Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pace-Maker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 114

CARNIGRAS TROUBLED
Students Slashed
In Two Incidents
Jacqueline Patricia Hutchinson, Avon Park and T. Windham
Sargeant, 2UC, were victims of slashings in separate incidents late
Friday night after being attacked near Carnigras by a group of
Negroes, some of whom were identified as members of JOMO.
Sargeant and a UF coed were walking across Flemming Field when
they reported an object being thrown and landing behind them, police
said.
The group then surrounded the couple and shouted insults at
them, Sargeant told police.
One of the group then wielded a razor, police reported and slashed
Sargeant across the right cheek. ?
Miss Hutchinson was walking with her brother and sister near the Pi
Kappa Alpha fraternity house when they were accosted by the group,
police said.
Hutchinson told police the group was throwing objects at the house
and shouting insults and obscenities at the group. Miss Hutchinson
was struck on the forehead but did not realize she was injured until
she arrived at the fraternity house and blood was streaming down her
face.
Both Miss Hutchinson and Sargeant were treated and released from
J. Hillis Miller Health Center emergency room.
The incidents occurred after the same group of Negroes had caused
a disturbance at the Carnigras earlier that night, police said.
University Police Investigator J. K. Morrison reported that the
group of nine Negroe males were disturbing a Carnigras ride operator.
He radioed for assistance and when the group saw him doing this,
they surrounded him and began hurling insults at him.
Arriving to assist Morrison were University police officers Sgt. Cecil
Goad and Jim King.
The officers attempted to overcome the group which was joined by
10 more males and five females who shouted obscenities at the
officers and the ride operator.
Morrison said he was hit on the back with a bottle and one of the
females jumped on Goads back.
Morrison then used his chemical Mace to break up the disturbance.
The apprehended subject broke free again and the group dispersed
toward Flemming Field.

Shepherd Wants More UF Police

Recent attacks by roving
bands of Negroes near the UF
campus has caused at least one
presidential candidate to
demand and propose immediate
action.
First party presidential
candidate Charles Shepherd
Sunday demanded immediate
action to enlarge the university
Police Department.
In the past several weeks we
have had 13 incidents involving
radical groups on or near this
campus, Shepherd said. At
least five directly involved

SKtM -*
Bre>. i ,_ 'j^V

For Story, More Pictures See Page 3

The
Florida Alligator

physical attacks upon UF
students.
I intend to do something
about this now, not just talk
about it. We demand that
students be protected from
extremist groups on the fringe
of campus.
Shepherd called for the
reinstatement of budget requests
for additional personnel in the
police department. The State
Budget Commission cut the
request for funds as part of an
overall budget reduction for the

University of Florida, Gainesville

W Jf &
H f #
H| Hr %* jste
'IIHm
TOM KENNEDY
SDS SECRETARY ON THE ATTACK
... Klonsky vs. U.S.A., democracy, UF. 11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111l
Rascals Tickets On Sale
Tickets for the May 2 performance of The Rascals at an
IFC-sponsored benefit go on sale at several locations today.
Tickets are $2.50 per person and are available at the Reitz
Union Box Office, the Record Bar, Quik-Save Records,
Belk-Lindsey and Recordville.
Profits from the concert will be donated to the UF Coliseum
Fund.
lllllllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllHllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll

university system.
If the state wont provide
the money, student government
should pay for it, he said, This
is a student response which
demonstrates student
responsibility.
Recent estimates place the
campus police as many as 15
men short of the desired quota,
but Shepherd said this figure is
closer to five or six.
Student Body President Clyde
Taylor agreed with Shepherds
proposal.
I have discussed the matter

m

with Shepherd, Taylor said,
and action is both necessary
and critical.
However, he said, it is a
shame that students have to pay
for their own police protection.
Its an ironical situation, and one
that is very distasteful.
Financing for the additional
personnel can be paid for out of
student government reserves,
Taylor said.
These reserves were
earmarked for other projects
which will have to be put off,
he said.

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PHOTOS BY PHILIP COPE

Monday, April 14, 1969

SDS Speaker
Describes UF
Racist School
By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
The UF is a racist institution
through and through which has
to be opened up to people that
it oppresses, the national
secretary for the Students for a
Democratic Society told about
200 UF students Friday.
What weve got to do is open
the campus to the people it
oppresses, Mike Klonsky said at
a SSOC-sponsored rally on the
Plaza of the Americas, for them
to come in and struggle against
it.
Klonsky called the university
a place where research is done
on how to put down their (the
Negroes) struggles, where social
workers are trained and sent into
their communities to manipulate
them and buy them off.
Klonsky also blamed the
university system for the
condition of the young people
of America.
Look" what theyve done to
the young people. Historically
the young people have been the
warriors, the revolutionary force
in society, but look what theyve
done to them. Theyve turned
them into flower children
spending their lives running
around trivialities.
Theyre made weak and
pathetic, theyre told they are
middle class, that they have no
people, that they are in the
middle of the struggle between
the classes.
Were thrown bones and told
we are better off than the
colored because we get more
bones.
This is a racist institution
through and through, he said,
and all you have to do is look
around you and see what I
mean. People around this state
take tests to get into this
university. Those tests dont
show if youre smart or not,
they show if youre white or
not.

