Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
$25 Tuition Hike Introduced In Legist

TALLAHASSEE (UPI)-A biU introduced in
the House Monday to up tuition at state universities
by $25 per quarter would not increase the students
percentage share of a college education, Chancellor
Robert Mautz said Monday.

With costs of everything going up, and the state
footing most of the bill, the student share actually
would be less even with the higher tuition, Mautz
said shortly after the higher education committee

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Ernest Zeaman, guidance counselor at Tampa Plant High School,
chats with (l-r) Nancy Rosenblar, 2UC, and Sandy Weissman, lUC,
Monday during "Transition to College." The two-day workshop at the
Reitz Union is being attended by 18 counselors from five counties.
Their goal is to better assist the high school senior in the jump to
college life.

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CLARK KERR
... speaks tonight

TRANSITION TO COLLEGE

MAUTZ- '-.EVERYTHING GOING UP

Florida Alligator

Talks By
Religion

The climax of UF Religion in Life Week will be
the University Convocation at 8 tonight in Florida
Gym. Clark Kerr, former President of the University
of California at Berkeley, will speak on
Students .. From Apathy to Confrontation.
Max Lcrner, noted author who spoke Monday
night will present his views at the close of Kerrs
speech.

Kerr is currently professor of economics,
research economist, and professor of industrial
relations at the University of California. He also
conducts a varied lecture schedule, and is a trustee

proposed the boost from $125 to $l5O per quarter.

The increase is included in the House
appropriations bill, which hits the floor Tuesday.
The bill also includes an additional $25 increase for
graduate students, and another $25 per quarter hike
in the out-of-state fee.

The Senate committee is still having public
hearings and has not drawn its bill as yet.

The council of presidents of student bodies of

TOM KENNEDY

The

University oj I'lorida Gainesville

TO SUPPLEMENT PRESENT STAFF

O'Connell Renews
Request For Police

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor

Rejecting government by
crisis, UF President Stephen C.
OConnell Monday renewed his
request to the Board of Regents
for I 1 ) new positions in the
University Police Department.

In a letter to Board of
Regents Chancellor Robert B.
Maul/, O Connell stressed the
need for more manpower on the
police force before an
emergency situation arose.

The president said inadequate
police officers for campus
security constitutes a grave
need and feared the recent
increase in incidents of violence
on and around the UF campus
would create eventual
emergencies which the present
police staff would not be able to
handle.

OConnell made the first
request to the Regents Nov. 21,
l l )68 and the number of new
positions requested was whittled
down to nine by Mautz. The
decreased request was then
forwarded to Wallace W.
Henderson, state planning and
budget director. Henderson
rejected the request saying he
saw no emergency situation that
would justify the increase in
appropriations.
In the absence of a real
emergency, l feel the question of

Kerr, Lerner

In Life Week

of the Rockefeller Foundation and chairman of the
Carnegie Commission on Higher Education.
The University Convocation will end the formal
portion of R-in-L Week. The remainder of the week
will be devoted to discussion groups to continue the
programs personal approach to UF students.
The highlight of these discussion groups will be a
panel reaction to R-in-L Weeks activities at the
Baptist Student Center at 6:15 p.m., April 24. The
panel will be composed of UF students: Harold
Aldrich, John McPhail, John Sugg and Student
Body President Clyde Taylor.

the universities have agreed to go along with the
increased $25 tuition so long as part of it goes for
increased scholarships.

Nobody will be deprived of going to school
because of this increase, Mautz said.

The increase would put Florida a little ahead in
tuition compared to other southeastern state
universities, he said, adding that Florida would be in
line with the big 10 colleges in tuition, which we
consider our real competition.

establishing these positions
should be delayed until such
time as the 1969-70 operating
budget is approved, Henderson
said in a letter to Mautz, dated
Feb.2s.

A letter from George Kaludis,
director of planning and
evaluation for the Board of
Regents, sent to UF Vice
President for Business Affairs
William E. Elmore, suggested the
possibility of four new positions
to be paid for by the sale of

Walk, Phoenix Suns

Start s3oo,oooumor

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NEAL WALK
... signs contract

Mark

Close

ature

Tuesday, April 22, 1969

campus parking decals.

OConnell dismissed this
suggestion Monday, saying any
funds generated are badly
needed to support the
transportation and traffic plan
to go into effect here next
September.
If it be necessary to show an
emergency in order to have a
need met, I believe recent events
on and surrounding this campus
demonstrate such an emergency
to exist, OConnell said.

By Alligator Services

PHOENIX, ARIZ. -UFs
All-American center Neal W'alk
Monday signed what was
rumored to be a $300,000,
no-cut contract with the
Phoenix Suns of the National
Basketball Association.

Walk, a unanimous AU-SEC
choice the past two seasons was
the first round draft choice of
the Suns after they lost a coin
flip to Milwaukee for rights to
Lew Alcindor, UCLA. Alcindor
signed for a reported $1.4
million.

The Suns did not announce
specific contract terms, but two
state newspapers, the Miami
News and the Jacksonville
Journal, reported in Monday
afternoon editions that the
235-pound Miami Beach native
signed a three year no-cut
contract for more than
$300,000.

As a junior Walk lead the
nation in rebounding and was
the only major college player to
rate in the top ten in both
scoring and rebounding. As a
senior he lead the Gators to a
third place finish in the SEC and
a bid to the National Invitational
Basketball Tournament. He
holds 13 individual records at
theUF.

America's

Number One

College

Daily



Page 2

!, The Florid* Alligator, Tuesday, April 22.1969

Sea Os Japan Site Os US Task Force

WASHINGTON (UPI)-The
United States is massing a
23-ship task force-including
three giant carriers with about
250 jet fighers-in the Sea of
Japan to protect further
reconnaissance flights off the
North Korean shore.
The Defense Department
officially announced formation
of Task Force 71 Monday
after the Japanese Maritime
Safety Agency at Fukuoka,
Kyushu, reported picking up on
radar several U.S. ships entering
the southern part of the Sea of
Japan.

Presidential Race:
Endurance Sport
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
The dorm-stump begins about noon.
The presidential candidate races through the Question of the
Day for the Alligator, then meets a campaign manager. For the next
four hours, they will canvass parts of two dormitories, looking for
votes, looking for as many people as they can.
Today's target is Hume Hall. He is in a bad mood. He has been
pressured all morning. Campaign literature has been left so scatter the
library, and it will only be a matter of time before there is a call from
someone in Plants and grounds.
What part of this place do we cover today, he asks.
His assistant consults a sheet of paper. Three floors need
canvassing.
Outside, the temperature stands at 83. Inside the narrow corridors,
it hovers near 90. The candidate's temperature flares as the proper
sections cannot be found.
Im sure weve covered this floor before, he tells his assistant.
These doors look too familiar.
Every door is identical, stretching off into the distance until a
comer relieves the monotony.
The first knock. A voice from inside yells come in, and he opens
the door.
He looks fresh. His dialogue is new, and the handshake is firm.
Any questions? he concludes. Happy? Well, the debate is
tonight in the basement. Hope youll be there.
The comer is reached, and a blessed water fountain is found hiding.
The two drink greedily.
Dorm stomping is a special branch of psychology. Each person
visited must feel that the candidate has made this trip especially to see
him. If the handshake becomes wet, the shirt collar is undone, or the
commentary and greeting become bland, it can result in a lost vote.
To counter this, the candidate doesnt do the knocking. The aide
does. The candidates hands stay dry. Each handshake feels as though
this was the first, and perhaps only on the campaign.
At first, it seems that the dialogue between the candidate and voter
follows no set pattern. The first one opens with a comment on the
open air-conditioning ducts. Then, it changes to a discussion of the
last debate.
The previous closing comment serves as the opening one. This
keeps the candidate alert.
By the afternoons end, perspiration shows under his arms. The
trips to the water fountain become more numerous, and last longer.
The last door, the last piece of literature gets handed out. It has
been a good afternoon. No one hostile, and lots of posters decorating
windows.
As they leave the cafeteria, an unexpected compliment. From the
fourth floor of the girls side, a simultaneous chorus of He 110...
He turns and waves. Then he checks his watch. 4 p.m.
Now he asks, Whats left?
North Hall. First and second floor.
THE "FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
Uafversity of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
.July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the'official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
watered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
aQ advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
'Objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
(advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
.'advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than on* incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
limes. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
i in i
I PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS ;!

