Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 119

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DOUG CASE
A MONUMENT TO MONUMENTS
Some unknown artists in the Plaza of the Americas couldn't resist
the urge to create a new memorial from the bricks stacked near
Friendship Walk.
Devaney Proposes
Finals For Study

Presidential candidate Jim
Devaney called Sunday for
C-course finals to be available
for study in campus libraries, to
lessen what he described as the
inequality of the Honor System.
Part of the mythology
students live as real each day, is
the rigidly structured idea that
the honor system is Floridas
most cherished tradition, he
said. A system which first
admits to the honor of all and
then emphasizes the necessity of
those same people keeping their
eyes open, is a system of
suspicion on shaky ground.
Devaney was asked last year
by the then Honor Court
Chancellor Pete Zinober to
cooperate in attempts to find
illegal finals in the fraternity
system. Devaney, who was IFC
president at the time, told the
Alligator that amnesty was to be
granted to all groups that would
relinquish illegal files.
Os course, no finals were
ever obtained from independent
or fraternity sources, probably
because they view possession of
illegal finals not as immoral, but
as study guides.
This investigation arose from
an editorial written by the then
Alligator Managing Editor
Harvey Alper, contending that
several fraternities kept files of
exams obtained illegally. He
followed up his editorial with an
article showing portions of a
stolen final exam.
Devaney added, Despite the
fact that a whitewash statement
came from Vice President for
Student Affairs Lester Hales

Florida Alligator

office, stating that no evidence
of widespread use of illegal finals
was found, this statement only
perpetuates the very theory that
we are honorable according to
(SEE 'DEVANEY' PAGE 2)

Taylor Announces
Shepherd Backing
By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
In a move which seemed almost overdue, student body President
Clyde Taylor Sunday endorsed Charles Shepherd as his successor.
Taylor has been actively working for Shepherd since the campaigns
beginnings, but only as an individual. Sunday, he threw his support to
Shepherd in official capacity as president.
In endorsing Shepherd, Taylor said he could find no other serious
and realistic candidate.
In the past several days, Taylor said, many student have asked
me which candidate I was supporting for student body president. I do
not believe there should be any doubt in anyones mind as to whom I
am behind.
I am supporting the only truly qualified and competent candidate
in the race. I am actively working for the only really serious and
realistic candidate.
I am endorsing Charles Shepherd.
While some other candidates, especially James Devaney, have
suggested some unique issues, I cannot accept their campaigns as
realistic at this time.
The only real issue facing UF at this time is academic reform. This
past year, several programs were begun in other in other critical
non-academic areas, but now, student govemement must move into
the academic area.
Charles Shepherd and First Party have been the only people to
talk in these terms, and to see this need realistically.
Further, Shepherds experience, coupled with the close contact he
has held with my office in the last year is excellent assurance of his
knowledge and concern of the programs this administration has
started.

University of Florida, Gainesville

ON ATTACK CHARGES
Liberation Party
Acquits JOMO

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writar
Liberation party Sunday
lashed out at charges that JOMO
members were involved in the
recent assaults on UF students.
Liberation party is outraged
by Campus Police Investigator
(Ken) Morrisons slanderous
Lies, reported as fact by the
Alligator, to the effect that
JOMO has been in any way
responsible for the recent
attacks on UF students, said a
statement released by
presidential candidate Joan
Warren and vice presidential
candidate David Smith.
Two students were victims
April 11 of slashings in separate
incidents by a group of Negroes,
some of whom Morrison
identified as members of JOMO.
Liberation party denounced
allegations that JOMO members
were responsible:
If any group or person can
offer any proof that JOMO was
in any way responsible for the
recent muggings, Liberation
( Partys statement said, we ask
i them to present their evidence in
public. If not, we suggest that
the Alligator and Campus Police *,
review the libel laws. There has
so far been no proof presented
that JOMO was in any way
involved.
Liberation also reiterated its
support for JOMO. At a rally
two weeks ago, the party called
on the UF to permit JOMO to
use campus facilities:
Liberation party knows that

JOMO is a responsible
community organization
working to organize the black
community of Gainesville for
self-defense and black liberation.
They are in no way a racist
organization. Liberation party
fully supports their just
struggle.
The party also called on the
UF to raise the minimum wage
for all full- and part-time
employes to $1.65 an hour
immediately the federal
minimum wage level.
The party, in proposing these
changes, took note of the
relationship between the UF and
Gainesville.
Liberation party is

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Poll Shows Shepherd Ahead 1
One-third of the students polled by the Alligator Sunday 3
said they would vote for Charles Shepherd in in the upcoming
Student Government election, while another third remains s
undecided.
Out of the 120 randomly called, 37 said they would vote for s
Shepherd. Fourteen said they would vote for John Mica, three j|
for James Devaney, and two for Joan Warren. None said they §f
would vote for Vic Ramey, while 42 were undecided.
Twenty said they would not vote and two said they haven't
3 decided if they will vote.
Forty said they voted last year, but about half of the
|| remaining students said they were not attending the UF during g
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PHILIP COPE
IM FLYING
Cheerleading hopefuls Maureen Osteen and Dick Maddock
demonstrate their abilities in Friday afternoon's judging for next
year's screaming, yelling, bouncing and jumping squad. Names of the
winners will be released Tuesday.

Monday April 21, 1969

" V v.A r y~
Jmt
JOAN WARREN
... outraged at charges
concerned with the current bad
relations between the UF and
the Gainesville community. We
feel that the presence of the UF
hurts the people in several ways,
by raising consumer prices and
rents in town, and by paying
sub-standard wages to university
non -academic workers.

America's
Number One
College
Daily



\, Th* Florida Alligator, Monday, April 21,1969

Page 2

Proposed Amendments
Go To Vote In Election

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
In addition to electing a
student body president
Thursday, UF students will have
the chance to vote on four
proposed amendments to the
student body constitution.
The amendments, approved
recently by the Student Senate,
cover four broad areas: student
body elections, the chartering of
organizations by the senate,
structure of the Honor Court
and duties of the student body
vice president.
Student body elections, both
in the fall and spring,
traditionally we on a Thursday,
but the amendment would
change them to Wednesday.
The second amendment
would give the senate the power
to grant charters to any student
organization as h may deem
necessary to the proper
functioning of the government
or the general well-being of the
student body.*'
The way it is now, the senate
is empowered only to charter
organizations that receive funds
from Student Government.
This amendment would also
let the senate initiate, grant,
amend and revoke* amendments
to charters. This provision arose
out of a hassle that erupted last
Devaney
Proposes
FttOH PA6E ONE
present structure.''
The unaffiliated candidate for
the top Student Government
post also repeated his campaign
theme: the need for an
atmosphere of understanding on
this campus.
It is not that we are not
honorable, simply the system
itself is corrupt. Thus we
castigate individuals who deviate
from an immoral system. The
system, as it exists, creates an
atmosphere which is foreign to
the goals of understanding by
measuring understanding in
terms of a grade point average.
This is by any means of
explanation absurd.
A black line on a prog test
gives no indication of
understanding. This method of
testing is economically practical,
but it furthers nothing
connected with learning.''
He said crowded libraries at
exam time is a good example of
the poor atmosphere.*'
First Party Rallies.
First party will sponsor a
rally tonight at 9 pm in the
Rathskeller for all students.
Featured will be free popcorn,
15 cent beer, and entertainment.
There will be no speeches.
Poll Workers Moot
All Poll Workers are required
to attend a meeting tonight at 7
p.m. in room 349 of the Reitz
Union. Secretary of Interior Bill
Modlin announced that anyone
who cant be present must call at
392-1665 in advance.

fall when the senate amended
the constitution of the Union
Board of Managers without the
board's consent. Union Board
President Roger Brown
contended the action was
unconstitutional and eventually
took the matter to the Honor
Court.
Each college at the UF elects
a justice to serve on the Honor
Court, and the justice from the
College of Law is automatically
the vice-chancellor. The third
amendment would make the
office of vice-chancellor
appointive. The chancellor and
the student body president
would name the vice-chancellor
and the appointment would be
subject to senate concurrence.