America's
Number One
College
Daily



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14, 1969

Student Injured
In Warrens Cave

By DAVE REDDICK
Alligator Associate Editor
Edward Allen Ramey, 3LW,
remained in fair condition in
the J. HiDis Miller Health Center
Sunday after he slipped and fell
in Warrens Cave,, an
underground cavern northwest
of Gainesville, Saturday.
Ramey sustained head and
neck injuries when he fell an
undetermined distance in what is
called the chimney area of the
cave, about 100 feet from the
mouth.
Shellie Downs, head of the
Alachua County Sheriffs
Department Rescue Unit, said
Ramey slipped as he and a
companion, Kenneth Olsen, also
a law student, were on their way
out after exploring the cave.
Downs estimated Rameys fall at
about 75 feet.
Robert Straub, a member of
the Florida Speleological
Society, a UF dub, said two of
the club members were
beginning to enter the cave when
Olsen climbed up to them and
'>UAUSOauueAyyw.y.yy.yvvy.y.%v.^
| Martin Notice J
fWas Incorrect j
In Fridays edition the |
;i; Alligator reported that £
Richard and Eunice Martin jj:
>: editors of the University |
|i; Report from July until J
December of 1967, had §
$ purchased a legal notice in £
$ the Gainesville Sun £
V V
disclaiming and further fiscal J;
£ responsibility for the Report !;
: after Feb.l. |
§ This was incorrect.
The Martins legal notice $
§ disclaimed any fiscal £
J responsibility after Jan. 6, the §
| last issue that was published £
| and paid for by the Martins. £
| The Alligator regrets the j:
| mistake. S
KWV.WAV.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.V.VfIAVAW

Foresight Candidates
Give Musical Rally

By KATHIE KEIM
Alligator Staff Writer
Foresight partys top two
candidates and only two
candidates presented a unique
rally in the Plaza of the Americas
Friday. Not a word was spoken,
no microphones were set up, no
large crowds gathered to hear
slogans or to wave campaign
posters.
The rally consisted of
two-and-a-half hours of recorded
classical music, ranging from
Bach and Beethoven to
Stravinsky and Rachmaninoff.
Lighter music had its

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR it the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of aO advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator win not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

told them of Rameys fall. The
two called the Sheriffs
Department and other club
members who rushed to the
scene.
Downs said Ramey fell about
11 a.m., but because the cave is
so far away from any
telephones, it was 11:35 before
he was contacted.
By noon, members of Downs
unit, a highway partolman and
members of the UF club were
with Ramey, who was conscious
most of the time, but
occassionly passed out.
While the patrolman
administered what Downs called
a hell of a good first aid job, it
was determined that a
basket-like litter would be
needed to lift Ramey to the top.
A litter was acquired from the
Gainesville Police Department,
and at 12:35 pjn., Ramey, who
had lapsed into shock, was
carried into the sunlight.
By that time, about 25
bystanders, including two
employes of a Gainesville funeral
home,had gathered at the mouth
of the cave.
A little more than a year ago,
on March 19,1968, a Gainesville
High School senior and a college
coed friend, fell in almost the
exact place.
The high school student,
Warren Ogletree, then 18,
remained in critical condition
for four months in the Health
Center before he was released.
He has still not regained
muscular control of many parts
of his body. His coed friend
sustained a broken arm and
injured back.
At that time, many county
officials said the cave should be
closed because it was a danger.
This has happened so many
times that something ought to
be done to close that thing up,
E, A. Bethel, director of the
countys civil defense, said.

moments too, as selections by
the Beatles and pieces from the
soundtrack 2001: A Space
Odessey were interspersed
among harpsichord pieces, piano
toccatas and sonatas, and
movements of symphonies.
Foresight partys slate,
consisting of presidential
candidate Vic Ramey and vice
presidential running-mate
Edward Nuckels, had originally
planned to announce their
cabinet at the rally but decided
to wait until this week so they
could have another look at their
cabinet positions.

Ilf Ilf/
/ Ilf/
JOHN MICA
... UF needs social role

Hgm

(EDITORS NOTE: On Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday, The Alligator will print a question directed
to candidates for president of the student body and
the candidates replies. Todays question is: Whai do
you think is the most critical issue facing UFs
Student Government and how will you deal with
it?)
VIC RAMEY The most critical problem in SG
is the overlapping responsibility between Student
Senate Committees and Cabinet Committees,
wasted energy, mounds of red tape which result in
inefficiency and encourage political playing.
Foresight Partys administration plans to do away
with much of this overlapping responsibility by
abolishing the Student Senate. Delay in acting on
proposals would be cut in half, and proposals not
approved by the student body would not be
implemented.
CHARLES SHEPHERD The major problem of
SG is not what it does nor even what it doesnt do,
but that the student is not fully aware of the impact
which SG has upon his daily life. The need, then, is
to bring home to the student those actions or
programs which DO have an impact on his life
I would expand the Ombudsman program;
decentralize SG into the colleges, letting them tell
SG What it can do to help them; I would open up
opportunities for serving on university-wide
committees to any students desiring to do so by
advertising in the Alligator and soliciting student
response; I as president will stomp the dorms after
the election as well as during it.
Communication is a two-way street on which
both SG and the students need to travel.
JOAN WARREN I think the most critical
problem facing SG as a part of the university is to
determine what part the university plays now in the
society and what part it should play.
if you look at this from the radical perspective,
you realize the university must be restructured. 1 see
the university as something other than a training
institute. It must be a place where students leam to
think, question, criticize and leam how to initiate

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Mica Calls For Look
At Social Problems