The Pentagon announcement
said only that the task force was
the result of North Koreas
shooting down a week ago of an
unarmed Navy ECI2I
reconnaissance plane with 31
men aboard.
Obviously, however, the ships
and planes were sent there to
protect continued intelligence
gathering flights that President
Nixon promised at his news
conference Friday.
The President said any
further U.S. action would
depend on how the North
Koreans respond to the

INCLUDES 23 SHIPS. 250 JETS

continued flights.
The task force, under
command of Rear Adm.
Malcolm W. Cagle, Grand
Junction, Colo., included the
attack carriers USS Enterprise,
Ticonderoga and Ranger, the
antisubmarine carrier Hornet,
three cruisers and 16 destroyers.
The attack carriers each have
between 80 and 90 jet fighters
that will be used to fly
protective cover for the
reconnaissance flights.
The Defense Department has

OF ALDRIDGES RESIGNATION

Issue Party has vowed to
investigate the resignation of
Melvin Gene Aldridge, a
journalism instructor, Steve
Hull, vice-presidential candidate
said Monday.
If we dont win the
forthcoming election we will call
upon Student Government to do
it. If we do win, we will get the
investigation underway
immediately.
Hull calls for the investigation
because he knows Aldridge was
forced to resign because he
attempted to use an innovative
process in education. He gave 32
students an A for their class
grade.
This was done because
Aldridge feels students are under
too much pressure, and by
releasing them from this
Debate Series
Ends Tonight
The last in a series of debates
between the student body
presidential candidates will be
held tonight at 9 in the
Rathskeller.
All presidential candidates are
scheduled to appear.
The debate is being sponsored
by the Alligator and will be
moderated by Don Reed of
WGGG news.

Only sheep need d
a Sh epherd J
VOTE MICA ?
a

SUMMER JOBS
WE HAVE A SPECIAL JOB JUST FOR YOU!
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P. O. Box 52492
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Cash Check Money Order
GENTLEMEN: PLEASE SEND 1969 SUMMER JOB DIRECTORIES CHECKED BELOW.
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SPECIAL OFFER Our latest bulletin which contains
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Issue Vows Investigation

refused to say whether the
flights, discontinued briefly after
the downing of the EC 121, have
been resumed. They were being
flown twice a week.
The cruisers and the
destroyers, in addition to
protecting the carriers, also
served to present a greater show
of strength to the North
Koreans.
The Pentagon said the
battleship New Jersey will not
be part of the task force but will
return home.

pressure, they would have a
chance to actually learn.
Aldridge was asked to
appear before Dean John P.
Jones and later forced to
resign, Hull said.
He claims this was another
case of a teacher going against
the status quo of the university
and getting stepped on. Hull
cites Marshall Jones, the
professor whose political beliefs
caused so much controversy at
the UF last year.

TUESDAY STEAK SPECIAL
LON SON BROIL
97
I :
4,000 COLLEGE MEN worked for the
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;: s
THE AVERAGE MAN EARNED j
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:j:Applicants for this summer will be interviewed^:
£ Thursday, April 25 24th. Sign-up sheets are ij:
. 1
: available in the Placement Office, Reitz Union. s
$ S

w
RICHARD M. NIXON
... for protection

We of Issue Party believe SG
should not tolerate these
actions, Hull said. We are
going to find out actually why
Aldridge was investigated when
he gave out the As and why he
was forced to resign.
John Webb, assistant dean of
the College of Journalism said
that in the first place he wasnt
fired. I have no comment about
the rest. Ask Aldridge.
When asked, Aldridge only
said, No comment.



IF ELECTED SG PRESIDENT

Mica PlansToebuildFlavets

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
John Mica, Issue Party
presidential candidate, Thursday
announced plans for rebuilding
the Flavet married student
housing if elected president.
UF faces a major disaster if
the on-campus Flavets are not
tom down and rebuilt, said
Mica.
The Flavets are tinder
boxes, capable of burning to the
ground at the slightest fire.
Mica promised to pressure the
Board of Regents for
construction of on-campus
married student housing and
dorms to replace the Flavets and
Murphree area.
Married students on this
campus are a neglected minority;
while the dorm areas are
allocated thousands of dollars
for new swimming pools, the
married students suffer through
inadequate and unsafe housing
facilities.
Mica proposed a housing plan
to replace the Flavets and
Murphree similar to the
commercial dorm building plan
at South Florida. Under this
plan the state provides land, at

High School Students
Counseled For College

Noon today signals the end of
a two-day conference on The
Transition from High School to
College.
The conference is being
sponsored by the Preventive
Action and College Mental
Health Grant issued by the
National Institute of Mental
Health.
Thirteen high schools
throughout the state are
represented on campus.
Counselors from the various
schools are meeting with former
students now attending UF to
discuss personal, academic and
social problems involved in the

YOU are \
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the ISSUE \
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no expense to the taxpayers, for
private companies to build
dorms and apartments for
students. This is done at no cost
to the university.
Also as an aid to married
students, Mica said he would
make efforts to open channels so
that wives of UF students could
get free treatment at the
Infirmary.
The Issue Party candidate
also proposed a plan for Student
Government to underwrite
utility deposits for students
living off campus.
He cited a proposal at
Michigan State University that
does this. The same thing can
be done at UF, Mica said.
SG would have to take
around $20,000 out of their
budget to bond the deposits, but
since the deposits are returned,
there would be no actual loss of
money, said Mica.
Mica has talked to two
members of the City
Commission, and he said that
their reaction was favorable to
the idea.
Each off-campus student
might save as much as $25 if the
City Commission approves the

transition from high school to
college.
University representatives
include the Office of the
Registrar, University College,
Housing and the Deans offices.
Participating students were
selected at random with the aid
of dorm counselors and the
registrars office.
TIRED of getting it
screwed at this college? I
SO AM I. I
You can do something I
about it by VOTING I
for me. 9
STEVE "RAK" RAKUSIN 1
Candidate for the Senate I
from Arts & Science* I
_£PAID POL AD* __

proposal, Mica said.
Student government in the
past has not been receptive to
the needs of the students. By
bonding utility deposits for
off-campus students, SG for the
first time will act as a positive
force to stem the tide of rising
costs on the city of Gainesville.
Excellence in Food

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From the
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AT THE GAINESVILLE MALL
H MARVELLO
MAKE HIM LAUGH
AND WIN:
Automobile
Mobile Home
MAKE HIM SMILE
I AND WIN
r K sioo
On The Job
Marvello will appear
in the GAINESVILLE
MALL Thurs., Fri. A Sat.
Sponsored by:
Gainesville Mall
Bonanza Mobile Homes
Melton Motors

PATRONIZE GATOR ADVERTISERS

Tuesday, April 22,1969. The Florida Alligator, 1

Page 3



Page 4

> The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 22,1969

Issue Holding
Gentle Rally
Issue Party is holding a Gentle
Tuesday rally in the Plaza of the
Americas from 11 am to 1 p.m.
today. Candidates will be there
to speak. Food, hot dogs, and
cokes will be sold.

50 FOCUS ON SIMSOC

Students Simulate Society

By RICHARD McCULLOUGH
Alligator Staff Writer
Last weekend 50 students
participated in a simulated
society on campus.
Sociology 201 students were
its citizens.
The society, called Simsoc,
was devised to focus on the
central problem of a student in
social activity:
The establishment and
maintenance of social order.
Simsoc attempted to create a
situation in which the student
could actively question the
nature of social order and
examine the process of social
conflict and social control. The
society had provisions for
financial transactions, industry,
power structure and
geographical diversity.
Associate Professor of
Sociology Ben Gorman and
graduate assistant Steve Sheridan
acted as game monitors and
observed the overall
performance.
Hopefully, by participating
in a society which did not have
established rules, the
participants will better
understand the nature of rules
and social order, Gorman
explained. Game participants
made and enforced their own
regulations.
The game was in operation
from 3 to 5:45 Friday in Walker
Hall, from 9 a.m. to 5:45 p.m.
Saturday and from 9 a.m. to 3
p.m. on Sunday in the College
Library. Several rooms were
used to represent different
geographical regions, presenting
problems of transportation and
communication. All regulations
were made by the simsocians.
Simsoc did not attempt to
imitate a real society in every
Butler To Talk
On Student Role
Gainesville City
Commissioner, Neil Butler, will
speak in Room 349 of the Reitz
Union tonight at 7:30.
He will be open to questions
on the students role in the
community and other matters.
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respect, but characteristics were
included to highlight certain
issues and problems. Individuals
had personal goals and there
were also group objectives.
Travel tickets were sold for
transportation between regions,
Masmedia published and
profitably sold newspapers and
Sim-Fun was incorporated as a
non-profit entertainment group
performing with guitar and
kazoo. Profits went to welfare
and conservation.
When the game ended the
society had divided into two
diametrically opposed groups.
One group, headed by
capitalists, who were providing
for the society with a welfare
state. The other group was a
large proletarian movement
which was striking for
redistribution of the wealth.
There was also a splinter
group that wanted to obtain

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permanent subsistence and
withdrew to a retreat in the
Himalayas to exist as students of
nature with no greed, lust or
power. The movement lacked
mass support.
The society operated for a
relatively long period of time
without any starvation or
death, Gorman said Sunday,
And the involvement of the
citizens remained high. However
it appears as if the ideological
conflict between the haves and
the have-nots would have
destroyed the society.
Simsoc had been played
previously at the Universities of
Michigan, Indiana, California at
Santa Barbara and UCLA.

