill
Modlin said Sunday.
Apparently what happened is
that the form for recording the
returns did not have enough
space to include all the results of
the amendments and questions.
So, although some of the Honor
Court officials recorded the
results on the bade on the form,
others did not record them at
all.
Modlin, who made out the
form, said, I hate to admit 1
made a mistake, but I made a
mistake.
However, he added that the
officials should have recorded
the votes somehow.
Honor Court officials are
sometimes not as reliable as they
should be, he said.
The amendments deal with
four broad areas: the Student
Senates power to charter
organizations, and to initiate,
grant, amend and revoke
amendments to charters; the
office of vice chancellor of the
Honor Court, which would
become appointive; the duties of
the vice president of the student
body, who would no longer
preside over the senate, day of student body elections,
which would be changed from
Thursday to Wednesday.
The eight opinion questions
cover both academic reform and
student activities in general.
They are as follows:
Do you favor designating
UF Freshman
Wins Florida
Beauty Title
UF student Maria Josefa
Junquera was named Miss
Florida Universe Saturday night.
Miss Junquera will represent
Florida in the Miss USA Pageant
in Miami Beach on May 16.
She is a freshman who plans
to major in political science and
eventually wants to become a
translator at the United Nations.
She is a member of Alpha Delta
Pi sorority and enjoys painting
as a hobby.
Miss Junquera has reigned as
Strawberry Festival Queen in her
home town of Plant City.
Recently she won the Miss Gator
Gras contest on campus. She is
also an Army Sweetheart.
Carol Moore of Miami, a
student at the University of
Miami and Linda Thomas were
runners-up in the contest.

America's Number 1 College Daily

$5 of any future tuition increase
to go for the construction of a
Student Activities Center
(coliseum) on our campus?
Do you favor voluntary
class attendance?
Do you favor completely
voluntary Physical Education?
Do you favor a pass/fail
grading system for all courses?
Do you fel that the Reitz
Union meets the needs of
University students?
Do you favor Student
Government having total charge
over recognizing, regulating and
funding of all student
organizations?

By CAROL ROBERTS
Alligator Staff Writer
A shorter summer quarter may mean more homework and
out of class assignments for students attending the UF during
the upcoming summer quarter.
Instead of the usual 10 weeks of classes* the summer quarter
will be only nine weeks long, Dean of Academic Affairs Roy
Lassiter said Sunday.
So far, there have been few alterations in most colleges to
accomodate this change.
During the 1968 Summer quarter there was a conflict
between scheduling of final exams and registration for the
summer term, Lassiter said. We felt a greater length of time
was needed between spring and summer quarters, said Lassiter.
Typically there is some change in curriculum during the
summer quarter anyway, Lassiter said.
Well just have a short summer quarter of 45 days and a
long 55-day fall quarter, Lassiter said.

NICK ARROYO
MARIA JUNQUERA
.. wins Miss Florida Universe title

Summer Term Loses A Week

9 Do you favor retaining the
current traffic court system
rather than turning over its
function to the Gainesville court
system?
Do you favor the Student
Body funding of out of town
trips of student organizations?
No complaints about the
election were filed with the
Honor Court, but, according to
Modlin, there was one verbal
complaint, that the Business
Administration polls closed five
minutes early.
Candidate totals, certified
Friday by the court, show a
(SEE 'ELECTION'PAGE 2)

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DERBY DRAMA NICKARROYO
Delta Gamma sisters strained muscles they didn't even know
existed in Saturday's Sigma Chi Derby tugof-war. For a full page of
pictures of the weaker sex in battle, see page 4.

Os five college deans consulted only one said plans were
being made to change curriculum requirements.
The change in the Summer quarter is going to mean well
have to do some tailoring of our courses, College of Journalism
Dean John Paul Jones said Sunday.
Professors will probably be asked to adjust their course
loads. I think theyll have to, Jones said.
It comes as a surprise to me that class periods arent going
to be extended. This would have been one way of helping the
student, College of Engineering Dean R. El Uhrig said.
The decision to shorten the summer quarter is very
desirable from the standpoint of the College of Education, said
Bert L. Sharp, education dean.
We have lots of in-service teachers who work 10 months out
of the year. This will enable them to attend school without
missing any classes, Sharp explained.
The summer quarter, which was scheduled to begin June 16
will now begin June 23. However, classes will still end Aug. 22
as scheduled.

DeGaulle Resigns,
Political Era Ends
COLOMBEY-DES-DEUX-EGLISES, France (UPI) President
Charles de Gaulle officially resigned Sunday night after French voters
defeated his Constitutional reform plan in a referendum. He had been
president of France since 1958.
The general made the announcement that will end a political era in
France from his country estate here after nearly complete polling
results showed Frenchmen had rejected his political reform plan by a
tentative margin of 52.48 to 47.52, per cent.
De Gaulles announcement said his resignation would be effective
as of noon Monday.
According to the French Constitution, De Gaulle will be succeeded
immediately by French Senate President Alain Poher, 60 year-old
leader of the Center Party.
The 78-year-old general informed France his day and its
day had come with these terse words:
I am ceasing to exercize the functions of the president of the
Republic.
This decision takes effect at midday today.
Thus, in 20 words, Charles de Gaulle again stepped out of the
hurly-burly of French political life as he had done shortly after World
War II and ended the De Gaulle reign in France which began in May of
1958. Then, he came forth from retirement from this same estate to
lead France out the bitter rivalries of the Algerian rebellion and to
build his Fifth Republic on the political ruins of the fourth.
The immediate question for France was who, in the long run,
would fill the vacuum left in the presidency. Poher will take over for a
period of 20-t0?35 days until new presidential elections could be
called.
Many observers believed former Premier Georges Pompidou,
relieved of office last spring, would be the strongest Gaullist
candidate. Premier Maurice Couve de Murville was seen as De Gaulles
personal choice and several leftist and center party candidates were in
the running.



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 28,1969

Page 2

Red Leaders Readying
For US-Chinese War

HONG KONG (UPI)
Defense Minister Lin Piao, heir
designate to Chairman Mao
Tse-Tung, has called on
Communist China to prepare for
nuclear war with both the
United States and the Soviet

I Fire Destroys FSUs
{{Administration Building!
>* Special from FSU Flambeau
5 s
$ Fire broke out in FSUs Westcott Hall late Sunday afternoon |j;
gutting the fourth-floor art department offices and studios and
causing extensive damage to second and third-floor
administrative offices.
The Tallahassee Fire Department received word of the fire at X
j 5:30 pjn. and responded with five pumpers and two aerial £
5: ladder trucks. By 7:30 the fire had been brought under control, J
i* according to Fire Chief Earl Levy. X
£ The art department area was termed a total loss, however an
>: original painting by Rubens valued at $30,000 and paintings by
:*i Dr. Karl Verve of the FSU faculty valued at up to $50,000 were x
: saved.
Most university and student records were saved, according to jj;
William Wamton, registrar.
j: Hundreds of students and members of the faculty formed £
:j bucket-brigades to aid firemen.
: Cause of the blaze has not been determined. jij
V.v.y.w.y.y.y.'.y.w.y.v.-.yAV.V.W.V.V.V.V.V.'.V.'.V.V.V.V..V.V.V.'.V.V.V.'.vX*'

Election Tally Incomplete

FtOH PA6E OWE J
total of 6,922 students casting
ballots, a substantial drop from
the 8,000 predicted by election
officials last week.
The Charles Shepherd-
Charles Harris ticket ran away
with 3,769 votes. Their closest
competition, John Mica and
Steve Hull, received 2,237 votes.
Liberation partys Joan Warren
and David Smith, with 383
votes, finished third.
At the Rathdcetter Thursday,
Mis Warren termed it a victory
As a radical party can amass
five per cent of the total vote.
Unaffiliated candidate Jim
Devaney received 330 votes, and
Foresight's Vic Ramey ended up
with a paltry 57 votes.
Shepherds First party swept
the other upper slate offices,
too.
Jim Roll received 3,380 votes
to Marty Habers 2,622, for the
student body treasurers post.
Liberations Robert Keiser came
up with 433.
A total of 3,950 votes went
to Craig Lawrence, Firsts
candidate for Honor Court
chancellor. Issues Jack
Klausner, Lawrences only
opponent, received 2,143.
The Traffic Court chief
justice post went to Firsts Bob
Wattles, who received 3,711
votes. Issues Carol Anderson
ended up with 2,297 votes.
These figures will be sent to
the senate Tuesday night, where

University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than qpe incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
ti"s.HNoticeg for correction must be given before next insertion.