Issue partys John Mica called
for a change in the UFs role in
the area of social problems
Sunday, urging a re-evaluation of
higher educations place in social
concern.
In my evaluation, Mica
said, the university as a leading
institution of higher learning,
and specifically our
administration, has failed
miserably to meet the social
challenge facing the community,
the state, and this locality.
Nearly every other major
university, including the
University of South Florida and

social change.
JAMES DEVANEY The very fact that this
question is worded so as to segregate SG from the
university as a whole and to suggest that its
problems are separate from the rest of the university
leads me to believe that there is a misplaced
emphasis on all parties making up the academic
community. Our problem in the university as a
whole, then, is the problem of segregation.
One area of emphasis is the need to change the
university orientation from one of competition and
emphasis on grades and higher position to one of
learning and cooperation.
In our second area of emphasis is one big
question of the role of the university to the state
and the state to the university. I want the
preposition to changed to the preposition with
by the time I leave office.
During this campaign I am going to be
documenting cases in which the university can and
Should have a role in changing and improving
society cases in which the intellectuals of our
academic community should be telling society, this
is what you are doing wrong and heres how you can
improve. This is the most critical problem that SG
has to deal with and in which SG should be taking
an active lead.
JOHN MICA I feel the most critical problem
today is the inability of students to relate to SG.
Most students dont care about SG nor are they
concerned with it, mainly because theyve been
excluded from it. In the past, SG has been run like a
closed club with a very limited membership. A new
direction and emphasis in SG will be necessary
before students will be able to indentify with their
governing body.
By running and winning this election without any
committments to or from any organizations or
power blocs, I will be able to implement the
necessary changes to involve a larger number of
students after the election. Id like to open the
doors of SG to all students regardless of
organizational affiliation and I pledge myself to do
so.

Florida State University, are far
ahead of the UF in programs for
the disadvantaged and in
working with social problems,
Mica said.
Most social problems, I feel,
are directly related to education.
Mica urged the creation of an
Upward Bound program for
disadvantaged children with
federal funding; expansion of
community services and
projects as extensions of the
university, such as Project
Samson; and creation of an
office for disadvantaged
students.

Happy Hour
Mon Thur 9-10
Beer $l.OO Pitcher 15< Stein



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ROGUE'S GALLERY ON THE PLAZA TOM KENNEDY
. . UF males(?) line up for judging in Ugly Man Contest

Dean Norman
Succumbs
Former Dean of the College
of education William J. Norman,
died Saturday morning in
Alachua General Hospital.
Norman served as an
instructor at the UF from 1916
until 1953, when he retired. He
was dean for 16 years.
He is credited with initiating
efforts to start the P.K. Yonge
Laboratory School and other
developments at UF.
Norman, a 1906 graduate of
Mercer University received his
masters degree from Harvard in
1912 and his Ph.D. from
Columbia University in 1920.
The education building,
Norman Hall, was named in
honor of him by the Board of
Regents.
SDX Has Smoker
The SDX Spring Rush Smoker
will be hold at the Union at 7
p.m. Thursday, April 17.
All men in good scholastic
standing who are interested in a
career in journalism are invited.
After the rush a joint meeting
will be held at 8 p.m. with Theta
Sig m a Phi, Wom e n i n
Journalism.
I calmed speaker will be
toimer Dean Rae Weimcr of the
ioII eg e o I Journal ism
Si fiesli me ms will be served.
Conference Off
* The leadership Conference
Summit '69 has been postponed
mill Max I I
Am campus organization
ime tested in entering an
outstanding candidate should
k .m tact the Roil / Union
Piogram Office

JHL i STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM <)<>c
()PEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgate Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida

Carnigras Netss2ooo

Carnmras Week ended as an
enormous financial success,"
Eddie Floyd, assistant chairman
of the Gatoi Loan bund, said
Sunday, and signs point to even
grcatei success in future years.
Carnigras brought in over
S2OOO dollars for the Gator
Loan Fund and these monies
will be matched on a nine to one
basis by the federal government.

Quarter Survey Continues

About 1,000 questionnaires
concerning the quarter calendar
which appealed on the campus
last week have been received by
student goveinment.
The completed questionnaires
may si ill be handed in this week.
These loims may be left in the
at the Hub, or at the
information desk of the Reit/
Union.
An analysis of the student
responses to the questionnaires
will be made by the student
governments at the various state
universities, and by the Quarter
Calendar Study Committee, for
faculty and staff responses.
These analyses will be received
by the Board of Regents May 1.
If any reforms are to occur,
they must be approved within
the faculty senates at the various
state universities, according to
Fd Tolle, a UF student and
member of the Quarter Calendar
Just a walk away
from U.F. campus :
t 1620 W. UNIV. j
r > ft# UNIVERSITY PLAZA Jl
Bettes }
HAIRSTYUST,

Phi Delta Theta fraternity
won the trophy awarded for
selling the most pre-sale tickets
and also cleaned up the parade
grounds after the carnival came
down.
A five-year contract was
signed with the carnival
owners, Floyd added, so
CArmgras will be a yearly event
in the future.

Study Committee.
The Board of Regents has no
power to administer the reforms,
but if a widespread desire for
certain changes is indicated on
the questionnaires, the Board of
Regents can point out this
evidence to the university
faculty senates.