The ISSUE g
J
is YOU l
<£
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UFTeam Debate Competes
At National Championship

The UF Debate Team upped
its last years record (1-7) by
defeating four of the eight teams
it debated in the preliminary
round of competition in the
National Championship Debate
Tournament, April 15-17, in
DeKalb, 111.
Harvard captured the
Championship title by defeating
the University of Houston,
arguing in favor of Curtailing
executive power in U.S. foreign
policy, the topic of the
tournament.
UF placed midway among the
44 schools participating.
The UF squad, composed of
Ralph Glatfelter, 4AS, and
Gregg Mathews, 3AS, defeated
Loyola University of Los
Angeles, Marquett University,
University of Arizona, and
Kansas State Teachers College.
Ohio State, University of the

5 Electrical Engineers
Attend Regional Meet

Five UF electrical engineering
students today will attend the
Region 111 Institute of Electrical
and Electronic Engineers
Student Convention In Raleigh,
N.C.
Thirty-five engineering
schools in the southeast will
send delegates to the meet, for
presentation of technical papers
and open forum discussions of
UF To Host
Army Officers
Students at UF this week
have the opportunity to learn
how they can qualify for Army
Officer Candidate School.
An officer selection and
testing team will interview
students. Interviewing,
counseling and testing will take
place on campus. The Army
personnel will be available from
9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Friday.
Capt. Susan West (WAC), 2nd
Lt. Brian Clowe and Sgt. 1 C.
Charles Doherty makeup the
visiting team.

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Redlands, George Washington
University, and the
Massachusetts Institute of
Technology put down the UF
team.
Part of the reason we didnt
do better is because we havent
had much experience against the
West Coast teams. We havent
had a chance to hear their
arguments, John Wittig, debate
team coach, told the Alligator
Sunday.
Budget restrictions limit the
UF team from traveling to many
tournaments, especially ones in
which West Coast teams
participate.
We havent been able to
compete often enough ?n
tournaments. All year we
havent been at enough
tournaments to compete against
Harvard or Houston, Wittig
said.

problems in the field of
engineering education.
Representing UF are: Richard
Motta, St. Petersburg; Albert W.
Momeault, St. Petersburg; Carl
J. Aidick, Miami; Kent Swan,
Miami, and James Gunter, of
Vero Beach.
The best student paper
presented will later compete
with entrants from more than
25 0 engineering schools
throughout the world.
Prof. M.H. La tour, faculty
advisor for the UF student
branch, said Monday that in all
probability the 1970 Region 111
Convention will be held here.
Latour will accompany the
students for seminars with the
education committee.
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'DANDYUON

The University of Georgia
was the only Southern school to
qualify for the second, sudden
death round of competition,
but they didnt make it to the
finals round.
Georgia has the largest
budget in the south and could
travel to the West Coast, Wittig
said.
Another chronic problem the
UF squad has encountered
which was especially significant
this year was the lack of good,
stiff regional competition, Wittig
said.
There are only about four or
five good debating schools in the
South. And Miami and Emory
had weak programs this year.
In the National Tournament
Georgias record was 5-3, and
Miami and Emory were each 44.
We spend three quarters of
our time in Regional
Tournaments competing against
less difficult teams, Wittig said.
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Why Vote
JOHN MICA?

To have student government reorganized into
a participatory democracy.
To make the university and community more
responsive to student needs.
To establish fresh, dynamic leadership in
student government.
%
John Mica gives a damn...
The
ISSUE is You!
I
MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT
VOTE MICA
/-. '
(PAID POL AD)

Tuesday, April 22,1969, The Florida Alligator.

Page 5



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuwrtay, April 22, 1960

Page 6

c*
The
Florida
Alligator
Dave Doucette
Acting Editor-In-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Acting Managing Editor
Carol Sanger
Assignments Editor
Vicki Vega
Glenn Fake
News Editors

Speaking Out

After Charles Fulwoods letter was printed in
Thursdays Alligator, one could have hoped for an
end to racist attacks on JOMO.
Instead university police investigator John
Morrison was quoted in Fridays paper as saying
that the greatest threat to pedestrian traffic is from
JOMO militants, and that these groups have been
carrying out several attacks and slashings in the last
few weeks and Mark Johnson in a column in the
same issue refers to JOMO members who
surrounded students last week.
To my knowledge, no evidence connecting
JOMO with the recent incidents on campus has been
offered.
It is wrong for a single policeman to conclude
that an organization is responsible for an action and
to announce this to the public as if it were a fact.
The charge of guilt by association and the
wholesale attack on a group of citizens are
reminiscent of the witch hunting days of McCarthy.
In light of recent events which have been aimed

Black Voices

Black Student Harassment Unwarranted

The recent outbreak of alleged
racial attacks on UF students has
created a Black scare on this campus.
And UFs Black students are suffering
because of it.
The Black scare is an annual visitor
to UFs campus. Last year alleged rape
attempts by some anonymous but
ominous black phantom sent chills
down the spine of every white coed who
walked across campus at night.
The scare penetrated to high places.
It kept campus cops up all night, caused
off-duty city policeman to patrol the
campus and placed brillant flood lights
in every darkened comer of this
campus.
This time the scare has reached an
even higher level. No less an honorable
(and reasonable and sane too) man than
UFs President Stephen C. OConnell
has called for increased police
protection for the good WASP students
of UF.
Charles Shepherd, a student
presidential hopeful, was so upset that
he sent a personal telegram to almost

Investigate Morrison

w
%
One Thing The Pueblo Taught Us: Never Go On
A Reconnaissance Mission Unprotected

everyone you can think of calling for
more protection.
All of these acts were typical of this
system and the kind of people it
produces, They represent motor
reactions of a university that is more
racist than it wishes to admit.
Caught up in the mist of this cry for
law and order are UFs Black students.
They are the people who are suffering
the ill effects of the turmoil that exists
between UF and Gainesvilles Black
community.
Black students on this campus are
constantly harrassed each time the
Black scare occurs. They are endlessly
stopped from dusk to dawn by
second-grade hide cops, who ask for
their IDs even though they stopped the
same student in the same identical spot
the day before.
With the recent call for increased
protection campus cops have grown
more arrogant and more trigger happy.
Recently a UF black student was
stopped by a campus cop who found it
necessary to draw his gun before he

at creating distrust between blacks and whites, I
would suggest the following:
(1) An investigation of Mr. Morrisons
apparently imprudent and unprofessional conduct
in making public statements about an association of
citizens of this state. I would assume that Mr.
Morrison would enjoy all of the privileges of due
process which would include a full report to the
public.
(2) An apology by Charles Shepard, a candidate
for student body president, who has linked JOMO
and other racial groups with the recent incidents
without providing any evidence.
(3) An apology by President OConnell to JOMO
for attributing to it a slogan (In Guns we Trust)
which it has never claimed. OConnell should assure
JOMO and its members the same access to the
university which is enjoyed by other citizens of the
state.

By Ken Megill

asked for the students ID. Even more
appalling however, i$ the action now
being taken by residents of Murphree
area. The residents have formed a
vigilante squad to protect their area
from Black trouble makers.
If these acts are continued, they will
ultimately lead to an open clash
between Blacks and Whites on this
campus.
Black students have enough problems
attending this university without the
added burdens brought about by White
suspicion and fears. Tom between an
alien campus and a community that
does not really accept us, we now have
to contend with gun-quick cops and
students who call themselves vigilante
UF should look behind the incidents
at the reasons why the Black
community of this city has so much
hatred for this institution. The remedial
positions and sub-standard wages that
Blacks receive for their labors on this
campus may well be a good place to
start.
But, even more apparent than these

EDITORIAL
Blame Goes To
Independents
One of the major rallying points of John Micas campaign
for Student Body President has been an attack upon the
large bloc of votes that First Party candidate Charles
Shepherd has supporting him. a
Mica has called First Party the Florida Blue Key and
fraternity party saying that it will be bad for the student
body for this bloc to control Student Government. He may
have a point in that one group should not control SG, but
the only way the bloc, if it really is that dangerous, can be
broken is for the independent students to vote.
Its that simple, but with all the campaigning that has
been aimed at the non-bloc voters by Mica as well as
Shepherd, the independents have only themselves to blame
if they do not vote Thursday.
Any qualified independent who wants to work in
Student Government can do so simply by walking into the
SG offices and volunteering to work.
Anyone who thinks a qualified person will be turned
away because he is not owed something or in the right
bloc needs to examine his value system. The true SG leaders
care enough about the future of SG and the UF to place the
qualified workers in the right positions.
People who complain of the bloc domination and the
failure of large number of independents to hold SG
positions should try to induce them to vote and work in SG
activities.
You cant make someone vote or work who doesnt want
to, and it seems a majority of the independents care to do
neither.
Instead of trying to make the bloc behind Shepherd look
like some sort of ugly political machine that chews up
people, Mica should devote his time campaigning for votes
because of his record or qualifications, not his opposition to
the bloc.
He should spend the rest of the campaign trying to get
apathetic students out of their shells to vote, instead of
crying about big bloc domination.

