Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
8,000 Lever-PullersExpectedToday

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writar
Approximately 8,000
students are expected to turn
out today to elect a student
body president and a host of
other student government
officials. Also included on the
ballot will be several public
opinion questions and
constitutional amendments.
>
The polls will open at 8 am.,
and close at 6 pm
In a campaign which has seen
few major issues conte'
interest has been low and
turnout is expected. One
estimate places the probable
number of voters at under
6,500.
Five presidential candidates

Police Request
Passes House
v

The State House of
Representatives Wednesday
voted to appropriate $121,000
immediately to the UF to cover
the expense of hiring and
equipping 19 additional campus
oolice personnel which UF
resident Stephen C OConnell
had requested.
The bill was due to the
initiative of Gainesville
Representative William (Bill)
Andrews, who called the UF
business office Wednesday to
express concern about the
situation at the university.
Presdient OConnell, in his
request presented to Chancellor
Robert Mautz on April 21, had
cited recent incidents of campus
violence and the inadequacy of
the present number of campus
police to effectively patrol the
campus
The State Budget
Commission has plans, as yet
unofficial, to appropriate funds
to provide for 25 additional
personnel for the UF Physical
Plant Division. The campus plice
force is a part of the Physical
Plant Division. At the time that
O'Connell presented his request
to Mautz, Mautz asked if
OConnell would be willing for
the State Budget Commission to
approve of the request for 19
additional campus police and
staff, but to draw these 19 from
the 25 personnel which it
planned to allow to the UF
Physical Plant Division.
President OConnell would
prefer to have the 25 personnel
for the Physical Plant in addition
to 19 additional campus police
and staff. He did not respond to
Chancellor Mautzs compromise
plan at that time, and has not

Vote At These Locations
it

*
University College
I Agriculture and Forestry
Architecture
MCWOMWWOOOSWOWWOfIOW

are in the race the largest
number in recent years. At stake
too are the offices of
vice-president, which will be
voted on along with president,
Treasurer, Chancellor of the
Honor Court, and Chief Justice
of the Traffic Court.
Also contested are 40
Student Senate seats, and 14
Honor Court justice positions.
Vying for president are James
Devaney, seeking election on an
independent ticket, Issue Partys
John Mica, Foresight Partys Vic
Ramey, First Part candidate
Charles Shepherd, and
Leberations Joan Warren.
A poll taken Wednesday
indicates Shepherd has a near
two to one margin over his

yet responded. As a result,
Chancellor Mautz as of
Wednesday afternoon had not
forwarded OConnells request
to the State Budget Commission.
The House appropriations bill
passed yesterday may solve the
problem. If the appropriation is
ultimately granted, UF would
probably get the 19 additional
campus police and staff which it
has requested and also, apart
from these, 2 C other personnel
to be alloweu to the Physical
Plant Division.

* v *-* s
THIS CAMPUS POLICEMAN WAS RATHER HAPPY
... perhaps after hearing about the new help he'll probably get

Broward Hall Main Lobby
Graham Commons Lobby
Hume Hall Cafeteria Walkway
Jennings Hall Lobby
Murphree Area, Fletcher K Study Lounge
South Hall Lobby
Yulee Hall Porch
McCarty Hall, between buildings
A and B
Architecture Complex, south entrance
to Building C

In Elections For 69-70 SG

nearest competitor, Mica. A
large undecided vote could put
Shepherd into a runoff with
another candidate, however.
The major issue in the
campaign, as agreed upon by
most of the candidates, is
academic reform. Several
candidates have promised such
reforms as abolishment of
progress examinations in the
University College, abolishment
of the Honor Code, and the
publishing of course and teacher
evaluation reports.
In relation to past campaigns,

The
Florida Alligator
America's Number 1 College Daily

Vol. 61, No. 122

Shepherd Leads Last Minute Poll

Forty-five percent of the students
polled by the Alligator Wednesday said
they would vote for Charles Shepherd in
the election today, while twelve percent
asked what election and whos
running?
Os the 265 randomly polled, 114 said

Arts and Sciences
Business Administration
Education
Engineering
Health Related Professions
Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy
Journalism
Law School
Physical Education

this one has been relatively
clean, with rumors taking the
place of open accusations, v
*
One issue which came up
early in the campaign was
conflicting reports over the fate
of Mica while he served in
Shepherds cabinet two years
ago as Secretary of Academic
Affairs. Mica claimed he was
squeezed out of the job.
Shepherd claimed he was fired.
An Alligator investigation
showed Mica had been relieved

University of Florida, Gainesville

Fee Card, ID
Required For
All Voters
All students wishing to vote
today must present both their
picture I.D. and their fee card at
the polls, says Secretary of the
Interior Bill Modlin.
No exceptions will be made,
because there is a law which
requires both cards to be shown.
Polls will be open from 8 a.m.
until 6 p.m. Anyone in line at 6
p.m. with his cards will be
allowed to vote.
Students who have lost their
picture I.D.s who wish to vote
must see Mr. Funkhouser in the
teaching resources center, pay
the $5 fee, then use their receipt
as proof of voting eligibility.

Plaza of Americas, near entrance <
to Graduate Library *:
Old Law Building Colonnade S
I
Norman Hall, Lobby nearest Dean s £
office |
New Engineering Complex |
B and I Building
Medical Center, Second Floor Lobby
Stadium, Gate Three
Holland Law Center
s
Florida Gym, basement jj

they would vote for Shepherd. Fifty-five
are voting for John Mica, four for James
DeVaney, and eight for Joan Warren.
None are voting for Vic Ramey.
Thirty-two of the students asked still
had not made their decision, and 31
bluntly said they will not vote at all.

of his non-paying job by
Shepherd.
Among the candidates,
Devaney is offering a more
philosophical candidacy, with a
vow that he will use his office to
fight more fundemental issues
such as air and water pollution.
Mica is offering a return to an
independent Student
Government. His claim is that
other candidates, notably
Shepherd, are controlled by
(SEE 'BALLOTS/ PAGE 2)

Thursday, April 24, 1969

. # 1
yill Alb*-
K% M
v \:, r *
§&£ JHHM
lIIiMHB auMWlmil
Ml J&
jpg;
SIGMA CHI DERBY
This "quick-change"
contestant from last year's
Sigma Chi Derby (unidentified
for obvious reasons) wasn't quite
quick enough and Alligator
Photographer Nick Arroyo
caught her southern exposure as
she headed north. Derby fun
(and embarrassment?) begins at
2 p.m. Saturday.



l. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 24,1969

Page 2

sVViVtW/iV.y.y.v/.Vi'.v.'.v.v.'iV.v.ViViV.v.ViV.v.y.v.y.'.v.y.v.y.XAXvVviXvyi'
jTodays The Dayj
IFor SG Elections j
:j v
Today is the day an estimated 8,000 students will go to the
polls and make their choices for five major Student Government
positions.
j: The ballot includes not only SG candidates, but four
: amendments to the student body constitution.
Offices being sought are president and vice president, :j:
j: treasurer, honor court chancellor and chief justice of traffic
court. Each person will also vote for honor court justice and
: senators from his college.
: The amendments are:
to change the day of student body elections in Fall and
Spring from Thursday to Wednesday, $
to give the Student Senate the power to grant charters to
: any student organization, not just the groups receiving funds £
*: from SG; and to give SS the right to grant, amend and revoke
: amendments to charters,
to make the office of vice chancellor of Honor Court
appointive instead of the office going automatically to the :
: justice elected from the law school, :
:j: to change the duties of the vice president to serve in the £
j: functions assigned by the president instead of presiding over the £
: Senate. :

: Polls will be open from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. <
...v;'W AV...V 1 w. .v.v.v.v.v.v. .v. .%%vAV.%N\y.y.y.y.;.y.y.v.v.v.v.v.v.; v ;.v.v.;.,

Nude Considered Lewd

HOUSTON (UPI) A
number of women who have
been annoyed by a naked
doorbell ringer called upon
police Tuesday to conduct a
nude lineup so a suspect will not
be camouflaged by his clothes
when they view him.
The police said no nude
lineups. They said if everybody
in the lineup had to take his
clothes off, it would be unfair
to innocent persons.
Theyll just have to identify
him with his clothes on, one
policeman said.
The women police would
not say what the exact number
is protested that they might
not be able to identify the man
with his clothes on.
Police captured a suspect
early Tuesday in the heights area
of Houston. When word got
around that a suspect was in jail,
the women asked for the nude
lineup.
VOTE
TODAY

Ballots Cast Today

BtOH PA6t OMt J
fraternities and power blocs like
Blue Key.
Ramey has concerned himself
principally with the plight of
dorm students, and effecting
changes within the University
College.
Shepherd, who is backed by a
bloc of 20 fraternities and all
sororities, is promising
immediate academic reforms,
including the distribution of
teacher evaluation reports done
earlier this year. He was
president two years ago, when
he put together supp<~~t made up
almost entirely of independents.
Warren is calling for a greater
role by women in Student

(PAID POl AO.)
! VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

lii i~i

Sirhan B, Sirhan Given
Death Sentence Verdict

LOS ANGELES (UPI)
- Sirhan B. Sirhan, certain that
not even Jesus Christ could save

Government, and the
recognition of women as a
political force, including their
admission into Blue Key and
other all-male groups.
Several public opinion
questions are on the ballot.
Included are questions favoring
voluntary class attendance,
voluntary physical education
and a pass-fail grading system.
Another question asks if the
Reitz Union is meeting the needs
of the students, and one other
asks if Student Government
should be the sole recognition
agent for student groups.
A final question asks if
students would favor using five
dollars of a proposed tuition
increase to pay for a university
coliseum complex.

( PAI D POL AD)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

LAST CANDIDATE <"OMFRONTATION

Tempers Flore At Debate

ByCAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
Tempers of the presidential
candidates flared short and the
student turn-out was admittedly
low at the last of the great
debates in the Rathskeller
Tuesday night.
The debate, sponsored by the
Alligator and moderated by Don
Reed of WGGG radio, was called
the only real debate of the
campaign by the candidates.
Charles Harris,
vice-presidential candidate on
the First Party ticket, spoke for
Charles Shepherd who was sick
Tuesday.
Harris took the brunt of the
criticism of a Student
Government that is ineffective
and unrelated to the students.
Questions of where were
you when .. .thrown out in

him from the gas chamber, was
condemned Wednesday to die
for the murder of Sen. Robert F.
Kennedy.
The 2 5-year-old Arab
nonchalantly chewed gum as the
jury decreed the death sentence.
He told his attorneys he was not
surprised and added, even Jesus
Christ could not have saved me.
Appeals of the verdict v'ere
expected to stay indefinitely
Sirhans execution for the
assassination of the presidential
candidate in an Ambassador
Hotel pantry last June 5.
His attorneys immediately
launched the first of what was
expected to be a long series of
legal maneuvers to save Sirhans
life by moving for a new trial.
Superior Court Judge Herbert V.
Walker set a hearing on the
motion for May 14, the same
date he will formally impose the
death sentence on Sirhan.

(PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

rebuttal by Harris drew laughter
from the candidates and the
audience when a question from
the floor asked Harris, Where
was First Party when the Civil
War started?
The rest of the debate lacked
the levity of the opening
remarks, however.
Repeating the most
important points of their party
platforms, the candidates came
to verbal blows over the issues of
academic reforms and their
plausability and the role of SG
in the lives of UF students.
Issue Party candidate John
Mica called First Partys
proposals to abolish C-course
progress tests unrealistic He
said no party could ever achieve
this.
Mica and Devaney both
decried what they termed the
academic ratrace existing on
the campus. Devaney called it
obscene.
He proposed bringing SG in
to present the problem to the
administration and try to find a
workable solution to the
ratrace.
Mica ridiculed UF President

Mrs. Bethea' Stories
Slanted, Ridiculous
Mrs. Alma K. Bethea, Alachua County supervisor of elections, said
Wednesday that stories on use of her relatives to set up voting
machines, which appeared in the Alligator and the Gainesville Sun
Wednesday were ridiculous.
The stories were so slanted they were ridiculous, she said.
The stories charged that various members of her family had been
paid sl2 a machine for readying them for elections.
It was like beating the old dead horse, she said of the stories.^
She said the amount was the same charged the county for
programming the machines since 1948.
The Alligator story said a bill pending before the state legislature
would raise the supervisors pay, but would require all funds for
setting up the machines go into the county coffers, and would n
allow the employment of Mrs. Betheas relatives.
Sen. Bob Saunders said Tuesday the bill was sure of passage.
Richard Wilson, a local lawyer for Mrs. Bethea, said in 1967 die
had proposed a bill similar to the one before the legislature, but the
legislative delegation and the Board of County Commissioners
overruled it.
Mrs. Bethea said she would continue charging the sl2 per machine
for setup, but if a group would agree to t r )rt the machines, it
would not be charged the $9 per machine cost.
Im not playing for nothing, she said. Im not working for
nothing.
Im deserving of my services, she said.
Treasurer Endorses Haber

Student Body Treasurer Phil
Burnett Wednesday endorsed
Issue party candidate Marty
Haber for the treasurers post.
I didnt feel I should
endorse a candidate, Burnett
said, because I think the
students should decide for
themselves. However, when the
Alligator endorsed a presidential
candidate but said nothing about

July and August when vlu!? Shed time week ly except during June,
and exam published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
authors
Building, S en< £ to the Alligator, Reit* Union
entered as second class GainesviDe > Florida 32601. The Alligator is
Florida 32601. att er at the United States Poet Office at Gainesville,
Si attjjsar sr. i?*-***-
of all advertisement !!J ngh / to regulate the typographical tone
objectionable. to revise or turn away copy which it considers
The Florida AUutator will
advertisement involving tvnnil c on l s,der adjustments of payment for any
notice is given to the ypog aphlcal errors or erroneous insertion unless
advertisement appears. Tim ng 4 S anager within (0 day after the
than one incorrect insertion 8 will not be responsible for more
times. Notices for correction a dver tisement scheduled run several
L... or correction m ugt be given before next insertion.