Union, Radio Peking said
Sunday.
Lin listed the United States as
Chinas principal enemy and
ranked Russia second in a
political report given unanimous
approval at the ninth congress of

the senators will vote either to
accept or reject the totals.
Senate President Jack Vaughn
termed the action a formality
to check the validity of the
returns.
A breakdown by colleges
shows the following official
results of senate and Honor
Court justice elections.
Agriculture: Honor Court
justice, Ray Crawford; Student
Senate, Jerry Selph.
Architecture: Honor Court
justice, Robert Forman; Student
Senate, Barbara Brown and
Robert Garvin.
Arts and Sciences: Honor
Court justice, Kathryn Spellman;
Student Senate, Sandra Moore,
Henry Solares, Tom Tworoger,
Sue Woytych.
Business Administration:
Honor Court justice, Wayne
Nellums; Student Senate, Rudolf
Kohler, Janis Tarapchak, Arthur
Wroble.
Education: Honor Court
justice, Rhonda Rothschild;
Student Senate, Joseph
Bartasius, Jaime Eckhoff, Ronna
Goldstein, Charlotte Kissinge*.
Engineering: Honor Court
justice, Robert Stevens; Student
Senate, Jan Browning, Charles
Knudsen, Donald Tucker.
Forestry: Honor Court
justice, Arthur Wyatt; Student
Senate, Samuel Poole.
Health Related
Professions: Honor Court
justice, Betty Brown; Student
Senate, Adrienne Roy.

the Chinese Communist party,
which ended last week. Contents
of the report had not been
disclosed until Radio Peking
broadcast it. The two hour,
15-minute broadcast was
monitored here.
In outlining Chinas political
program for the future, Lins
report also promised continued
Chinese support to Communists
in Vietnam, pledged to wrest
Nationalist China from the
control of Generalissimo Chiang
Kai-Shek, and rebuffed Soviet
offers to negotiate their border
dispute as hostile.
But it was particularly
explicit on the prospect of war
with the United States and the
Soviet Union.
We must not neglect the
danger of a full-scale war
launched by U.S. imperialism
and Soviet revisionism, Lin said
in the report.
We should make adequate
preparations, be prepared for 3
full-scale war with them, be
prepared for their all-out war
effort, be prepared for nuclear
war with them.

Journalism: Honor Court
justice, Dennis Watson; Student
Senate, Judy Spiro and Linda
Marcus.
t Law: Honor Court justice,
Jack McEwan; Student Senate,
Robert Blunt and Marilyn
Horder.
Medicine: Honor Court
justice, John Arnold; Student
Senate, Craig Kitchens.
Nursing: Honor Court
justice, Donna Lerch; Student
Senate, Lilliam Jones.
Pharmacy: Honor Court
justice, Vinson Bailey; Student
Senate, Don Houston.
Physical Education: Honor
Court justice, Robin Hendel;
Student Senate, Diana Bennett.
i Freshmen: Honor Court
justices, Robert Clark and Mark
Zack; Student Senate, Rita
Bowman, Arthur Estes, Herman
Hoehn, Lionel LLewellyn and
Andrew Schuster.
Sophomores: Honor Court
justices, Raliegh Greene and
Helen Zeiler; Student Senate,
James Armstrong, William Black,
Adra Farriss, Garry Glickman,
Trip Grower, Lance Hall and Sue
Howard.

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ErSH TEKFECTIONI H
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Pxrtta row ORPttt AMP PICKUP...

UF NEWS
SHORTS
JOMO Stays Off-Campus
JOMO has no right whatsoever to use campus facilities, UF
President Stephen C. OConnell said Thursday.
Theyre not students. They have no more right than the Ku Klux
Klan to demand the use of campus facilities.
OConnell was answering Liberation Party s demand th* campus
facilities be opened to all community groups, mcludmg JOMO
JOMO is a black activist group now organizing in Gainesville. The
group was instrumental in organizing a garbagemen s stake in St.
Petersburg earlier this year.
200 Protest Laird Speech
Saturday about 200 demonstrators from UF, USF and other
Tampa Bay Area schools gathered in San Antonio to protest against
the presence of Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird, the ABM system,
and the Vietnamese war.
Laird was the commencement speaker at St. Leo College. He also
was awarded an honorary degree of doctor of humane letters from the
school.
Lee Marvin, popular movie star, also received an honorary doctor s
degree. Marvin, a former St. Leo student, was expelled in 1940 for
throwing a fellow student out of a second story window.
Demonstrators were not allowed into the San Antonio city limits.
City, Pasco County, and state law enforcement officers confronted
the assembly. National Guard units were also on hand.
The 350 to 400 officers on hand made no formal arrests.
Credit Card Watch Formed
A new corporation, Credit Card Control Inc., has been formed by
UF senior, L. Fred Pounds, who is majoring in accounting.
The company promises to speed the reporting of lost or stolen
credit cards and promises to report by telegram missing cards within
30 minutes after it is notified. It charges $5 a year and agrees to
accept free telephone calls from anywhere in the United States.
Pounds, president of the new company, points out that credit card
holders are responsible for all charges made on credit cards until the
loss is reported. Insurance policies covering credit cards usually have a
$ 100 deductible clause.
Credit Card Control is designed as a convenience for people who
own cards. Often owners do not know where to report information,
so important time is lost.
Advertising Majors Win
A UF team of student advertising majors placed second in the
south last weekend in competition in Memphis, Tenn.
The UF team, consisting of Steve Gaddum, Bud Skidmore and Art
Deane, competed with other southeastern schools including first place
University of Georgia and sixth place Florida State University.
The competition, consisting of the creation of a marketing plan,
advertising plan and examples of advertising for a, soft drink much like
Gatorade, was sanctioned by the Deep South District of the American
Advertising Federation and hosted by the Memphis Advertising Club.
Bicycle Mess Cleaned Up
Clean-up work began Tuesday morning on the Bicycle Mans
property on W. University Avenue. The Bicycle Man, Ray Brannan,
was a well-known figure to generations of UF students before he left
Gainesville two years ago.
The city began the clean-up despite a last minute effort on the part
of Brannans attorney to get a second extension on the order Monday.
Circuit Court Judge John Murphree ordered the city to go ahead with
the project even though sale of the property is still pending.



FOR NEXT THREE TERMS
*

Alligator Editors Selected

A Gainesville native and a
Cuban refugee have been elected
as editors of the Alligator.
Dave Reddick, presently
Alligator associate editor was
elected to the post for the
summer quarter by the Board of
Student Publications Friday.
Named as Reddicks
managing editor was Dave Osier,
of Tampa. Osier is presently
editorial assistant for the
Alligator.
Raul Ramirez and Dave
Doucette were named editor and
managing editor respectively for
the fall and winter quarters,
exchanging the positions they
hold at the present time.
Ramirez, a native of Havana,
Cuba, has won several awards
from the William Randolph
Hearst Foundation for
journalism students. He is a
senior in journalism.
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DAVE REDDICK
... summer editor
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RAUL RAMIREZ
... fall editor

SG/Gator Staff Trade
Positions This Afternoon
If the Alligator looks a little unusual Tuesday, theres a special
reason.
In order to better understand each others problems, Student
Government officials and the Alligator staff will trade places and
positions today.
Tuesdays Alligator will be completely written by SG officials with
Student Body President Clyde M. Taylor as editor-in-chief.
At the same time, the Alligator staff will fill SG positions with
Alligator Editor Dave Doucette as president of the student body.
WUK MOSCOW
World Famous Pocket Billiards Champion
Will Give An Exhibition At The
REITZ UNION HRST FIOOR LOBBY
Tuesday, April 29,1969
SHOWS AT 4:30 P.M. and 8:00 P.M.
r

Doucette, also a senior,
recently took over the position
of editor upon the resignation of
former editor Harold Aldrich.
Both Ramirez and Doucette
are graduates of Palm Beach
Junior College.
I dont plan any sweeping
changes for the paper, Reddick
said. I will be limited by lack of
staff, by and large. I do hope to
work closely with the Board of
Regents to keep informed of
pending legislation which is of
vital concern to university
students.
Osier hopes to lay the
groundwork for an investigative
reporting department in the
summer Alligator while serving
as managing editor.
Hopefully, the summer
Alligator will have more in-depth
reporting and stories which are
both hard-hitting and accurate.
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DAVE OSIER
... managing editor
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... managing editor

Also, Im looking forward to
working on the four-section
edition that well be mailing out
to incoming freshmen.
We hope to improve the
Alligator and its public image by
launching an all-out recruiting
program to attract more
qualified students from all areas
of the campus, Ramirez said.
This will help improve the
quality of the paper.
Ramirez also plans to
emphasize a training program for
staff members, a closer working
relationship with the College of
Journalism and Communica Communications,
tions, Communications, and better coverage of
campus news.
Our main emphasis is that
excellence means fairness and
accuracy, Ramirez said.
Doucette said he planned no
reorganization of the paper on
his part, saying he was happy
with the way the paper is
organized now.

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Monday, April 28,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 28,1969

Tri-Delts Top Derby Day Field

Delta Delta Delta emerged
with top honors Saturday as the
Sjgma Chi Derby festivities
closed out a week of
competition among UFs 15
sororities.
Among the events Saturday
afternoon at Broward Reid were
a tug-of-war, a chicken-chasing
contest, and the naming of the
derby queen. One other contest,
a relay event, saw the sorority
girls place balloons under their
jerseys and run to the opposite
end of the field and, using any
means other than the hands,
pop the balloons against a Sigma
Chi Derby Daddy.
Sharyn Keller, a Delta Delta
Delta freshman, was named the
derby queen. Tied for the
runner-up spot were sophomore
Pam Pemberton of Alpha Delta
Pi, and sophomore Diana Allen
of Delta Gamma.
The Tri-Delts winning score
was 65 points. Zeta Tau Alpha
finished second with 4216 points,
and in third place was Kappa
Delta with 40 points.

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WOULD YOU BELIEVE IT'S A BALLOON HE'S AFTER?

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IN COLLEGE YOU ALWAYS USE YOUR HEAD



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THIS SIGMA CHI TAKES HIS PRIZE HOME

Monday, April 28,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 28,1969

SCAT Slogan
Contest Ends
The Students Coliseum
Activity Team (SCAT) slogan
contest ends Wednesday and the
winner will be announced
Friday. The slogan will be used
in the fund drive. The winner
will receive a season pass for two
to all Student Government
productions next year. Slogans
should be submitted to Slogan
Contest, 921 S.W. Depot Ave.