(EDITOR'S NOTE: the question of the day today for student
body president candidates is: Do you think the Student Senate should
be reapportioned? If so, why? If not, why not?)
CHARLES SHEPHERD Yes, on the basis of colleges only. This
is the fairest basis of representation. Presently we have both
residential and college representation, in which there is some disparity
because of the large number of students living off-campus. This
off-campus representation is somewhat artificial. Consequently, we
should either district off-campus areas or apportion strictly on the
basis of colleges. I dont feel off-campus districting is feasible, so that
only leaves college representation on the one man-one vote principle.
JOAN WARREN Since the Student Senate doesnt really
represent the students, it doesnt make any difference if its
reapportioned or not. Most students dont know who their senators
are, what the Senate does, what it is, and what it does for them.
Students must come to an understanding that SG and the Student
Senate as they exist now merely function to do the administrations
busy work.
JOHN MICA I dont think the problem is reapportionment but
rather a change in the functioning and operation of the Student
Senate is necessary. I will establish Student Senate offices in each of
the living areas and in each of the upper division colleges. With these
changes, students will be able to discuss their problems and gripes
with their elected representatives. Students presently have no way of
directly identifying or relating their needs and problems to their
elected governmental officials. SG and the Senate only communicate
with the students during the general election and seem to be forgotten
the other 350-odd days of the year.
VIC RAMEY Did not appear to answer question.
JIM DEVANEY Maybe it should and maybe it shouldnt. I am
more interested in how well it functions in creating a truly academic
atmosphere. Previous Senate composition has failed to establish
participation and communication among all segments of the
university. I dont think reapportionment would have changed their
emphasis. What I feel will make the Senate more complimentary to
the university will be the inclusion of persons who make up the silent
majority that never participates in SG elections as a voter or as a
senator. When we include them, then we will have reapportioned the
Senate.
i (%_ i bF S REPRESENTATIVES I
Jim Bartlett Tom Stewart
George Corl Mel Ward
Dan Sapp Arlie Watkinson
Fidelity Union Life insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 367-1208
DEFERRED PERMIUM PAYMENTS
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN
f^
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the-official opinions of their
.authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Budding, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
'entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it consideis
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator wfll not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

The final proposed
amendment would change the
duties of the vice president.
Rather than presiding over the
senate, the vice-president would
simply serve in functions
assigned by the president. The
senate elects from its members
to a president to lead meetings
and conduct business.

School Bonds Sold,
UF Gets $5 Million

The sale of about S4O million
dollars worth of bonds in
Tallahassee last week has
virtually assured the completion
of the second unit of the
biological sciences building, and

MAX LERNER
... speaking tonight

the air conditioning of Matherly
Hall.
W. Ellis Jones, director of
university planning, said Sunday
the UF will benefit $5,053,000
from the sale, although about
$3 million had already been
granted to the institution, so
about $2 million more will be
made available. He said most of
the money will go to the work
on the biological sciences unit
and the Matherly Hall project,
but some will go for other minor
projects.
All of the work is expected to
be finished within two years.
The architectural work on the
science building has already been
done, and the wheels are turning
to get federal aid for the air
conditioning.
Jones said the bonds were
sold for a little more than 4.4
per cent. The legal limit is set at
4.5 per cent.

I BEER! BEER! BEER!
L ife j
s ' n
wamm
By now everyone is getting a little weary of the campaign oratory, the
crowded debates, the dorm-stomping and the hand shaking.
So we're offering a change of pace.
Beginning at 8:30 tonight at the RATHSKELLER, Charles Shepherd and
the rest of the FIRST PARTY slate will be talking with you about
student government or anything else you might want to discuss.
As an added incentive, beer will be sold at the discount rate of only 15c a
glass.
So come on over and relax, talk and meet the First Party candidates.
And for those students who aren't 21 yet COKE! COKEI COKE!
Charles Shepheid
for Student Body Pres.
(PAID pol apv.)

Max Lemer
Speaks For.
Religion Week
Max Lemer, presented by UF
Religion in life Week, will speak
at the Reitz Union Ballroom at 8
p.m. tonight. Lemer is a noted
author and daily columnist for
the New York Post.
He will be speaking on an
aspect of the R-in-L program's
primary concern, the question of
student dissent.
The climax pf the week will
be the University Convocation in
Florida Gym at 8 pan. Tuesday.
Clark Kerr, former President of
the University of California, will
speak on Students... From
Apathy to Confrontation.
Lemer will give rebuttal at the
close of Kerr's speech.
We have designed this years
Religion in Life Week to have a
much more personal approach
than it has had in the past, said
David Holbrook, the R-in-L
chairman.
Rev. Robert Nesby, who
spoke Sunday on Race,
Religion and Radicalism/* will
be the work horse of the week
moving from discussion to
discussion group.
The highlight of the
discussion groups will be April
24 at the Baptist Student Center
at 6:15 pm. Harold Aldrich,
John McPhail, John Sugg and SG
President Clyde Taylor will give
a panel reaction to R-in-L
Weeks activities.



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AWARD-WINNERS WITH DEAN J. P. JONES
... Skip Perez, Jim Henderson and Raul Ramirez
Profs Resignation
Gets Student Airing
The recent resignation of Gene Aldridge, College of Journalism
broadcasting professor, was one of the main grievances discussed in
the first meeting of the newly formed College of Journalism Student
Advisory Committee.
The committee, formed to give administration student feedback
and to give students more voice in the workings of the college, met
with College of Journalism Dean John Paul Jones Tuesday afternoon.
Some members of the committee told Jones they felt Aldridge had
been forced to resign as a result of pressure from the broadcasting
management and old line journalism professors.
Jones said he advised Aldridge to resign and promised him a freer
intellectual climate if he decided to return in two or three years,
committee member said.
Dr. Christiansen, manager of broadcasting, stated he did not know
of any friction between he and Aldridge which would cause Aldridge
to resign.
There may be a copy of his resignation on my desk, but I really
haven't had a chance to read it, Christiansen stated.
Dean Jones said, Aldridge was not forced to resign, he just
resigned.
Aldridge sent me a letter of resignation but the letter is Aldridge's
personal property and I cant reveal its contents, Jones said.
Aldridge said he had no comment.
OConnell Speaks For FIPA

UF President Stephen C.
O'Connell will be the main
speaker at a luncheon to
publicly introduce the Florida
Institute of Public Affairs
(FIPA) May 7 at the Robert
Meyer Hotel in Jacksonville.
The announcement was made
Tuesday by Farris Bryant, Prime
Osborn and John P. Evans, who
comprise the FIPA luncheon
committee. The three
Jacksonville businessmen are
members of FIPAs board of
trustees. Bryant, former
governor of Florida, led the
group which formed the
organization, serving as its acting
president for the past year.
FIPA is a non-profit
corporation, with membership
open to the public. Its objective
is to provide the Florida citizen
with a non-partisan source of
information professionally
compiled and presented, relating

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to government operations and
controversial state issues.
A Lotto Coffee
The Coralville Reservoir in
lowa is the states second largest
body of water. Someone in the
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
office here figured out that
during the summer months the
reservoir holds enough water to
make almost 281 billion cups of
coffee.
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Journalists Win Second
National Title In A Row

By Alligator Services
Students in UF's College of
Journalism and Communications
have won the Hearst national
writing championship for the
second year in a row and an
unprecedented third time.
The national championship
team is determined by points
accumulated by individual
students in six monthly contests.
Five UF students this year won
seven of the 60 top awards.
One of this year's monthly
winners, Harold Aldrich of
Belleview, former Alligator
editor, will compete in the
national individual
championship write-off against
seven others in Washington April
28. He placed first one month
and fifth another.
Other students earning points
for UF this year were Raul
Ramirez Jr., acting-managing
editor of the Alligator from West
Palm Beach, third place and tied
for third in the final monthly
competition; Louie Andrews of
Panama City and Louis Skip
Perez, both of Tampa, additional
third place awards: Jim
Henderson, Clearwater, ninth

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place, and Larry Jordan,
Alligator staff writer from
Jacksonville, honorable mention
in the concluding contest for an
Alligator story exploring the
feelings of the Negro community
after the Dawkins incident.
Presentation of awards for
the competition will be made in
the U.S. Senate Building April
29. Representing UF will be
President Stephen C. O'Connell,
Journalism Dean John Paul
Jones and Hugh Cunningham,
professor of journalism and
chairman of the Florida Hearst
Contest committee.
The university has been
entering the Hearst contests
since 1961 and never has placed

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21 Wt Uwlvwtty Avr, QaiaviH, Fla. Phon 37-15U

Monday, April 21,1969, The Florida Alligator,

lower than sixth nationally,
Cunningham said.
Standings are as follows:
1961-62, fifth; 1962-63, fourth;
1964-65, first, 1965-66, sixth,
1966-67, third; 1967-68, first,
and 1968-69, first.
wM ipff j f /
Excellence in Food

Page 3

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Page 4

l. The Florida AMgrtor, Monday, Aprff 21,196E

Angel Flight
Wins Awards
The UF Dale Mabry
Squadron and Angel Flight Area
Commander, Eileen McDazgh,
were honored at the Arnold Air
Society's annual Conclave in
New Orleans.
Floridas AF-ROTC squadron
was chosen as the best in the
society in the Southeast and
Miss McDargh was honored as
the outstanding Angel Flight
area commander in the nation.