Stephen C. OConnells propsed
plan to solve real social
problems by lining the UF with
police and dogs and everything
else you can think of. He
accused the administration of
failure in solving social problems
by eliminating their effects and
not their causes.
Foresight candidate Vic
Ramey called for more
professors instead of more
policemen on campus.
When given a question from
the floor asking if the individual
candidates would support the
National Student Associations
petition saying students should
and would go to prison before
going to Vietnam, Harris and
Mica both said they would
present the students here with a
campus-wide referendum on the
matter.
Ramey and Devaney both
suggested cultivating a 4-F draft
classification, and Liberation
Party candidate Joan Warren
said she would support the
statement because the Vietnam
war was unjust and
imperialistic.

the paper was remiss in its
duties, so I felt obligated to
*. the students aware of the
-imparities between the
candidates.
The office of treasurer,
virtually with more power and
responsibility than the vice
president, requires someone of
outstanding ability and
discretion, he said.



Candidates Fill Out 5 PartiesToD 5

Via PRESIDENT
Charles Harris, majority floor
leader of the Student Senate, is
seeking election as student body
vice president under the First
party standard.
The 22-year-old Orlandoan, a
senior in political science, has
held a number of positions in
Student Government, including
senate minority leader, senate
minority whip, member of six
senate committees, chairman of
four, and twice a member of the
Cabinet. He was also vice
president of the Murphree Area
Council.
He has been selected as the
brother of the year in Sigma Phi
Epsilon fraternity and is a
member of Florida Blue Key.
Harris has consistently been
on the Deans List in the College
of Arts and Sciences, holding an
over-all 3.5 average. He has been
in departmental high honors for
several terms.
Steve Hull, Issue Partys vice
presidential candidate is a young
man with an ambition to
hitchhike around the world.
The 22-year-old candidate
from Miami will graduate from
the College of Business
Administration in June and
enter the College of Law in
September.
Contending that Student
Government is not receptive to
the students needs, Hull claimed
SG functions chiefly as a
springboard for future state
politicians.
Through my election as vice
president, I will develop an
attitude of not giving a damn
about what the state and
legislature think but rather what
the students think.
The candidate for vice
president on the Liberation
party ticket calls for an end to
UFs existence as just a training
ground for big business and the
military.
David Smith, 4AS, said his
party wants to throw ROTC
off campus.
We think the university
should be an instrument for
social change and should not be
involved with the military,
Smith said.
Active in SSOC for two years,
Smith said he learned what was
happening at the UF by working
with SSOC.
A history major from Ft.
Lauderdale, Smith says he has
no personal political ambitions.
He has been coordinator of a
marxism seminar for the Florida
Experimental College since
January.
Jim Devaneys running mate
is admittedly a novice in the
political arena. Rather, Dan
Jesse, 4AS from Ft. Pierce, is
active in the speech field at the
UF.
Excellence in Food

The unaffiliated candidates
campaign theme the need for
understanding and improved
human relations has been
underscored by Jesse in his work
in dramatics: *'
I have been trying to express
these ideas through the media of
stage communication. I have
written a play along these lines
-about the lack of interraction
- which I plan to produce this
summer.
Jesse is chairman of the
constitutional committee of the
Florida Players and he has
played major roles in the drama
groups last three productions.
He wants to find alternatives
to the present grading system.
Foresight Party
vice-presidential candidate
Edward Nuckels hails from
Melbourne but has traveled
extensively around the United
States pursuing his interest in
mountain clin 'mg.
Nuckels, a geology major
with a 3.49 average, admits to
having no previous experience in
Student Government, but
believes this will help him
manifest his political
philosophy.
In the past, SG has been a
closed system. It is a playground
for law students and fraternity
men, many who are using
campus politics to further
personal ambitions, Nuckels
said. I have no attachments
with power groups and no links
with the old SG.
TRAFFIC COURT
CHIEF JUSTICE
Carol Elaine Anderson, a
freshman law student, who did
her undergraduate studies at
Wellesley College, fills out Issue
partys upper slate as a candidate
for chief justice of the traffic
court.
The chief justice of the traffic
court is a contested contest in
the student body general
election this year for the first
time, since the new student
(
body constitution provided that
the post would no longer be
filled by appointment by the
student body president and

AT THE GAINESVILLE MALL
MARVELLO
MAKE HIM LAUGH
AND WIN:
Automobile
Mobile Home
MAKE HIM SMILE
I AND WIN
f K SIOO
On The Job
Marvello will appear
in the GAINESVILLE
MALL Thurs., Fri. A Sat.
Sponsored by:
Gainesville Mall
Bonanza Mobile Homes
Melton Motors

Student Senate.
Making a bid to step up from
assistant chief justice of the
traffic court, Robert Wattles is
running for chief justice of the
court on the First party ticket.
The 22-year-old senior
business administraion major has
also served as a justice of both
the traffic court and the Honor
Court. He is a former president
of Chi Phi fraternity and editor
of the Gator Greek magazine. He
has served as chairman of two
Homecoming committees.
Wattles was involved in recent
controversy when his eligibility
for office was contested because
of an old law requiring the chief
justice to be a law student.
The Honor Court ruled,
however, that the old law was
superceded by the new
Constitution passed last year and
that Wattles was eligible for the
office.
HONOR COURT
CHANC&LOR
Jack Klausner, Issue partys
candidate for chancellor of the
Honor Court, believes in the
need for quicker processing of,
Honor Court cases.
Klausner, a 3LW from
Scarsdale, N.Y. ; says he wants to
speed up trial processes,
described as sometimes very
bogged down.
He also wants increased
jurisdiction for trials from
residence area councils and
extension of jurisdiction over
claims against student
organizations and their officers.
He received his bachelor*
degree in business from UF.
Craig Lawrence, First partys
candidate for chancellor of the
Honor Court, is a graduate of
Florida State University, where
he majored in history. He is now
a senior law student.
Lawrence is currently the
Honor Courts chief defense
council. He has formerly held
the positions of assistant chief
defense council and chief
investigator for the defense staff.
Named the outstanding
ROTC graduate at FSU,
Lawrence, 24, is married and an
alumnus of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
fraternity at FSU.

TREASURER
Jim Roll, 7EG, is running for
student body treasurer on the
First party ticket.
He is seeking a PhD in
electrical engineering and has a
3.9 grade point average.
The 26-year-old candidate is
married and a former member of
the Student Senates budget and
finance committee. He has work
experience in computer
operation, having once been an
instructor in computer methods
of cost analysis for the
Pratt-Whitney Aircraft Corp.
Marty Haber is Issue partys
choice for Student Body
Treasurer.
A senior in business
administration, Haber has
operated his own accounting
firm in Gainesville for two years.
He is also a junior accountant
with a Miami accounting firm.
He is assistant to the
Comptroller of Barons, the
largest chain of mens wear
stores in Florida.
He plans to enter the UF
College of Law in September

If youve never §
j
voted before... 2
VOTE ISSUE I

DANCE
featuring
"THE PLANT LIFE
Winner of Gator Gras
Battle of the Bands
Friday nite April 25th
9-1
Union Terrace
FREE
BEAT
THE I
GREEK
BLOC
I VOTE I
MICA
I (PAID POL. AD) I

Thursday, April 24,1968, The Florida Alligator,

where he will specialize in tax
law.
Liberation party's candidate
for treasurer is Robert Keiser.
He is a senior majoring in
history who has served as
treasurer of Phi Alpha Theta, an
honorary history society.
For too long, theyve been
emphasizing businessman for the
-easurer position, Keiser said.
That's not half as important
as knowing the issues involved.
The important quality the
treasurer should have is knowing
where the money lould go.

(PA I D POL AD)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST
(PAID POL,'aD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST I
(CORN
KETTLE IS
(COMING

Page 3



Page 4

>, The Florida Alligator. Thursday. April 24. 1969

f ill '
Af>> own feeling is that if
the disruption-the violence violencecan
can violencecan be contained, the basic
American concern for the
best quality of education in
the world will remain tri triumphant.
umphant. triumphant.
- Dr. Clark Kerr

More Manpower Needed
By Evaluation Program

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The Course and Teacher
Evaluation Program is aiming
towards its most ambitious
examination of instructors and
course sections yet, but
ambitions could be clipped
because it is hurting for
manpower.
We need people, says
Executive Chairman Fred
Breeze. Were hoping to have
an evaluation this term that is 10
times the size of the evaluation
we ran last fall, but we need
people to run the rpogram. And
right now the only position we
can say is filled is the position of
executive chairman, which I
hold.
Hence the programs call for
interested workers in research,
program operations, publication
of evaluation results, public
relations, and office work.
Were going to need people
of all sorts of knowledge,
Breeze said. One type which we
especially need is the type of
person who is inclined towards
academic research.
Persons in this area would
do research into evaluation
programs at other universities to
see how they handled and
corrected loopholes and
improved the program and such.
You might call it scholarly
research.
Office workers, to compile
results and handle
correspondence, are also in
heavy demand, as are persons to
administer the evaluation test in
the classroom.
Applications are available at
the Student Activities Desk on
VETERANS
Be a commercial pilotl
NEW G. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELSINTHE AIR
Area's only approved school
378-2646

Student Unrest May Benefit Campus

The good that can come from student disorders is that the
campus may become a better place, Dr. Clark Kerr, chairman of
the Carnegie Commission on Higher Education, said at the UF
Tuesday night.
Speaking at a University-wide Religion-in-Life convocation
on the topic, Students: From Apathy to Confrontation, the
former president of the University of California said that
because of disorders faculty members will pay more attention to
educational policy and teaching. Students, he said, will be
brought more into consultation and decision-making than
previously.
On the other hand, I would say that results of student
disorder will be more negative off campus. Certainly a good
many people are quite upset by the dissension, he reported.
Kerr was the man-in-the-middle when the 1964 student
disorders erupted on the Berkeley campus. He was dismissed
from his position by California Gov. Ronald Reagan, and said he
left office exactly as he entered it fired with enthusiasm.
My own feeling is that if the disruption-the
violence can be contained, the basic American concern for the
best quality of education in the world will remain triumphant,
Dr. Kerr explained.
Kerr noted that what is going on among students is the same
as what is going on in the nation.. .only more so. The

the third floor of the Reitz
Union.
Interested persons are asked
to apply soon so that a staff may
be organized soon for an
evaluation this quarter.
The course and Teacher
Evaluation Program has made
two evaluations in the past on
in 1967 and the second in the
Fall of 1968. For Falls
evaluation, the staff sent
participation requests to every
fifth academic department on
campus.
We evaluated about 250-300
professors and section, Breeze
said. This time we plan to send

MODELS
NEEDED-FRI6PM
EVERY FRIDAY
VANDYUON

THURSDAY SPECIAL
OLD FASHION
STEWED CHICKEN AQa
& DUMPLINGS
FRIDAY SPECIAI
CODFISH CAKES & AQ
CREOLE SPAGHETTI
LUNCH
IBFSPPI and
| 313 W. UNIV. AVE.
/i BLOCK WEST OF
ITTIIIIIIHJ FLORIDA THEATER
v

NEGATIVE RESULTS OFF CAMPUS-.KERR

participation requests to each
faculty member and invite him
to volunteer to have each section
he teaches evaluated.
There are about 6,000
sections meeting on this
campus, he continued. We
usually have about 50-60
percent response, so we could
expect a response of about 3500
sections to be evaluated. Wed
like to be able to handle this
many sections.
A leading reason for the
ambitious plans for expansion is
that Breeze feels the program
would be more relevant if
expanded.
I 378-5724 I
I Dick Hoimi/
Jeweler/
I CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY 1
I REPAIRS I
J TROPHIES-ENGRAVING
I 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
J V? BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

campus is a mirror of society, but a mirror exaggerated, he
said. The unsolved problems of the United States are the
problems of our campuses.
He pinpointed the two big issues tearing the country apart as
the war in Vietnam and civil rights.
When great issues trouble society at large, they trouble the
campus even more. When these issues are solved, you will find
the campuses becoming much more peaceful than they are
now, he said.
Kerr advocated the use of academic discipline to turn back
the use of force on the campus. But, he said, the faculty and
the students will have to decide the amount of discipline in
advance and apply it. He suggested that suspension rather than
expulsion would suffice in many cases,
Kerr noted that many disruptive students are from permissive
middle class backgrounds. The troublemaker often comes from
a small community and finds himself thrown into complex
situations when he arrives on the big campus. One of the
adjustments we can make it to see that no campus becomes too
large, he suggested.
Changes in society are occurring around the world, he noted.
In the new world there is more pressure for time than ever
before and a new technology is outrunning us, putting us in
revolt against 1984 before 1984 arrives, he explained.

(PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

THURSDAY SPECIAL
ROAST KEF
Vs. 97*
I Revlon I
I invents I
I f i in I
I nil |
Lipstick!
jj Un-Lipstick? Its hare, but the color s jj
1 there. Pale, but the shine wont fail. 20 |j
1 blushy little mouthcolors like Nothing 1
* F losted, Polar Bare Pink, Grapevine and jj
Jj ithy Peach. All clear as tinted glass, and I
jj gleaming with Fresh young color. 1
1 Natural Wonder f Un-Lipstick I
1 Campus Shops and Bookstore 1

. 1. ' 1 =~
(PA I D POL A D.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST



U.S. Charged With Violations Os Truce

TOKYO (UPI)- North
Korea charged Wednesday the
United States was staging a
massive military buildup along
the Korean truce line and firing
thousands of bullets and shells
into Communist territory. It
warned of an escalation toward
total war.
The government statement,
boradcast by the Korean Central
News Agency and monitored
here, said North Korea would
take whatever action necessary
to protect itself against land, sea
and air threats

Rash Os Helicopter Accidents
Plague Americans InVietnam

SAIGON (UPI) More than
40 allied soldiers have been
killed or wounded in a rash of
American helicopter mishaps in
South Vietnam in a 24-hour
period, the U.S. military
command reported Wednesday.
The losses raised to 1,079 the
total number of U.S. helicopters
downed in South Vietnam.
Military spokesmen said at

Accent Positions Open

Applications for positions on
the staff of Accent 7O have
been sent to all student
organizations and are now being
accepted at the Activities Desk
on the third floor of the Reitz
Union.
A statement listing the
committees available and
responsibilities required of the
committee member is attached
to the application.
Final appointments will be
made by the individual chairmen
from the list of applicants
received. All applications should
be in by the second week of
May.
The following committees are
open to application: magazine,
program, technical, personnel,
speakers, publicity, public
relations, and finance.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor said this has been
the most extensive program
Party Minded
LONDON (CPU One band
of thieves in London have set
themselves up for a old
time.
They broke into a warehouse
Thursday and stole 900 cases of
brandy.
Miller-Brown I
V
dIE MILE
NORTH OF jfEK I
THE MALL Qfifl
376-4552 AUTH orized I
DEALER I

The statement made no
mention of any North Korean
firing across the Demilitarized
Zone, separating North and
South Korea, nor did it claim
any firing by the U.S. Task
Force 71 assembled in the Sea of
Japan to protect aerial
reconnaissance flights and as a
show of strength.
The North Korean report of
truce line shooting apparently
triggered rumors in the Wall
Street financial district of New
York that U.S. warships had
fired on the Communist

least four helicopters were shot
down by Communist ground fire
or shattered by mines and two
others crashed after colliding in
flight. A seventh helicopter
mistakenly fired on allied
ground troops, killing six
soldiers, one of them an
American
The heaviest single loss
occurred early Wednesday when

conducted for Accent 7O and a
greater response than before is
expected from students. Joe
Hilliard is the current chairman
of Accent 7O.
Anyone desiring an
application should contact either
his fraternity, sorority, or dorm
leader or obtain one at the
Activities desk, Room 300,
Reitz Union. t

(PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

WONDER
HOUSE
RESTAURANT
DNNERS ONLY
V
BAKED MEAT LOAF
w/MUSHROOM SAUCE b I .UO
SOUP & POTATO
VEAL PARMIGANNI 1 oc
w/ITALIAN SPAGHETTI, SALAD I JO
BAR B-Q BEEF & RIBS
w/ BAKED BEANS, FF, 1.45
LARGE COKE
BAKED LASAGNA 0
w/MEAT SAUCE I. O 5
SALAD
OPEN SUNDAYS

BY NORTH KOREANS

country.
Each new war provocation
maneuver by the U.S. imperialist
aggressors will be uanable to
avoid a powerful, defensive
counter-blow from the Korean
people and the Korean Peoples
Army, the North Korean
statement said.
If the reconnaissance
planes. .intrude into the
territorial air of our country, we
will not sit with folded arms but
will take resolute isures for
safeguarding our sovereignty.
Then the U.S. imperialists

eight American soldiers were
killed in the collision-crash of
two U.S. Army helicopter
gunships in flight 35 miles
northwest of Saigon. It was the
worst helicopter disaster
involving allied forces since April
4 when a crash just below the
Demilitarized Zone killed 24
allied troops and injured 53
others.
The U.S. command said it
was unknown whether either of
the helicopters involved in
Wednesdays collision might
have been hit by Communist
fire.
Two other helicopters were
destroyed by cxplosives cxplosives-apparently
-apparently cxplosives-apparently Communist mine
blasts while they landed in
assault areas northwest of Dong
Ha, some 400 miles north of
Saigon. Three American
crewmen of the helicopters were
killed and 20 persons aboard
were wounded, three of them
Americans.

(PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

will use this as a pretext to
comit a full-scale armed attack
against us, which ultimately may
lead only to another totaTwar in
Korea.
North Korea said the United
States was emplacing heavy
artillery and mortar peices along
the truce line as part of its
military buildup there, as move

(PAID POL. AD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST
rr~~ > '

' fomiETOmonmffli
31 Wit University Ave,, Gainesville, f|a. Phone 376-35 U
BLOW YOURSELF UPI
TO POSTER SIZE "j
Ge *. y wu- wn p / h0 t0 E st r s /, nd any Bla:k A 525.00 Value for H
and White or Color Photo. Also any news newspaper
paper newspaper or magazine photo. OwO $0.50111
PERFECT POP ART AAO 0 M
Poster rolled and mailed in sturdy tube. ova ft 57.50
Original returned undamaged. ** ip|
PHOTO JIGSAW PUZZLE (ft. x n/ 2 tt. s 3' s# |B
Get your own Personalized Photo Jigsaw Puzz'e. Send any black and white or SH
color photo. Mail' in <0 easy to assemble pieces. Great gift or gag for anyone. k§9
Add SCc for postage and handling for EACH item ordered. Add local Sales H
Tax. Send check, cash or M.O. (No C.0.D.) to: .8j
PHOTO POSTER, Inc., 210 E. 23d St., Dept. T-24, N. Y. 10010 H

# Ji&utuMsi/. ..
ib, Jdajb&U?
about $ / also puM aUJt aeoutiyuj
/JcuA/f bit Vjiacl dud fclo.
about *3. 50.
f
OPEN 9:30-6:00 DAILY
2401 Southwest Thirteenth Street Village S 'iare

Thursday, April 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Only sheep need o

a Shepherd j
VOTE MICA I
o.
y (PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

it described as a crude violation
of the Korean armistice
agreement.

Page 5



Page 6

B, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 24,1969

Election Party Set
At 'Rat Tonight
An election return party will
be held tonight at the
Rathskellar, featuring winning
candidates and free
refreshments.
WRUF will broadcast from
the location, and election results
will be announced as they come
in.
There is no admission charge
for the evening.

Student Board Checking Aldridge Resignation

There is no need for Issue Party to investigate the
resignation after giving an entire class A grades.
So says Bob Mayer, a senior journalism student
who coordinates the student advisory board at the
College of Journalism and Communications.
The advisory board has been investigating the
case for several weeks, said Mayer. We are having
very frank sessions with the individuals involved and
we hope to get to the root of the problem.
Mayer claimed there is more to the resignation of
instructor Melvin Gene Aldridge than the fact that

Honor Court Supports Changing
Vice-Chancellor To Appointive Post

The Honor Court fully
supports changing the office of
vice-chancellor from an elective
position to an appointive one,
according to a policy statement
released Tuesday.
The change is one of four
constitutional amendments to be
put on the ballot Thursday along
with the general student
government elections.
Under the amendment: a
The justice elected from
the Law school would serve in
the same capacity as justices
elected from other colleges.
Presently the justice from the
Law school automatically
assumes the duties of a vice
chancellor.

%,' 1 I 1 i^/' f lt- tt. .
WHOEVER THINKS IS NOT SUITABLE AS A
PARTY MEMBER. HE SOON THINKS HIMSELF
RIGHT THROUGH THE PARTY.
NIETZCHE

DROPOUTS

The Vice-Chancellor would
be appointed jointly by the
student body president and
chancellor, and the appointment
ratified by two-thirds of the
senate.
The amendment will give the
chancellor a chance to pick the
man he thinks is most qualified
and competent, and we think it
is a big step in upgrading the
qualities of the court, Zack
said.

(PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

DEVANEY JESSE
. V w
FOR A CREATIVE GOVERNMENT
FROM SAND. . FROM MAN. .

NO NEED FOR INVESTIGATION, SAYS SENIOR

he gave 32 As for one class.
He said at the moment the group of students
does not know whether the resignation was
pressured, as some have charged.
Tuesday, Issue Party Vice presidential candidate
Steve Hull vowed to investigate the resignation of
Aldridge, insisting that the young progressive
instructor was forced to resign because of the grade
allocation.
We have been working on this case for some
time, said Mayer, and we will announce our
findings. We just dont want the issue to become a

VOTE S
J
MICA s
<
Q.

QT Smarted by coyest o I The bat-uVAs mcvH M M
K V f.o.YK \BE
PX tzt* /We. corses C toss Cansow Dorm l
$ \ /jn Wocfraid Vbc.nv l
f IVfjY TVe ?Jorron S1 S
I

BOLT THE BLOCK
(PAID POL. AD)

TRANSCEND
THE
PARTIES

political football.
Aldridge is still teaching at the journalism
college. His resignation isnt effective until
September.
Mayer, who heads up the group investigating the
Aldridge resignation, was enrolled in the particular
class in which all As were given.
He came into class the first day, said we all
would make As and that he didnt want any big
hangup over grades in the class. Instead, he wanted
all of us to be as original and creative as possible.
I think it worked, Mayer said.

OPEN
WEEKNIGHTS
TIL 9 PM
Mon. thru FrL
1236 N.W. 3rd Ave

l Mi|i ll l|i| i|li||i| | 1
ii|. Ik ~
Mk>- -m JB
§ JfeK £ JEt w MKftik'
TRUTH EXISTS FOR THE INDIVIDUAL ONLY
AS HE HIMSELF PRODUCES IT IN
ACTION
KIERKEGAARD

BY HOWARD POST
f THAT'S
/ show mzUj
O' /<_3
4-i+ 'Pair* C 1969 by United Footer* Syndicate, Inc.



A computer has no mind of its own. Its
brainpower comes from the people who
create the programs, says Rod Campany.
Rod earned a B.S. in Math in 1966. Today,
hes an IBM Systems Programmer working on
a portion of Operating System/360, a
hierarchy of programs that allows a computer
to schedule and control most of its own
operations.
A mixture of science and art
Programming means writing the instruc instructions
tions instructions that enable a computer to do its job.
Says Rod, Its a mixture of science and art.

Programming at IBM ilWMllI" |
Its a chance M|^^H
youve got
\ w J&nBH
HBF
v dHr Hk,
HHMk
JHP ji
v ' inirriif*Kffvus' '
'
jr H#J|
.jj*'*i',.fr l,^r /^ f I f'V* i VVf "i' 1 ;
- i /&''/* p'?'}'* sf a v?*fv^vv,"
Mk .IMfc SBM V
Jfl B B

Youre a scientist in the sense that you have to
analyze problems in a completely logical way.

But you dont necessarily hunt for an ulti ultimate
mate ultimate right answer. There can be as many
solutions to a programming problem as
there are programmers. Thats where the art
comes in. Any given program may work, but
how well it works depends entirely on the
ingenuity of the programmer.
Programmers hold a key position in the
countrys fastest growing major industry industryinformation
information industryinformation processing. Business Week re reports
ports reports that the computer market is expanding
about 20 percent a year.

Thunday, April 24,1909, Th Florida Alligator,

You dont need a technical degree
If you can think logically and like to solve
problems, you could become an IBM pro programmer
grammer programmer no matter what your major. Well
start you off with up to twenty-six weeks of
classroom and practical training.
Check with your placement office
If youre interested in programming at IBM,
ask your placement office for more information.
An Equal Opportunity Employer
IBM.