Reds Gain Strategic Power
Every Day Nixon In Office

By JOHN HALL
Ignited Press International
WASHINGTON American
estimates of Soviet strategic
power on land, on sea and in
the air have increased at a
dizzying rate in the three
months since the Nixon
administration took office.
The intelligence estimates
form the basis for a galaxy of
strategic weapons requests from
the Pentagon including the
controversial Safeguard
Antiballistic Missil System.
A side-by-side comparison of
how the Johnson and Nixon
administrations interpreted data
supplied by the Central
Intelligence Agency (CIA)
produces stark differences.
The Johnson administrations
estimates were contained in a
posture statement submitted to
Congress by former Defense
Secretary Clark M. Clifford last
January.
The NIXON ADMINISTRA ADMINISTRATIONS
TIONS ADMINISTRATIONS estimates were
contained in statements made
since then by Defense Secretary
Melvin R. Laird and the
secretaries of the Army, Navy
and Air Force.
Here is how the two
administrations sized up the
Soviet threat:
Clifford said an ABM system
now deployed around Moscow,
called Galosh, was only a
limited defense that could be
seriously degraded by currently
programmed U.S. weapons
systems.
But he said the U.S. strategic
offensive force must be
programmed on the assumption
that they will have deployed
some sort of an ABM system
around their major cities by the
mid-19705.
Laird has warned on two
occasions that Soviets have
tested a sophisticated new
ABM device.
Laird and Clifford agreed that
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the Soviets were catching up
with the'United States in the
number of Intercontinental
Ballistic Missiles deployed.
However, Clifford said in
January, the Soviets new
solid-fuel missile appears to be
no better than our earliest
Minuteman missiles, deployed in
1963.
Laird, however, contends the
Soviets have deployed at least
200 gigantic SS9 missiles capable
of carrying a 25-megaton
payload far larger than
anything the United States has.
CIA officials late last year
told congressional committees
that the SS9 missiles could carry
only 10 megatons, according to
Sen. Stuart Symington. D-Mo.
Clifford said Soviet strategic
bombers were distinctly
inferior to anything the United
States had an were expected to
continue their gradual decline.
But Gen. John P. McConnell,
the Air Force chief of staff, said
the manned bomber remains an
important part of the Soviet
force and warned that new
Russian supersonic transports
could easily be converted into a
heavy bomber.
The Nixon administration is
recommending development of a
new supersonic intercontinental
bomber. The Johnson and
Kennedy administrations
rejected it.
Both administrations
recommended an elaborate new
American air defense system to
discourage the Russians from
introducing new manned

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bomber threats. But the Nixon
administration apparently is
considering developing a more
sophisticated fighter-interceptor
to cope with a supersonic
bomber.
Clifford said new Soviet
ballistic missile submarines were
probably most comparable to
our earliest polaris submarines
which became operational about
a decade ago.
But Navy Secretary John H.
Chaffee has warned that the
Soviets are modernizing their
force, the worlds
largest.
In addition, the Navy has
warned that new Soviet
antisubmarine advances in including
cluding including a sonar system that is
superior to that of the United
States could make the U.S.
Polaris submarines less than
invincible.
President Nixon, in urging
Congress to approve the ABM,
told a news conference last week
that the United States was in
danger of falling behind the
Soviets strategically by 1972 or
1973.
Clifford, on the other hand,
said only three months ago, that
even if the Soviets attempt to
match us in numbers of strategic
missiles we shall continue to
have, as far into the future as we
now discern, a very substantial
qualitative lead and distinct
superiority in the numbers of
deliverable weapons and the
overall combat effectiveness of
our strategic offensive forces.

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BY HOWARD POST



UFs fraternities will be
receiving fire inspection reports
soon from the Gainesville Fire
Department, according to Jay
Stormer, fraternity counselor for
the dean of mens office.
Last week, fraternity houses
on and off campus underwent
safety inspections conducted by

June 15 Graduation May Be
Last Annual Commencement

What may be the last annual commencement
at the UF will be June 15 at 5 p.m. in Florida
Field for approximately 4,500 degree recipients.
Since the spring of 1963, the UF has held one
major commencement for all students graduating
at any time during the academic year.
Professional colleges such as law and medicine
have had separate ceremonies.
With the increased number of students
graduating each year and the annual awarding of
military commissions, distinguished alumni
awards and honorary degrees all included in the
activities, the event had become too lengthy.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has
recently received a recommendation from the
Council of Academic Deans suggesting quarterly
campus-wide commencements, except for the

WHAT'S
HAPPENING

LAW SCHOLARSHIP Philip W. Dann 3LW has been awarded the
S2OO Martha B. Culpepper Law Review Scholarship for the 1969
Spring quarter. He was selected on the basis of his outstanding
performance in the College of Law.
MEDICAL HONORARY Eleven UF students and one faculty
member have been tapped for membership in Alpha Omega Alpha,
national medical honorary. New members are Wade Renn, Charles
Tullis, Craig Kitchens, Richard Martin, Carl Couch, Walter Marshall,
Ronald Aronson, Daniel Souder, Robert Watson, Gary Watson, Bruce
Stewart, and Dr. Franklin L. Deusk, assistant professor of pediatrics.
FORD CONSULTANT Dr. Willis LaVire, professor of education,
has been named consultant to a new international school scheduled
for construction in West Pakistan. He will be in Islambad until
Saturday under the sponsorship of the Ford Foundation and the U.S.
Office of Education.
DISTINGUSHED ALUMNUS Dr. Roe L. Johns, professor of
education, has been named one of two recipients of 1969
Distinguished Alumni Awards at Southeast Missouri State College. He
is a 1923 graduate of the college.
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Frat Houses Given Safety Inspections

BY GAINBSVIIIC FIRE DEPARTMENT

Chief David Laird, inspection
officer, Gainesville Fire
Department.
During the inspection tours,
Laird said he checked for
hazardous conditions including
improper wiring, congested
storage or work areas, rubbish or
trash accumulations.

College of Law and Medicine, which may
continue individual exercises.
The deans also recommend ceremonies be
simplified and shortened by proportioning
honorary degrees and distinguished alumni
awards among the quarterly exercises and
commissioning military officers in advance.
Faculty participation should be voluntary and
academic units should be encouraged to hold
separate informal receptions for graduates and
relatives, according to the recommendation.
The measure to change commencement from
an annual event to a quarterly one will not be
implemented until December, 1969.
Ceremonies for this academic year will
proceed as in the past, with the presidents
reception for graduating students and their
parents from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at his home.

combustibiles near heating or
cooking devices, unsafe masonry
work, overloaded circuits, and
fire extinguisher maintainance.
Although the two-day
inspection came just weeks after
the Sigma Nu house was
destroyed by fire, Stormer said
the inspections are conducted
annually during the spring, at

RASCALS
A

The Rascals.
Theyre gonna blow your mind
with good lovin.
Friday, May 2 at 8:00 p.m.
in Florida Field.
Just to raise money for
the Coliseum Fund.
Tickets are $2.50 each
at the JWRU Box Office,
Record Bar, Quik-Save Records, I
Belk-Lindsey, and Recordsville. I
Tickets are $3.00 each I
at the gate. I
Better get your tickets now I
before they run out. I
Besides, just think what I
you can do with fifty cents. I
B

the request of the Dean of Mens
office.
Recommendations

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Monday, April 28, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

concerning the fraternity houses
will also be given to the UF
Department of Housing.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 28,1969

voice From The Past 1

Night Isnt Far

(EDITORS NOTE: Bob
Moran, former Alligator
columnist and staff writer is
currently on his way to Vietnam
as a medic in the Army. The
Alligator staff wishes him the
best of luck.)
I stood on a mountain last
night, peering at a world going
insane below. Cities, like people
bursting with nothingness. Pure
hate sliced the sky and I said,
quietly in my vacuum mind,
Hello, reality.
Tension is a cute game;
people and situations pulling at
one another. Minds burning,
priestesses globbling mansions,
suicidal remarks tom from
motherless children, Jesus
dropping acid because he cant
stand all that truth and me, on
that quiet mountain all
coliding with the sunset.
HEY YOU, you on the
mountain. Just what the hell do
you think youre doing
Waiting.
O.
And it was quiet again. I saw
a black face and a white face. I
saw a girl and a boy. I read a
poem by a pregnant woman and
walked on down the mountain,
feeling alien.
Hello, Gainesville. I see you
are all alone.
Dawn.
Sleeping then, I dreampt of a
lonely Gainesville. While all
around me there came life. And
Gainesville wasnt lonely
anymore. Sorry Gainesville. But
Joan Warren looks like Joan
Baez, she must be a good person.
So maybe, just maybe, you can
stand the day. The night isnt
that far.
Meeting people, people,
people people peoplepeople.
. I dont remember you. I
dont remember you. (In
harmony) We must have been
in love, love.