Financial Aid No Handout;
Most Students Get Help

By DIANE RUSH
Alligator Corrmpondent
Financial aid does not
represent a handout. Students
shouldnt feel they need to
crawl in here for financial
assistance.
This is the philosophy of UF
Student Financial Aid Director
Douglas Turner.
The majority of financial
assistance is in the form of funds
which the student actually earns
himself or returns to the
program with extra measure
after graduation.
In addition, Turner says that
as educational costs spiral in the
future, almost no family with
children in college will be
exempt from needing some
assistance program.
More than 50 per cent of
UF students are now receiving
some type of financial
assistance, says Turner, and
we expect this to increase to 75
per cent within a few years.
At UF, the Student Financial
Aid Office has a variety of
programs to meet the students
need. Grants, which are
conditioned by annual federal
appropriations, are available for
students whose parents earn less
than $5,000 yearly. Need rather
than outstanding academic
accomplishment is the principle
factor in receiving a grant.
In addition to grants, several
types of loans are available for
UF students. National Defense
Loans, according to Turner, are
alloted to students whose family
annual income falls in the
bracket up to SIO,OOO. All long
term loans are repaid after the
student graduates.
A new program, Federal
Insured Loans, may be obtained
by any student regardless of how
much his family earns.
Short term loans from UF for
amounts up to S2OO are
available for emergency relief.
Students with high academic
records and financial need may
apply for scholarships. In
addition to those available
through the Student Financial
Aid Office, scholarships are
awarded by each college from its
own program. A student With a
B
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high academic record should
apply at both sources.
This year the Student
Financial Aid Office projects a
total expenditure of $9 million
in assistance for students. The
amount of total money utilized
by UF students increases about
$1 million a year.
Employment is another facet
of financial aid for students.
Turner estimates that about
2,400 students work each year
as part-time student assistants on
campus. These students earn a
total of over $1 million a year.
A student who works 15
hours a week can earn enough to
pay his tuition and books, or
about $650 a year, says Turner.
Student applications for
financial assistance are usually
filed between Nov. 1 and Feb.
28 each year. Applications are
accepted at other times,
however, and this rule does not
apply to short term loans and
Federal Insured Loans.
A student application for
financial aid springs a set of
organized and systematic
responses in the Financial Aid
Office.
After we receive
information on a students
family income, savings and
personal situation, says Turner,
we can determine what portion
of the individuals college cost
should be borne by his family,
by other assets such as savings,
and by himself.
At this point, we try to find

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a balance between grants or
scholarships, loans and
employment to make a college
education attainable.
We try to counsel students
in the light of their individual
needs. We never encourage a
student to work while hes in
school if it appears that this, will
jeopordize his academic standing
or his health. It is better for him
to work during the summer, and
take a little more time getting
through college, he said.
UF students are becoming
more and more mature about
financial responsibility according
to Turner.
Many students are insistent
about earning their own college
expenses even though, in the
case of loans, it obligates their
future earnings. Some of them
have brothers and sisters at
home who they feel deserve the
same advantages they had during
pre-college years, he says.
We hope the student will
approach the Financial Aid
Office on the same basis he
would any counselor, says
Turner. We are here to provide
a service, not a handout. Our
office can tailor a program to
meet most any students
financial need.
Just a walk away >
from U.F. campus a
1620 W. UNIV. f
UNIVERSITY PLAZA M
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TO AID BLACK STUDENTS
UF Gets Foundation Grant

UF Provost for Agriculture
Dr. E.T. York i Jr., has
announced the establishment of
a new program to help black
American students enter
graduate studies in agriculture
and related fields.
The three-year program was
made possible by a $261,750
grant from the Rockefeller
Foundation.
In explaining the purpose of
the program, York said that
excellent employment
opportunities exist for black
American graduates -with
advanced degrees in agriculture
and related sciences. But, many
potentially good students are
unable to satisfy the high
entrance requirements for
graduate studies and thus qualify
themselves to take advantage of
these opportunities.
Under the new program,
such students will be recruited
primarily from the
predominantly Negro
institutions throughout the
South, and will receive financial
aid while they take any
additional courses they will need
in order to qualify for admission
to graduate school,*' York said.

Symposium Concludes Florida
Among Top Urbanized States

Urbanism is developing
rapidly in the Southern states,
and Florida is one of the more
advanced in this direction.

Blood Drive Collects
652 Pints For IFC

The Interfratemity Council
Blood Drive, held earlier this
year netted 652 pints, bringing
IFCs total to 1600 pints.
Fraternity winners were
announced Thursday by Russ
Bobo, IFC public relations
director.
Blue League has Delta Chi as
the fraternity donating the most
pints of blood. Delta Chi gave
123 pints, 125 per cent
participation.
The Blue League fraternity
which gave the highest
percentage of blood was Delta
Sigma Phi with 140 per cent
participation, giving 63 pints.
In the Orange League, Phi
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9:30 AM-9:00 PM Mon-Fri

e
This pre-graduate school
preparatory program will vary
from one to three quarters in
length. Once students have been
admitted to graduate school
they will continue to receive
financial assistance from other
sources until they complete their
Master of Science degrees,
York said.
At least 15 Negro college
gradustes are expected to enroll
in the program this fall, and a
comparable number are to be
recruited annually over the next
two years. Total enrollment
under the program is expected
to be about 45 students between
now and 1972 when the
program may be renewed by the
Rockefeller Foundation.
Dr. Marvin A. Brooker, who
is retiring this spring as dean of
resident instruction with the UF
Institute of Food and
Agricultural Sciences (IFAS),
will head the program. He will
visit predominantly Negro
institutions to acquaint
administrators and prospective
students with the program.
Selection of students will be
supervised by Brooker, who will
also be available for counseling,
both personal and academic.

This was the consensus at the
annual Southern Symposium
held at Louisiana State
University in New Orleans

Delta Theta donated the most
pints, 166, and had the highest
participation, 125 per cent.
Five plaques were awarded to
fraternities for special
recognition in the drive. Winners
were Sigma Phi Epsilon, Chi Phi,
Beta Theta Pi, Phi Kappa Tau
and Tau Epsilon Phi.
Donated to the Heart
Association were 125 pints of
blood.

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DR. M. A. BROOKER
... will head program
This program can make a
major contribution to widening
the employment horizons of
black graduates, allowing them
to assume professional and
scientific positions in both
public and private sectors of the
economy. It will also help
remove some so the barriers
which Negroes face in their
endeavors to make their
maximum contribution to
society, York said.

recently.
Dr. Manning J. Dauer,
chairman of the UF political
science department, was one of
many political science professors
invited from over the country to
discuss southern politics in the
last 20 years.
The symposium results will
be compiled and published in a
book due for release January,
1970, by the Louisiana State
University Press.
Dauer, who contributed a
section of the book, spoke on
Florida politics, 1948-68.
He also participated in a
comparative analysis among the
southern states, paying
particular attention to race
relations, the two-party system
and urbanism.

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Monday, April 21,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



i. The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 21,1969

Page 6

GUEST EDITORIAL
About Time
(EDITORS NOTE: The following is a
reprint from the lowa State Daily of
Saturday, April 12.)
A federal judge has recently ruled that
the religious restrictions of the 1967
Selective Service Act concerning
conscientious objectors are unconstitutional.
The judge ruled that, Congress
unconstitutionally discriminated against
atheists, agnostics and men ... who ... are
motivated by profound moral beliefs which
constitute the central convictions of their
beings.
The Selective Service Act clause violates
the First Amendment of the Constitution.
Congress shall make no law respecting an
establishment of religion...
The ruling made in the Massachusetts
Federal court district may not be in
agreement with other Federal court districts
and the Justice Department has been urged
to rule on it.
Although support of this ruling may
widen the breech in one of the drafts major
excape routes, we can only hope this
decision wont be reversed by a higher court.
Persons whose moral convictions are in
opposition to war should not be forced to
fight, whether their convictions are based on
moral grounds or otherwise.