Page 7



Page 8

I. The Florid* Allioatnr Thursday, April 24. 1969

f
M V
JIM DEVANEY
...unaffiliated

The Presidential Candidates Speak

JIM DEVANEY
At the end of this campaign,
it is obvious that my candidacy
has been less than typical. When
Dan Jesse and I entered this
contest three weeks ago, we
were not thinking primarily of
winning, although we would
certainly welcome that outcome.
Rather, we hoped to elevate
the level of the campaign
oratory to a plane of relevance.
We wished for the students to
hear about truly valid issues
confronting all American youth
today.
Over and over again we talked
about certain common themes:
The obcenity of the competitive
Grade Point Averages, the lack
of enjoyment or even
involvement in learning, the
power that students have as
people not just students, the
necessity of students to look
beyond their dormitory and
fraternity doors to the
community around them. .over
and over again.
Whether or not our original
goals were reached will not be
determined by the size of the
vote today, although it can be an
indicator. Habits are not broken
overnight.
Rather our success will be
determined by the actions of
future student governments and
future candidates.
You, as students, owe it to
yourself to demand nothing less.
JOHN MICA
John Mica entered the race
for student body president with
a dream.
The dream was
simple Make student
government relevant and
receptive to student needs.
Throughout his campaign Mica
Promised he would return
confidence and integrity to
student government.
The balding candidate vowed
if elected president he would
restructure student government
to make it open to students who
had never had a chance to
govern their own lives.
Admitting this was not the
season for dreamers Mica vowed
to change the image of student
leadership.
He pledged to:
0 To socially involve
students in community affairs.
0 Underwrite cuts in
National defense Loans.

ri|l M mmWg I
JOHN MICA

EDITOR S NOTE: I
The Alligator is doing away with the regular editorial page today so
that the candidates for Student Body President can express their reasons
for seeking the office. Each candidate was notified, given a space
limitation, and this it what they said.
Liberation Party candidate Joan Warren did not turn in a statement.
WE RECOMMEND:
Charles Shepherd, First Party, for President.
Charles Harris, First Party, for Vice President.
Marty Haber, Issue Party, for Treasurer.

0 Abolish $lO parking fee
registration for students.
0 Establish competitive Food
Service.
0 Revamp the system of
academic counseling.
0 Abolishment of off campus
utility deposits.
0 Creation of student
Checking Account system.
But John Mica is a dreamer
and when the haid facts of
politics combined with the
supposed apathetic voting trends
on campus, Mica was termed an
idealistic candidate by his foes.
John Mica is idealistic but
also aware that the only way
student government can be
receptive to student needs is
through an honest approach at
looking at problems.
Today, students at the
university will go to the polls to
elect a president that will
represent the needs of the
students.
Micas opponent who has
been endorsed and lauded by the
Florida Alligator, is supported
by the largest fraternity-sorority
conglomeration in the history of
the UF
John Mica, although termed
an underdog has the support of
no fraternities but instead the
support of independent thinking
students.
Mica is a dreamer who can be
elected the students president
if students vote today.
Students today have a chance
to make this A year for
Dreamers.
Vote MICA.
VIC RAMEY
Foresight Party, throughout
this campaign, has been
consistent in its statements and
actions. It also has presented, in

! t
1
VIC RAMEY
...Foresight Party

its platform, a synthesis of
student feelings and logical and
simple steps to alleviate the
problems recognized by all of
the candidates and students.
Foresight Party was founded
because of the mandate the
students made in the last
election; the overwhelming
majority want student
government reformed.
Foresight Party, in its
platform, called for 1.) the
abolishment of the student
senate; which is recognized by
most to be inefficient,
ineffective, and unreceptive to
the students. The student senate
deals in trivialities, unable to
graple with large problems
simply because of apathetic
senators who do not attend
meetings.
2. The SG cabinet has all the
necessary powers to take over
the functions of the senate. The
cabinet, being a smaller group,
can function efficiently and
more effectively than the bulky
minded senate.
3. Students, byway of
monthly wide referendums,
make proposals to the cabinet,
who research the proposals and
then present the proposals to the
students to be approved or
disapporved by them. Students
not voting would simply be
expressing the fact that they
have no preference.
4. The honor court and the
honor system can be revised to
include two courts, one for
interpreting, studying, and
proposing laws while another
hears cases ol cheating, stealing
etc.
These four proposals are not
difficult to understand or to
enact; and w r ould place the
power of the SG in the hands of
the students, not mediocre.

> >
CHARLES SHEPHERD
...First Party

half-witted, and selfish clerks.
We, of Foresight Party, have
noted the recent statements of
other parties. se statements
closely allign with our own
platform which was formulated
weeks ago.
We particularly note
statements which allign with our
honor court policies, and with
our senate recommendations. We
feel that though we may not win
this election, we have influenced
public opinion and the actions
of other parties.
This in itself is a victory in
the fact that at last, a party has
delt in issues rather than in
mudslinging. This campaign has
been enjoyable and educational
and we hope that other students
have learned as much as we have.
A victory celebration will be
held Thursday evening in the SG
offices. Doctor Billy Graham has
been invited. He will say grace.
CHARLES SHEPHERD
You, the students, will have
the privilege of exercising a vital
freedom today when you go to
the polls to elect student body

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
Kiss, offices in R m 33 Reitz uni n
Phone 392-1681, 392-1682, or 392-1683.
or Flor > "> those of .ho editors
Florida" art C,e and not those the University of
"

HHBy mmar
i W W
' ve9C %^; : jHH||jfnjg||
'f|:' 1
JOAN WARREN
...Liberation Party

officers for the coming twelve
months.
As you do so, there are many
serious and pressing problems
facing our university. Perhaps
the most urgent of these are in
the area of academics. The
University of Florida is facing a
very real danger of
disaccreditation because of
external political meddling in
the internal affairs of the
university. This must be
stopped.
Over 2,000 courses are
offered each year, and many of
them are antiquated and
irrelevant. Curriculum evaluation
and reform must be undertaken
immediately.
First party has brought its
candidacy to you and discussed
with you the seriousness of these
and many other complex
problems. We have listened
carefully to your views and
concerns. We have pledged
ourselves to helping make your
total experience at the
university, both educational an'*
social more meaningful
relevant.
First party also has
emphasized that the problems
we all face cannot be solved
merely by making unrealistic
promises and then hoping for
the best. Long-lasting solutions
demand effective leadership,
based r isitive concern and
meaningful experience, not on
impatience or negativism.
We sincerely believe that our
record and our experience speak
plainly for themselves. And we
are convinced that after another
term of office as your elected
leaders, our record will again
prove that when it really
counted, First party was
there solving problems for
you.
This is our total commitment.
We ask your support for that
cause at the polls today.



FORUM:^^
C Adola qml ViMtot J
hone for
Village Mayors
For Shepherd

MR. EDITOR:
As chairman of the Mayors
Council and Mayor of Corry
Village, I am deeply concerned
with and aware of the problems
of married students at the UF. I
am interested in real solutions to
real problems. For this reason, I
looked forward to the campaign
for the Student Body presidency
in the hope that all candidates
would offer realistic programs of
benefit to married students.
However, only one candidate
came forward seeking my advice
about married student programs.
Fortunately, this single
candidate was willing to discuss
and to offer realistic, progressive
programs of immediate concern
to all married students. This man
was Charles Shepherd.
To date, we have worked out
tentative plans for a Day Care
Nursery Facility and we have
also made arrangements to

Staff Writings

Toes Get Browner Every Day

HAVE you noticed?
ALL of a sudden people have toes again. (And all ten of them are
getting browner day by day.)
AND the birds are noisy enough to wake you up before your
alarm.
GRASS is greener green.
MAYBE cause the sprinklers are on, seems like, 24 hours a day?
PANTIHOSE sales have gone down drastically.
AND the guys, too, have put their foot wrappings in the back of
their drawers.
PEOPLE smile whenever the sun comes out from behind a cloud.
YOURE having to carry a sweater or wear longsleeves to keep
from freezing in the air-conditioning.
AND the flutter of returning friends overhead may not be so
welcome when you have to clean their helloesoff your windshield.
SHADES all shapes and colors, adorn more noses. Theyre really
hiding sun-burned, sleepless or bloodshot (?) eyes.
EVERYONE talks diet cause there are new bathing suits to fill
out less full.
AND of course, tubing fans are getting their fun devices ready for
the ride down their favorite spring.
HAIR becomes streaked and the already blondes have trouble
staying one color.
DORM residents without air-conditioning begin to wish they lived
off campus while commuters, sweltering in their un-airconditioned
cars in the long lines hunting a parking space wish they still lived
on.
SO far this quarter, every Saturday, (knock wood) has been
beautiful.
YOU feel very alive or very alone.
ITS even harder to study in the day time and its getting dark just
a little later every day.
HAVE you noticed?
SUMMER, friends, is just eight weeks away!

continue the Summer
Recreational Program for
children of married students
which Shepherd initiated two
years ago as student body
president. Mr. Shepherd has
already made progress toward
securing additional police
protection and additional
lighting for the married villages.
These are the reasons I am
actively supporting Charles
Shepherds candidacy. I think
they are good ones. They
represent realistic programs that
are already taking shape.
I encourage all married students
to join with me and with Roger
Bass and Rickard Enochs,
Mayors of Diamond and Flavet
111, respectively, to elect Charles
Shepherd president of the
Student Body on April 24.
JERRY YAKATAN
MAYORS COUNCIL
MAYOR, CORRY VILLAGE

Speaking Out

(EDITORS NOTE: The Law Students Civil
Rights Research Council is comprised of UF law
students and has been on campus about five years.
It is best known for its work in preparing the
research for the defense of Pam me Brewer, Marshall
Jones, Ed Richer and other civil rights cases in the
state and nation.)
This week the President of the John Marshall Bar
Association appealed to law students to vote for the
candidate who supports law school programs. The
candidate referred to in that appeal was Charles
Shepherd.
LSCRRC now responds to such political
campaigning by presenting for your consideration
another side of the issues for which Charles
Shepherd stands. LSCRRC is opposed to First
Partys platform based on increased police
protection and law enforcement.
The type of police protection planned is based

r ii WRjP
Its Only A Toy To Pacify Him During This Latest Crisis

By Anne Freedman:

JjSr
%,

Shepherd Stand Racist

on racist grounds which represents an affront to the
community we supposedly serve. No student
government official or administrator called for more
police protection when a student from Africa
withdrew from school because he was spat upon by
white college students.
No official responded when the first black law
professor (visiting, of course) fled the university
because of threats to his wife and family after the
brutal execution of Dr. King.
As law students we should stand for justice. The
program Shepherd advocates represents a type of
law enforcement which symbolized injustice.
LSCRRC urges all law students to consider the
most important issues first and make our own
personal interests subordinate to those which are
best for the image of law in Gainesville community.
We do not support Charles Shepherd.

Attention Charlie
MR. EDITOR:
Attention Charles Shepherd:
I must remind Mr. Shepherd that eyen when the Veil known
cafeteria near campus charges two cents for catsup and a
penny for napkins it still has prices more reasonbale than
Servomation. And the food is at least edible.
Also, I would rather give my money to that gouging
establishment and get something for it than give it to our
equally gouging food service and get such things as: molded
bacon, paper plates and plastic forks (the Florida Room), stale
eight-cent donuts, hamburger that is half onod, and a number
of other things that pass as food.
If we boycott the off campus cafeteria that leaves only
Servomation and no one would make that choice.
B.E. JOHNSON
The System Is Behind Cheating

MR. EDITOR:
I suppose Vic Ramey will
not be elected SG president.
He says he will try to clean
up our university. This is a
death-move. The Greeks
football, and basketball
players, as much as
one-fourth of the student
body with cheating their way
through college. I am
sympathetic to Rameys
cause. But he has tackled
something bigger than he has
ever dreamed.
The files the fraternities
supposedly containing 60 per
cent of the final exams must
have taken much time and
effort to attain. The Greeks
would depend on these like
an addict does drugs. They

Thursday, April 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

By LSCRRC

not about to let someone
in that will upset the
applecart.
I think the editorial
printed April 16, on page
eight was obviously pressured
into the paper, the system is
hiding behind the paper,
telling him to put up or shut
up. It seems like a big joke
to me, everyone knows there
is cheating going on, anyone
that says anything is
immediately censored, I am
now sure Vic Ramey will not
be elected.
People could care less
whether the doctor that
removes their appendix or the
architect that designs their:
house cheated through
college.
T