Speaking Out*

No Action Breeds More Communist Violence

I must comment on Tim Tripps criticism of my
letter to the President.
First, Mr. Tripp, you say that we must not be
goaded into action by any power that would cause
unilateral repercussions that would lead to
unlimited war between the major powers. Goaded is
hardly the correct word.
This line of reasoning is precisely what the
communists base their strategy on and is exactly
why we find ourselves in these embarrassing
situations. They were almost certain that we would
do nothing in response to their act of war. They
took a very well calculated risk.
They have now captured an American naval
vessel and subjected its crew to a year of abuse and
torture and they have shot down an unarmed navy
intelligency plane clearly in international air space,
killing 31 men.
Believe it or not, Mr. Tripp, they profit
immensely from such acts as these. Just as any
intelligent businessman will continue in the business
in which he is making a profit, so will the North
Koreans continue these unprovoked acts of
agression. I
We invited this latest cri me by taking no action
when the Puebjo was seized. Do you think these
North Korean barbarians (the word used by the
crew of the Pueblo to describe their captors) have

Love, Bob Moran

The
Florida
Alligator
"The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Editor-in-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Assignments Editor
Glen Fake, Vicki Vega
News Editors
PtUtolito

The Alligator is a morgue. I
feel at home here. The
typewritter I type these words
on feels friendly. Im singing an
obscene song in my head. Im
high.
Time to fade. Hello,
mountain; Im just passing
through this time. Dont wilt.
Goodbye, Gainesville.
And I look around. And
reality is still tagging along, like
a shadow with blemishes. You
know, Larry Jordan is laying
down some heavy stuff, too bad
nobody is listening.
Come on, reality, weve got
places to be, stories to lie about
and a long-god, but a long,
long road ahead.

GUEST EDITORIAL

(EDITORS NOTE: The following guest
editorial is a reprint from the Oklahoma
Daily, the student newspaper of the
University of Oklahoma.)
Filings are almost closed for student
congress seats and the office of student body
president, and the campaign is about to
begin in earnest.
Candidates for the presidency have
indicated that this campaign will be a
campaign of issues rather than personalities.
The Daily is going to make every effort to
encourage such a campaign and the
discussion of issues problems which have
been facing students for years but which
have never before been brought to the
surface.
Such issues include the relevance of the
ROTC program to the university
environment, the students right to academic
appeals, the role of student minorities in
student government and the university
community as a whole, curriculum reform,
tenure of professors and what role students
should have in granting tenure, and in
general, the right of the student to have an
authoritative voice in university affairs.
Unfortunately the present student
congress has allocated only one week for
campaigning between the end of filing
period and the election on April 28. One
week gives very little time for discussion and

learned not to continue these crimes? I hardly think
so.
Mr. Tripp, you go on to discuss Red China and
Russia and how they would both come to the aid of
North Korea should they become involved in a war
with us. Unfortunately, this run-scared attitude is
also popular in our Capitol. This attitude dictates
that we ignore any crime committed by a
communist country against us for fear they will
gang up on us. Basic psychology will tell you that
we are in for one hell of a time if we continue with
this philosophy.
You mentioned President Kennedys blockade of
Cuba (an act of war). When have the two nuclear
giants of the world ever come closer to war? The
cards were on the table and John Kennedy made a
decision which President Johnson and thus far,
Nixon, have been incapable of making. This hard
stand we took instilled respect among the
communist countries for the United States and
prevented any further confrontations which might
have endangered peace.
Now, Mr. Tripp, the question is where do we
draw the line? It seems that Mr. Nixon already has.
The word from Washington is that the next time
will be the last time for the North Koreans. So you
see, Mr. Tripp, we are not going to continue to run
scared. The people in Washington are beginning to

A Week Os Issues

candidate-student communication
concerning such vital issues as those which
will probably surface in this campaign.
For that reason it is up to individual
students to make every effort to find out
what each candidate stands for, how he
proposes to solve the problems which now
face the university community and just what
he proposes to do with our new student
government.
The Daily will try to aid in this effort by
printing platforms from each candidate.
Candidates for student congress seats will be
received in the editors mailbox, located in
the Oklahoma Daily newsroom, by 5 p.m.
next Tuesday.
Platforms from candidates for student
body president should be no more than 500
words long and should be submitted to the
editor by 5 p.m. next Tuesday. All platforms
submitted from presidential candidates will
be printed in the Daily at the same time.
All platforms, from student congress
candidates and presidential candidates, must
be typed and triple-spaced.
This election offers OUs student body a
chance to deal in something more important
than the usual trivia offered in previous
student senate elections. We hope students
will see this chance and grasp it as a step
toward true STUDENT government oh this
campus.

By John G. Valenti

realize that we must once again let the communist
world know that we will not tolerate any threat to
our national security.
Unfortunately, because we took no action in the
capture of the Pueblo and the shooting down of our
reconnaissance plane, we can expect another such
violent act. North Korea, I feel, is not foolhardy
enough to try anything anytime soon. Keep your
eye on Red China, Mr. Tripp, and in your spare time
you might calculate how many milllions of dollars a
year we will be spending while we keep a fleet of at
least twenty-three ships and 250 aircraft in the Sea
of Japan protecting our reconnaissance flights in
international air space.
The
Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
_Rete Union. Phone 392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions express in the Florida Alligator are those of
the editors or of the writer of the article and not those
of the University of Florida.



With Flags Waving, ROTC Walks Line

mi ViAAMt
T % mMm
complacent
CAPET SAYS:
ROTC Is Not Fascist Group

MR. EDITOR:
When I read Wednesdays Alligators article on the Liberation
Partys condemnation of the ROTC program at this university I
was shocked that the Alligator would print such salacious
remarks pointing toward one goal agitation.
The article took the stand that the University of Florida
shouldnt participate in the ROTC program because it trains
nffir.
(juicers i(Ji me unjusi
Vietnam war and supports the
rising tide of militarism in the
United States.
I dont know if anyone from
the Liberation Party has ever

been on the ROTC drill field, if they were they would see that
the cadets are not being trained as little Nazis. The ROTC cadet
learns about the principles and weapons which he will encounter
after he graduates from college and goes into the service.
The fact that ROTC is voluntary gives the college student the
opportunity, if he elects to do so, to go into the service as a

Shepherd Gets
A Challenge
MR. EDITOR:
Issue Party challenges Charles
Shepherd to implement the
things he has promised,
including the abolishment of
progress tests and reforming
registration procedures.
Issue Party also challenges
President-elect Shepherd to
publicly announce the political
and social affiliations of his
cabinet appointments, showing
the Student Body that he will
truly open up Student
Government.
TOM INFANTINO
ISSUE PARTY

Genocide Generates Biafra Outrage

MR. EDITOR:
For the past several months I
have been trying, without
success, to persuade the
Alligator to print information
concerning Operation Outrage,
an organization dedicated to
aiding the war-ravaged people of
Biafra. However, this newspaper
(sic) has seen fit to ignore the
Ibos, instead filling its pages
with the usual drivel.
The Nigerian government is
determined to annihilate the
rebel Biafrans. I quote from

iMmimmimiHiMiiiiimmiHinimiiimiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
(
7/ the ROTC course credit is taken away will you
also remove my one hour credit for the University
Choir? Why not?

Spring Flood

Stephen Lewis Journey To
Biafra: Genocide is an ugly,
impossible word. I dont know
precisely how one defines it.
But if it means, even in part,
the deliberate, indiscriminate
killing of a people or tribe, then
there is concrete evidence to be
found in the terrible
Nigerian-Biafran civil war. It is
possible to ferret out eye-witness
accounts, or indeed, visit the
scene of upspeakable civilian
atrocities.
In this instance, a raid on
the little village of Uzuakoli

semi-trained officer. I feel that after four years of education at
this university I deserve more than to be placed next to a high
school dropout on the battlefield.
Im in ROTC because I know that when I graduate I will have
to go into the service to fight for my country whether I think it
is right or wrong. I dont like war one bit. And neither did our

credit I receive from ROTC will not make much of a difference
in my scholarship record. It rather reflects on three hours spent
on the field and in class in non-academic pursuit.
If the ROTC course credit is taken away will you also remove
my one hour credit for the University Choir?
Whynot? JAN ELLIOT BELLOWS, lUC

took a toll of 47 dead, and 102
seriously wounded. A little girl,
no more than three, hand severed
from her body, cradled in the
lap of a sister whose eyes
bespoke a bitter accusation;
another girl, perhaps six or.
seven, had her body horribly
burned; a young boy of ten,
barely focussing, blood trickling
from both comers of his mouth,
wearing a look of stunned
resignation.
And at the back of the
lorry, bathed in pools of blood,
three elderly lepers, hunched
and contorted, crippled by

forefathers who battled in many
unjust yars to preserve the
freedoms we now enjoy.
The university offers a
universe of academic and
non-academic courses. The one

disease and now mangled by the
war. The stench of the wounded
lay rancid and heavy. Death was
very much present.
It is imperative that all
possible efforts to aid the
Biafrans be immediately
undertaken. I urge all concerned
humane beings to send
contributions to:
Operation Outrage
(The North American Coalition
For Biafran Relief)
Box 1202 Cardinal Station
Washington, D.C. 20017
DAVID MILLER

Monday, April 28,1969, The Florida Alligator,

The Troth
About ROTC
MR. EDITOR:
Liberation Partys statement in
the Alligator, April 23, concerning
ROTC on the University of Florida
campus, contained three reasons why
the program should not be affiliated
with the university.
The first two reasons are mere
opinion. The last argument is false.
Reason one stating that the UF
should not participate in this
(Vietnam) war, because it is
unjust, is debatable. The second
argument: ROTC has no academic
content is again opinion, this time
based on the undefined term
academic.
The last argument that ROTC is
in no way answerable to the
university in determining its
curriculum and faculty it is only
answerable to the Pentagon is based
on mis-information. The Pentagon
does send the names of instructors to
the university administration, but it
is the responsibility of the
administration to rule on the
officers acceptance or rejection as an
instructor.
RODNEY MCGALLIARD 4AS