T- u
g b n ;Ki
> >.V
t m
X W "v Surveillance ~,,l
Hernando Misbehavior
MR. EDITOR:
The polarization of the country is getting out of hand. Sides of the
dispute over almost everything are resorting to the most naseating
pettifogging and nitpicking aggravation tactics.
The misbehavior of the Hernando County gendarmerie is the latest
in a sequence of noxious acts perpetrated by almost everyone these
days in the service of their cause.
Somebody should crack down on these crackpots and I indude
such idiots as the nut with the dippers in Hernando county with most
of my other personal unfavourites wouldn't it be nice if someone
did?
Hernando county may not be able to give Mr. Fulwood his hair
back in anything but a paper bag, but it ought to give him at least an
abject apology for such scandalous actions, and it certainly should pay
him some form of an indemnity.
I find it small wonder that the young and other groups in this
country have given up even dispairing of the System when such
asininities are perpetrated and go unpunished.
C.Y. WELLES

The Florida Alligator

Poo/mluai
Mi

ULI jyw

'The price of freedom
is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Acting Editor-In-Chief
Raul Ramirez
Acting Managing Editor

Carol Sanger
Assignments Editor

pslack Voices

Perpetuated Injustice

(EDITORS NOTE: Black
Voices will be the regular
sounding box for UFs black
students.)
After 13 incidents with
razor and knife wielding bands
of young Negro troublemakers
President O'Connell and SG
Presidential candidate Charles
Shepherd have called for
increased police protection and
the Alligator has declared a
state of emergency.
How superficial! Os course, it
is necessary to be able to walk
the streets without fear of
attack. But blades have never
enjoyed this right either. There
are numerous cases of attacks
and threats against blacks by
whites on and near campus but
no offers of increased protection
for blacks.
It is rather easy for young
blacks to generate an intense
hatred for whites merely by
observing our environment,
talking with other blacks, and
comparing black and white
society. Even within the
University Community there is
the typical dividion between
black and white blacks sweep
floors and whites sit behind
desks.
The state of Florida has a
population which is one-third
black, yet the University is
approximately .75 per cent
blade; thats 99.25 per cent

Glenn Fake
News Editor

Whats the chief trying to tell us?
- Crimes in Gainesville went up 54.7 per cent from 1967
to 1968, the largest increase of any city in Florida. The
national increase was 19 per cent.
- Robberies in Gainesville rose 129 per cent from 1967
to 1968. The national increase was 32 per cent.
-Alachua County has 2.11 police officers per 1,000
citizens. The national average is 1.7 and Florida average is
1.6.
- The federal government awarded Gainesville one ot nine
Florida grants on the basis of potential civil disturbance.
- The first week of March in Gainesville, arsonists struck
four homes, one grocery and one warehouse. On March 14,
arsonists destroyed the old Rose Theater. On March 28, it
was a house and on April 4, a truck.
-On April 1, a city policeman was target for two
shotgun blasts. The same night, vandals struck 18
automobiles and four businesses.
- On April 9, a gang of ten Negroes beat and robbed two
students on well-traveled NW 13th Street on the fringe of
the University of Florida campus.
- On April 13, a roving band of Negroes on University
Avenue near the campus injured two young people with
razor and bottles.
Now comes Chief Joiner, informing us that it is a basic
right to bear arms, part of our American heritage. And we
wonder if this is confession that things are out of control,
that Gainesville police are over their heads and its every
man for himself?
Be that so, we all need a gun. Or a new police chief.

white. It has no full-time black
faculty members, no black
foremen in plants and grounds
known to the author, only one
black supervisor in the same
department, and a lily white
administration that does not
recognize the problems inherent
in being black in a world
dominated by whites.
I submit that OConnell and
Shepherd will take the same
foot-dragging approach to
solving these problems that their
predecessors did. I remember the
dill-daily by Reitz in denying
admission .to blacks in the
1950*5; it was truly nauseating.
OConnell and Shepherd are
proposing to do nothing more
than perpetuate the same system
based on injustice toward blacks.
This university is accustomed
to seeing the black man as
ditch-digger, janitor, errand boy
and lackey-of-all-trades. Those in
positions of leadership have

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the atupfcc* of
the Boerd of Student Publications.
o#fk ** ,n Room **o. Union.
Phone 352-ISSI, 3*2-1 M 2, or 392-ICS3.
or 2f P tt£ A,M *t or *hose of the editors
ororme writer of the article and not those of the University of

ftiiPST EDITORIAL
Bring Your Own
(EDITORS NOTE: The following
editorial is reprinted from the Gainesville
Sun of Thursday, April 17.)
We note with much interest Gainesville
Police Chief William Joiners recent blast
against restrictive firearms legislation.

By Sam TaylorJ

never really interacted witV
blacks on an equal plane (in
spite of how much they adore
their maids) and have no
understanding of their part in
perpetuating the inequality.
OConnell attended the All
White University of Florida,
received a law degree from the
Completely White Law School,
served the Pure White State
Supreme Court and is now
perpetuating an unjust system
which will keep us at the botton.
Could we really expect
otherwise?
How can American society as
a whole change if its most
enlightened segment, the
university, remains a perfect
example of racial inequality.
With blacks having such a small
stake in this society, it is no
wonder that some brothers have
given up hope and only want
revenge for the welts on our
fathers backs.



Adnia oml 'VtA&tot
'
,$;J^
Vf***^^VflPS'ftfy
>i*jSr
. <, complacent
. > M
'UF Polities of Fun
PE Credit Is Sure
MR. EDITOR:
I just want to inform the students at this University who are
concerned about receiving credit for required physical education next
year, that it doesnt matter which candidate wins the Student
Government presidential election credit will be given anyway
starting in September.
Within the last three days I have heard both First and Issue parties
claim this marvelous feat. Just for the record it was a Special
Committee in the Student Senate that worked on this physical
education issue.
Tbe committee was non-partisan it dissolved last quarter and it
has already been decided that credit will be given next year (the
Senate as well as Dean Stanley have made it official).
John and Charlie lets stop taking credit for things that will
happen no matter who wins this election
JOYCE R. MILLER
Broward-Rawlings Senator

Out

Letter To President Nixon

This is a copy of the letter I
mailed special delivery to the
President. I hope you see fit to
print it in the Alligator.
Dear Mr. President:
I write this letter knowing
that you will probably never
read it, nevertheless, I must
write it.
I am a sad, angry, disgusted
citizen. I cannot find the words
to express the anguish I feel. I
know my feelings are shared by
millions of Americans. I only
wish my pen hand were capable
of transmitting to paper exactly
how I feel after having heard of
the murder of thirty-one of our
navy men at the hands of the
North Koreans. These feelings
are surpassed only by what I feel
for you, Mr. Nixon.
How can any man think that
the proper course of action in
this matter is no action at all?
You feel that we are in a critical
position with the Vietnam peace
talks and that any positive
action on our part concerning
the North Koreans might
en danger our chances for peace.
Are you fool enough to believe
that a country continually
swallowipg her pride in matters
a* grove as this can be a

respected country?
If her citizens are ashamed of
her governments actions how
can respect of foreign nations be
expected? Every country, large
or small; powerful or not, must
be respected and must, most
important of all, have self
respect. Only when countries
have mutual respect can peace
ever be a reality.
There is too much at stake to
be playing that Turn the Other
Cheek game with our
communist adversaries. They
invariably strike the other cheek.
Do you sincerely believe that
you can negotiate any type of
honorable peace with the North
Vietnamese as long as the North
Koreans are permitted to take
American lives at will?
You are only fooling yourself
Mr. President. You say we must
v have an ABM system to act as a
deterrent force against a nuclear
attack by an enemy. Do you not
also believe that we also need a
deterrent against all attacks
which take American lives.
How can our servicemen do
the job they must do if they are
not supported by their
Commander in Chief? Are our
men in uniform to be targets for
any fourth-rate power which

?.By John Valenti i

takes pride and pleasure in
killing Americans? If they are,
then I say that it is time for
new leadership in this country.
You deceived me, Mr. Nixon.
Your campaign promises were
merely empty statements
designed to get votes. If there
was one thing I was sure of, Mr.
Nixon, it was your integrity. I
was convinced that' you were
sincere during your campaign.
What makes you think the
American people will stand for
this type of deception. We have
had too much of it this decade.
This is a great country founded
and guided by great leadership.
What has happened to that
leadership?
If you do nothing about this
North Korean murder of our
navy men then you will surely
loose the respect of our three
and one half million men in
uniform, their families and
friends, and untold millions of
Americans who are tired of
having our embassies bombed,
our flags burned, our property
confiscated, and, God help us,
our servicemen killed. You will
surely loose my respect, Mr.
President. Sad be that day when
I can no longer call you my
President.