Sorry, Devaney

MR. EDITOR:
I want to apologize in print
to Jim Devaney for having
commented on his incomplete in
my course. I had not been
following the presidential
campaign and was taken offguard
by a telephone call about his
grade. I just learned today how
my remark was used.
What the Alligator reporter

aid was perfectly fair: she asked
me a question. But it was stupid
of me to answer it. What a
student is doing in a course of
mine is nobodys business but
the students and mine, except
in so far as he wants someone
else to know about it, and I am
very sorry I did not think before
I spoke.
JAMES MILLIKAN
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

By Larry Jordan

conditions is the simple fact that UF has
failed to provide the kind of leadership
and direction that Gainesville needs to
move out of the 18th century in race
relations.
More police protection is not a
solution to the problem. An elimination
of many of the basic inequities that
exist on this campus and in this
community may well be the only
answer to our problem.
EThe
lorida Alligator
Published by students of the University
of Florida under the auspices of the
Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room
330, Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, 392-1682
or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are
those of the editors or of the writer of the
article and not those of the University of
Florida.
-



Aftermath

Fun...A Mandate For Higher Education

It was Kierkegaard who asserted that truth is
primarily not something we talk about, but
something we participate in ... and until we do, we
do not know it. This suggestion is an intriguing
thought in the midst of our present campus
confrontations about curriculum. Most of our
students cannot participate in truth because the
curriculum and /or the bureaucratic structure
successfully removes them from any kind of
meaningful involvement.
It is usually the silent assumptions about our
university that communicate quite effectively what
it is that we believe in as educators. So it is that our
potentially educated citizens (students) are left
milking boredom from the brest of busyness in
hopes of finding some kind of truth in American
higher education.
What is it the student learns vis a vis the
structure that communicates so effectively to him?
The student usually learns to avoid excellence. A
student or faculty member for that matter who has
a high motivation for learning may be singled out by
faculty and peers as suspect.
Since most faculty members are prodcuts of the
malaise which we call graduate school, they have
never known the thrill of learning... the fun in
learning. What we reward by our grading system and
our archaic forms is vomiting of information which
will soon be outdated in a year or so.
The student also learns that the rewards of the
school may be earned in easier ways than academic
performance. If the student plays a good non-verbal
game in the classroom and in the presence of the
instructor he will be rewarded by this Skinnerian
Game of Academe.
We know the subtle forms, I studied so hard last
night, or This sure is interesting, etc. It takes a
perceptive student to manipulate the instructor in
such a manner... what if we could direct his
energies and talents to learning?
Conformance is rewarded. Students who do not

More 'Sic Letters
MR. EDITOR:
The Alligators self-righteousness is showing. You seem to go out of
your way to discredit the letter from Roberto Ibarguen (April 14,
1969) with the use of sic and the headline given the letter.
In the three instances where you use sic, only one is called for for
- for note the misspelling of benevolence but even that could be a
simple typing or writing error. You might think that hypercritical is
the right word to use, so you put sic after Ibarguens use of
hypocritical, but if you will judge the words in terms of the point
he makes, you should see that his choice is correct.
Also marihuana is the Spanish spelling of marijuana, and this,
too is perfectly legitimate. (One might even expect the former spelling
from a writer with the name of Ibarguen.) (Sic)
The headline you put over the letter also is misleading. Ibarguen
seems to make a good point, or at least ask a pertinent question about
philantropy, but why would you conclude or even suggest that his
view is bitterness? This term is used most often to note a peculiar
and excessive cruel or harsh point of view. You may disagree with his
point of view, but it is a strain of language and reason to call it
bitter.
You should apologize to Ibarguen for the indecent handling of his
letter.

Reds Here!
MR. EDITOR:
This is in answer to an article
Monolithic Domino by Jim
Reedy in. Friday April 11th
Alligator. He says we are in
Vietnam to prevent Communism
from spreading and to stop it
from taking over the world.
Ive only one question to ask
him. Why are American soldiers
fighting and dying to prevent
another country from being run
over by Communists when our
own country has a registered
Communist party and no one is
doing anything about it?
Why fight in a far away place
whats in your own back yard?
B.M.

ROBERT R. SHERMAN
fVending Politicsf
"MR. EDITOR:
Why are student government
candidates deliberately ignoring
the BIG issue? Anybody who
pledges to see that the broken
vending machines on campus are
fixed will have gone a long way
toward getting elected.
What issue is more pressing
than the select button that
reads orange juice, but yields
chocolate milk? How would
student interests be better served
than by throwing a little light on
the dark business of the use
correct change only sign
scandals? What sort of change is
more urgently needed than that
deposited in blind faith in
local mechanical bandits?
What this university cries for
is a little machine politics!!!
ROBERT W. HORRELL ILW

meet the demands placed upon them by the
environment as set by the instructor or the college
are branded as troublesome. Instructors and colleges
are famous for the repertoire of behaviors which are
acceptable or unacceptable in the daily business of
academic transactions.
One demand was reproted by one of my students
as Do not ask the instructor questions about the
subject matter for which he is not prepared.
The student in his search for truth learns that
curiosity is irrelevant. We have taught him not to
deviate from the intended path which the syllabus
has so adequately outlined. We have so much time
and this material must be covered or else is the
usual plea for academe.
We insist that the student must pursue his new
idea tomorrow or the next day, but not now. The
new scientific discovery of Pulsars, those strange
sounds from outer space, would not have been
discovered by the English graduate student if she
had not deviated from her standard operating
procedure.
Yet, we continue to lecture and utilize old forms
that in many instances cannot be changed into a
productive agent for learning. We pile old forms in
the name of innovation and change. When
educational television arrived on the scene we asked
research questions like: is face to face lecturing
better than lecturing on television? It took over 250
studies to prove that!
What kind of comparison is that? Bad education
piled on top of bad education usually equals bad
education! Even our research environment is an
anti-environment for the learning processes of our
students. Recently grad students have said to me in
discussing their research for their masters thesis,
Help me out, please. I want to do something
significant, not something they want me to
d 0...
The point is that students in our university do
learn what it is we teach. They learn to avoid,

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withdraw, manipulate, hate research and sometimes
they learn the history of the man who discovered a
gnat's fanny. Moreover, they sometimes learn how
to learn, that learning can be fun, that learning can
be a rewarding life experience.
That this latter process does not occur more
often is an indictment of the academic system and
not the student. Our focus should be upon the
behaviors of learning by the student and paticularly
those students that can manifest the zest for fun in
the midst of this horrid enterprise we call the
academic world.
It was Samuel Eliot Morison of Harvard whose
dictum on college selectivity is till rampant today:
Children must learn to read the Bible, that they
might know Gods truth, and to write and cipher, as
an aid to honest living...
In recent weeks it has been the cry of some
people in Tallahassee that this same dictum would
be the major function of the State University. But if
some of us choose to view the university in a
capacity other than that of a
super-duper-employment agency, what then should
be its function? What is the new image that could
emerge in the midst of confrontation and
controversy?
It certainly cant be this educational
condescension that is apparent. If the end product
of education is to adjust our students to society
or their job, then perhaps this system is justified.
But most of us would probably admit that we
would not know what the job would look like in
a few years which we are preparing the student to
enter.
We would probably admit that we have lost some
of the pulse and that society is out of balance. The
university must initiate a set of valid criteria for
evaluating our human worth, and for forming
devises to dissemble some of the horrid inhibitive
machinery that blocks us from meaningful
involvement from what we call human experience.