Reason one stating that the
UF should not participate in this
(Vietnam) war/ because it is
unjust ,' is debatable. The second
argument: ROTC has no
academic content is again
opinion, this time based on the
undefined term \academic

Left Fringe
Hypocritical
MR. EDITOR:
In its stand against ROTC,
Liberation Party has outfoxed itself.
If lack of academic content is to
be the standard for deciding to ban
ROTC or any other campus group as
the party suggests, then the party
will not be with us long.
However, lack of academic
content is a spurious reason for the
partys condemnation of ROTC. The
real reason was evident in the
Alligator article, Liberation
Condemns ROTC which appeared
April 23.
This article said Liberation Party
objected to training officers to fight
an unjust war of aggression in
Vietnam.
In other words, Liberation Party
is clamoring for censorship of a
i *. ii < i

group because it disagrees with the
goals and ideas of the group. This is a
paradoxical position for a party of
liberals who supposedly want
freedom of expression for all groups.
On the one hand, Liberation Party
aims to unleash the stifling, pervasive
influence of the censor to block
ROTC. On the other hand, however,
this lunatic left fringe accuses the
establishment of censorship in
instances like the Brewer episode.
Liberation stands exposed for
what it is -a band of hypocrites.
LANCE STALNAKER 3JM
MIKE HAWKINS 3EG
JOEMCELWEE 2UC
GARY MOGENSEN lUC

Page 9




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used. Call 372-6284 after 6 p.m.
(A-3t-124-p)
Martin D-18 Steel String guitar in
excellent condition. S6O case
S3OO. 1965 Honda Sport
90 in good condition with helmet
$165 Call Bill 378-4932.
(A-st-124-p)
1964 Honda 50 good transportation
with helmet and bubble $75 or best
offer. Phone 378-5789 or 392-4072.
Bob Burns. (A-st-124-p)
SPECIAL TO UF STUDENTS: Get
top grade motor oil at cost while
supply lasts. 30wt., 10W30 and
10W40 only 45c, 50c and 55c in
quarts. Some in gals, at $1.75 and
$1.90. No quantity limit. Also misc.
auto products at or below cost. Call
376-4747 or take Newberry Rd. and
turn left at white church (Ft. Clark
Church Road) about one-half mile
west of 1-75, sth house on left.
(A-3t-122-p)
Vashica TL-Super. TTL meter, f 1.7
Auto-Yashinon lens. Mirror lock.
Shutter speed B-l/1000. With case,
$l4O. Ph. 372-3002 (A-st-122-p)
Gibson Electric Guitar, perfect conb.,
Firebird 3-pickups, $l5O, was $250
pew. Call Walt, 376-1474.
(A-st-122-p)
6O Opel station wagon very clean,
engine very good; new crankshaft &
other parts; passed inspection $250
Call 378-8610 anytime. (A-st-122-p)
Guns Smith .44 Mag, Smith .38
Chfs spec., Colt Python .357 Mag,
dies, holsters; Carl Hayes 372-7591.
Call anytime, especially wee
nighttime. (A-3t-122-p)
Sony TC255 tape deck, Mclntosh
C 24 preamp, miracord changer, KLH
spkrs and other; pentax spotmatic sir;
Carl Hayes 372-7591 Wee hours ok.
(A-3t-122-p)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2 l lz acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20M16-P)
GRAND OPENING Every day up to
50% savings but April 21 thru 26 a
SUPER SALE. Reg. $79.50 full
suspension 4 drawer files, now from
$29.75 to $39.75. Reg. $49.95 full
suspension 2 drawer files, now from
$22.50 to $29.75. Also hundreds of
desks, chairs, files, and much more at
SUPER SAVINGS for this sale. NEW
and US ED JR OFFICE
FURNITURE, 620Vz S. Main St. Tel.
376-1146. (A-7t-117-P)
Guns Guns Guns lnventory
over 450 Buy Sell Trade
Repair. Reloading supplies, custom,
reloading Harry Beckwith, Gun
Dealer, Micanopy 466-3340.
(A-ts-104-C)
Sale a Martin guitar and case, good
condition SIOO. Call Frank Farrey
378-4104. Leave name and number.
(A-3t-123-P)
Get a Mau Mau mongrel. Itll chew
anything from bones to steel.
Champion lines. Pedigree African
barkless Basenji pups. All shots.
376-2630. (A-lot-119-p)
Borg-Warner 8 track stereo tape
player table model with detachable
speakers. Like new, $75. Call Hugh at
378-3301. (A-5M21-P)
Gibson 12 string 825-12 N with vinyl
case. $125 firm. 376-8007 after 6.
(A-5M21-P)
For Sale: 1966 Suzuki 120 cc
motorcycte. Good Condition. Call
378-6366 after 6 p.m. (A-4M21-P)
69 Honda CL 350 Scrambler, 33hp,' 5
sp trans., only 2200 mi. Excellent
cond. Best offer over S7OO, helmet
incl. Call 378-0691, ask for Gordon.
(A-4M21-P)
8x47 Ventura mobile home. Bay
windows, air conditioned, 7x20
porch awning, 2nd BR made into
study, furnished. $1990. Call
376-0622, 4546 NW 13 St.
(A-IM2I-P)
-
H'lTiXB

- l aammm a a m m a a
x*x x x FOR SALE
Honda 90 1964 ss. Call Steve
392-8879. (A-2M23-P)
Honda 350, perf. cond., 2000 mi.;
best offer over SSOO. Call 372-7942
after six. (A-3t-123-P)
FOR RENT
l* !!
y.;.x*sss?w : x x xcx*xsss?: : x x x x*x>&
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms for entire summer quarter.
Close to Campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21M15-P)
Peace and quiet is yours for the
asking by living in one of our
secluded luxurious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for an
appointment to see them. Immediate
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, Inc.
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-c)
Available for summer qtr. Trailer,
12x60, 3 br, l/z bath, air cond.,
washer completely furnished. $l2O
monthly plus utilities. Call Hugh at
378-3301. (B-st-121-P)
Tired of hot, crowded dorms? Enjoy
an air-conditioned spacious apt. for
only $l2O for the whole quarter
(with 3 roommates in furnished
2-bedroom apt) Come by rental
office, University Gardens Trace, 708
S.W. 16 Ave. Ph. 376-6720.
(B-st-122-c)
Must sublet quiet modern 1 bdrm
apt, close to campus, a.c., access to
pool. Will rent for best offer. Call
evenings 376-5642. (B-3t-122-p)
1 bdrm OLYMPIA Apt., 1 block
from campus, to sublet for summer
qt. Available in June. Call 378-4277.
(B-st-122-p)
Three-bedroom house for rent
summer qtr. accross st. from new law
schl. Pay for only 2/z months at
$l5O/Mo. Call 378-7748 or see at
120 SW 25st. (B-3t-122-p)
Sublet furn 2 bedroom apt, SW 16th
Ave. $155 mo. Avail June. AC, pool,
carpet, cable TV, draperies, laundry
facilities. Call 376-5818. (B-5M23-P)
HX:>ShMAS!fe>WX<>XCXX.XXWWX I WANTED |
3 male roommates needed for
summer quarter. 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
air conditioned apartment, 1 block
behind Norman Hall, sll2 each plus
utilities, for quarter, call 372-1272.
(C-lt-124-p)
Co-ed Roommate needed immediate
occupancy. Landmark 148. Elaine
378-8731 any pm, Tues. and Thurs.
am. (C-3t-124-p)
Mobile home wanted. Would like to
purchase used trailer, 2 bdr 12x60
must be available in August. If
interested, write Jake Varn 302
Duplex Court, Brooksville, Fla.
(C-9M16-P)
3 coeds for summer qtr. at
Tanglewood Townhouse. June rent
paid. Call 372-7882 after 4.
(C-5M23-P)
Need one female roommate to share
two bedroom Fr. Qrt. Apt. for next
year. Call 392-9871 or 392-9873.
(C-3t-122-p)
Female roommate Camelot Apt.
Immediate occupancy, rent paid thru
April. Call 378-9694 after 5 p.m.
(C-5M22-P)
"Hard, fonnY I
and sound!"
-RENATA ADLER. N Y TIMES
NORMAN MAILER'S
by GROVE PRESS
May 4 & 5
7 & 9 P.M.
Union Aud.
Imoonught
bowling
I O
XJV Game
Couples only
TONIGHT
I 9PM TIL CLOSE
J REITZ UNION GAMES AREA^