Silent Observe

Politics, despite whatever could be
and is said about it and about the third
floor union playground, is fun.
Its fun before the campaign because
there are the dreams that havent been
crushed and the jokes that havent
become reality yet.
And its fun after the campaign
because no loser ever wanted the dumb
job anyway and now the other sucker is
stuck with it.
Or will it be one of the other two,
whose names do not now grace the
dinner-table discussions of many UF
students. Will they ever become
household words?
Or a better question: will this
campaign ever be over?
The campaign itself, while not fun,
can be awfully funny to the silent
observer.
The presidential candidates are
always in the limelight, always taking all
the credit and glory, and all the good
stuff. But what about the poor, noble
soul who stands behind the great
humanitarian leader of the masses the
crusader who will be only a heart-beat
or a grade-point from the presidency?
Who can predict the day when mass
assassination will strike oh the UF
campus and our benevolent leader
whoever he may be will be felled by a
JOMO or SSOC or ACLU or University
Chess Club bullet.
After the tears of grief and the sad
farewell of a UF state funeral and the
burial rites under Century Tower, who
will be sitting in the plush presidential
chair?
Will it be the army fatigue-clad, cigar
smoking, mustachioed militant who

Fun Politics

Cohn Erred
MR. EDITOR:
Mr. Ray Cohn's column in Tuesday's Alligator is usually worthy of
criticism for the lack of thought it displays. Cohn bases his
conclusions on an analogy between a physical law and a socio-political
process. Such an analogy is a risky proposition in logic and Cohn does
little to prove his point.
His statements as to the cause and results of complex phenomena
in American history evidence simplistic thinking at best. His
arguments should convince no one with more than a high school
knowledge of American history.
The columnist accuses the New Left of advocating destruction
(without saying) how they would pick up the pieces.'' Then he makes
the same mistake himself by urging those who have fought for
peaceful change (to go) to bat without a word as to what they
should do.
In two following paragraphs, Cohn presumes to tell us the goals of
the discontented populace of America (which is) yearning for
change. However, he fails to distinguish between those yearning for
change and those whose philosophy starts and ends with
destruction. And just for the record, I would Uke to know how Mr.
Cohn learned of the goals of the former unless it was throught the
protests and demonstrations of the latter.
So far, we have assumed that Cohn knew what he was talking
about. However he gives us adequate reason to doubt his expertise as
well.
Among the minor errors is his lumping together in the first
paragraph of two of Newton's laws under the single heading of
Newton's law of gravity.
The crowning touch appears in the eighth paragraph where Cohn
displays his amazing knowledge of the leadership of the New Left. It
seems that the columnist somehow confused Marie Rudd of Columbia
University with Mario Savio of the University of California at Berkely.
Os course, since Cohn is a big-time journalist we will excuse this error
along with his misspelling of Savio's name.
Cohn's last-cited transcontinental error is typical of the rest of his
spaced-out thinking (if you'll pardon the pun.) Unfortunately, Cohn's
simplistic approach is not unusual among many who take it upon
themselves to lecture to society on its problems.
As Cohn suggested in the introduction, his column was interesting.
My interest as to his opinions is now more than satisfied, however.
Please, Mr. Cohn, think before you write. The results may be
credible. Your last column was not.
JIM MUNC ASTER ILW

Monday, April 21,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

By Carol Sanger:

will bring the establishment to its
collective knees and in his first solemn
address on the state of the campus
disunion proclaim:
The king is dead I mean the
queen is dead. ..Jong live the
dictator... .1 mean long live me... .Hey
man, what kind of cigar does old
Stephen C. keep in that box on his
desk? Im running low.
Or will it be the chief sheep of the
Shepherd flock, the nobel white knight
who hitches his brilliant white mare
illegally in the union parking lot, the
former iron-fisted referee of the Student
Senate who will tearfully promise that
the campus will go on and everything
will be alright since the master is in
heaven guiding us.
We shall continue along the path
our beloved president was so senselessly
prevented from leading us down we
shall continue... .just as soon as there is
a quorum... .Adams Andrews
Arthur... .Bates
Or the former editor of one of
Americas great metropolitan
newspapers, once a short-haird,
conservative, army-type who now sprots
side-bums and hippie-like suavity. And
he will also promise to continue in
heart-rending words that spring forth
from his mouth like pansies in the
spring:
We shall continue along the same
road, toward the same ideals of our
fallen chief... J shall see to it..,. .just
as soon as turn the lights on and
give me back my library card and the
pictures of the library decor for my
wall. . .come on guys... .play
fair

Page 7



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(A-tOt-116-F)
GRAND OPENING Every day up to
90% savings but April 21 thru 26 a
SUPER SALE. Reg. $79.50 full
sumcnslon 4 drawer files, now from
829.75 to 839.75. Reg. $49.95 fuU
suspension 2 drawer files, now from
822.50 to 829.75. Also hundreds of
Idasfcs* chairs, files, and much more at
SUPER SAVINGS for this sale. NEW
end USED JR OFFICE
FURNITURE. 620* 5. Main St. Tel.
378-1148. (A-7M17-P)
88 Yamaha twin lOOcc eyese only
driven 2500 miles in excellent
condition. Price' 260 dollars. Can
Steve at 392-9913 or leave
message.(A-6t-117Hp)
JEEP 1957 Awheel dr. Rons Good.
paiJEWOTCn On TnW MUST
SELL. Phene 3725742 lifter 5
o'clock. 480 or make offer.
(A-4t-117-p)
70 volume Encyclopedia
International toy Grollar. Brad tmm
for-lmlf price. Can 378-0009>.oftar
7prk4A-Bt-lS-o)
4vil Redftssd scope oacurann
2v7 scopo rings for 22 rifle #lO, field
teases 828, 8X redfleld 848. 270.
W7 dies, Bmm meussr custom rifle
with 4x seope, ammo.' diet 8150. 3
Pieces of' amen Italian, marble
auNable for coffee table sndjsbls of
floor aceent Celt 372-msVlar 6.
(A-st-lls-p)
1883. Valiant, runs weM slant Six
mkm atlek 4-door 8450. CBI
873-8608. Ask for Jack or sap
2244 t Plvet. (A-st-15-p)
Medium-brown shoulder lenth fan.
Worn very little excadent
Condition. Original price SSO. WIN
take3B or best offer. Bov.
392-9013. (A-3M17-P)
TTR

FOR RENT
I 'eBMTaWBMBBBBBBBBmNWWffIWfIBQBBBIBBBfII
Summit Houss Apt, two frrtnmwi
furnished or unfurnished $149j00.
Cell 372-2807 after Bp.m.
(B-3t-117-0)
1 bedroom furnished house SBS
month, available May thru Aug. Call
376-6769 after 5:00. (B-2t-118-p)
Summer Rates. From S9O for
efflclenclss to $l7O for two
bedrooms fro entire summer quarter.
Close to Campus. Air. Pool. Also
ranting for next academic year.
University Apts. 376-5990.
(B-21t-115-p)
Peace end quiet Is yours for the
asking by living In one of our
secluded luxurious one bedroom
furablbd town house apartments:
Only 6 minutes from the campus and
medical ebntar. $155 per month plus
$35 fqr utilities. .Qail us now for ao
appoktfffir* to see them. Imm site
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, In*,
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-C)
Available for this quarter or longer.
Modern efficiency for up to 3 people.
Pool. Air. $75 per month. 1530 N.w.
4 Ave. Can 376-8990. (B-5M16-P)
Available for summer qtr. Trailer,
12x60, 3 br, 1* bath, air cond.,
washer, completely furnished. $l2O
monthly plus utilities. Cell Hugh at
378-33Q1.(8-st-115-p)
f ~ A NTE D' Jln l ni> |
1 male roommate needed French
Quarter-52. Ph. 376-1437, AprH rent
paid. (C-117-4t-p)
Please help us! We need 1 female
roommate now and for summer
quarter at Landmark. Call after 5.
378-9954 (C-st-119-p)
Williamsburg apts 1 male
roommate wanted SSO month
April paid. Central AC. 2br. Pool,
dishwasher, disposal. Call 376-9719.
(C-st-119-p)
WANTED: Volunteers over 21 for
antibiotic study. Earn $50.00. Come
to M-438, medical sciences building
between 10 and 3 on April 23, 22,
and 23 for further details.
(c-3t-119-p)
Married couples wanted for
participation In an enrichment of
marriage group experience. If
interested in details, call the Marriage
and College Life Project, 392-1174.
Ask for Mrs. Thomstorff.
(C-10t-113-c)
Mobile home wanted. Would like to
purchase used trailer, 2 bdr 12 x60
must be available in August. If
interested, write Jake Vam 302
Duplex Court, Brooksville, Fla.
(C-9M16-P)
Male roommate for 1 bedroom
Summit House Apt. Pool, air cond.
$67 monthly. Immediate occupancy.
Apt. E-26. Call after 6pm, 378-6784.
(C-st-117-p)
1 male student to share French
Quarter Apt. with 3 others. 50 dols.
per month. Call 392-8263 evenings.
(C-st-117-p)
ggQflcoa&M 8'8; jysaaw wwwiiiwillil|
HELP WANTED |
TiVfTm nnnnwwwiininrira r
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY. If you
can handle the job you can name
your salary. Top executive in rapidly
growing company needs a mature,
well-organized person for difficult
and responsible position. Excellent
skills and Intelligence a must. Call
Mrs. Gabaldon at 462-2499.
(E-st-116-P)
LISTENERS WANTED: Will pay
$1.50 fear one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Mbs
Hardaway University ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. Can make up to $6.00.
.{E-15M07-C)
Cocktail waitress experienced, over
21. Attractive part time or full time.
Sea Mr. Pozin University Inn.
(E-st-115-p)
| STEVeI
I MCOLJEErM I
I 'BULLITT' I
U it
M ALSO SDBEY Poft)£R ROOSTB6EA I
I IHE ICTOPIIg KMGWT |

Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April t% 1969

j{ HELP WANTED 1
Biss!aeCQ9o'9iMWlfWCOQlNflflitfll
800 KEEPING TYPING position
with one of the finest firms.
Excellent working conditions with
very freindly small staff. Enough £
responsibility and activity to keep \t
you interested. Salary is excellent. 1
Call PAUL GRIMES ALLIED £
PERSONNEL of Gainesville, 1800 N. j
Main 376-4611. (E-st-118-p)
ATTENTION ALL SENIORS FROM
TAMPA BAY AREA Career
$600.00 per month, plus expense
allowance for man needed for
Insurance agency. Send resume to:
P.O. Box 11702 Tampa, Fla. 33610.
(E-Bt-119-p)
I AUTOS
Â¥ 3
jHeBMMMMMOHCOBMMOMMfcWAsoegoxq
V.w. Manx buggy 1300 engine
53H.P. Red metatflake soft top side
curtains rollbar many extras. Great
for sand, woods, street $1695 or
trade for big motorcycle and cash.
See at 1020 S. Main St. or call
378-0249. (G-10t-119-p)
59 T-bird conv. new brakes good V-8
engine. S2OO. Call 378-2748 anytime
or come by 304 S.W. 3rd Str. apt. no.
2. A GOOD BUY. (G-3t-119-p)
65 MUstang 2+2. Shelby 310 hp,
44bbl, headers, tach, 4 speed. Aztec
gold. Exc. cond. Reasonably priced.
Phone 376-1701. after 5. (G-3t-118-p)
Datsun 1968 sports 2000 convert.
135 hp 4 speed overhead cam Never
been raced. $2190. Call 378-8533.
(G-3t-118-p)
1966 V.W. 2dr sedan, Blue. New
clutch, runs good. $1,195.00 Crane
Inports 372-4373. (G-118-st-c)
1967 Volvo 142 with air and
standard shift. Radial tires x clean
Red $2,195.00 Crane Imports.
372-4373. (G-118-st<)
60 VW camper, lotus land variety,
new paint, rebuilt eng, complete
camping facilities, radio. S9OO. Call
372-0877 or 392-9367. (G-5M16-P)
XBBfl99M I PERSONAL j
ffBB.6OfInBWIiR>.6BWBiBWS!B!B!9!fI!Og I
Florida players: you are
cordially invited to another
HOO-HAW. Wander over to the
theatre Monday at 5:30. OK?
(J-lt-119-p)
Law student commuting daily from
Palatka wants passengers. Contact
RM Morris at law school or Ph.
649-4286 after 6 PM. (J-3t-119-p)
Passengers needed for trips to Ft.
Lauderdale. SIO.OO R.T. Leave
Thursdays 6:00 P.M. Return
Mondays at 11:00 P.M. Trips made
on April 24, May 8, 22. 1968 Merc.
Benz Air. D. Grosse 372-9317
Eves, except Weds. Buchman B-15.
(J-st-119-p)
COOK WANTED Good Food and
good company. Call 378-3538.
Transportation provided. (J-2t-119-p)
To the Pink and Blue, weekend at the
house? Make sure theres enough
precious booze to make you forget
your date is not there! (J-lt-119-p)
MIKE: Happy 2lstl Looking forward
to a wonderful A DPI week-end I
Happy Anniversary tool I cant stand
iti llymttyltt! Elaine. (J-IMI9-P)
LOST: Gold-plated chain about 50
long, wide. Sentimental value $5
reward Lea, 376-4053 (J-2t-118-p)
I 1 f
1 178T4H IF | WKliril J
RUTH GORDON
BEST SUPPORTING
ACTRESS! m
IN
Rosergarys
PLUS.. .THE ODD COUPLE
RIOTOUSLY
OIFFEBI

. r "personal i
, Visit beautiful Colorado. Drive there
in my car after June 15th. Call
378-1744 for details. (J-lt-119-p)
*
Tony, Im the happiest girl in the
> world because of wonderful you.
, ILIVM. Love and yours forever. 1
5 (65 days til blast off!)
f f
y Hash Pipe belt buckles Be
prepared, scouts DEMAINS.
(J-lt-119-p)
Interested in travel and/or study in
Europe, Asia or the Mid-East? Want
to buy or rent a car to use there. Call
392-1655. Rm. 310 Union.
(J-12t-l 14c)
Would you like to lose weight and
keep it off for good? Come to Weight
Watchers, 1615 W. University Ave.
Mon 10 a.m., 7:30 p.m. Wed., 9:30
a.m., 10 p.m., 7:30 p.m. PhT anytime
372-9555. (J-4M16-P)
i
Lost: Black and white pointer. 5
mos. 40 lbs. Fanthom last seen in
French Quarter area. Rewardl Any
information Call 378-6863.
(L-10t-110-P)
Lost: white -gold KA pin. Vicinity
University Inn. S2O reward. Call Ban,
376-9256 or leave message.
(L-2t-119-p)
Lost anything lately? We have plenty
of lost articles in Room 130 Reitz
Union. (L-3M19-NC)
| SERVICES j
Alternator Generators Stirteff
Electrical systems tested repairs
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)
TYPING ln my home five year yearexperience
experience yearexperience have my own IBM
ELECTRIC STANDARD
Typewriter, can 376-7809.
(M-st-115-p)
l ;i
.
\
::
;!
! WANT i
1 ADS I
}
J \

m i SPEaAL m
I Lunch and Dinner
M Monday Spocial 1
m BAKED MACARONI & M
m MEAT SAUCE M
M AIL YOU CARE TO EAT ||
M TuMday Special |jl
If FRIED CHICKEN M
H AU YOU CARE TO EAT ||
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS 1
pL QAINBVim MAU. IK

I' My office is small. My business is
new. Parking is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians
526 SW 4th Ave. next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (106-lt-m-c)
Tennis racket restringing. Satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489.
(M-19t-107-p)
ACTION AIRPORT flight instruction
aircraft maint. radio & electric
systoms maint. Parachute jumping
Cessna 150 $lO Hr. Stengel Field
Archer Rd. 376-0011. (M-st-lls-p)
Horses Boarded: pasture s3O a
month, 19 miles from Gainesville,
training facilities, miles of country
trails. Call 454-1181 Evenings.
(M-st-115-p)
iijifft* I
i£ THRU WED
3, 5, 7, 9
Hr v *
ALSO AT 9:20 M
fCLinT EaSTWOOO
MOONLIGHT
BOWLING
25<£n.
Couples only
TONIGHT
9 PM TIL aOSE
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA



f Hawk l Hangs Up
Bosox-lndian Trade

BOSTON (UPI) Baseball
slugger Ken Harrelson
announced his retirement
Sunday, apparently voiding a
six*player trade between the
Boston Red Sox and the
Cleveland Indians.
Harrelson and his attorney
announced that the defending
American League runs batted in
champion made the decision
because he did not want to leave
Boston and because he had been
guaranteed by an investment
firm that it would match his
baseball salary over the next
three years.
Harrelson was the key figure
in the Boston-Cleveland swap
announced Saturday. The trade,
which presumably will have to
be canceled because of
Harrelsons retirement, also sent
Boston pitchers Dick Ellsworth
and Juan Pizarro to Cleveland
for hurlers Sonny Siebert and
Vincente Romo and catcher Joe
Azcue.
While American League
President Joe Cronin was
unavailable for comment, league
spokesman Bob Holbrook
quoted a league rule which said
die deal would be contingent on
all the players reporting to their
new club within 72 hours.
Holbrook pointed out,
however, that because Pizarro
had been placed on waivers, he
could not actually play until
Tuesday at the earliest.
Both dubs said that by
mutual agreement, the five other
players involved in the trade
would be in uniform for
Sundays game but would not
play in the game.
Globe Cirder
Sails In Storm
FALMOUTH, England
(UPI) Robin Knox-Johnston,
nearing the end of an
around-the-world voyage in a
32-foot ketch, reported Sunday
he was battling a storm 150
miles off the coach from
Falmouth.
He said he expected to bring
his ship, the Suhaili, into port
ealry next week, which would
make him the winner of a
globe-circling yacht race.