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Kappa Sig Takes
Ugliest Man Title

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
If you happened to be
wandering around the Plaza of
the Americas Friday afternoon
around 3 p.m., you may have
thought the strains of the
quarter had really begun to
affect some of the students, or
that aliens had invaded the
eart h.
Actually, it was the Ugly Man
contest, sponsored by the Reitz
Union Program Councils annual
Gator Gras festival.
Fnt rants were judged on
originality of costume,
creativity, ugliness and audience

Mm, y->
UGLIEST MAN PHILIP COPE
. . Tom Hussey snarls for the crowd

Monday, April 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

response.
Fleeted the ugliest man was
Thomas Hussey of Kappa Sigma.
Dressed as a hunchback in
sackcloth, Hussey continually
gaped at the audience with a
wild, threatening stare.
Miss Gator Gras, Maria
Junguera, crowned Hussey.
Runner-up was Phi Delta
Thetas Richard Nelson, a
caveman dripping blood and
peanut butter.
The judges of the contest
were Dr. William Goldjurst,
humanities professor, Dean
Frank Adams and art chairman
Fugenc Grissom.

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14, 1969

Academic Changes Now
Being Studied By Deans

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the third in a series on Action
Conference.)
* A.
Several Action Conference
proposals offering what could be
sweeping changes in the
academic realm are now being
studied by the office of
Academic Affairs and the deans.
§ Foremost among these
proposals is one calling for
Grade Appeals Boards in each
department within the 13
colleges. UF President Stephen
C. OConnell sent this plan to
Vice President for Academic
Affairs Frederick Conner, who
asked the deans to consider it.
Student Government has also
been involved in Grade Appeals
Boards. Howard Rosenblatt,
SGs secretary of academic
affairs, submitted to each college
requests for appeals boards last
quarter, and the College of Arts
and Sciences tentatively
accepted such a plan.
9 Another proposal urges
instructors to rotate the topics
included in their courses, as a
way of increasing flexibility in
the curriculum. OConnell sent
this recommendation to Conner,
who has asked the deans to
study it and make
recommendations.
9 The conference also passed
a proposal recommending that
students be included in the
curriculum decision-making
process as active voting
members. Included in the
proposal is a plan for student
surveys to obtain the student
viewpoint on courses offered.
OConnell sent this proposal
to Conner, who asked the deans
to study it. All these proposals
most likely will be brought
before future Council of Deans
meetings, where the deans will
vote on them and offer
suggestions. Then they will
return their recommendations to
OConnell, who will make the
final decision.
9 A proposal providing for
topic rotation in seminars and
interdisciplinary courses within
colleges is also on the drawing
board. This plan would permit
more integration of specialized
fields and would be available to
seniors and beginning graduate
students for credit.
The Office of Academic
Affairs is considering this
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proposal and Conner has
presented it to the deans for
their study, too.
Several Action Conference
proposals submitted last
summer, many concerned with
race relations, have already been
implemented. Os special concern
are two dealing with housing,
both on- and off-campus.
9 One proposal called for the
Alligator to reject ads from
apartment owners who do not
sign open housing statements.
This proposal subsequently was
incorporated into Board of
Student Publications (BSP)
policy, which states that the
paper will not accept ads from
owners not listed by the UF.
The UF requires a policy of
non-discrimination.
9 A proposal calling for an

*69 SG Productions
To Get More Funds

By CAROL ROBERTS
Alligator Staff Writer
Next years student
government productions will be
subsidized with student activities
fees, Alan Howes, newly
appointed general chairman of
Student Government
Productions, said Sunday.
This way Student
Government will be able to offer
low price tickets for really big
name groups. Money taken at
the door often isnt enough to
pay for big name performers
such as the Supremes, even when
higher prices are charged, Howe
said.
Were trying to offer an
opportunity for the student to
be exposed to a wide variety of
performances. Every student will
be offered something for his
money each year, Howe said.
A greater amount of student
money will be used to subsidize
shows with wider appeal.
A really low student
subscription rate will be offered
to students who want to see all
six shows offered during the
year, Howes said. Subscribers
will be guaranteed a seat for

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investigation of on-campus
housing of black students was
passed by the conference after
Director of Housing Harold
Riker reported a no-policy
policy of room assignments for
black students. The UF has now
declared non-discrimination in
on-campus housing.
9 A resolution calling for
freedom of the press for student
publications was passed by the
conference, and this proposal
culminated in adoption of the
BSPs new policy manual.
9 A proposal creating an
Office of Coordinator of
Minority and Disadvantaged
Students is caught up in
administrative problems,
namely, where the office would
be housed and who would head
it.

ALAN HOWES
... big plans for SGP
every show at the price of about
$1 a show.
There will be one summer
special, possibly the Tijuana
Brass, said Howes, in charge of
booking, financing and
producing the shows.
In the offing for next year are
a ballet, opera, symphony, play
and pop show.
Student Government is trying
to get Do Your Own Thing, a
play which is very popular in
New York right now, Howe said.

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WRUF Programs Revamped

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
Classical music lovers, beware!
The format of the WRUF Radio
Center programs is being
revamped by a staff of
quick-witted progressive
broadcasting students.
Lamar Marchese, graduate
assistant in charge, said the
music is still heavy on the
classical side, but were trying to
diversify. FM stations all over
the country are making the
switch to include
middle-of-the-road to country
and western, stopping short of
recent rock sounds.
There was a low chortle
emitting from Tuesday night DJ
Neal Lavon, a practicing gag
writer whose puns range from
hysterical to miserable, but
provoke a laugh in either case.
Several weeks ago, Lavon
premiered a new program,
Experiment One, with the
Metal Man
Talks Here
An internationally known
scholar in the field of metals
will be on the UF campus
April 16 for a three-day
visitation with students and
faculty at the Department of
Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering.
Dr. Robert Franklin Mehl,
professor emeritus in
metallurgy from Carnegie
Institute of Technology, has
gathered an impressive
collection of earned and
honorary degrees, as well as
international medals and
awards for his work in this
vital field.