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 28,1969

Page 10

, :*x*x x*x>
| WANTED
SiswX<*Xx:NViyx*x*x*x*:*v.'W*x*xx*x*>i
Need 1 roommate Fr. Quarter. Fall
uarter. Share with 3 others. Call
J 92-8263 evenings. (C-st-122-p)
3 male roommates needed for
summer quarter. 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
air conditioned apartment, 1 block
behind Norman Hall, sll2 each plus
utilities, for quarter, call 372-1272.
(C-lt-12*-*,
Co-ed Roommate needed immediate
occupancy. Landmark 148. Elaine
378-8731 any pm, Tues. and Thurs.
am. (C-3t-124-p)
Male roommate wanted for Summit
House. Air Cond., pool, cable TV.
$41.75 plus V 4 util. Move in for May
or June. Call 372-5552. (C-3t-124-p)
Ride wanted to Jax. Thurs. afternoon
May Ist. Call 378-4348 ask for
Camie. (C-2t-124-p)
Male roommate wanted for Summit
House. Air Cond., pool, cable TV.
$41.75 plus l /4 util. Move in for May
or June. Call 372-5552. (C-3t-124-p)
Ride wanted to Jax. Thurs. afternoon
May Ist. Call 378-4348 ask for
Camie. (C-2t-124-p)
HELP WANTED
j!;
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS FROM
TAMPA BAY AREA Career
$600.00 per month, plus expense
allowance for man needed for
insurance agency. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 11702 Tampa, Fla. 33610.
(E-Bt-119-p)
The Rathskeller is looking for an
entertainment chairman and an asst,
business mgr. Students dont miss
this chance be a part of the
Rat Apply Rathskeller office, main
cafeteria. (E-3t-121-C)
Manager, rooming house reliable
senior or male graduate student. Live
on premises, references. Phone
376-6652 after 6 p.m. (E-5M23-P)
AUTOS |
v
V.w. Manx buggy 1300 engine
53H.P. Red metalflake soft top side
curtains rollbar many extras. Great
for sand, woods, street $1695 or
trade for big motorcycle and cash.
See at 1020 S. Main St. or call
378-0249. (G-10t-l 19-p)
1967 TR Spitfire excellent shape,
good tires (radials), 2 extra tires & 1
wheel extra, radio, luggage rack,
29,000 miles, br. racing green. Tim
767647. (G-st-121-P)
1964 Karmann Ghia, radio, w/w
tires. Excellent condition. Call
376-5687 after 5:30. Mechanically
perfect. (G-st-124-p)
57 Ford, very good six cyl std.
Excellent transportation, must sell.
Best offer. Also Honda CBI6O. $175.
Call 378-8477 after 6 p.m.
(G-5M21-P)
1967 Austin Healy Sprite convt mark
3. 12000 miles. Bought new in 68.
Excellent condition. Best offer. Call
after 5, 376-9724. (G-3t-122-p)
66 MGB British racing green; wire
whls; fold-away top. Good condition.
Only SIOOO Call Bob at 378-7748 or
see at 120 SW 25 St. (G-122-3t-p)
1964 Karmann Ghia, radio, w/w
tires. Excellent condition. Call
376-5687 after 5:30. Mechanically
perfect. (G-st-124-p)
SUBURBIA
J DRIVE IN IJRj

I PERSONAL |
, v.
To my B.S. from Pika town,
congratulations on your initiation!
Love Always, F.S. (J-lt-124-p)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message. Any time day or night.
Message changes each Wed. LET
FREEDON RING, 16 NW 7th.
(J-5M21-P)
ART PRINT SALE April 29, 30, &
May 1, REITZ Union Rm 235 from
10:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m. Come early to
insure your first choice of prints and
posters! (J-2M23-P)
I NEED A RIDE to U of Ga. MAY 9!
If you are going, please call Sandi at
378-4376 or 378-2078 after 5:30.
Let me know soon. (J-3t-123-P)
Electronic music studio, if interested
call Richard Reynolds 378-6908.
(J-3M23-P)
Interested in travel and/or study in
Europe, Asia or the Mid-East? Want
to buy or rent a car to use there. Call
392-1655 Rm. 310 Union.
(J-12t-114-c)
C.x4.!x*2axw*>x*xaj.
SERVICES I
M<*X*XXSftW X*X:*OiS! Q C O4*:*SC4S
Tutoring in German on all levels by
professional instructor. Streamlined
course for ETS exam. Individual or
group sessions. 376-9674.
(M-2t-123-P)
Vivian Woodard Consultant learn
techniques of applying make-up;
quality cosmetics available. Call
Cindy Humes 392-9764.
(M-st-123-P)
Tennis racket restringing satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19M07-P)
Volkswagen parts and service.
Guaranteed repairs by specialist.
Gainesville Mach. Shop. Call
376-0710. (M-14t-123-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)
NEED A PAINTER? Interior or
Exterior professional painting. Call
after 5 or anytime on weekends.
378-4855 Free Estimates.
(M-10t-122-p)
nSf-rf]
I Y7*bim S
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WANT
j APS 1
LAST 2
i !< [ DAYS
LEE MARVIN
TOSHIRO MIFUNE
Sl
__
NOW!
I
Wiss^ean^Brodh
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STARRING
Maggie Smith

SERVICES
X. v
i%SSS!W Q>K*:
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
526 S.W. 4th Ave. Next to
Greyhound Bus Station. 378-4480.
(M-lt-106-c)
8:20
11:55
I. AMNOUNT PICTURES Prutnli
I AN IVAN TONS PRODUCTION
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ACADEMY AWARD
| WINNER ..
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Baxters Students Number In The Millions

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
UF chemistry Prof. John
Baxter claims to have taught
more students than any other
teacher in the world. They
number in the millions.
Baxter is not immortal, but
he has been immortalized in
10,920 minutes of instructional
films which have been used
around the world to introduce
people to general chemistry.
For his contributions to
chemistry education, May 9
Baxter will receive the annual
award of the Florida Section of
the American Chemical Society.
The silver-haired professors
film career was launched in the
1950s when Encyclopedia
Britannica asked him to film a
160-lesson chemistry course.
Following that was an offer
from National Broad Casting
Company (NBC) to design a
similar series to reach all
secondary science teachers in the
country. The program was
carried on 168 stations for two
seasons, 1959-1961. Even
though the program was
broadcast at 6:30 a.m., the
audience reached the million
mark.
Occasionally, Baxter says, he
meets a chemistry major who
became interested in the subject
watching the early morning
program on NBC.
Since its original run, the
films have been used in
classrooms around the world. In
Japan, Baxters films are shown
with a narration in Japanese.
I have no idea how many
kids I am teaching today, he
says with a smile.
He has also filmed a 44-lesson
television chemistry course at
UF, a set of film strips for
Encyclopedia Britannica, and a
number of demonstration film
clips.
Films and filmstrips line his
office in the Chemistry Research
Building, along with workbooks,
Marine Corps
Recruiter Here
Until Friday
A representative from the
Marine Corps Officer Selection
team will be on campus today
through Friday from 9 ajn. to 3
p.m. in the Reitz Union,
according to Sgt. Bill Carr,
USMC recruiter.
Now Taking Applications
at
Summit House
1700 S. W. 16th Ct.
for
September
(9-10 & 12 month Leases
available)
Summer Term
Special Rates

lip
L ..AM
NHL
DR. JOHN BAXTER
... to receive award
manuals, magazines, chemical
journals, and a few Tarzan and
Tom Swift books, which he says
graduate students come in to
borrow.
So much filming has made
Baxter action-conscious in his
teaching.
Its ridiculous to use a class
only to talk, he says. You can
use radio for that. Theres no
excuse in an average class for a
teacher to stand there talking.
He excludes graduate
seminars from the average class
category and then admits hes
sometimes guilty of the sin
himself.
If you cant utilize the time
to do something the students
cant read, its a waste of time,
he says emphatically.
Having had so much
experience in film, Baxter finds
himself classified as a T.V.
teaching expert.
Im probably still the guy
thats done more of this than
anybody in the business, he
says.
Since hes an expert, people
seek his advice. Ford
Foundation has sent him on
trips to India, Thailand, and
Brazil as a lecturer and
consultant. He has also been to
England, Argentina, and Chile,

IP 1 SPECIALS M
1 Lunch and Dinner
M Monday Spocial 111
H BAKED MACARONI & H
m MEAT SAUCE If
M ALL YOU CARE TO EAT ||
% Tuesday Spocial
§| FRIED CHICKEN if
II AU YOU CAM TO EAT |
I MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I
OJUHBWtH MAIL Jjg

TEACHING BY FILM

talking about television
education.
In fact, he says, last
summer was the first time in
seven years that I spent the
Fourth of July in my own
country.
Even though he has not been
abroad lately, he continues to
receive letters from such far
points of the globe as Australia,
asking his advice on teaching
chemistry by film.
Bringing top notch
instruction to students in
schools that are too understaffed
to provide adequate teaching is
the main advantage of film
instruction according to Baxter.
Also, he adds theres so
much more you can do with
film.
Although television
instruction is common in a
number of UF departments,
chemistry is not one of them.
Were a little traditional,
Baxter says with a laugh.
Actually, were not set up
for filming, and we do not have
the problem of being
understaffed.
Baxter teaches his own
general chemistry classes in
person, using only occasional
film clips.
He doesnt plan to return to
the educational filming business
any time soon.
Not if I can avoid it, he
says. Its a killer job.
On the NBC series he says he
had to work seven days a week,
in the studio, preparing text and
lesson programs, and making
arrangements for guests. Most of
the United States Nobel prize
winners in chemistry appeared on
his program.
You have to do some hard
work, he says, but then you
get some rewards.