Page 9



i, Th* Florida AMpMor, Hmmimf, April 24.19

Page 10

NOWaU Week...
*-**- it. 45 AT AT <5 M ATT. "*5 A4" o* T. aw_ Ti
0 m Quonrm Rights ReservedP-ces oooc A Weev Wed Nioon thru WeG. Noon
Light 8u1b5..4/97* ^r M A
ssssizz fnld Power dm
*"?: LOW I Ye" oENT !^
VI IV V*Vf VC VI If I Or* >*t-pen* s* you' choice f-oot 0 Excluding Cigorettk*.
v - Ay. _>£
Sport Shirt 5 1 59 TOMATO SAUCE 5/sl. C.S. CORN .....5/SI.
Nylon Hosiery 39< TOMATOE S /sl. ROLL POPS 3/sl.
LAND O' SUNSHINE ~ 3' i : 2*thSo or mere purbase excluding cigarettes
EMITTER Arrow Bleach 19
U* 3 Arrow Detergent 39
* BREAD 29 CRACKERS 29'
HONIV BUMS S a NDWICH" 3/SI.
COOKING OIL 49*
PEANUT BUTTER 79 jm iLa M
FREE COLLECT
SUPER Ml£ Z mU 39
TRIIPKQ catsup.. 4/si. gr. beans s/si.
iPulftMSid KLEENEX 4/sl. FEMS 2/6V
%\ jSSf"*/f MAYONNAISE 59'
> *m\ when you buy TuWtu. 3/$ 1. BEEF STEW 59*
CIEANSER 2/29< tOCKTAIL....4/sl. SAUSAGE 5/SI.
DETERGENT 83 PEACHES 4/sl. CHirimi oo
4 S CIEANER 69- PINEAPPLE 4/$ DOG FOOD W
Jf* kM D l * AP S'_PUNCH. 5 '_ PUNCH. 4/SI. R| . 3 £
Cleanser 2 **29c j | j^j|jj^ i
cteoner:;-; 99=
Vonillo Wafers 8



km These Specials
IPm Good /k i/ noon k JPOP
U.S.D.A. CHOICE W-D BRAND CORN FED usda choice w.d brand corn fed boneless
rillirir on ACT ROUND STEAK T
MIVU& RwAJ I CALIF. ROAST 79*
Jtt EQi STEAK T RIBS.. 59*
3IP LB ROAST-89* SK* .T
USDA CHOICE CORN FED BONELESS TOP SIRLOIN 2%-Lbs. W-D BRAND ALL MEAT STEW OR GROUND
USDA CHOICE SPRING LAMB STEAK $ CHUCK.T
USDA CHOICE
LEG 0 LAMB -99*
CHOPS.. T CHOPS 79* PICIIII^ 9
CHOPS.. 1 BREAST 19*
shoulder lamb #
ROAST 69* PATTIES 39*
WAD BRAND FRESH LEAN GRA.DE 'A' QUICK FROZEN TURKEY 5-0. CRACKIN' GOOD ARMOUR STAR
GR. BEEF 3 $1.59 UG QUARTERS 29 CAN BISCUITS 3/19* FRANKS 65*
MRNOW TRATPAK 1-Lb. Bag SUNNYLAND PURE 12-oz. SUPERBRAND SLICED INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED AMERICAN 808 WHITE REGULAR
SMOKED SAUSAGE.. 7? PORK SAUSAGE 55* CHEESE FOOD 59* SLICED BACON 65*
DINNER FRANKS 59* BEEFSTEAKS 79* COnAGE CHEESE 53* TURKEY ROAST $1.99
FRESH BOSTON BUTT 9oz. BORDENS BIG TEN 9S4oz. PILLSBURY 12-oz. TASTE O' SEA
PORK ROAST 49* CAN BISCUITS 2/41* CINNAMON ROLLS 29* FISHCAKES 3/sl.
FRESH BREAKSTONE CALIFORNIA CREAMED WISCONSIN LONGHORN TASTE O' SEA BONELESS FLOUNDER
PORK STEAK 59* COTTAGE CHEESE 53* CHEESE 79* FISH FILLETS 49*
16-oz. TASTE O' SEA
ip jim. agk PA Perch Dinners 3/ $ 1.
CORNfI HB
wMI IV Spoon n' Serve 4/*L
YOUNG TENDER POLE FRESH FIRM HEADS J W
BEANS 2 49' CABBAGE 6' 10 oz. FRESH FROZEN SLICED STRAW 10-oz. DIXIANA SPECKLED BUTTER
DATATAEC 1A CO< I EMAiIC 19/AQ4 BERRIES 3/sl. BEANS ..4/88*
POTATOES lObagS LEMONS 12/4 iemaiiaiie o/ti bi di a/oo<
US. No. I SWEET JUICY GRAPEFRUIT OR LARGE FRESH HEADS LCIVIVIIMIrE O/ fI I DLAUIETE) "l/OO
ORANGES 5 49* LETTUCE.... 2-*-49 coffee RICH 4/sl. FRUITPIES 3/sl.
CAR ROTS... 2. 25* ROMAINE 2-29* MW PIES CUf OKRA 2/sl.
CELERY 2/39* POTATOES 10.079* GREENS. 3/sl. MARGARINE3/sl.
!S I \ W Cr BUNS 5/881MAR6MINE 431
Strawberries 3 1 BW
| ,P J t
VaLuTsTAMM : Tol VALUE STAMPS | VALUES TAMPS ; I [IIIW VALI^STA MPS VALuTsTAMPS QnnnhoH I A/* 1
|M MIvP0| COt'OOM .~c rvIOMU O* I* UH-W. 0> I (.onto* ~P PtHiCnovi Os I 1 wifro MwtfMll CCK.rO" r.oo* PwMMoVI Os ( **wv*HO COvrOn t ut. e 'll /1 J VjJ | |V I I | SmmLm /
G. FRESH QUART!* IOCT. BO* < HFjIWV THREE '/. CANO f"LA. GR. *A* RREOM > w D BRAND LCAM * '
LOIN ILICD INTO 0l A J? I' BLUE BAY I, WHOLE OR CUT-UR .. LlCk.lk.l\/ nek.
Pork Chops I; Trosh Bogs I Tuna Fish I; Two Fryers C n H II^ NV PEN
GOOD THRU APRIL 30 | n .... .h ivri'ri. i.*. -- 1 ~ j.yb i. i.. ii'rvr r jrrv-i -... .*< h.il *vr iT rr~r. liutuuu wnr.. 1 1 A *
No 301 Odd i irry pl-n-aH 6-oz. 9 LIVES TUNA. .2/33* or Tuna & Egg 12-oz. NABISCO 15-oz. SWITCH
Tomatoes .... Cat Food . 27350 Vanilla Wafers . 390 Cat Food .... 100
26-oz. RITTER 12-oz. 9 LIVES Tuna 28-cz. PARSON'S CLEAR or SUDSY 46-oz. LIBBY
Vegetable Juice 350 Cat Food . .310 Ammonia . 2.7 e Tomato Juice . 390

Thursday, April 24,1909, Tha Florida AlUgstor, I

Page 11



*GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

I FOR SALE I
TAKE soil away the Blue Lustre way
from carpets and upholstery. Rent
electric shampooer SI.OO Lowry
Furniture Co. (A-lt-122-c)
SPECIAL TO UF STUDENTS: Get
top grade motor oil at cost while
supply lasts. 30wt., 10W30 and
10W40 only 45c, 50c and 55c in
quarts. Some in gals, at $1.75 and
$1.90. No quantity limit. Also misc.
auto products at or below cost. Call
376-4747 or take Newberry Rd. and
turn left at white church (Ft. Clark
Church Road) about one-half mile
west of 1-75, sth house on left.
(A-3t-122-p)
Yashica TL-Super. TTL meter, f 1.7
Auto-Yashinon lens. Mirror lock.
Shutter speed B-l/1000. With case,
$l4O. Ph. 372-3002 (A-st-122-p)
Gibson Electric Guitar, perfect cond.,
Firebird 3-pickups, $l5O, was $250
new. Call Wait, 376-1474.
(A-st-122-p)
For a good buy on a good scooter
call 378-8189 or come by no. 48
Shady Nook trailer pk. Make offer.
Sears Crusair less than 6500 miles.
(A-2t-122-p)
Gibson-Kalamazoo guitar S7O
Silvertone amp. needs minor repair
S3O Ph. 376-8155. Guitar comes with
case and has tremelo. (A-lt-122-p)
*6O Opel station wagon very claen,
engine very good; new crankshaft &
other parts; passed inspection $250
C&ll 378-8610 anytime. (A-st-122-p)
Gusn Smith .44 Mag, Smith .38
Chfs spec., Colt Python .357 Mag,
dies, holsters; Carl
Call anytime, especially wee
nighttime. (A-3t-122-p)
Sony TC255 tape deck, Mclntosh
C 24 preamp, miracord changer, KLH
spkrs and other; pentax spotmatic sir;
Carl Hayes 372-7591 Wee hours ok.
(A-3t-122-p)
120 base accordium SIOO excellent
condition. Record player (stereo)
Magnanox, SBO, excellent condition.
Call 372-7039 between 5-7.
(A-3M20-P)
Bed & mattress S4O. Window exhaust
fan $25. Mineral collection. 50
samples & shelf $75. Two 16 piece
dinner set $7 both. Call 372-7039
between 5-7. (A-3t-120-P)
Honda 50 in excellent mechancal
condition and 2 Helmets for $95.
Call 372-2257. (A-3M21-P)

(PAID POL. AD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

| 1

FOR SALE |
Borg-Warner 8 track stereo tape
player table model with detachable
speakers. Like new, $75. Call Hugh at
378-3301. (A-st-121-P)
Gibson 12 string 825-12 N with vinyl
case. $125 firm. 376-8007 after 6.
(A-st-121-P)
For Sale: 1966 Suzuki 120 cc
motorcych. Good Condition. Call
378-6366 after 6 p.m. (A-4t-121-P)
69 Honda CL 350 Scrambler, 33hp, 5
sp trans., only 2200 mi. Excellent
cond. Best offer over S7OO, helmet
incl. Call 378-0691, ask for Gordon.
(A-4t-121-P)
8x47 Ventura mobile home. Bay
windows, air conditioned, 7x20
porch awning, 2nd BR made into
study, furnished. $1990. Call
376-0622, 4546 NW 13 St.
(A-lt-121-P)
TV 20" GE b&w, beautiful early Am.
cabinet. Perfect condition SIOO. Call
392-9982. 3224 NW 13th ST.
(A-3t-121-P)
'6B Honda 90 (step through model).
1900 miles. $175. In very good
condition. Call 372-9358, ask for
Haynes in Room 195. (A-4t-119-p)
GRAND OPENING Every day up to
50% savings but April 21 thru 26 a
SUPER SALE. Reg. $79.50 full
suspension 4 drawer files, now from
$29.75 to $39.75. Reg. $49.95 full
suspension 2 drawer files, now from
$22.50 to $29.75. Also hundreds of
desks, chairs, files, and much more at
SUPER SAVINGS for this sale. NEW
and USED JR OFFICE
FURNITURE. 620% S. Main St. Tel.
376-1146. (A-7t-117-p)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2% acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20t-116-P)
1965 Triumph Bonneville, good
condition S6OO. Also 1948 Olds,
rolled and pleated interior, heater,
radio, antique tag, inspected make
offer. 378-9606. (A-3M21-P)
Get a Mau Mau mongrel. Itll chew
anything from bones to steel.
Champion lines. Pedigree African
barkless Basenji pups. All shots.
376-2630. (A-lOt-119-p)