SUPERCHICKEN
SPECIAL
3 large pieces chicken
cole slaw AA l
freach fries If U f
hash puppies Uw
fIoJVUfA PICK UP OR
PORE-BOY FREEDBJVERY
1029 W. UNIV. AVE. DIAL
ACROSS FROM 378-1492
UNIV. CITY BANK

Sports Editor

Harrelson and his attorney,
Bob Woolf, announced the
retirement at a news conference
after the 27-year-old outfielder
and infielder had conferred with
both Boston manager Dick
Williams and Cleveland skipper
Alvin Dark.
Both and his
lawyer said the retirement
resulted from his refusal to leave
Boston. The Hawk added that
his action would have been the
same no matter what team he
was traded to.
A crowd of several hundred
assembled outside Fenway Park
several hours before Sundays
Red Sox-Indians game.
The chanted bring back the
Hawk, and waved signs. The
demonstration dwindled to a
few dozen youngsters before
game time though there were
dozens of large and small signs
on display in the park criticizing
the deal. There was a
near-capacity crowd at the game
and some scattered chanting of
bring back the Hawk.
Harrelsons retirement was
the second announced this year
as a result of a trade.
First baseman Donn
Clendenon announced his
retirement in January when he
and outfielder Jesus Alou were
traded by the Montreal Expos to
the Houston Astros for
infielder-outfielder Rusty Staub.
C1 e n denon eventually
I I
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
H Con, Tracks, 4-whori %
ill JJiij
HH WiTV* Jra
No. 1 in Japan
Codding fir Clark
Motors I
I 1012 SOUTH Maia St. I
S Opoa t A.M. S P.M. 9

returned to baseball and is now
back with Montreal. The Expos
sent pitchers Jack Billingham
and Skip Guinn to Houston in
place of Clendenon.
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF XH
THE MALL NU
376-4552
A UTHORIZED
DEALER
Pizza
Inn
SANDWICHES
BEING SERVED
Now you can enjoy Amer America's
ica's America's favorite pizza ...
freshly prepared from a
secret recipe ... flavor
baked to perfection with
your choice of: cheese,
olives, mushrooms, pepper pepperoni,
oni, pepperoni, hamburger, sausage or
anchovies.
SPECIAL
OFFER
Reg. $1.65
Pizza
NOW, Q 9
ONLY 7
Good only
Apr. 21, 22, 23, 24,
Ph. 376-4521
Bring this ad
316 S.W. 16th. Avt,

What makes MICA
run?
iHUKyi
V 5 n^Hggw 1
jfl p
** I^K-"
|fe,
'SlO raise in parking
fee
5
v/Two tuition hikes in
two years
*
/$6.00 date tickets
/Charles Shepherd
/S3O deposit on
utilities
JOHN MICA
gives a damn ...
The ISSUE Is You ...
(Poid Pot AcL)

Monday, April 21,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 21,1969

Melnyk Captures First, j
Team Slips At Houston j

By CHUCH PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
£ UFs All-American Steve
£ Melnyk continued his
$ dominance of collegiate golf
£ by shooting a seven-under par
£ 281 to capture individual
£ honors Saturday at the
Houston Collegiate golf
:j: classic.
Despite the play of
: Melnyk, the Gators fell victim
£ to a series of mediorce rounds
£ from the remainder of the
team and could muster only a
£ third place finish in the
£ prestigious tourney.
UFs Melnyk carded a
72-hole total of 281 over the
par 72 Pine Forest Golf and
£: Country Club course to nose
£ out Arizonas Drue Johnson
$ by five strokes.
£ Melnyk just played
£ outstanding golf, said UF
Golf Coach Buster Bishop.
: Melnyk shot rounds of
: 69-67-74-71 to take honors in
: the strong 80-man
j tournament field. Melnyks
second round 67 tied the
j: tourney record.
Houstons Cougars won

Graves: Gators 'Hitting Hard/
Get Ready For F Club Game

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
Ray Graves: The hitting was
the hardest weve had during any
spring practice session since I
started coaching here.
The Gator grid boss referred
to the vicious blocking and
tackling in Saturdays game-type
scrimmage at Florida Field.
The desire to hit and general
enthusiasm to play is one of the
most encouraging aspects of this
springs practice/* Graves said.
The overall scrimmage was
ragged, which is normal here
before the Orange and Blue
game, he noted. Spring
practice has served a needed
personnel-finding purpose, as six
or seven younger boys are
looking good and finding where
they best fit into the line-up.
Graves singled out two
sophomores, Mike Rich and
Robert Harrell, for turning in
strong performances Saturday.
Rich, 6-2, 195-pounder from
Dublin, Ga., ran hard for
sizeable gains from his
second-team fullback slot.
Listed as a defensive tackle,
Jacksonvilles Harrell helped
stack-up a few end runs from his
new defensive end post.
The touted 212-pounder will
stay at end this week,
according to Graves.
TIRED of getting §
screwed at this college? |
SO AM I. I
You can do something
about it by VOTING 1
for me. I
STEVE "RAK" RAKUSIN 1
Candidate for the Senate I
from Arts & Sciences

fejLT' : gPt
> '* iyjf c II
p g
j£SS3SHKBr |ll
. ?&&&? W" jwK
HWr
STEVE MELYNK
... shows winning style
team honors with Texas
finishing second, followed by
the Gators. FSU finished
11th in the top twenty

Led by tackles Jim Kiley and
Mac Steen, the offensive line
drew special praise from the
head mentor.
Graves was prompted to term
the overall offensive effort the
best in weeks.
UF opens its fifth week of
spring drills effort.
F our touchdowns marked
Saturdays team effort.
In the second quarter,
first-team quarterback Jack
Eckdahl rolled to his left and
lofted a 40-yard scoring pass to
tight end Skip Amelung to open
the afternoons scoring.
After numerous series of

Alall s Cubans
Mister Sandwich of Gator Country
You Now Get
[free POTATO CHIPS 1
With Each Sandwich Ordered
Alans Cubana University Plaza
378-1230 I FREE DELIVERY! 378-1252


college team field. :*
We could have won the >
tournament, said Bishop.
But we only had one real
good round of golf. The >
course was not that tough, we £
just didnt play as well as we £
have been doing. :
UFs Richard Spears fired a £
four-round total of 296, eight :
over par. Following him were £
Gator teammates John £
Sale3o3, and John :
Darr3o4. £
In team match play the £
Gators came out third by £
beating Texas A&M, 42. :
The Gators finished fourth in £
four-ball competition and in a £
tie for third place with Texas £
number one and two teams in £
two-ball play on the strength |
of Melnyks and Darrs 271 £
total.
The Gators face Georgia £
Tech., Vanderbilt and
Auburn Friday in Atlanta. £
Saturday the Gators travel to £
Athens to meet the Bulldogs A
of Georgia in a warm-up for £
the Southeastern Conference x
championships May 1-3 in jj
Athens.

downs highlighted by strong
up-the-middle running of Rich,
soph Tommy Durrance and
first-team FB Garry Walker, and
the adept play-calling of John
Reaves, the second-team offense
scored on a short burst up the
middle by Gene Conrad.
Later, Amelung sped past
defender David Ghesquire and
hauled in a beaufitul 45-yard
scoring toss from the
smooth-dealing Reaves.
On the final play of the
two-hour scrimmage, swift
cornerback Steve Tannen
hijacked an Eckdahl delivery in
the left flat and sprinted into the
end zone.