RASCALS
"GOOD
LOVIN
J mmmmrna M

His rewards have included the
James T. Grady Medal from the
American Chemical Society, the
1962 College Chemistry Teacher
Award from the Manufacturing
Chemists Association, and
Scholastic Teachers 12th
Annual National Film and
Filmstrip Awards.
A UF teacher since 1952, he
has also taught at Washington
and Lee University, Gettysburg
College, Loyola College, and

I 4?Ti 4 B
Wf Jeans In Blue
and White
Hand ball
Gloves
, & Unpadded
- $6.50
We Now Stock Ace
Handballs SI.OO
We Just Received New Shipment
.> BUFFALO SANDALS
Sizes 7-12 $4.00
G&TOB SHOP
1710 W
University GiTOBSHOP Murph r r o m A r..

Monday, April 28,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Johns Hopkins University.
He received his A.B. degree
from Bethany College and his
PhD. from Johns Hopkins.
He is married and the father
of three children, ages 20-26.
First With Women
The University of lowa was
the first state university to admit
women on an equal basis with
men.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 28,1969

Blues Blow Taps Over Orange, 42-10

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
An expected offensive battle
between Jack Eckdahl and John
Reaves was cut from the football
script Saturday as an underdog
Blue team belted the Orange
squad, 4210, in the first annual
Lettermans Club intrasquad
game at Florida Field.
Leading censors were a
fired-up Blue defense Orange
quarterback Eckdahl got decked
numerous times and Reaves, a
6-3 sophomore hit 13 of 23
passes for 156 yards and two
touchdowns.
Eckdahl was the special target
of rambunctious Richard
Buchanan, who solved the weak
Orange pass-protection to throw
him for losses six times in the
second half alone.
Often finding his receivers
covered, Eckdahl scrambled for
38 yards in 14 tries but was
Hr jr m*
Ik .0.
k VhHBH
R/'^^^hhM
TANNEN RETURNS
... a Blue kick-off
contained by the gang-tackling
Blue defenders on crucial
third-down plays.
Mark Ely, John Faix and
Jimmy Barr frustrated the
Orangemen with a pass
interception apiece. Eckdahl was
victimized twice, back-up QB
Glenn Bryan once.
The Orange team secondary
wasnt so fortnuate. With
aggressive comerback Steve
Tannen slowed by a persistent
groin injury, Blue Receivers
Carlos Alvarez and Paul Maliska
got open on a variety of pass
patterns.
Alvarez, shadowed by Tannen
throughout, stayed a step ahead
to haul in six passes for 70
yards. He caught a six-yard TD
pass from Reaves.
Reaves made connections
with Maliska on a 39 yard
pass-run play to cap the games
scoring with only-55 seconds
VETERANS
Be a commercial pilot!
NEWG. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Area's only approver! school

remaining.
Maliska, also a hurdler on the
UF track team, caught five
passes for 71 yards.
Blue tight-end Skip Amelung,
a convert from tackle this spring,
hauled in two passes and
blocked well in the assault.
Reaves broadcast his
intentions to fill the air with
passes on the Oranges first
offensive play. He threw a
bomb to the speedy Alvarez.
It was long and incomplete.
After an exchange of punts in
the first quarter, sophomore
fullback Tommy Durrance
bounced off several tacklers and
fell into the end zone on a
brilliant 20-yard scoring run.
Eric Taggarts kick made it 7o
Blue.
An off-side penalty midway
into the second quarter gave the
Orange a first and goal situation
on the Blues three yard line.
Charley Hoods dive from the
one proceeded Rich Francos
PAT, and at 6:28 of the second
period the score went to 77.
Reaves forthwith blew taps
and lolled the Orangemen to
sleep with his deft tosses to
Alvarez and Maliska as the Blues
stormed the length of the field.
Alvarez TD snag of a six-yard
Reaves floater over Tannen
made it 147.
Franco tightened it to 14-10
with a 29-yard field goal as the
half ended.
The second half was no
contest.
While the active Blues
defense completely stymied
Eckdahl and Co., the Reaves-led
offense crossed the goal four
times with seeming ease...
Mike Richs one-yard
plunge sent the score to 21-10
after a vicious tackle by
Buchanan caused Tannen tp
fumble a kickoff, Rich ran 16
yards and the Blues led, 28-10
via great blocking, Blue
veteran Mark Ely raced 77 yards
with a punt, making it 35-10
finally, Reaves 39-yard
bomb to Maliska capped the
scoring, 4210.
The height of the Orange
teams frustration came early in
the final period. Soph speedster
r \
STUDY IN
CUERNAVACA
Learn to speak SPANISH
Intensive courses, with drills,
supervised labs, and theory
taught by experienced Mexican
teachers.
$135 per month.
Study in the INSTITUTE FOR
CONTEMPORARY LATIN
AMERICAN STUDIES.
Examine themes such as "Protest
and its Creative Expression in
Latin America" and "The Role
of Education in Social Change"
in 10 to 30 new courses each
month.
Access to excellent library.
S3O per credit.
Live in CUERNAVACA
Near Mexico City, at 4,500 feet
. elevation, with Mexican families
or in dorms or bungalows.
Approx. SBO per month.
Request catalog from
Registrar Cidoc W.
Godot, Apdo. 479,
Cuernavaca, Mexico
k A

DURRANCEPLUNGES
over the North goal for a Blue score

Andy Cheney was running in the
clear at the Blue 15 but
stumbled and dropped Eckdahls
pass. Had Cheney caught it hed
have scored easily.

RASCALS
"GROOVIN

- WHERE
ft Am
FEDERAL SCHOOL REPORT says: The Philadelphia
KIJ public schools are engaged in the most dramatic revolu-
Hlh tion in a city school system in the post-war period.
Reform in Philadelphia is more widespread and far farreaching
reaching farreaching than in any large school system in the country.
DR. MARK SHEDD, Superintendent of Schools, says:
I will continue to support teachers who are able to
examine, in a mature way, the gut issues of our day
war, sex, race, drugs, poverty. If we divorce school sub subjects
jects subjects from the guts and hopes of human beings, we can
expect students to find them gutless and hopeless.
RICHARDSON DILWORTH, President of the Board
of Education, says: The city is where the action is. It's
HHIHUH where the challenge is. Its where we are facing the great
moral issues of our day. If you want action, come teach
in Philadelphia. If you don't, teach in the suburbs.
WE SAY: Come join our school revolution as a teacher.
Get in on the action. Teacher salaries are rising rapidly.
So is our school system. See our recruiter on your campus
or write to the
Office of Personnel-Recruitment (Telephone 215-448-3645).
SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PHILADELPHIA
21St STREET AND PARKWAY, PHILADELPHIA, PA. 19103
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PRESSLY UPSET WINNER
... at Cape Coral tournament

Hondo Leads CeltsTo 111-105 Win

BOTSON (UPI) The
Boston Celtics had to fight back
Sunday after blowing leads of up
to 18 points to score a 111-105
win over Los Angeles and chop
the Laker championship lead to
2-1.
Celtic captain John (Hondo)
Havelicek and reserve guard
Larry Siegfried rallied their team
after the Lakers staged a red-hQt
third quarter surge to wipe out
what had been Boston
domination in the first half.
Los Angeles, with Jerry West,
Mel Counts and Elgin Baylor
showing the way, exploded for
3 8 third quarter points
concerting what had been a 17
point Celtic lead to a flat tie
after three periods.
But Havlicek, who led Boston
scorers with 34 points in the
nationally televised game,
repeatedly brought a Garden
crowd of 14,037 to its feet in
standing ovations as he fired a
Celtic comeback that built leads
of up to 14 points in the heavy

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going of the fourth quarter.
Siegfried netted 28 points,
while West who had scored 94 in
the two Laker victories in Los
Angeles had 24.
The Celtics, who have never
successfully overcome a 2-0
playoff domination, were
cutting the Laker lead to 2-1
pending a fourth game in the
title series at Boston Garden
Tuesday night. The Celtic
victory also assured a fifth game
would be needed on Thursday
night.
The Lakers attempted a
second comeback in the game
when they slashed Celtic leads of
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Pressly Upset Winner;
Gators Secure Team Title

CAPE CORAL -UF tennis player Jamie
Pressly, thrust into the background this year by
two of his teammates, stunned both Saturday
and won the singles title in the seventh annual
Cape Coral intercollegiate tournament.
Pressly, an All-American last year and
Southeastern Conference No. 2 singles champion,
has been dropped down because of the arrival of
frosh star Charlie Owens.
\
But Pressly, who had been picked to win the
tourney by UF coach Bill Potter, upset No. 1 UF
star Armi Neely 7-5, 6-4 in the semi-finals and
then topped Owens in the finals 7-5, 6-2.
The Gators made it a sweep by compiling 29
points for the team title and Neely and Steve
Beeland, the UFs No. 1 doubles duo, clipped
Owens and Gren Hillev. another UF twosome.

> {
> >
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§ UF plays Rollins at home §
|i| Wednesday on the varsity §
$ tennis court at 3 p.m.
s 1 >
s S
t ..>
,^V.Wi%%V>AW//.%V//.V.V., .V.V.V.V.V

up to 14 points in the fourth
pperiod back to four in the
waning moments. A Havlicek
jump shot and a pair of free
throws by the Boston swingman
took the pressure off.
Weber Leads Bowing
j
Dick Weber of St. Louis is the
leading money winner in the
professional bowling tournament
trail, having won $279,362 in
the official tournament money
over the past decade.
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
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Monday. April 28. 1969, The Florida Alligator,

j
6-2, 6-2 for that honor.
Neely won an award as the meets top
sportsman and received a trophy.
Pressly downed Owens with a tenacious
retrieving game. Owens led 5-4 and 30-love but
Pressly rebounded for the first set win, then won
the second set as he pleased.
Owens reached the finals by downing FSUs
John DeZeeuw 6-3,3-6,6-2.
Neely-Beeland moved up with a 6-3, 64
victory over a team from Oral Roberts, Mikaysi
and Mendelnon, while Owens-Hilley clipped
FSUs Dave Danielson and Al Procopio 6-0, 64.
FSU was second with 16 points, Rollins had
12, Oral Roberts 10, Furman and Stetson 4 each,
University of South Florida 3 and Jacksonville 1.