(PAID POL. AD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

l, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 24,1969

Page 12

| FOR SALE
x.x.r.vxvx-x-x-x.x-w.snv:-:-x*x-x*x*x.x;*£
2 bedroom concrete block home in
NE $450 equity, take over payments
of $61.48 month at 6% interest. Call
owner at 378-5145 after 5:30
pm.(A-st-118-p)
I FOR RENT |
Peace and quiet is yours for the
asking by living In one of our
secluded luxurious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.'
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities, qall us no* for n
appointment to see them. lmgedmt>.
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, In**,
Phone 3y-6461. (B-22t-105-c) /
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms fro entire summer quarter.
Close to Campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21t-115-p)
Available for summer qtr. Trailer,
12x60, 3 br, IV2 bath, air cond.,
washer completely furnished. $l2O
monthly plus utilities. Call Hugh at
378-3301. (B-st-121-P)
Tired of hot, crowded dorms? Enjoy
an air-conditioned spacious apt. for
only $l2O for the whole quarter
(with 3 roommates in furnished
2-bedroom apt) Come by rental
office, University Gardens Trace, 708
S.W. 16 Ave. Ph. 376-6720.
(B-5M22-C)
3 bedroom house furnished air cond.
5 mins from campus new $l4O
month lease for summer quarter. Call
378-0476. (B-3t-121-p)
Must sublet quiet modern 1 bdrm
apt, close to campus, a.c., access to
pool. Will rent for best offer. Call
evenings 376-5642. (B-3t-122-p)
1 bdrm OLYMPIA Apt., 1 block
from campus, to sublet for summer
qt. Available in June. Call 378-4277.
(B-st-122-p)
Three-bedroom house for rent
summer qtr. accross st. from new law
schl. Pay for only 2V2 months at
$l5O/Mo. Call 378-7748 or see at
120 SW 25st. (B-3t-122-p)
f lJU "" WANTED |
%SXWS?X >XfrWXXXXXXW-X-XiSSy
Please help us! We need 1 female
roommate now and for summer
quarter at Landmark. Call after 5.
378-9954 (C-st-119-p)
Williamsburg apts 1 male
roommate wanted SSO month
April paid. Central AC. 2br. Pool,
dishwasher, disposal. Call 376-9719.
(C-st-119-p)
Need one female roommate to share
two bedroom Fr. Qrt. Apt. for next
year. Call 392-9871 or 392-9873.
(C-3t-122-p)
Female roommate Cameiot Apt.
Immediate occupancy, rent paid thru
April 1. Call 378-9694 after 5 PM.
(C-st-122-p)
Need 1 roommate Fr. Quarter. Fall
Quarter. Share with 3 others. Call
392-8263 evenings. (C-st-122-p)
Mobile home wanted. Would like to
purchase used trailer, 2 bdr 12x60
must be available in August. If
interested, write Jake Vam 302
Duplex Court, Brooksville, Fla.
(C-9M16-P)
Two mature, responsible male
roommates for summer quarter in
Landmark Apartments. Call
378-0727. (C-2M21-P)
The Rathskeller is looking for an
entertainment Chairman and an asst,
business mgr. Students dont miss
this chance be a part of the
Rat, apply Rathskeller office, main
cafeteria. (E-3M21-C)
, !SVX.>NXWXv.*X X C*X X X X*X*.XXi*X X M>
I HELP WANTED |
il<*x*x*xx:x<*:xx-x-x-xv.!.s%wiw;*:*j>
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS FROM
TAMPA BAY AREA Career
$600.00 per month, plus expense
allowance for man needed for
insurance agency. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 11702 Tampa, Fla. 33610.
(E-Bt-119-p)

HELP WANTED 1
V, # i -.......-...v,..;.j.;.;,;.;,y,y;*;*X 800 KEEPING TYPING position
with one of the finest
Excellent working conditions witn
very freindly small staff. Enough
responsibility and activity to keep
you interested. Salary is excellent.
Call PAUL GRIMES ALLIED
PERSONNEL of Gainesville, 1800 N.
Main 376-4611 (E-st-118-p)
I rnccuEEix I
I 'euLimr I
@ Hisni m am anna!
ALSO SIDNEY POTIER ROO SIBBER I
-MIKtEffIOFIK NIGHT I
"Hard, fanny
and sound!"
-RENATA AOLER. N Y TIMES
NORMAN MAILER'S
by GROVE PRESS
May 4 & 5
7 & 9 P.M.
Union Aud.

MRKSiifBE 30X OFFICE OPENS 6:45
show starts t. ib
Ist RUN IN GAINESVILLE
A combo of scuba dupes
rockupastomina
S BACKUS KEN BERRY-RODDY McDOWALL Jjjfe
GRIFFIN m FRANK TftFORO IyMUOftS mt Mt ARTHUR
GEOflCr SHERMAN JACK
|L VV \ SPECIALS ||
Thursday Special
I BROILED CALVES LIVER!
I & ONIONS ||
§§ FRIED SHRIMP WITH S
- §§ FRENCH FRIES, HOT m
M SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES M
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS i
TOHr-rrr.ni MAU Jfj

I
fcScsEi^]
WATCHED
TRAINS
3 .7^9
ISRSTCI



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| HELPWANTED ]|
Counselors White Plains. My day
camp wants men from NY area to
serve as gen. couns. Write Mohawk
Day Camps, Old Tarrytown Rd.,
White Plains, NY 10603. (E-3M20-P)
AUTOS 1

i
V .v.v/.VAV.V.V.VAVAV
/.V.'.V.'.V. '
1967 Volvo 142 with air and
standard shift. Radial tires x clean
Red $2,195.00 Crane Imports.
372-4373. (G-118-st-C)
1967 TR Spitfire excellent shape,
good tires (radials), 2 extra tires & 1
wheel extra, radio, luggage rack,
29,000 miles, br. racing green. Tim
767647. (G-5M21-P)
1960 Ford radio heater, new battery
and value job. Runs good. Call Val
392-8922 or 227 Reid Hall. $250.
(G-3M21-P)
57 Ford, very good six cyl std.
Excellent transportation, must sell.
Best offer. Also Honda CBI6O. $175.
Call 378-8477 after 6 p.m.
(G-st-121-P)
Must sell. 1964 Corvair Monza $495
or best offer. Call Steve at 378-7423
between 5 and 7 p.m. (G-3t-121-P)
V.W. Manx buggy 1300 engine
53H.P. Red metalflake soft top side
curtains rollbar many extras. Great
for sand, woods, street $1695 or
trade for big motorcycle and cash.
See at 1020 S. Main St. or call
378-0249: (G-10t-l 19-p)
1967 Austin Healy Sprite convt mark
3. 12000 miles. Bought new in 68.
Excellent condition. Best offer. Call
after 5, 376-9724. (G-3t-122-p)
66 MGB British racing green; wire
whls; fold-away top. Good condition.
Only SIOOO Call Bob at 378-7748 or
see at 120 SW 25 St. (G-122-3t-p)
r l
S s
Cocktail party this and every Friday
with teh Friday Afternoon Club.
Sponsored by four graduate students
for the University crowd over 21. At
the Lamplighter from 5-7:30. Ladies
drinks $.20. (J-3M21-P)
Good action at the Friday Afternoon
Club. Over 100 people enjoy the
good company and inexpensive
drinks every Friday. Two private
rooms and private bar. Sponsored by
four graduate students. Ladies drinks
$.20. (J-3M21-P)

KSKI NOW**! MARVIN llfllil
\ TOSHIRO |p!||||
enemies. . they tormentedSffifl @ -JhII
each other as savages .. they Jjj
faced each other as men! H| mmmjmi IN IHE
Wm/m PAN AVIS ION* PACIFIC TECHNICOLOR^%|fcS^H^B
ISfr A SESSION WITH THE COMMITTEE
|I -1
Mliff. .. Extraordinary ... Simply Great!
MAGGIE SMITHS PERFORMANCE IS STAGGERING 199
Vincent' Canby, New York Times

;NSSS*XX X X*X*X > X-X PERSONAL
$ ?
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message. Any time day or night.
Message changes each Wed. LET
FREEDON RING, 16 NW 7th.
(J-5M21-P)
Interested in travel and/or study in
Europe, Asia or the Mid-East? Want
to buy or rent a car to use there. Call
392-16 55 Rm. 310 Union.
(J-12t-114-c)
Passangers needed for trips to Ft.
Lauderdale. SIO.OO R.T. Leave
Thursdays 6:00 P.M. Return
Mondays at 11:00 P.M. Trips made
on April 24, May 8, 22. 1968 Merc.
Benz Air. D. Grosse 372-9317
Eves, except Weds. Buchman B-15.
(J-st-119-p)
We refuse to concede! Join
Liberation Party, SDS, Devaney at
beer party to form govt, in exile.
Friday BPM 1000 SE 3rd. Ave. Pd.
Pol. Ad. (J-2t-122-p)
Tired of a major you don't care
about? Can't find anything better?
Come to Rm 302 Fla. Gym.
Recreation the young field with a big
future. (J-3M20-P)
1 LOST & FOUND |
v
vx-x-x-x-x-xo-x-xax.v.v.v.v.vxvx-xx-XsX
Lost: blue zip-up windbreaker during
baseball game at Beta field Thursday
night. Plaese call Bob or Art at
376-0430. (L-lt-122-p)
Lost Black labrador puppy 3 mos.
White chest-red checked collar. NW
area. Her name is Roogie. Please help
I need her. 378-0726 or 378-5411.
(L-lt-122-p)
Lost GLASSES trifocal heavy brown
frame, 6 P.M. Tuesday, Campus
Store-Computer Center. Reward. Call
372-8905 or 372-5883. (L-lt-122-p)
Lost: Prescription glasses Call Mike
392-7508. Reward. (L-2t-122-p)
Found: Prescription glasses in black
leather case after ES 203 final can be
claimed by calling extension 0110 or
coming by Matherly 310.
(L-3M21-NC)

(PAID POL. AD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

LOST & FOUND f
Found slide rule near bee hives
behind Bartram Hall. Identify. 326
Bartram. (L-3t-121-NC)
SERVICES |
NEED A PAINTER? Interior or
Exterior professional painting. Call
after 5 or anytime on weekends.
378-4855 Free Estimates.
(M-10t-122-p)
I have an IBM mag. tape typewriter
and guarantee perfectly typed short
papers. No dissertations. Very fast.
Mrs. Lamm after 5:00.
378-5514.(#*5t-118-p)
Alternator# Generator# starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)

(PAID POL. AD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

I DRIVE IN I U I

f Dewntewn Gsincivill*. { S
Urt'ilir f
/!y\ -and then, there are the people
// \\ who steal people...
L \ \ sometimes for some very
\ peculiar reasons...
Marlon Brando
Boone
Rita Moreno Pamela Franklin Jess Hahn
A love story
that begins with
an incredible
experiment!
TO,
|||j||||j&&|^ L
j ffiAjlty--- CLAIRE BLOOM wm [g]

RAY BRADBURYS masterpiece of the supernatural!
ROD STEIEER [
CiaiE BLOOM
agg
Don't dare |f W,
IIIUSTR9TED
MON f J
§ Bk
TECHNICOLOR RANAVISIOr
FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS A#. F jfl
*

Thursday, April 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 24,1969

PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU / H
mini ll# WEDNESDAY NOON, APRIL 30, 1969 £ M
fi *** matveloui v.tiety
of fun foods-from alphabet Jr -8
soup to dry-roasted nuts. .# :> i fp\ j'Â¥ %' *s. W*\\ VI
our Danish Bakery with I
. fresh-baked goodies. And \ y TTllffTJ'T' \\V\ \ \ J^IFV
what rivals the joy of a .'[Trl, ) i/ / # f fff V\ | HoJkK^^f
juicy steak or Butterball i! "jll \1 /! I I Iff ** F : J\ \\ 11
turkey? But if you do live by huu Il n ri?T> f AfTTiiT] I1 11 I fttl 7 "H 11 1
bread alone, the vaTiety at ll WEM (WJMWJJ/ J LLLUJILI UJ 1 I 'l J.ilLjTV*' l IT| 1 1
Publix makes it a pleasure, too! |T | | I
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED M FREE
A Patfeful of Ideas w
who do wjtdfa/e, aUmb.
-"Tl'.^ i,l,bMry i Auto.rat, by Soalto.t, Auortod Flavor.
Cake Mixes 3 '; *1 i MA m A £";"' t..* c,
sf.ktiy, ( .r,win,Nrk ( IC CPGCilll ,!! 59 Coffee Mate M ii? L 69 e
*ljk.iy'.Mi.i...cr **yi. Sherbets sf* $1 1, Napkins 3 T l, $ 1
Golden Corn -* **< coc s# i".. I ***. f* T i*. pk,fc 1
wiuuii worn O ... DV Mi(i..,,H M khi.is M .w.e S 12
*: 59- Prune Juice 49- 8
Stekely'., Serve with Breekfeet Cluh Mertarine Jewelleu Pue Fordhook Limas # r 29 Fruit Drink 3*~. $ 1 p~';:r
Cut Green Beans e# 3 can. 59* CAcktflil e #3o3 $8 A ,^#w!Z ta n' 0 MJ ~yorPr i, ,h v, "
stekeiy'.smeii 9 * Preserves # ^ 1, 30*
Whole Green Beans .. # 3 . 3 25 c k *- oiTh *** £*
- Chunk Tuna 3^B9 e s ,tz Crac *ers 37
. waswaieuw. Vienna Fingers ..... 43
i *d < i w w w->.wWwj.!ss -o