FBK Projects Known
For Diversity, Service
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Florida Blue Key, best known for sponsoring Homecoming each
year, is a diverse organization with many services that benefit all
students.
Besides Homecoming, which is an eight-month long project, Blue
Key sponsors Dialogue, the Speakers Bureau, Second 100 and Junior
College Achievement Awards.
Dialogue is exactly what the name implies a dialogue between
students, faculty and other organizations to discuss campus problems.
Several Dialogues are held each quarter. The format is usually a
panel discussion open to all students after hearing an expert speak in
the field of the topic of the Dialogue.
Last quarter a Dialogue was held concerning the referendum about
whether to keep or abolish student government.
This quarter, Dialogue will sponsor debates between the candidates
running for Student Government president.
FBK also sponsors the Speakers Bureau. This is a group of UF
students, chosen on the basis of their speaking availability, who tour
the state giving speeches to promote UF.
The Second 100 is a television program shown throughout the
state. Showing life at UF, the series promotes UF by telling what the
school is doing.
Outstanding student leaders in all the junior colleges in Florida are
given recognition by FBK through the Junior College Achievement
Awards.

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history of country-western
music. The songs ranged from
1900 to Flatt and Scruggs and
Glen Campbell.
Another Experiment One
program was a documentary on
Jack Johnson, the first Negro
heavyweight recognized as world
boxing champion. A complete
tape from the New York Rock
ML*-,,.. ~ j. x
PULL HARDER!
Several losers in the Gator
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pulled along by a superior force.
The Sigma Nu's topped ATO in
the finals for the big win of the
day.

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and Roll Ensemble Concert that
appeared at the UF last
February is scheduled for April
17 at 8:30 p.m.
WRUF as a public service
lends its facilities to the Radio
Center from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m.,
Monday through Friday. The
difference between the stations
is that WRUF is a
m iddle-of-the-road commercial
station, whereas the Radio
Center is moving away from the
classical emphasis and is
non-commercial.
Alan Pernchansky, Wednesday
night DJ, said hes hoping for
two things to happen.
In terms of classical
standards, I hope we can use
more historic recordings and
that well be able to diversify
more in the future.
Enthusiasm mounted as each
of the announcers talked of new
changes and proposed programs.
The regularly scheduled
programs contain everything
from classical to poetry readings.
Monday through Friday at
9:30 is Landmarks in Music,
Reclaim Books
Today Says SG
Today is the last day for
students to reclaim unsold books
which were previously handed
over to the SG Book Exchange.
The Book Exchange will be
open from 3 to 5 pjn. on the
collonnade of the Reitz Union.
For a list of all books which
the Book Exchange has sold, see
the campus Crier in this issue.
lUC Forum Set
On Probation ;
All freshmen who are on
academic probation are invited
to attend a forum sponsored by
University College Dean
Franklin A. Doty Tuesday in
Bless Auditorium (Physics
Building) from 7 to 9 p.m.
Doty said he plans to talk
with the students about
identifying what is causing their
unsatisfactory performance.
Since Doty feels that one of
the major problems freshmen
have is taking objective tests, he
will give suggestions on how to
read and respond to them.
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Preleasing for September
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music from Debussy to Beatles
to Brahms; Monday at 10:30 is
Jazz of the Past, from Mezz
Mezzrow to Duke Ellington;
Tuesday at 7:30 is the
Orchestra, from Dlndy to
Mozart. Soloist Ensemble at
7:30 on Thursday contains
works such as Beethoven: Sextet
in E-Flat, and The World of
Opera at 7:30 on Wednesday has
works of Gilbert and Sullivan to
Verdi.
Music takes on a lighter air
Tuesdays with the program
Broadway at 8:30. April 15 the
soundtrack from Hair will be
aired. Thursday at 9:20 is
entitled Poems Aloud with
campus and visiting Florida
poets reading informally.
Fridays at 8:30 is Theme and
Variation, music from foreign
cities, followed by The
Folksinger at 9:45. April 18 the
Folk singer will feature lan and
Sylvia. At 10:15 Music and
Memories concludes the show.
This is notable recordings from
the first 40 years of the century.
We have been much too
conservative in the past, said
Marchese, but well try to make
our image a little more
progressive. thing
though is to make students
aware that we do play other
types of music besides classical.
Suggestions, complaints, and
compliments can be directed to
the Radio Center/ College of
Journalism and Communica Communications/
tions/ Communications/ room 234, Stadium.

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Monday, April 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

1 Concert Set |
'* i"e
I For Sunday I
l The IIF 1
>| Orchestra will present a <
$ concert Sunday, April 20, at '<
:jj 4 p.m. in the University
:jj Auditorium. Admission is
f ree
Works to be performed
are: Handels Water Music,
Mozarts First Horn
Concerto, Pistons Variations,
and Schumanns Spring
Symphony. The horn soloist
will be Kenneth P. Jones, i;:
J winner of the Concerto
§ Contest held by the
$ Department of Music last
§ quarter.
§ This will be the eighth :$
§ concert of the eighth season
§ for the 60-piece orchestra
8 under the direction of
§ Edward Troupin. iji
The ninth and final concert §
fi of this season will be held in
June to benefit the Cleva J. §
S Carson Music Performance S
ra x
§ Scholarship Fund. 8
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Cara, Tracks, 4-whscf
I I
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Page 5



Page 6

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14, 1969

Disneyland
Searching UF
For Employes
Disney world will be the
states single biggest source of
summer jobs for college students
by 1971 according to Maurice
Mayberry, student placement
center director.
Th. Oria.uo tourist attraction
is already looking for employes
among UF students.
Two representatives will be on
campus Friday to interview
applicants for a Prototype
College Program, in which
Florida students will spend the
entire summer working at
Disneyland in California.
This is a trial run, Mayberry
explained, for the students to
see how they would like working
for Disneyland. It is also a
chance for Disneyland to look
over the students as possible
career employes, he added.
Californias Disneyland
employs over 7,000 people and
the Florida version will be even
larger. Disneyland employers in
this state are planning to use
colleges as an almost exclusive
source of recruitment, Mayberry
said.