Page 13



\. Tlm Florida Alligator, Monday. April 28,1969

Page 14

Bb V %
flp : > : >. -&/JIL.
. ......
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GETTING DOWN TO EARTHI
Leeann Gibson, KAO, looks for a golf ball hit into the Broward
stream during sorority intramurals action on Friday.

-<
Lone UFer Bachelor Wins Two At
Drake Relay In 3,6 Mile Events

DES MOINES, lowa-Jack
Bacheler of the UF Track Club
became the only competitor to
take double wins when he set a
new record in the six-mile run in
Saturdays windup session of the
Drake Relays.
Bacheler, who won the
three-mile run, whacked almost
a full minute off the relay record
of 28:22.2 set by Van Nelson in
last years meet. Bacheler
covered the distance in 27:29.2.
' A soaking rain and a fadeout
by distance star Jim Ryun kept

Mosconi Here Tuesday,
UF Joggers Face FSU

Willie Mosconi, world famous pocket billiards player, will give an
exhibition at the Reitz Union Tuesday.
Mosconi will give two exhibitions, one at 4:30 p.m. and one at 8
p.m.
Tom Graham, campus pocket billiards champ, and Krista Hartman,
campus female champ, will compete against Mosconi.
The exhibition is free, sponsored by the Union Program Council
Recreation Committee and the Games Area.
* *
Florida State University Joggers have challenged their UF
counterparts to meet in Tallahassee Saturday.
The meet will take place at 6 p.m. and will be scored on a
predicted mile basis, like cross country.
Any interested should contact Jack Gamble at 392-0836 or Larry
Tuggle at 378-9092.
LET'S SEE YOU
PASS THIS ONE UP.
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new records to a minimum.
An ex pected heavy
record-breaking assault on Drake
Universitys new red Tartan
track faded into fresh meet
marks only in a special 100-yard
dash with a 9.4 victory by world
record co-holder Charlie Grdene
and Bachelers triumph.
In Fridays sunny opening
session, six Drake records were
set and the two-day total of
eight was far below expectations
on the first test of the new
synthetic track.

Gators Top Dogs 17-10
In SEC Golf Preview

By Alligator Services
UFs defending Southeastern
Conference golf champions got a
good indication in Saturdays
17 10 dual-match victory over
Georgia of what to look for in
the SEC Championships.
Ron Mahood and Mike
Estridge, a pair of junior golfers
who have not played too big a
part in the Gators brilliant golf
season to date, gave UF chances
for a SEC title repeat a big
boost.
Mahood (70) teamed with
UFs All-American Steve Melnyk
(72) to down Georgias

Ryun, asserting I was tired,
dropped out of his anchor 880
lap for Kansas sprint medley
team after running fourth at the
time. Friday, the world record
holder at the mile and 880
turned in a poor 4:11.0 anchor
mile for second-place Kansas in
the four-mile relay.
The university sprint medley
race ostensibly was won by
Notre Dame in a creditable
3:16.0, but the Irish were
disqualified because the lead-off
runner, Bill Hurd, moved into
the wrong lane at the outset.
The victory was given to
Rice, its second baton title of
the meet, with a clocking of
3:18.0 after the Owls anchor
half miler had been whipped by
Notre Dame's Joe Quigley with a
fine 1:46.9.

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Bell Bottoms 20% off

All-American Allen Miller (79)
and Pete Davidson (74) for a
9o win.
Estridge (70) teamed with
John Sale (75) to top the
Bulldogs Joe Koon (73) and Len
Lott (72) and a sxfiVA5 x fiVA win.
The UFs lone dual match
defeat came as Richard Spears
(74) and David Barnes (76) fell
to the Bulldogs Terry Diehl (74)
and Lloyd Siegier (75) by a
6 1 /z2Vz score.
The Gators win in Athens
gave the squad a preview of the
same course that will be used
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
for the SEC Championships.
Saturdays match also gave
the Defending SEC Gators a
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chance to play one of the serious
contenders for their title. The
Gators face a bigger real threat
in Tennessee, the Vols finished
only two strokes behind the
Gators in last years SEC
tournament.
THIBSTT
W.C. FIELDS
"The Barber Shop
AND
"The Fatal Glass
OF Beer'
HLMS START
AT 9 FUN
STARTS ON ARRIVAL



By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
A two year jinx ended
Saturday morning when a long
home run by Rod Wright paved
the way to a 7-3 Gator win over
Miami.
Saturdays victory followed a
4-3 UF setback Friday, a loss
that marked the seventh straight


Luckless Dobies Lucks Out

By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
Tony Dobies luck has been
so bad lately that it just had
to get better.
Being a streak hitter, he
expects to have a mild slump at
the plate now and then. But he
has to feel that there will be
enough three-for-four games
during a season to make up for
the cold spells and keep his
batting average somewhere over
.300.
Lately it just hasnt been this
way. Although Dobies has been
moving the ball, somebodys
been there to catch it. And his
batting average has become an
anemic .203.
In an intersquad game last
week he lined a screamer into
center that was caught. As he
trudged back to the dougout,
Coach Dave Fuller felt for him.
Tonys been hitting the ball
like that a lot lately, he said,
but they wont fall in for him.
The funny thing is that there
isnt anyway to help him. All I
can do is leave him in the lineup
and hope the hits start coming.
In the bottom of the first
inning Friday Tony caught a fast
ball and lashed it on a long arc
toward the practice diamond in
center field. Back ran Larry
Pyle. And back. And back. And
finally, some 420 feet from
where Dobies unloaded, Pyle
made the catch. A home run in
almost any other college park
was another big out at Perry
Field.
Saturdays 10 a.m. game
against Miami almost got off to a
worse start. Dobies overslept. It
was 9:20 before he was on the
field and things didnt improve
as he popped to center the first
time up. Tony was now hitless in
his last 13 at bats.
Thirteen? Unlucky 13? Not
for luckless Tony Dobies. In the
fourth he ripped a single into
left. Then he stole second and
scored on Rod Wrights hit
through the middle.
Fluke, you say. But wait.
Dobies led off the sixth with
another hit, a sharp single past
the shortstop. He then moved to
second on a sacrifice and from
there to third on Skip Lujacks
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Gators Split With Miami, 4-3, 7-3

time Miami had successfully
handled the Gator nine.
In splitting the two games,
the Gators fell to one of the
countrys best pitchers but were
quite successful in silencing the
bat of an All-American hitter.
Larry Pyle, Miamis center
fielder, came to town hitting at a
.436 clip with six home runs.
UFs pitchers cooled him off

jjjp '* Jfflg Jr
*** RS|
f 't
11111 l iimiP wSKKKM BP
LUCKY TONY
... safe on an out at home plate

single into left.
Thats how it should have
been, but the fired-up
sophomore didnt even begin to
stop at third. Ignoring Coach
Ray Rollysons pleas to hold up
Dobies was thrown out at home
by a good 10 feet.
But wait again. After the
collision the umps thumb in the

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Actually, its a rich mans Volvo.
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END TWO-YEAR JINX

4
completely, however, as he
managed to hit only two balls
out of the infield while going
o7 in the series.
The first five innings were a
tight pitchers duel with UFs
Wayne Rogers, now 2-2,
allowing two hits and Miamis
Bob Lehman one. But in the top
of the sixth Miami collected
seven singles, six in a row, and

air was changed to palms down
as the ball slowly rolled away
from the entangled players.
Boy was Dobies lucky. Well,
maybe he was. He certainly
hopes that whatever the reason,
a little luck will inhabit him for
a while and help a few of those
hard hit balls start falling in
again.

pushed across all the runs
Lehman ultimately needed.
The Gators fought back with
a run in the seventh on Skip
Lujacks double and a pair of
unearned tallies in the eighth.
Saturday morning the Canes
again went ahead in their half of
the sixth as they chased starter
Larry Sheffield with a pair of
runs. Glen Pickren relieved and
got the third out to hold the
score at 2l.
In the home half of the
inning, lead-off batter Tony
Dobies singled to left and moved
to second on Will Harmans
sacrifice bunt. Lujack then
lashed a single inside third base
to score Dobies, who ignored

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Monday, April 28,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Coach Ray Rollysons stop
sign and had to kick the ball
from catcher George Maduros
mitt or be out by 10 feet.
Ovca fouled out and then
Wright, who had earlier singled
in UFs first run, hit a 340-foot
homer, made the score 4-2 and
provided the winning margin.
Miami added a run in the
eighth but couldnt prevent its
record from slipping to 268.
The Gators, who play Florida
States ninth-ranked Seminoles
in single games today and
Tuesday at Tallahassee, now
stand at 20-11 overall. UF will
be out to snap FSUs victory
string, which stands at 20
straight this season.

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 28, 1969

m an mm H
W Campus Crier F|l 0Â¥ YOUrSCIf
___\ SPQN ?9 REP BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT Ihl W W
t&T COLISEUM
AT THE SAME T/ME/
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