Second Asia War?
MR. EDITOR:
The latest flagrant act of aggression and murder by North Korea
poses some serious questions as to what steps the United States should
take, if any, in retaliation. Retaliation in some manner may be quite
necessary though necessarily risky.
As long as North Korea or any aggressor believes it can attack
ground, naval,- and air forces of the United States with impunity from
reprisal, it will continually do so, encouraging other would-be
aggressors. Yet, if we embark upon a military response we may cause a
second and wider war in Asia.
In order to prevent further attacks upon us we must ourselves
attack in some limited form the homeland or military forces of North
Korea. But in the process we face grave dangers and risks. However, as
is true throughout the field of international affairs, whatever strategy
or policy we plan to execute, we are damned if we do and damned if
we don't.
Let us not stand idle or cry out peace, peace!, for there is no
peace only the clash of resounding arms. While we must never
abandon our commitment to peace we must never raise it as a banner
to justify fear, or lack of will, or uncertainty.
We can ill afford to provoke aggression by refusing to punish
aggression. The challenge we face must be met not with a lack of will
or by intermittent verbal protest but rather by firm response.
BRUCE DAVID ALPER 2UC
v
GDls Are Asleep, Too

MR. EDITOR:
In reference to the editorial
page of Monday, April 14, there
were two letters written
regarding the recent tragedy of
the Sigma Nu*s. Perhaps 29 boys
were spoiled, big, rich boys
who were not poor black, long
haired, or intelligent, and
perhaps they were forced from
the building in their
undershorts, but before anyone
decides to degrade Joe
College, he should be forced to
stand in front of his own home
and watch irreplaceable personal
property and forty years of
tradition go up in flames.
As we are writing this letter
in Broward Hall at 3:00 in the
afternoon, one can be assured
that if a fire broke loose many

Tuday. April 22,1969, Ttw Florida Alligator,

IBy Gene Aldridge

GDls and Sorority Sues would
be seen leaving the dorm
similarly ill clad.
BONNIE K. PICHFORD
CAMILLE C. SYMONS
CAROL S.CONYE
LETTERS
v
In order to appear (n the
Alligator, letters to the editor
must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words
in length. Writers names may
be withheld from publication
for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all
letters in the interest of
space.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 22,1969

Orange and

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Campus Calendar

Tuesday, April 22
Student Senate Meeting, 349
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Young Democrats Meeting,
Speaker: Neil Butler, 347
Union, 7:00 p.m.
MBA Club meeting, 346 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Alpha Delta Sigma Business
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7:30
p.m.
Painting for Fun, C-4 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Duplicate Bridge, 150 C & D
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Religion-in-Life Speaker: Clark
Kerr plus Max Lerner, Florida
Gym, 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, April 23
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 347 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Dept, of German: One Man
Opera, "The Three Penny
Opera," Union Aud., 8:00
p.m.
MENSA Meeting, Flavett Rec
Hall, 8:30 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE:
RASCALS Tickets, $2.50 per
person.

Arabian Night
Sponsored by the Arab Club U. of F.
Enjoy eating Arabic foods. Entertainment
Place: Baptist Student Center
Time: 7:00 p.m., April 25, 1969
For tickets call: 378-3270, 378-9668
$5.00 per couple International Center
$3.00 single Mrs. Lawry

. | GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FERERAL CREDIT UNION
- taxes? debts?
SB A"'' f It's Income Tax time again and this year is even worse!
f|V|;\{t M Besides this, all of those nagging bills can amount to
LjH j Tfcfrv /v enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces neces/
/ neces/ --y gtSjgfigiy y f\ sities f CONSOLIDATE all of those bills, pay
i ) your taxes anc entl up ,ess * a mont^, Y output,
i V 4 m w Come n t 0
Mil vw. y / A those kinds p roblems!

Thursday, April 24
Christian Science Organization
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 150 G
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Association of Women Students
Meeting, 346 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Assoc., 349 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Sailing Club Elections, Union,
7:30 p.m.
Arnold Air Society/Angel Flight
joint Meeting, ROTC Bldg.,
7:30 p.m.
Poetry-Jazz Concert, Poetry
Reading, Ed Ochester, plus
Ergood Quartet, MSB Aud.,
7:30 p.m. Free.
Friday, April 25
Bowling Lessons, 118 Union,
11:30 a.m.
Union Movie, "One Potato,"
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:00 &
10:00 p.m.
Campus Crusade for Christ
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Univ. of Fla. Veterans Club
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7:30
p.m.
Poetry-Jazz Concert, Poetry
Reading puls Ergood Quartet,
Rathskeller, 7:30 p.m.
Union Dance, "The Plant Life,"
Union Terrace, 9:00 p.m.

BLUE BULLETIN

Administrative Notices

HOLDING OFFICES: To
hold any elected or appointed
office in any extra-curricular
activity, a student must be free
of disciplinary, scholarship,
academic or admissions
probation. He also must be
classified as a full-time student
enrolled in a minimum of 12
hours. In exceptional
circumstances, a student, not
eligible to hold an elected or
appointed office, may obtain
information on seeking a waiver
by contacting the Dean of Men
or the Dean of Women.
ISRAEL INDEPENDENCE
DAY CELEBRATION, will be
observed Thursday, April 24,
8-11 p.m. at the Hillel
Foundation. Free. Sponsored by
the Maccabee Student
Organization.
POETRY-JAZZ CONCERT:
A benefit for emotionally
disturbed children featuring the
poetry of Bob Sokol and the
jazz of the Bruce Ergood
Quartet will be held Thursday
and Friday, April 24 and 25, at
the following times and places:
April 24, from 7:30-9:00 p.m. in
the Medical Center Auditorium;
April 25, half-hour periods
running from 9:30-11:30 p.m. in
the Rathskeller.
GRADUATE SCHOOL: The
last day for filing an application
to enter graduate school is April
25. Applications may be picked
up in room 33 Tigert Hall.
APPLICATION FOR
DEGREE: Students who expect
to graduate at the end of the
spring quarter must file an
application for the degree and
pay the graduation fee at the
Office of the Registrar no later
than April 25. Students must
make application for the degree
in the quarter in which they
expect to graduate, regardless of
previous applications.
SPEECH SCREENING FOR
TEACHER EDUCATION
MAJORS: All teacher education
majors, regardless of college
classification, are required to
satisfy the speech screening
requirement before being
admitted into the advanced
professional sequence or
enrolling in EDS 400, EDE 400
and the elementary block.
English and speech majors do
not take the test as SCH 201 is
required in all their programs.
Appointments are now being
made in Room 124 Norman
Hall.

AUTHOR HARRY CREWS,
assistant professor of English
Composition and author of
"Gospel Singer" and "Naked in
Garden Hills/' will meet
students informally in the
Special Collection Reading
Room Thursday, April 24,
beginning at 3:30 p.m.
PROGRESS TESTS: All
students taking the courses listed
below are expected to take the
progress test as listed. Each
student must bring a No. 2 lead
pencil and will be required to
use his Social Security Number.
NOTE: Room numbers are
different from last quarter;
therefore, check this schedule
carefully and report to the
proper room number.
CSS 111 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 29,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A-L report to
Peabody 1,2, 4,7, 10 or 11;
M-Z to Peabody 201, 202, 205,
208 or 209.
CSS 113 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Tuesday, April 29,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A report to
Floyd 104 or 106; B to Little
101 or 109; C to Leigh 207; D-E
to Little 113, 121, or 125; F to
Little 201, 203, 205 or 207; G
to Little 213, 215, 217 or 219;
H to Little 221, 223, 225, 227,
233, 235 or 239; l-L to Matherly
2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8, 9,10,11,12,
13, 14 or 16; M to Matherly
102, 105, 108, 111, 113, 115,
116, 117, 118 or 119; N-0 to
Anderson 104, 110, 112 or 115;
P-Qto Floyd 108 or 109; R to
Flint 101, 102, 110 or 112; S to
Walker Auditorium; T-V to
Anderson 2,4, 5,7, 18 or 20;
W-Z to Walker Auditorium.
MS 102 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday April
30, at 7 p.m. in Walker
Auditorium.
MS 204 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Wednesday, April
30, at 7 p.m. in Little 101 and
109.
CMS 171 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 1,
at 7 p.m. in Walker Auditorium.
MS 302 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 1 at
7 p.m. in Little 101, 109, 113,
121 or 125.
MS 303 PROGRESS TEST
will be given Thursday, May 1,
at 7 p.m. Students whose last
names begin with A- 1 report to
Matherly 2,3, 4,5, 6,7, 8,9,
10, 11, 12, 13, 14 or 16; M-Z to
Matherly 102, 105, 108, 111,
113, 115, 116, 117,118 or 119.

PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for June and August
graduates unless otherwise
indicated.
APRIL 22: STATE OF
FLORIDA-DIVISION OF
VOCATIONAL REHABILITA REHABILITATION
TION REHABILITATION Counseling, Guidance,
Rehabilitation Counseling,
Psychology or related fields.
JOHN DEERE CO. Ag. Eng.,
Agri-Bus., Bus. Ad., Mkt and
Acctg. CANNING, WELLS AND
SALZER Acctg. SUN LIFE
ASSURANCE CO. OF
*
CANADA lnsurance degree
ROBERTSON, MAY, ZIMA
AND CO. Acctg.
APRIL 22, 23, 24: THE
BELL SYSTEM lnterview for
technical positions. Math,
Physics, all engineering.
APRIL 23-U.S. FOREST
S E RVICE Engineers. WALT
DISNEY WORLD CO. CE,
Bldg. Const. UNION
PLANTER'S NATIONAL
BANK Bus. Ad., Lib. Arts
majors interested in a career in
banking. THE MUTUAL
BENEFIT LIFE INSURANCE
CO.-All majors. MUTUAL
LIFE INSURANCE CO. OF
NEW YORK Usually
interviews for life underwriter
and management tranee
positions. All majors.
APRIL 24: AETNA LIFE
AND CASUALTY-Usually
interviews for management
training programs and field
representatives. All majors. F.W.
WOOLWORTH Usually
interviews for Management
training program. Bus. Ad.
WATSON AND CO. Usually
interviews for architects, CE,
ME, EE.