SALES-SERVICE-RENT ALS
Authorized Authorized
Adler Dealer" V Smith Corona
/ Dealer"
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
FORMERLY Hancock Office Equipment
MONDAY SPECIAL
14 SHRIMP IMA BASKET
I v~ 1225 W UNIVERSITY AVI. V
% BLOCK PROM CAMPUS
TAKE THE 30 MINUTE DRIVE AND
SAVE!
STARKE, FLORIDA l^||j
SOONER OR LA TER YOUR FA VORITE DEALER l|r
- HOURS HOURSWEEKDAYS
WEEKDAYS HOURSWEEKDAYS BAM 6PM
SATURDAY BAM IPM
GAINESVILLE PHONE 372-0103 ANYTIME BY APPOINTMENT

r Climb aboard l_ \
The S.S. Winnjammer
i Meals served from 11:00 AM to I .V
f Midnight
/ Bernie Sher at the Organ Ji
t on ft
,1 Thursday, Friday & Saturday \Y
1 r)
Oysters & clams on the half shell \{\
Michelob on draft \
Steaks & Seafoods our Specialty 4*
ft
Visit our Package Store competitive area -1/
prices Try our Special package deal ill
for Student Organizations. \\ )
At the sign of the beacon light. m
Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM
'A I- Harry Lawton, Manager JEjf
520 S.W. 2nd Ave.



By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
Saturdays action saw Glen
Pickren, the ace of last years
pitching staff with a 10-3 record,
finally win his first game this
season after three straight
setbacks.
Pickren, plagued by
tendonitis in the elbow of his
throwing arm, breezed to an 8-0
lead before giving up single runs
in the eighth and ninth innings.
He allowed only six hits and did
not walk a man, rediscovering
the control that had eluded him
until this game. In one stretch,
Pickren set down 14 Wildcats in
a row.
Pickrens pitching was not the
whole story, though, as his three

Courier Pitches, Hits
Gators To 6-1 Victory

By ED PAVELKA
Alligator Sports Writer
The line drive was speared for
the third out, but as Jim Courier
walked slowly from the mound
to the dugout he shook his head
pensively.
The scene was an early inning
last Friday in the opening game
of the Kentucky series. Courier
was pitching for the Gators and
he was being hit hard.
I dont know why, but Ive
been having some trouble
pitching effectively in the early
innings, Courier said after the
game he won to stretch his
record to 8-1.
I just got by today, he said
reviewing the Gators 6-1
victory. The team won the
game in the early innings with
good defense.
After the first three innings
I started pitching better, but I
cant pinpoint the reason for the
early trouble I had today and in
some of the other games Ive
pitched this season.
Courier gave up seven of the

MON. APR. 21
TWS. APR. 22 WED. APR. 23
I (SAVE- 510 CLEANINO ORDER
I 2 PANTS 99<
I (SAVE 41<)
I PLAIN DRESSES 99<
| (SAVE 4k) I
TROPICAL CLEANERS
402 NW. 13th ST.
209 NJ. 16th AVE

Gators 16 Hits Nullify Cats, 8-0

, V"'-'"'' HppF
UF OVCA
... suffers as Coach Fuller looks on.

eight total hits he allowed in the
initial three frames, but he was
touched for only one run.
By the time Kentucky scored
in the third, UF had put the
game out of reach with three
runs in the first and another two
in the bottom of the third.
Courier, who has now won
seven consecutive games, has
developed into the ace of the
Gator pitching staff after
tendonitis slowed him to a 5-3
record last season.
Couriers complete game
Friday was his fourth in a row.
He has one shutout, against
Tennessee, and holds an earned
run average of 1.42.
Fuller has used Courier in the
outfield several times this year
I Dick Holme/ I
I Jeweler/ I
9 CLOCK. WATCH & JEWELRY 1
1 REPAIRS 1
8 TROPHIES ENGRAVING 8
8 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE. 8

PICKREN WINS FIRST

hits paced a 16-hit attack that
routed three Kentucky hurlers.
The St. Petersburg junior had a
long double to left center and he
scored two runs.
Other Gators collecting three
hits Saturday were Guy
McTheny and Will Harman.
Harman, Rod Wright and Leon
Bloodworth collected two RBls
apiece in the game marked by
the wildness of Kentucky
pitcher Mike Sills.
Sills, i who pitched three
innings in relief, walked five
Gators and uncorked three wild
pitches. He also hit Skip Lujack
and catcher Mike Ovca.
Ovca was struck in the left
ear by a high fast ball when he
was the first batter to face Sills

and does not hesitate to call on
the .325-hitting lefty as a pinch
hitter.
I have enjoyed playing a lot
more this year because I played
some outfield, Courier said
Friday between games.
I would rather hit when Im
playing in the game, rather than
come in cold to pinch hit, he
said. I always feel more ready
to hit the more Im involved in
the game. r-
THIKXP
W.C.FIELDS
in
'The Fatal
Glass Os Beer
AND
'The Great Chase
PLUS
FUN
TIIUTT
THIRSTY
THIRSTY
HUMS START
AT 9-FUN
STARTS ON ARRIVAL

in the third. His ear was cut by
the edge of his batting helmet
and he was taken to the UF
infirmary for three stitches and
an overnight stay for
observation.
Hell be all right, coach
Dave Fuller said. The doctors
told me the worst he could have

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Maccabee Student Organization presents
Mr. YITZCHAK SHOMRON
an Israati journalist, who will saak on
THE IDEOLOGY OF EL FATAH
Monday, April 21, 7:30 p.m. in room 361*2
JWR Student Union. EVERYONE INVITED
I Buy Any In Stock At Reg. I I
I SECOND PAIR ONLY I I
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I R *o 3.98 4* | ANY ITEM OF
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I "HAPPENINO Friday Nights 6PM-9PM I
I NEW ARRIVALS 3 98 I
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I SUITS tol6 95 f I
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I BIG BIG NEW SHIPMENT I
I SHORTS n^ ds 1/2 nml
| MODELS NEEDED EARN WARDROBE! |
I POST EASTER CLEARANCE |
I Reg to $lO Second I
I DRESSES NOW 1 5 only |
I MMS-Rog $14.95 < I
I JACKETS 2\
i
I THE SOUTHS MOST UNUSUAL I
I BOUTIQUE I
I "DatuUfUott I

Monday, April 21,1969, The Florida Alligator,

was a mild concussion and he
doesn't appear to have that."
Ovca is expected to be ready
for action next weekend when
the Gators host Miami for two
no conference games.
The UFs overall record now
stands at 19-10, their SEC
record is a league leading 9-3.

Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 21,1969

w Campus! Crier
\ iL SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT

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1 ;: the STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA RESOLVE THAT: I I
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| j: Whereas, the Gainesville City Commission refused to waive sly2oo j: $
| j: in f ees to be levied on the University of Florida Carni- ft ft
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| j! Whereas, the loss of this $1,200 meant the loss of $12,000 in | |
| : loan funds for needy University of Florida students; and, J I
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| ij Whereas, several Gainesville businessmen collectively donated § ||
| i| personal funds to the Carnigras program to make up for ft %
ft ij the fees paid to the city; and, ; %
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¥ : That the Student Senate expresses its sincere appreciation £
5 ii to th e following Gainesville businessmen for their £ S
| i; generosity and interest in the University of Florida £ ?
I Ii in general, and in the Gator Loan fund in particular. ? S
i ii ii 1
IJI .* v
I j! -Michael L. Adams &w. K. Hunter, Jr. (Architects) 1 I
iji : -Charles W. Ansel 1 (Record Bar) ft $
I ii -Harry Dougherty & Larry Fender (Fender Insulation Co.) I 3
:j: ft -Gainesville Sun ft ft
est :j Selig Goldin & Richard Jones (Attorneys) ft >j:
| ii -John Hintermeist, General Gaines Steakhouse | &
ij (Holiday Inn) -ft j:j
iji ji -Robert N. Howe ;j: ijj
jij ij -Alan Lederman (Alan's Cubana) jij ij:
fti j: -Ronald A. Neder (Gainesville Hardware and Buildinq I ?
ftj ft Supply) jj ftj
ij: ji -Nathan Pozin (University Inn) x ij:
§ ji -Stephen Shey (Summit House Apartments) § I
j:j ft -L. J. (Buddy) Thomas, Jr. (Thomas Oil Co.) B i
| ji -David A. West & Nath C. Doughtie (Attorneys) ;j: |
| j: Passed Unanimously by the Student Senate April 15, 1969 ft I
$ ij ft ifti
| j| / / | |
iji -i / 7 / ~f~ J j "X I
jij jj //(. 7 . :j: ft:
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j Student Body President Student Senate President
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............. ft............. tV.VW.V.V.V.V.V.Vj.oVA.V.V.V.yy.rr.V.V.V.Wji 'Vl* i

STUDENTS, Lets Show Our Appreciation

THANK YOU!