Stekeiy'. Sliced

PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU



I, premium Proton Boneless Imperial Qy
oof Boos* B** Sfi&ag***
f p r# mium Proton Boneless Knglisb Cut Macaroni Salad ...X 39* Listerine *t^B9 e | |
oaf Roast ee e lb. 99* Carrrt Salad X' 39* Kan Spray 49< 1, **",*|l """*
hock Steaks... 79* M ~
eef Short Ribs I^69 e £ Sliced American.. ST 65* I*
m Arm-rt Ml.. WIM-Un m..t | White Rain Shampoo 1
1 Sharp Cheddar .. X 79 I 2 14^,1b0 1
Mellow vneaaar P k ov
Sifts prem.um proten government EEi ~ ,5 [[illM^GreMStamilSpl
IsPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE! jHQPHr/ Margarine 47 I: Regular or Extra-Hold |
- fO I *( Armour* Gold Star Boneless FUifchmann'* salt | White Rain Hair Spray |
vTrolCnv Margarine 47* | j. |
Wlhkery** Swat ar I (Expires Wed., April 30, 1969) 1
Biscuits 4 caa 45* aera.a.AAataaAit PftOeaAana
Slkpt.
JEm nOIIIO Broccoliaugratin..'iS49 I: uirari*. I
| Si SB ORB a fli SteuHar'i Praiaa |> Tooth Paste 1
# KMr 3-lb. can Noodles Romanoff ST 49 ]: 5-. or 6y 4 -oz. tube |
J 1 Thomas' Frozen (Expires Wed., April 30, 1969) |
J RNb London Crumpets 3 IS: $ 1 **************
K W Botter Beans 45* HillMWGrenStampSM
Baby Limas 49* I
... 1(U1 .. ~u .. . . | PSD Shrimp Meats <
(Slat 100 latra SAM Oraaa Stamps with caapoa) Birds lye Frasaa leaf ar k r |
Chopped Spinach I 5 ivwb.pk*. 1
Jciou. lean Center-Cut tomh T.st, f (Expire. Wed.. April 30, 1969) j
B>rk Chops Lb. 79 c Fish Sticks eh.- 39 c jnjW|| fln fl *' AA E*XTRA D p
Bare Ribs 59c DIXIE LILY
Sf, Premium Sou, 09. Vm.tSllUfc' Vall.y Fr.il Whole I
Sown 'N Serve ... tSf 63* : s*rwirri., |
Smoked Mackerel. c 79* : |
S I # am, Saafaad Traat, Daliciaws $ (Expire. Wed., April 20, 1969) |
araunscnweiger lb. 09 Plain or Self-Rising Swordfish Steak .. r 99* g jig -|r.
Erkey Slices and 3LAt,&. HipWGreenStampspl
Potatoes i s appad I
Lu Tiitc l-Oi. AAc Hard Florida 7 two pkgs. O# 10
\uUTa eeeeeee pkg. ** I 1 | HAA|| fMIIkfIMA A* (Expires Wed., April 30, 1969)
:kle A pimento, olive A pimento, beef bologna) Wl vwll aHHUUyu 000000000090 lb. w v^^aassssssssas^^ssssMtossss*
enel Copeland Presents I 1 F^_th F i or jda Tronicana a EXTRA
opeland Wieners ... 9 c Q Orange Juice £1! 69* fifll^GreenStamps^^
now's Famous Whole-Hog _, .. with tats caaraa aaa rstcaaii or
ag Sausage St 69- Yellow Sweet Cor. .... 10.-59- JZ^ZZ.
now's S. C. Breakfast g of 12 9
nk Sausage ;c 69 [~| -- j rnfr oie< li I^.. A P m i0., 8 , |
rasota Brand Tasty Chipped RBIMIn %! !# 000000090 Mt pkg. W SaOAAAAOAAAAAAAAOQIIBAAA OAAO AAAAAAAOOX
! H J urkey * 351 Cucumbers ..... 2- 15 Bil^GreenStamps^
lump Wieners .... ph9- I i Baal Oa BB ____ #U lb. *# j
rmans Orange-Bond Fresh | | IMfHItG POpCORR 90000000# 2 Pkg- 25 \\ Tea Ba 9
licea Boloana Bka 5# C Also available for your Spring Salads! Endive, Escarole,Bib, Leaf, Boston and Romaine 1) Ct. pkg.
VM VMWyiIVI eeeeeee pkg. ew Lettuce L I (Expires Wed., April 20, 1969)
O O C us^^- N
lpy#j (iJkfe QL^^U^T^emMy
publix a

I GAINESVILLE MALL
2630 N.W. 13th Street

GAINESVILLE SHOPPING CENTER
1014 N. Main Street

WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER
W. University Avenue at 34th Street
Stores hours: 9-9 Mon. thru Fri. 9-7 Sat.

Thunday, April 24, 1960, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 15



Page 16

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 24, 1969

Creative Concerts

By MIKE SIMMONS
Entertainment Editor
Creativity an essence as
allusive as love and as indefinite
as ESP. Its a substance that
dodges the grasp of all artists,
one that few manage to hold for
very long; a tool applied to
success by a subtly sparked
miniority.
Its manifest in infrequent
souls, some of whom who will
display their effort-filled talents
today and Friday for the UF
publics awe and appreciation
when Bob Sokols Poe try-Jazz
Concert is performed in the J.
Hillis Miller Medical Center
auditorium and the Rathskeller.
muteboy
cannot scream
for help as open mouthed,
taught tounge
father sank in
silent wet.
One barefoot
dirty boy
in silence ..
cant understand ...
santa clause cries
and American Indians
are still shot at
by the good guies?
Whats Wrong Embryo?
This ugly-rolled-up
kid squirts out and
squawks cause
its cold outside.
The programs will include

s*& :388P
Jp I
KIg|H jaM
L
MICA
GIVES
A
DAMN
I VOTE TODAY I
I tjfe; i:, (PAID POL. AD) I

UF TALENT DISPLAY IN

poetry by UF student Bob Sokol
(examples of which are printed
above), works of Negro
authorship presented by Earl
Williams, an employe of the
Medical Centers Childrens
Mental Health Unit, and a wide
variety of poetic material
offered by UF English professor
Ed Orchester. All three readers
will be backed and
complimented by the jazz
improvisations of the Ergood
Quartet.
Todays presentation will be
given free of charge in the
Medical Center auditorium from
7:30 until 10:30 p.m. Fridays
show in the Rathskeller will be
subject to the establishments
usual weekend admission price
and will be offered in three
segments at 9:30, 10:30 and
11:30 p.m.
Also on hand this weekend at
the Rathskeller will be the
Satruday performance of
another selection of UF
talent The Seventh Chord, a
vocal combo known as one of
the most popular the Rathskeller
has presented to date. The
duo Kitty and Rick
Oliver will be giving
themselves over to soul and
ther brands of musical
entertainment. f

(PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

'Cosmopolis-ABC Special Soon

Cosmopolis, a North
American J Rockwell Special,
which received great acclaim
from critics and governmental
agencies alike, is based on the
growing agonies of the worlds
cities and will be repeated in
color on Monday, May 12,
10:00-11:00 p.m., EDT on
ABC-TV with George C. Scott
narrating. (The Special was first
broadcast Jan. 13, 1969.)
All cities are afflicted with
the same problems, urban

VOTE f^.DPOL.AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

j 1 AW
you can get away
JaBKA
: : . JwjWt'
.yCQftPffiftVftflffTTTTTTr
I Jljt
Qj f
Jjfl m y .. M Bgf H m.
I ;i I W**
See you t Honda dealer for a color brochure, safety pamphlet lillll
American Honda Motor [WmB

W?M

Mmmm
WMMm

:WS: : : :; *: : : : >: : : : : : : : ij:
: : yyyy y.-y.-y*x-yy. :

vfc.
ttw

K

sprawl, uncontrolled growth,
obsolescence, overcrowding,
decay, pollution and a lack of
planning for the future.
Executive producer John
Secondari seeks out some of the

Maccabee Student Organization Sponsors
an ISRAEL'S INDEPENDENCE DAY celebration
Thursday, April 24, 8 p.m. in Hillel auditorium
16 NW 18 Street.
Israeli food!
Israeli music!
Israeli short films!
No charge. Everyone invited.

worlds most knowledgeable and
concerned experts who discuss
their approaches to solving these
problems which, they predict,
must be solved within the next
30 years if we are to survive.



SIGMA CHI
Sigma Chi Derby, a
well-known and fun-filled Greek
function on the University of
Florida campus and a tradition
on campuses throughout the
country takes place this
Saturday on Broward Field,
starting at 2 p.m.
This is the UF Sigma Chis
23rd Annual Derby, staged for
the benefit of the fifteen
sororities on campus. Basically,
Derby is a day when the girls let
their hair down, wear sweatshirts
and cutoffs, and don a new
personality.
The weekend starts Friday
evening with a street dance
beginning at 5:30 p.m. Everyone
on campus is encouraged to
attend the dance which takes
place in front of the Kappa
Delta house.
Saturday the Derby begins
with a Parade circling the
campus and ending at Broward
Field where the Derby Day
events will take place.
This year Derby Day will
include the seven familiar events
plus a spirit event. The events
include an announcement of the
Sigma Chi Derby Queen, the
pledge dress-up, and the popular
tug-a-war, plus several wild
mystery events.
The Spirit winner will be
decided on the basis of a banner
on the front of each sorority
house, the Golden Derby garb,
and the Derby parade.
Last years Queen, Mickie
Luckhardt form the Kappa
Alpha Theta house, will crown
the winner of this years contest,
who was selected last weekend
at Rainbow Springs.
All of the trophies will be
awarded to the winners of the
individual events and the overall
Derby Saturday night during an
open party at the Sigma Chi
House on Fraternity Row.
The band for the entire
weekend will be the fabulous
Soul Tenders.
PHI KAPPA TAU
This week the fraternity will
celebrate their annual Dream
Girl Weekend. Friday will
feature a banquet, the crowning
of this years Dream Girl, and
the Dream Girl Dance. A caravan
to Crescent Beach and a beach
party dance will be Saturdays
highlight.
Presently Phi Tau is in second
place in the Blue Leagues
Presidents Cup race.
In campus activities, brother
Dave Pesek has been appointed
chairman of the Reitz Union
Fine Arts Committee and will
coordinate all projects and
programs of the committee.
George Crawford was appointed
chairman of the Reitz Union
Special Projects Committee and
brother Tom Korge was recently
MG LINE
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE
AUSTIN AMERIC A
V CRANE (tfl(jj)
IMPORTS
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373
Gainesville

Greek Neios

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Staff Writer

named assistant treasurer of the
IFC.
ALPHA DELTA PI
Jo Lynn Pijot has been
chosen as the new Miss
University of Florida. She will
compete this June in the Miss
Florida Pageant in Orlando,
along with another ADPi from
her hometown, Carol Still, who
is the current Miss Panama City.
In the Miss Florida Universe
Contest in Miami this summer
the University of Florida will be
represented by Maria Junquera,
who was selected last week as
Gator Carni Gras Queen.
Pam Pemberton i£ one of
three finalists in the Engineering
Fair Queen Contest. The new
Queen will be crowned at the
Engineering Ball, Friday night,
April 18 at the Holiday Inn.
ADPi weekend is this Friday
and Saturday, April 18 and 19.
Friday night ADPis and their
dates will dance to music of
We The People at the
University Inn until about 1:30
when breakfast will be served.
Saturday everyone will be up
early and off for a day at the
beach and an afternoon
cookout.
ALPHA CHI OMEGA
Alpha Chi sister, Eileen Me
Dargh, recently returned from
the Angel Flight Convention
held in New Orleans. She was
recognized as the outstanding
area commander in the nation.
Mrs. H. M. Mauger, the
Province President of this area,
visited at the Alpha Chi house
for a few days this past week.
Mrs. M. A. Hittle, the
national president of the
sorority, visited the chapter
Wednesday and Thursday. A tea
was held in her honor.
BETA THETA PI
The Daughters of the Dragon,
little sister organization of Beta
Theta Pi, provided the first
runner up in the Miss University
of Florida contest, Miss Margaret

V N'S
NIGHT
GIRLS
TONITE-8 p.m. TIL
AU. BAR DRINKS
25t
Be sure to ask ERNIE hr
your Thirsty Gator ID.
card youll never be the
same again!
THIBSTT
QATbn-

Toms. All of the Gamma Xi
Betas extend their heartiest
congratulations to Margaret.
The Betas also took an active
part in the recent Gainesville
cleanup operation. Hank Salzlar,
head of the Beta Garbage
Party, saw to it that everyone
did a good job and had a good
time.
SIGMA KAPPA
Recently the Sigma Kappas
helped celebrate Easter by
having a party for foster
children. The little boys and girls
seemed to enjoy hunting eggs on
the lawn and running around
with their laden baskets.
The girls also have seen one
of their pledges, Vana Christian,
gain the semi-finals in the Miss
University of Florida contest.
Vana, a freshman, displayed her
talent by singing a popular folk
song.
With initiation looming
somewhere in the future, the
pledges completed their pledge
project by washing cars with the
Beta pledge class.
PI KAPPA PHI
So far this quarter Pi Kapps
have seven new pledges.
Pat Marshner, tri-Delt, who
was sponsored by Pi Kappa Phi
in the Gator Gras Beauty
Contest, was one of the ten
semi-finalists.
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
The brothers of Sig Ep held
an Easter egg hunt for the
children of the Flavetts, Easter
Sunday afternoon. About 60 of
the youngsters and their parents
took part in the search. On hand
was a truly unique Easter rabbit,
a baby pig dressed in bunny
garb.
The Sig Eps finished second
in the IFC blood drive with 119
pints.
Pressures On
The pressure at the deepest
part of the ocean is nearly seven
tons per square inch, almost a
thousand times the atmospheric
pressure on the surface.