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE |
120 base accordium SIOO excellent
condition. Record player (stereo)
Magnanox, SBO, excellent condition.
Call 372-7039 between 5-7.
(A-3M20-P)
Bed & mattress S4O. Window exhaust
fan $25. Mineral collection. 50
samples & shelf $75. Two 16 piece
dinner set $7 both. Call 372-7039
between 5-7. (A-3t-120-P)
Wing Presentation One of the Fine
Target Bows With 4 degree Prism
Sight and other acc. S6O. Call George
at 378-7030. fIS-lt-120-P)
SPOTS before your eyes on your
new carpet remove them with Blue
Lustre. Rent electric shampooer,
SI.OO. Lowry Furniture Co.
(A-lt-120-C)
Get a Mau Mau mongrel. Itll chew
anything from bones to steel.
Champion lines. Pedigree African
barkless Basenji pups. All shots.
376-2630. (A-lot-119-p)
1966 BRIDGESTONE 175 cc.
Excellent physcial and mechanical
condition. Very reliable. s3oo'. Call
Jim. 392-8070. (A-3t-119-p)
6B Honda 90 (step through model).
1900 miles. $175. In very good
condition. Call 372-9358, ask for
Haynes in Room 195. (A-4t-119-p)
2 bedroom concrete block home in
NE $450 equity, take over payments
of $61.48 month at 6% interest. Call
owner at 378-5145 after 5:30
pm. (A-st-l 18-p)
GRAND OPENING Every day up to
50% savings but April 21 thru 26 a
SUPER SALE. Reg. $79.50 full
suspension 4 drawer files, now from
$29.75 to $39.75. Reg. $49.95 full
suspension 2 drawer files, now from
$22.50 to $29.75. Also hundreds of
desks, chairs, files, and much more at
SUPER SAVINGS for this sale. NEW
and USED JR OFFICE
FURNITURE, 620 Vt S. Main St. Tel.
376-1146. (A-7M17-P)
68 Yamaha twin lOOcc cycle only
driven 2500 miles in excellent
condition. Price 260 dollars. Call
Steve at 392-9913 or leave
message.(A-st-l 17-p)
JEEP 1957 4wheel dr. Runs Good.
Needs paintwench on front MUST
SELL. Phone 3725742 after 5
o'clock. 450 or make offer.
(A-4t-117-p)
Twenty volumn Encyclopedia
International and ten volumn set of
art books. New, never been used,
need money for school. Call
376-0022. (A-5M16-P)
Santa Fe Lake. Tired of tiny lake lots
at big prices? See 2Â¥t acres, pecans
fronting on water. Huge lots, easy
commute, terms. Call 378-6459.
(A-20t-l 16-P)
I FOR RENT
>*
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efficiencies to $l7O for two
bedrooms fro entire summer quarter.
Close to Campus. Air. Pool. Also
renting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-8990.
(B-21t-115-p)
Peace and qufet fs yours sos she
asking by living in one of our
secluded luxurious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for $n
appointment to me them. immedfcL
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, In**,
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-c)
Available for this quarter or longer.
Modern efficiency for up to 3 people.
Pool. Air. $75 per month. 1530 N.w.
4 Ave. Call 376-8990. (B-5M16-P)
Available for summer qtr. Trailer,
12x60, 3 br, IV* bath, air cond.,
washer, completely furnished. $l2O
monthly plus utilities. Call Hugh at
378-33Q1.(8-st-115-p)
| WANTED I
N:.x.sssss?>?T-x-. -x-:x-xwWXX-x-x-x-s%v
1 male roommate needed French
Quarter-52. Ph. 376-1437, April rent
paid. (C-117-4t-p)
Male roommate for 1 bedroom
Summit House Apt. Pool, air cond.
$67 monthly. Immediate occupancy.
Apt. E-26. Call after 6pm, 378-6784.
(C-st-117-p)
H IXIIb

Tuesday, April 22,1969, The Florida Alligator

f WANTED j|
WiMtiWiWMiwraM: wwwsMaw
Please help us! We need 1 female
roommate now and for summer
quarter at Landmark. Call after 5.
378-9954 (C-st-119-p)
Williamsburg apts 1 male
roommate wanted SSO month
April paid. Central AC. 2br. Pool,
dishwasher, disposal. Call 376-9719.
(C-st-119-p)
WANTED: Volunteers over 21 for
antibiotic study. Earn $50.00. Come
to M-438, medical sciences building
between 10 and 3 on April 23, 22,
and 23 for further details.
(c-3t-119-p)
Mobile home wanted. Would like to
purchase used trailer, 2 bdr 12'x60'
must be available in August. If
interested, write Jake Varn 302
Duplex Court, Brooksville, Fla.
(C-9M16-P)
1 male student to share French
Quarter Apt. with 3 others. 50 dols.
per month. Call 392-8263 evenings.
(C-st-117-p)
3 Male roommates needed for
summer quarter. 4 bedroom, 2 bath,
air conditioned apartment, 1 block
behind Norman Hall, sll2 each plus
utilities for quarter, call 372-1272.
(C-lt-120-P)
HELP WANTED ~
>i.sxxwxx*xSNS ; > ;-.''Ww
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. If you
can handle the job you can name
your salary. Top executive in rapidly
growing company needs a mature,
well-organized person for difficult
and responsible position. Excellent
skills and intelligence a must. Call
Mrs. Gabaldon at 462-2499.
(E-5M16-P)
'LISTENERS WANTED: Will pay
$1.50 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Miss
Hardaway University ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. Can make up to $6.00.
(E-15M07-C)
BOOKEEPING TYPING position
with one of the finest firms.
Excellent working conditions with
very freindly small staff. Enough
responsibility and activity to keep
you interested. Salary is excellent.
Call PAUL GRIMES ALLIED
PERSONNEL of Gainesville, 1800 N.
Main 376-4611 (E-st-118-p)
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS FROM
TAMPA BAY AREA Career
$600.00 per month, plus expense
allowance for man needed for
insurance agency. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 11702 Tampa, Fla. 33610.
(E-Bt-119-p)
Counselors White Plains. My day
camp wants men from NY area to
serve as gen. couns. Write Mohawk
Day Camps, Old Tarrytown Rd.,
White Plains, NY 10603. (E-3M20-P)
AUTOS f
Â¥ ft
,*J:*:*:w:*x*x<*x*x*x*x< 59 T-bird conv. new brakes good V-8
engine. S2OO. Call 378-2748 anytime
or come by 304 S.W. 3rd Str. apt. no.
2. A GOOD BUY. (G-3t-119-p)

|r VV \ SPECIALS gif
J Lunch and Dinner
W- TUESDAY SPECIAL ||
1 FRIED 1
I CHICKEN 1
H ALL YOU GOA II
II CARE TO EAT //{ ||
11 WEDNESDAY SPEOAL ||
I CHICKEN STEW 1
I DUMPIJNGS 49< Jf
i MORRISON'S 1
1 CAFETERIAS |
MALL M

Page 9

| AUTOS
65 Mujeng 2+2. Shelby 310 hp,
44bbl, headers, tach, 4 speed. Aztec
gold. Exc. cond. Reasonably priced.
Phone 376-1701. (G-3t-118-p)
Datsun 1968 sports 2000 convert.
135 hp 4 speed overhead cam Never
been raced. $2190. Call 378-8533.
(G-3t-118-p)
1966 V.W. 2dr sedan, Blue. New
clutch, runs good. $1,195.00 Crane
Inports 372-4373. (G-118-st-c)
1967 Volvo 142 with air and
standard shift. Radial tires x clean
Red $2,195.00 Crane Imports.
372-4373. (G-118-st-C)
V.W. Manx buggy 1300 engine
53H.P. Red metalflake soft top side
curtains rollbar many extras. Great
for sand, woods, street $1695 or
trade for big motorcycle and cash.
See at 1020 S. Main St. or call
378-0249. (G-10t-119-p)
60 VW camper, lotus land variety,
new paint, rebuilt eng, complete
camping facilities, radio. S9OO. Call
372-0877 or 392-9367. (G-5M16-P)
PERSONAL \
wwswwwwx:xs::?w<^
Law student commuting daily from
Palatka wants passengers. Contact
RM Morris at law school or Ph.
649-4286 after 6 PM. (J-3t-119-p)
Passangers needed for trips to Ft.
Lauderdale. SIO.OO R.T. Leave
Thursdays 6:00 P.M. Return
Mondays at 11:00 P.M. Trips made
on April 24, May 8, 22. 1968 Merc.
Benz Air. D. Grosse 372-9317
Eves, except Weds. Buchman B-15.
(J-st-119-p)
COOK WANTED Good Food and
good company. Call 378-3538.
Transportation provided. (J-2t-119-p)
BEGINNING BOXER needs sparring
partner. Eqpt. will be provided. Call
Lee at 372-9410. (J-2t-120-P)
The Student Tutor Society has tutors
available for CPS-121 & 122, CY-201
& 202, MS-102 & 204 & 301 & 302,
CMS-171, CLC-141 & 142, SY-201
and Spanish. There is no charge for
this service. For more information
call 372-3806. (J-IM2O-P)
Attention to those born Nov. 8,
1839: Peace and quiet is yours for
the asking; get drunk enough and it
might be yours for good! (J-lt-120-P)
Sheri: Seeeech!! Been tedious at
times but what fun! Wink, and its
maxim time again! May the
champane flow forever! Luv ya.
chom. J.L. (J-IM2O-P)
interested in travel and/or study in
Europe, Asia or the Mid-East? Want
to buy or rent a car to use there. Call
392-1655 Rm. 310 Union.
(J-12t-114-c)
RED PIN I
BOWLING
tonight
8-10 P V)
UNION GAMES AREA