Radio, TV

College of Journalism and Communications Broadcasting Day
today will feature two well known speakers, Stephen B. Labunski,
president of the National Broadcasting Company Radio Network, and
Liz Trotta, NBC televisions first full-time woman war correspondent.
Labunski will keynote a 12:30 luncheon with his topic,
Broadcasting: Looking Forward.

Miss Trotta, recent recipient of the Overseas Press Clubs award for
best reporting from abroad, will speak at the 7 pjn. Florida
Association of Broadcasters banquet. Her topic will be, Covering the
Vietnam War.

Broadcasting Day will begin with a 9:05 a.m. address,
Broadcasting 69, by Harold R. Krelstein, president of Plough
Broadcasting Co., Memphis.

At 9:55 ajn. a coffee break will be sponsored by Alpha Epsilon
Rho, National Honorary Broadcasting Fraternity.
Broadcasting and the Law, will be the topic of the 10:10 a.m.
address by Thomas W. Wall, partner of Dow, Lohnes, Albertson;
Washington.

At 11:15 a.m. Matthew J. Culligan, president of the Culligan
Communications Corporation, New York, will speak on the
Communications Explosion.

The afternoon program after the luncheon will feature a discussion
on Jobs in Broadcasting, Will Krelstein, Culligan, Labunski and
prominent Florida radio and T.V. broadcasters participating.

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Concert Features
Students Talent

On Wednesday at 6:45 pjn.
the University Symphonic Band
will present a Twilight Concert
on the University Auditorium
Lawn.
Emphasis will be placed on
student talent in the fields of
conducting and soloists. The
student conductors that will
participate demonstrate the high
quality of talent present in the
UF Music Department.
The repertoire will include the
following selections:
9 Sword & Shield, written by
the Director of Bands Richard
Bowles.
9 Finlandia, conducted by
student Bill Booth.

Day Today

9 A1 Antica, conducted by
student Charles Corbin.
9 Joyous Interlude,
conducted by student Dan
Ferrari.
9 Tapor No. 1 conducted by
student Bill Davis.
9 Outdoor Overture fbv
Aaron Copeland) conducted by
Ken Jones.
9 Semper Fidelus, conducted
by student Bob Mulhns.
9 Preludium & Fugue
conducted by Richard Bowles.

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STILL IMPORTANT FOR INDIVIDALS
Religion Losing Power In Education

By HELEN HUNTLEY ~
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell and several local
religious leaders agree that
religion is losing its place of
power and prestige in education.
They also say, however, that
it has retained importance in the
lives of individual students.
OConnell attracted attention
in the state press recently when
he was quoted as saying that
religion has lost the place of
prominence it once enjoyed in
the educational institution of
this nation.
During his speech at the new
Biscayne College in Miami, he
cited evidence for his statement
in the shift in enrollment from
private to public institutions. He
added that public schools can no
longer openly encourage
adherence to any particular
values and beliefs.
Father Michael V. Gannon,
UF asst. prof, of religion and
pastor at the Catholic Student

Latin Anti-Americanism
A Source Os Problems

The rise of technicians to
power in Latin America under a
strong anti-American banner will
provide future problems for the
United States, a Latin American
expert predicted at the UF
Friday.
Victor Alba, native of Spain,
former journalist in Europe and
Mexico and political scientist at
Kent State University, raised the
storm warnings at a
u niversity-sponsored
Southeastern Conference on
Latin American Studies.
Alba was luncheon speaker at
the Reitz Union, following a
morning session devoted to the
subject, U.S. Presence in Latin
America.
More than 200 specialists on
Latin America from throughout
the South are participating in
the two-day event, devoted to
the Aspects of Latin-American
Development theme.
In noting that the trend
toward technocracy is already
very much in evidence in
Argentina, Peru and Brazil, Alba
said: We will have to change
our ideas and interpretations
about Latin America because we
are entering a period in which
Latin American reality will be
absolutely different from what
we have had in the past.
He predicted: In the future,
I believe that we will see in
almost all the Latin American
countries new regimes which will
be a mixture of military men
and young businessmen, with
the support of the pseudo left,
pseudo Marxist parties, and the
traditional Communist parries.
Gatortown
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Center, concurs with OConnell.
Church schools are in for
hard times ahead, he says. His
reasons include insufficient
funding from private
denominations, loss of
denominational control of
academics in order to get
government funds, and a desire
of young people to attend
school where they will be
exposed to all types of faiths.
Bob Smith, Baptist Student
Center director, adds the high
cost of private education to the
list of attractions a secular
university offers the student
over a private school. He also
points out a declining interest in
formal religion among UF
students. Fifteen to 20 years
ago, he says, most of the
religious centers along University
Avenue had a much higher
degree of participation.
Most of the great private
universities in the U.S. were
founded by churches,