YOU are ]
o
the ISSUE |
cl

SPEND *£ $ f
ONE MOMENT
*s|!* On Gator Advert! sments **
| 4,000 COLLEGE MEN worked for the
ts $
SOUTHWESTERN CO. last summer- ?
t |
THE AVERAGE MAN EARNED
| $193.92 PER WEEK |
xApplicants for this summer will be interviewed S
ij: Thursday, April 25 24th. Sign-up sheets are |
: jj:
i;available in the Placement Office, Reitz Union.§
$ -v, $
We design our cars the way we design our jet
planes. For maximum performance, comfort and safety.
As* about our new SAAB leasing program / Unusual overseas plan Free delivery Irom Sweden lo P O E. East Coast
OF SWEDEN
You should see
the car we make. S*f\
Pinna Performance
615 North Main Street
Gainesville, Florida 32601
904-378-1668
WHITE LEVI'S FLAIRS
The aware ones . that make things happen
. . are in White Levi's Nuvo Flair bottom pants.
They've got it all from Sta-Prest to wide belt
loops. It's the new look . and it happens
at Fremacs.
White Levi's Nuvo Flairs 9.00
i Blue Levi's Flairs 7.00
GAINESVILLE MALL

Thursday, Arpil 24, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

KORN
KETTLE IS
KOMING

Page 17



Page 18

I, Tha Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 24,1969

Netters Swing At Cape Coral Tourney
"..aa 1 V a

By JEFF FRANK
Alligator Correspondent
The high-flying UF tennis team will compete this weekend in the
Cape Coral Intecollegiate Tennis Tournament Thursday through
Saturday.
This tournament, sponsored by the Gulf American Corporation, is
being held for the seventh annual time, but this is the first year the
Gators have entered it.
Besides the UF eight other schools are entered. They are Rollins
College, University of South Florida, Furman University, Mississippi
Culbertson Top Passer
Faces Spurrier Next

UF men turned out in great
numbers for the Campus Punt,
Pass and Kick competition
Wednesday at the ROTC Drill
iSsBBr s m I*'
Sgg ''SflEEyiiHS§r
TOM KENNEDY
CULBERTSON
... tosses ball 176 feet

uqi_iMjjcpi MW ^MMi
The Rascals! |9
In a benefit for the UofF Coliseum Fund
8:OOp.m. -Fla. Field
$ 2.50 per
Tickets at: Reitz Union Box Office
BHg Belk-Lindsey Quik-Save Records ||p
Record Bar Reco rdsville

Field.
The finalist figure to give UF
Heisman Trophy winner Steve
Spurrier a tough test when they
meet him Saturday afternoon
before the Lettermen Intrasquad
game at one.
Finalists in each division are:
Pass Jim Culbertson (176
feet), Jim Manning (173 feet),
Stewart Goodman (161 feet),
Dean Classman (160 feet), Tom
Reavell (160 feet). Punt Mike
Dallas (52 yards), Marty
Solomon (50), J.A. Goetz (49),
Culbertson (49), Ed Omes (48),
Manning (48), Jim Posey (48).
Kick Jack Yant (55 yards),
Howard Hammer (53), Randy
Silverberg (48), Manning (46)
and Jim Shalls (44).

(PAID POL. AD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

NEELY FACES STIFF TEST

The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN
Sports Editor
Hawk Returns
By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
NEW YORK Ken Harrelson
returned from retirement late
Tuesday night, and will play for
Cleveland.
The former Bosox slugger had
announced his retirement
Sunday after being dealt to the
Indians in a six-player trade.
Baseball Commissioner Bowie
Kuhn, Red Sox General Manager
Dick OConnell, Indian owner
Gabe Paul met with Harrelson
and his lawyer Bob Woolf in a
four hour session. It was
reported that the Hawk signed
his 1970 contract with
Cleveland, terms were not
disclosed.

(PAID POL. AD.)
SHEPHERD
FIRST

State University, Oral Roberts University, Florida State University,
Jacksonville University, and the University of South Carolina.
The Gators, sporting a 17-1-1 record, have beaten three of these
teams in dual meets already this year. Rollins, Florida State, and
Jacksonville University. But the Gators will face strong competition
from Oral Roberts and the University of South Carolina.
The Tulsa based Oral Roberts team is virtually an all foreign team.
Included in their top six are a South African, a Finn, two Czechs, and
an Australian. Their number one player is Peter Van Lingen figures to
give Gator Armi Neely his toughest competition.
South Carolina is a very strong Atlantic Coast Conference team.
There are several Floridians on this team, who will be anxious to make
a good showing upon returning to their home state.
Representing the UF will be Neely, Charlie Owens, Jamie Pressly,
Steve Beeland, Greg Hilley, and Paul Lunetta.
The Gator netters have an added incentive to do well, since the
Gator golf team won the Cape Coral golf tournament earlier this year.
TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
iiM
STARKE. FLORIDA
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER
-HOURS
WEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT



Ur Pitchers Wear Down Base Paths

By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
Major league baseball is trying
some new ideas this season to
put more excitement into the
game.
Thus far, lowered pitching
mounds and a smaller strike
zone have helped pro hitters
produce over 100 more runs
than in a comparable number of
games last year.
But if professional baseball is

1 R
i :; |
t mil
Wp I \ a^|/^|
2SL< r*


*'* ~ .v, . .'<*.
PICKREN THE HITTER
... rounds third against Kentucky

Theta Chi Defeats AGR
In Blue League Golf Action

John Lynn fired a blistering
37-33-70 to lead Theta Chi over
AGR, 150-164 to win the Blue
League golf title Monday.
Lynn carded seven birdies
and five bogies over the par 72
UF Golf Course in what was the
finest exhibition of fraternity
golf this season.
Lynn's partner, Craig Fox
carded a 39-41-80 as he tied for
second position with AGRs Tim
Colbert. Miller Couse recorded
an 84 for his efforts.
Lynns efforts followed
previous nine hole scores of 39
outstanding performance in the
last five years.
In the Orange League,
defending SAE fell by the
wayside to a strong KA team
that had recorded the lowest
scores throughout the
tournament. The KAs shot a 54
hole total of 235 to the Es 242
in the 18 hole event..

(PAID POL AD.)
SHEPHERD
_ FIRST

seeking some real excitement,
UF coach Dave Fuller has a good
suggestion: get a pitching staff
that can hit as well as pitch.
In 29 games this spring, a
nine-man Gator pitching staff
with a respectable 2.15 earned
run average has a sky-high
batting average of .347.
Glen Pickren leads the hitting
parade for those pitchers having
at least 10 official at bats.
Pickren went three for four
against Kentucky last Saturday

John Fox led the KAs with a
76. He was followed by Harry
Nesbitt with a 79 and Grady
Cooksey with an 80s
The SAE downfall was
destined after the first nine holes
when John Johns shot a 46 on

(PAID POL. AD.)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIR ST

ROBBIES I
ftrTha Best In Steak
RoLOR TV & BILLIARDS
|I7IB W. University Ave.
I On The Gold Coast*

WITH A .347 HITTING AVERAGE

thr front portion. Johns came
back with a 36 on the back nine
but it wasnt enough. The KAs
played consistently over the 18
KA defeated Pi Kappa Phi
and SAE defeated TEP to gain
final berths.

I The ISSUE ?
is YOU i

to boost his average to .375
while hurling the Gators to a 9-2
win.
Tied at .364 are Mike Jacobs
and Wayne Rogers. Collectively
they are 12 for 33 at the plate
and Jacobs has an on-base
percentage of .463 to lead the
staff.
Jim Courier has been the
workhorse of the pitchers, both
on the mound and at the plate.
The senior lefthander has
compiled an 8-1 record and a
team-leading ERA of 1.42. His
13 hits in 40 lit bats for a .325
average is complimented by the
fact that hs has struck out only
twice.
Courier and Jacobs have also
seen some action in the outfield
and as pinch hitters, although
Fuller does not like to use them
in the latter capacity. He feels
safer with them in the bull pen,
ready to relieve.
The two lefthanders would
rather pitch, anyway. They both
feel that pitching helps their
hitting.
It seems like you have more
to work for when youre
pitching the game, Jacobs said.
You are helping yourself if you
get a hit and this keeps you fired
up at the plate.
Courier feels much the same
and adds that it is always much
harder for him to hit coming off
the bench cold.
Id rather bat in a game that
Im pitching because Im a little
more involved in the action, he
said.
No Gator regular has a better
batting average than the pitching
staffs, although outfielders Dale
Turlington and Guy McTheny
are close with .343 and .337,
respecitvely. This situation has
resulted in a contest between the
pitchers and the rest of the
squad.
Coach Fuller mentioned one
day how well the pitchers were
hitting, Jacobs said. Now all

of us on the staff encourage each
other at the plate and we are
trying to keep our average above
the regulars. I guess its partly
because of the old saying that
pitchers cant hit.
So how come UFs pitchers
are hitting so well?
Most of our pitchers are
good hitters anyway, Fuller

DEEPHERS WILL WIN
SIGMA CHI
DERBY
*

DIAMONDS
and JEWELRY
SAVE Rfl %
UP TO VV
?oad at SW 13thS^ I

l r
v NiMKW^gffitKv^OTrwCT'MwlatKMH>:yvfy
I THE CLASSIC SOLUTION I
| TO WARM WEEKENDS I
I The perfect answer for those in-between week I
I ends, when you have to be presentable, but not I
1 dressed up. Casually tailored in summer weight 1
1 blends. Glen plaids, over-checks, stripes and I
H Blazers... I
I from $49.95 I
I Use Silverman's Charge I
8 -jy or Bank Americard |£y |
I IF Silverman*, I
I 225 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. I
8 Free Customer Parking on Huge Lot At Rear of Store m

Thursday, April 24,1969, The Florida Alligator,

said. Many could play for us at
one of the other eight
positions.

(PAID POL AD)
VOTE
SHEPHERD
FIRST

Page 19



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 24, 1969

Page 20

SHOP Stri* '* lb ** 6* Fra* -jrcpPijU fafaw.l^Jb
The store that 2 i 3 ib
cares about you! J
601 S. W. 2 J A t
A 111 k A 11 1 I 1
c¥ci( MAST 48 c
ALLGOOD BACON sy 59c Sf sSsrvsSss 4 99 c
MEAT DINNBS r 39c
Quick Frozen Ocean W Y Peach Halves 29-oz. w X
Ck. Lt. Tuna 6V4-oz.
PERCH FILLETS b & 39c r 6 oq
GIFjVCHEKCOUPONS*
J J n jg^f l MH IMIIMIBUWAUfI! !>s.^>MinntUMHH|tmmT
Hm j t lilt § J|^^^Ev: : : : : : :v:^!iS>:^^P. : : : : : : : : : :W : : : : : : : : : i^iPPk : ;:j^^^Sf;^jijBa|j^Hlte : R :^^R:; ::: : ff: : : : ::::: : <: : : : : :: [ |STnvT?^4 l W9VrTrtiTninnri'>TiT>T
U I ILJIn-fftWm^^ -^,:,,.^bx, ,; pm :j f FRr IfFT+'CHEK j!
1 |jSLIC[BBACON2ib."pkg.JIJSj! I CARRoKTih*tg29c jl
ll V_ _ji fe^.? sr^i !!&) sasssarw} l!
H i: CtfTyCHEK [ J FREE GIFT-rCHEK j |
|j 1, 9 W ;* |j AftP Fresh Chilled ;
Extra Special PI. or S.R. PILLSBURY | White or Pink Special j- WOOLITE I6ez.bti. $1.28 * fiFRUIT JUICE qt. bil. 39c s!
! Cl Ol ID 1 ft'FDIIIT C Itot tejsssssssr^ &L sssicar^li
iLvUlx i urKUii j b W lasa^
l-sa R b. QOa 1 ;i Sj;:SW!KK£S I j!
! Exc. BAG 07yi ICMAIIC 8 a 9 Me jj SLICED CHEESE 12 oz.pkg.69cj! Jj CLEANED 22 oz. bti. 59c j!
7 7p7J7n7 J 12 Kj) &S & timi i@: i fcx 835 VSt SSVtt $k I i
Kraft Philadelphia special J L Ijj t Vs?;.
A At . 02 M Jane Parker Cracked Wheat, * ~' l g| IpSwisSSsS.at?Ss^Sw
Cream Cheese 8 29c ii *k t i ; ji
vivum viivvjv A#v DDmn /I b QQ C U m Jl£7 Um M i!* MSBT" i|
6 pak of 12-oz. cans OLD special DKCHu 1 loa,e! Otl !: CAI(E MIXES 2 KC :. t: PINEAPPLE PIES 2 U .| ID AA. I M.X or MATCH 'EM fjg\ \
Milwaukee Beer 99( 1 r
Morton Frozen special
Cream Pies 3- 89t i eal Ki 89c i s,areh 49 l Aprii29 h ,A&ps,or in ;
VIVUIII | IVJ W#Y i GOOD THROUGH APRIL 27 4-26-69 ', J GOOD THROUGH APRIL 27 A