§ PERSONAL |
Tired of a major you dont care
about? Cant find anything better?
Come to Rm 302 Fla. Gym.
Recreation the young field with a big
future. (J-3M20-P)
Go West young man or woman and
drive my car to Denver after June 15,
eall 378-1744 for details. (J-IM2O-P)
Would you like to lose weight and
keep it off for good? Come to Weight
Watchers, 1015 W. University Ave.
Mon 10 a.m., 7:30 p.m. Wed., 9:30
a.m., 10 p.m., 7:30 p.m. PhT anytime
372-9555. (J-4M16-P)
:*X-:X*X*X*V.X.?:N9to*X*X*X*X*X*XX*XAX
I LOST A FOUND f
K v
vx-x-x-x-x*x*x LOST: Gold-plated chain about 50"
long, V<4" wide. Sentimental value. $5
reward Lea, 376-4053.
(L-2M20-P)
Lost: white -gold KA pin. Vicinity
University Inn. S2O reward. Call Ben,
376-9256 or leave message.
(L-2t-119-p)
Lost anything lately? We have plenty
of lost articles in Room 130 Reitz
Union. (L-3M19-NC)
| l "' "'sTrvt a l
I l*ic queEIM I
I *1 11 IT I I
B [eej SV66f\F,O Off Mirutt itdlfCtl
B tollll[n lM ' WWWH IMS SEW MTS B
AISO SIDNEY POfTIER ROD STEIGER I
I IN Trt rtOT OF TO NIGHT I

Gator PAWN SHOP
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
DIAMONDS
\J-OANS j guns
BUY SELL TRADE
"We specialize in Gator-Aid 99
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575
Km LAST DAY
UIiEUBp] "ROSEMARY'S BABY"
<-Jl| "THE ODD COUPLE"
Out of violence, compassion.
Out of suspicion trust. Mik
Out of hell hope. i|jjP
SELMUR PICTURES and ||t| >H|P
HENRY G SAPERSTEIN present I 111 | f IE
PACIFIC HI
MUS LALOSCHIFRIN ***INM*B-LALOSCHIFRIN ALEXANDER JACOBS ERIC BERCOVICI

BiBW ENTIRELY DIFFERENT!

| SERVICES
I have an IBM mag. tape typewriter
and guarantee perfectly typed short
papers. No dissertations. Very fast.
Mrs. Lamm after 5:00.
378-5514.(A-st-118-p)
Alternator Generators carters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)
iismic*
55 THRU WED
j| 3,5,7,9
S\fwTNE
g
My
fcnd*j6p#|
leJfcxjelmg Pocket
ALSO AT 9:20 M
rCLini EaSTWOOD



I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 22,1969

Page 10

Infrasquad Game Saturday

UF football lettermen of past
years will be the guests of honor
Saturday at the Lettermens
Club Game at Florida Field.
Kickoff for the intrasquad
contest for the Gator gridders
will be 2 pjn. Lettermen will be
seated in a special section and
Coach Ray Graves will play host

Spring Grid Shorts
By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Reflecting on spring football accomplishments and projecting
a bit into the future, we can ...
... look for the green, small, fast Gator team to spice a
rebuilding season this fall by upsetting a couple of favored
opponents thanks mainly to fine team speed and
quickness ... UFs opener Sept. 20 against offense-minded
Houston shouldnt shock the Gator defense ... secondary
coach Don Brown journeys to Houston Saturday to view the
explosive Cougars spring game ...
On speed, comerback Steve Tannen, flanker Carlos Alvarez
and split end Ted Hager turned in top times of 4.6 in the
40-yard dash ... Tannens trial at split end has been termed a
success and hell see action there in addition to his defensive
duties, say UF coaches....
Spring injuries have fortunately been few ... vet defenseive
edn Britt Skirvanek is out for entire spring with knee injury,
while running back Jerry Vinesetts ankle is healing we 11... he
should be ready for May 3 Orange and Blue clash ...
Gators radiated tremendous spirit during Saturdays
two-hour scrimmage in 82-degree weather ...
The holler guys are led by Tannen and Tom Sheik
Abdelnour, 5-9 linebacking demon ...
First-team offense clashed with first-team defense in second
half of Saturdays scrimmage ... Graves says the boys prefer it
that way, meaning they learn best by going up against the
best...
Big Jack Youngbloods play has coaches touting him as
most improved defensive player ... number one QB Jade
Eckdahl won the most improved accolade for offense ... the
lefty signalcaller will undoubtedly share duties with 6-3
sophomore QB John Reaves next fall..
Finally, dont forget to come see the 69 Gator grid squad in
action Saturday in the first annual Lettermens Club game, 2
p.m. at Florida Field .-. .itll be a game-type intra-squad with
proceeds going to the F-Club to aid its campus projects. Charge
will be $2.00 for adults and SI.OO for students.

Dorms Sign Up
Friday is the last day to sign
up for dormitory softball. All
dorm sections wishing to play in
this years competition must sign
up in room 229 Florida Gym or
call 392-0581.

I AMI g
m in
I K. Drop your dry cloon cloon
cloon ing any our plant*,
on your way to work .
up on your
way Kama.
MON APR 21 TUES APR 22 WED APR 23
RIP'S ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING & MARTINIZING PLANTS
7 COMPLETE PLANTS TO SERVE YOU
319 N.W. 13th Street
204 N.W. 13th Street 3444 West University Avenue
1603 S.W. 13th Street 130 N.W. 10th Avenue
1150 N.E. 16th Avenue 316 North Main Street

to the group that evening at
6:30 at a buffet at the Moose
Club in Gainesville.
Lettermen, and all other
Gator football fans, will view a
contest between two teams
which have been equally divided
in order to insure competition of
an exciting nature.

I Dick Hoimu I
I JCWIIIB# I
I CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
I REPAIRS |
1 TROPHIES ENGRAVING |
m 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 1
I^BLOCKFROMOAMPUS

Senior Jack Eckdahl of
Gainesville will quarterback one
team against his sophomore
counterpart, John Reaves of
Tampa.
Each quarterback has had a
good spring, according to
Graves, and they appear to be
taking turns shining in spring
scrimmages. Both were sharp last
weekend with Eckdahl firing a
20-yard TD pass to tight end
Skip Amelung and Reaves
coming back with a 45-yard
pitch to the same target for a
score later.
Special ceremonies at
halftime will include
competition among campus
athletes in punt, pass and kick
with the winners in each division
facing Heisman Trophy winner
Steve Spurrier in an exhibition
match.
Complete squad rosters will
be announced later this week.
This will be the first of two
spring football games, the final
one being the Orange-Blue clash
Miller-Brown
NORTH OF jfDV
THE MALL MM
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER

This campus
is crawling
with leg men

Your legs get the once-over every time
you turn around. And theyd better look
great. Once over with the sleek new Lady
Norelco, and they will.
The rest of you will, too. Because the
Lady Norelco isnt just a fast, close, com comfortable
fortable comfortable leg shaver. It's a fast, close, gentle
underarm shaver too. And it's even an easy easyto-handle
to-handle easyto-handle trimmer that takes off those
wispy little neck strands that sneak up on
Sassoons between appointments.
Its a whole new way to
stay great looking.
So is the new Norelco
Ladyshave pictured at

j;.
It/:;. .:. . i; iufjSh,
Wfimr
-v ;;
(Good Housekeeping V)
W ci'HMUts j
mjjEjjh
iji

which concludes spring practice
on May 3.