111
JKm II I I SI
H gfl IS a m wk
DISCUSSING LATIN AMERICA
... were (from left) Dr. Eugene R. Huck, West Georgia College,
president-elect. Southeastern Conference on Latin American Studies;
Dr. William E. Carter, director, UF Center for Latin American Studies;
Dr. Charles W. Wagley, director, Latin American center at Columbia
University, and Dr. Frederick W. Conner, UF vice president for
academic affairs.
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Department of Religion
Chairman Dr. Delton L. Scudder
notes. There has, however, he
states, been a gradual
secularization of these
institutions, particularly the
Protestant ones.
Once presidents and trustees
were all church people, religion
was a required subject and
chapel attendance was
mandatory. Today the reverse is
true in most institutions, he
says.
They are quick to agree,
however, that religion has not
lost its attraction for the
individual student.
I am not distressed by
attendance at organized
services, Scudder says. He feels
that while many students are not
enthusiastic about organized
religion, a large number are
tremendously interested in the
life of religion and what it can
mean personally.
OConnell in his speech also

pointed out that the college
years should include studies in
religion.
A number of UF students
apparently agree. According to
Scudder, approximately 650
students are enrolled in religion
courses each quarter.
Father Gannon says UF
students are very interested in
religion. This generation is the
finest our nation has ever
produced, he states
enthusiastically.

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Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14, 1969

EDITORIAL
A Killer Cave
At this moment, Edward Allen Ramey, a UF student, lies
in the J. Hillis Miller Health Center in fair condition after
he fell in what has become one of the most notorious spots
in Alachua County.
Ramey fell about 75 feet in the chimney area of
Warrens Cave, an underground killer northwest of
Gainesville.
One year ago today, Warren Ogletree, a Gainesville High
School student, was also in the health center because of a
fall in the very same spot of the vary same cave. But
Ogletree was not as lucky as Ramey. Ogletree was in
critical condition in a coma, and remained in the hospital
almost four months.
He will never be the same.
His life and the life of his family was ruined because of
one false move which almost cost him his life. With Ogletree
at the time were two college coed friends. One fell with him
and broke her arm and injured her back. Later the other
coed said she didnt want to go caving again.
We really cant blame her.
As a matter of fact, we would go further, and say
Warrens Cave should be closed, forever.
When Ramey fell Saturday, almost a dozen people,
members of the countys rescue unit, a highway patrolman,
and members of the Florida Speleological Society, a UF
club, risked their lives to get him out. The same was true a
year ago when Ogletree fell.
If only the individual was involved, it would be a
different story, but when dozens must risk their lives to save
one, it becomes a community concern, and a community
project.
Warrens Cave is a hazard, a deathtrap, and should be
eliminated.
We know this call will be met with screams from many
student spelunkers, who often enter the cave to explore its
many wonders; and from many others who find it a nice
place to drink beer, but if for one moment they would place
themselves in Ogletrees or Rameys position, their minds
might be changed.
Seventy five feet is a long way to fall.

SSOC Now SDS,
The Reasons Why?

(EDITORS NOTE: Last
week SSOC became affiliated
with Students for a
Democratic Society. Are
these the reasons why?)
(The following is a
summary of a letter sent to
Stephen OConnell by SSOC
The purpose of that letter
was to point out the errors in
the reasons and in the manner
by which the administration
purported to have denied
SSOC recognition.)
You state that recognition
of a student Organization by
the Universtiy means that the
purposes and objectives of
that organization enjoy the
approval of this institution.
However, inherent in the
definition of a university is an
openness to all points of
view. Therefore, the purpose
of a university if not to
approve or disapprove, but to
discuss all solutions to every
problem. By denying SSOC
recognition, you undermine
and subvert the purpose of
this University.
You criticize SSOC
because you say anyone
may attend and participate in
their meetings. In other
words, SSOC was criticized
because they practice
participatory democracy. In
so doing, SSOC, by openning
its meetings to the general
public, is merely trying to
make the university relevant

to the community. The
purpose of a university is not
to isolate itself from the
society but to become
involved in it.
You accuse SSOC and
JOMO of jointly conducting
self-education courses in
firearms usage, hand-to-hand
combat, and survival
techniques. This is a
spurious charge.
The only courses in
firearms, combat, etc., which
SSOC members might have
attended would be classes in
compulsory ROTC (this
program of mindless training
for violence, collaborated in
by the UF Administration,
has been opposed by SSOC
for years).
Not only was your
reasoning faulty in denying
SSOC recognition, but you
also deyised new rules for the
specific purpose of excluding
SSOC. Not only did you
personally pick the members
of the committee who would
vote on the recognition, but
when the committee voted to
recognize SSOC, you
disregarded their
recommendation.
The acts of yourself and
the Board of Regents in
denying SSOC recognition
lack logic and are
diametrically opposed to the
true purpose of a university.
SSOC STEERING
COMMITTEE

The Florida Alligator
"The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Acting Editor-In-Chief
T? i Raul Ramirez
r OU/IMMj Acting Managing Editor
M Carol Sanger Glenn Fake I
Assignments Editor News Editor
' M A,
News Headline: Obscenity In Home Ruled Legal