BLOW YOURSELF UP
I TO POSTER SIZE
Get your own photo poster. Send ouy Mock and white |||
or color photo. Also any newspaper or magaxina photo. |||
A $25.00 Value If
PERFECT POP ART 2x3 ~ s 3" I
Frame tor 23 Ft. foster only 3.50 3x4 Ft.S7.SO |
PHOTO JIGSAW PUZZLE ut.,i/,. $ 4 50 I I
Get your own Personalired Photo Jigsaw Puiile. Send any block ond white or
color photo. Moiled in 40 easy to assemble pieces. Great gilt or qog. ffi
PHOTO DART BOARD 11t. diameter 8
Get your own Personoliied Photo Dort Boord. Send any block and white or color
photo. Mounted on genuine cork and comes with 3 precision darts. |||||?
Paster rolled and mailed in sturdy tele. Your original returned |B|§
undamag'd with pester or jigsaw puxzle or dart board. |||
Add 50c for postage and handling for EACH item ordered. Add local
Sales To*. Send check, cash or M.O. (No C.O.D.J to:
PHOTO POSTER Inc. 210 E. 23rd St.. Dept. C, N.Y 10010
I ROBBIE+S I
The Best In
Meals.QWSandwichei
TV & BILLIARDS^
1718 W. University Ave.
On The Gold Coast

right. It comes in a purple and white travel
purse and does a good job of pampering
your legs, under-
arms and pocket pocketbook.
book. pocketbook.
Lady Norelco and ic*3P \ \
Norelco Ladyshave. // sSas
Two fabulous new | II
ladies'shavers. For 111
the benefit of man. 1
a fJorelcd
|||kyoii cant get any closer

Make your vote 3
count- o
VOTE ISSUE l



Three Prospects Inked
By Gator Cage Coach

Alligator Smvfcas
Moving into the heartland of Americas high
school basketball scene, UF Coach Tommy Bartlett
Monday announced the signing of three future
Gators to scholarships.
UF has signed two-time All-Ohio Gass A Mark
Thompson, 64, of Mt. Pleasant, Ohio; All-State
Kentucky honorable mention Bill Nagel, 6-3, of
Bellevue, Ky.; and Indiana star Tim Fletcher 6-2, of
Evansville, Ind.
Bartlett said he is also interested in several
in-state players, particularly guard Tommy Curtis of
Tallahasee Leon and forward Ken Van Ness of
Seminole.

Graves Taps Gator Getters

Eighteen UF coeds have been
selected to the Gator Getters,
an organization to promote and
work with the schools athletic
program.
The coeds represent various
sororities on campus plus the
independents.
We think these coeds will be
a tremendous asset to our
athletic program, said UF
Director of Athletics Ray
Graves. They are all attractive,
poised and charming. I think
they are a more representative

Punt, Pass, Kick Today

First round punt, pass and
kick competition among campus
athletes will be held today at 4
p.m. on the UF football practice
field.
Five finalists in each of the
three divisions will participate

SCAT Day Set

Order of Omegas Project
Student Activity Center Team
(SCAT) Assistant General
Chairman Steve Rohan
announced Monday the dates for
the Student Quarter drive and
The Activity Center day.
The quarter drive, originally
started by the UF Swim team
last term, is one of SCATS
programs to encourage student
support for an Activity Center.
The dates set for collecting
quarters from students are April
28, 29, 30. Booths will be set up

DANCE
featuring
"THE PLANT LIFE
Winner of Gator Gras
Battle of the Bands
Friday nite April 25th
9-1
Union Terrace
FREE

example of todays college
student than you read about and
see on television and we are
happy to have them helping us.
The coeds are Tammy
Bowman (Kappa Delta,
Jacksonville), Linda Burr (Delta
Gamma, Clearwater), Pat
Boutchyard (Zeta Tau Alpha,
Maitland), Linda Comparato
(Tri-Delt, Titusville), Trish
Cotthoff (Tri-Delt, Hopkinsville,
Ky.), Beth Graves (Kappa Alpha
Theta, Gainesville).
Also, Carol Holcomb (Kappa

Saturday at halftime of the
Lettermens Gub Game at
Florida Field, the first of two
scheduled intrasquad contests
for the Gator gridders this
spring. Kickoff is set for 2 pjn.
Saturdays winners will face

around campus and all students
are urged to give $.25.
Ed Boze, coordinator of the
quarter drive said, The success
of SCAT depends on the support
of each and every student.
All campus organizations are
encouraged to send
representatives to SCATS
regular meeting being held
tonight at 7:30, room 150 G &
F Reitz Union. Anyone
interested in working for SCAT
should attend.

Thompson was named to the Gass A All-Ohio
team by the United Press International and
Associated Press Ohio prep editors and coaches.
Thompson led his Mt. Pleasant team to the finals
of the Eastern conference, before losing to the
eventual state champions.
Nagel averaged 24.7 points a game and grabbed
over 20 rebounds a game for his Bellevue, Ohio
team. Coach Bartlett tabbed Nagel as one of the
finest prospects he has seen this season. Nagel, prior
to his signing, had received over 60 scholarship
offers.
Fletcher averaged 21 points a game for Reitz
High and has been termed one of the top 20 guards
in talent rich Indiana.

Delta, Tampa), Robin Keeley
(Delta Gamma, Miami), Sharyn
Keller (Tri-Delt, Titusville),
Donna Lough (Kappa Alpha
Theta, Orlando), Pamme Miller
(Delta Gamma, Augusta, Ga.),
Joan Pasteris (Delta Gamma,
Miami), Diann Smith (Tri-Delt,
Jacksonville), Anna Spinale
(Delta Gamma, Coral Gables),
Ronna Stahl (Alpha Epsilon Phi,
Miami), Shirley Starling (Phi Mu,
Fort Lauderdale), Cathey
Sudduth (Phi Mu, Miami), Pam
Turner (Independent, Miami).

Heisman Trophy winner Steve
Spurrier in an exhibition match.
Gator freshman coach Lindy
Infante will supervise todays
competition and the Athletic
Department will furnish the
footballs.

If youve never S
j
voted before...
VOTE ISSUE I

I New this year... the most exciting car of any year... dual over- I
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I contour bucket seats... 2+2 ... Gran Turismo styling. I
I Fiat 124 Sport Coupe *3050 I
HOW DOES P.O.E. I
FIAT DO IT
I R F R E PR,CE? I
..Jjr j||h |
I Mr A wife
W > ?.. y f .* ,' s
- n * ,v

Maccabee Student Organization Sponsors
an ISRAEL'S INDEPENDENCE DAY celebration
Thursday, April 24, 8 p.m. in Hillel auditorium
16 NW 18 Street.
Israeli food!
Israeli musicl
Israeli short films!
No charge. Everyone invited.
TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
I STARKE, 1 FLORIDA '^BB|
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER llf
- HOURS HOURSWEEKDAYS
WEEKDAYS HOURSWEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT
TUESDAY SPECIAL
LARGE PORTION DELICIOUS
BAKED CHICKEN &
YELLOW RICE 584
WEDNESDAY SPECIAL
ITALIAN STYLE aQA
VEAL PARMIGIAN/T V
Bl DINNER
A J 313 w UNIV. AVE.
IMUMM Vi BLOCK WEST OF
FLORIDA THEATER

Tudy, April 22,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



. Tin FfcwMi ARMT. Th*. April 22,1909

Page 12

Everybodys talking
about the
Ijlppj-N of Warts says, Yechhhhhhhhhhh Wsr molbegott
* fwT courtney smullion, Vocational School
jjl^lpi junior at Mildew A&M says, for the Tall says,
It keeps time! It comes with a packet Its sort of colorful!
(Its electric, dont you know.) of f
(arent you just panting now?)
Being a full 36 inches high by 8 inches wide its perfect for: Giving to your
>und 27ft.tall.
boyfriend
Can anybody look us in the eye
and honestly say they can do with- f \
out a BIG DUMB WATCH THING? j ;
(Sorry about that, BIG DUMB / ) \ \
WATCH THING people.) h L IK*
Who has the gall to bring you j fk> J
the BIG DUMB WATCH THING? K/l / t/T \W7 M
Pepsodent Tooth Paste, thats LVV/ J|B
who. Pepsodent gets teeth their LJ j /\j L-J/V/
absolute whitest. Which means if Ay ZggdL
they were any whiter youd be ar- Jp ; 9 \
rested for impersonating a head- n
light. Pepsodent is madeespecial- pepsodefp J|j : f
ly for smiling at BIG DUMB WATCH U]) JW : ;3
THINGS and such happy stuff. j I j
' I s 'T 80 6 "* too^^rus^ es |
m 111 To get a BIG DUMB WATCH THING send only $7.50 (how about that?) and an fT3 I §~/ J (
JIH 11 empty carton from any size Pepsodent Tooth Paste or label from a Pepsodent sjh 1 /\Add [)
toothbrush to: |mO J | /tip
- BIG WATCH THING BOX 9473 ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA 55177 | -i /$ A
I BUT SEND NOW!! (Actually you can take your time. The supply is vast.) | |
J NAME | O J L S A
I ADDRESS Q, I
CITY STATE ZIP CD
I Get your BIG DUMB WATCH thing today!! After all, somebody has to be first. S 3 I S*
m Expires July 31, 1969. Allow 4 weeks for delivery. | *** j
L \ MUI