A View In Economics

A Look At Inflation

(EDITORS NOTE: This is the first of a three
part series on the problems of inflation currently
facing this nation. Today Mr. Thijssen explores why
there is inflation.)
I am a philosopher, not an economist. But I am
also, by preference if not by choice, a citizen of the
planet Earth. As a result the increasingly irregular
motions of the American economy worry me.
Those who follow the daily columns of economic
commentators will have noticed, in the last several
weeks, distinct signs of impending despair about the
possibility of arresting the current inflation.
Sylvia Porter writes that if the anti-inflationary
program does not work we may have to throw all
our respected economics texts away. Lou Schneider,
in a rather futile effort to help stem inflationary
psychology, announced in March that the
government program in April was definitely going to
stop inflation without even knowing what that
program would consist of!
Measure after measure has bit the dust before the
inflationary tide, despite confident announcements
by commentators that this would do the trick.
As I say, I am a philosopher. But with the
presumption characteristic of my profession I
propose to do an analysis of the economic situation,
pointing out some factors which are consistently
ignored by the critics, and in my opinion of critical
importance.
If I am wrong I would very much appreciate
having this pointed out to me by the resident
economic experts.
The analysis will not pretend to completeness,
naturally, in view of newspaper space and my time
limitations. We will select data which regard of
central importance.
In 1967 business planned a four per cent
expenditure on capital goods, in 1968 five percent
and in 1969 a whopping 15 per cent.
Business profit has soared in the last few years, an
increase out of proportion with almost all other
indicators in the economy.
The government has imposed a 10 per cent surtax
on income, in order to take the heat out of the

By Frans Thijssen

consumer sector: this tends to slow expansion
generally, and, the government hopes, thereby
inflationary expansion also.
The government has periodically raised the prime
interest rate on credit, which has now reached a
record high, hoping thereby to cool the economy in
all sectors.
The rate of utilization of existing plant and
equipment is low and going down (from about 85
per cent last year to 82 per cent this year).
These are the basic data with which we will work.
Two major reasons for the large increase in
business profit are discernible:
The Vietnam war has given the defense
industry, as well as a large number of other
industries contributing to the ligistics of the war, a
tremendous boost, and for a variety of reasons
defense business is highly profitable.
The large increase in welfare spending, together
with government deficit financing, has given the
consumer sector a large boost, which, due to its
suddenness, allowed the general price increases and
higher business profits.
All the commentators regard the large projected
increase in outlay on capital goods a prime indicator
of a solid inflationary trend.
But the reasons for it are not so obvious, and
they, in my opinion, hold the secret to stemming
the inflationary tide.
The
Florida Alligator
The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility."
Published by students of the University of
Florida under the auspices of the Board of
Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330,
Reitz Union. Phone 392-1681, 392-1682 or 392-1683.
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those
of the editors or of the writer of the article and not
those of the University of Florida.



Alligator Gets Praise And Complaints

FORUM:
C Aina ml V iaut J
hope for the

Regent Has Congrats

MR. EDITOR:
As a regular reader of the
Alligator, with too many
impulses to write critical
comments oil' both your
editorials and your student
attempts to be journalists or
columnists, I want to take this
opportunity to commend you
on your editorial UF Radicals
Afflitied With Now
Syndrome.
If you wrote it,
congratulations. If the accolade
belongs to someone on your
staff, please pass on the word.

Tote Dem Bales, Boys, Be A Proud American

MR. EDITOR:
There has recently been some discussion
concerning violence, non-violence, and black
survival. It seems that, to many people, any black
man who tries to assert his dignity and manhood in
this racist society is guilty of klansmanship.
Moreover, President OConnell, in denying
recognition of SSOC, has linked SSOC with JOMO
in a classic bit of guilt by association. Since there is
such a commotion concerning black militancy* I feel
it necessary to now give some words of wisdom to
the Black Masses.
The angry, frustrated blacks have to learn that
the American Way must be cherished above all.
Work hard, be courteous, go to church, and
someday you may be lucky enough to be an
honest-to-God second-class citizen, with the
opportunity to be treated like dirt by white

> Jjj^^^JmL^Mmmj,
H Ek Jl IjL^
' Bs| SjUft.uL
Were They Asleep?

MR. EDITOR:
Much has been made of the
fact that fratemitites are not
dead, following the recent fire at
Sigma Nu. Judging from the fact
that many of the boys were

The opinion of a lone Regent
probably isnt too important in
current student thinking. But in
this particular case I believe I am
echoing the sentiments of the
entire Board.
In any event I happen to
believe that the present and
future need of the University
will profit most by the type of
thinking manifest in your
editorial of April 3, and again I
congratulate you on it.
C. L. MENSER
VERO BEACH

forced from the building in their
undershorts at 3:00 in the
afternoon, I would submit that
while the fraternity may not be
dead, it is at best asleep.
DR. JOHN B. MUNSON

Rising To Occasion Makes
Editor A Liberal Idealist

MR. EDITOR:
After only one less-than-complimentary letter by
Steve Fahrer to the Alligator, the Alligator rose to
the occasion and responded.
The editorials thesis that idealistic thought must
be tempered by the realities of the political
processes of change if the desired change sought is
ever to be implemented is indeed correct. But the
point in which the editorial grossly errs is in the
identification of radicalism with idealism.
It is precisely the proven uselessness of the
idealism of blind faith in working through
channels which has made me a radical.
The editorial states the change could and
probably would have come about without
eyeball-to-eyeball demonstrations and that the
correct and most effective procedure would have
been to carry the case to the Board of Regents. To
my knowledge this is what Student Body President
Clyde Taylor and also Manny James proposed to do
at a rally last quarter. I have yet to see any results
which merit the Alligators confidence in this
procedure.
The tendency to believe that the change
probably would have come about by working

Americans of every creed. Support your local
police; maintain law and order.
Then you can smile cheerfully as racists cops bust
heads in the ghetto or bust heads in Chicago or bust
heads on the steps of the Pentagon. Dont riot;
instead submit a list of grievances to your local
slumlord. Then you can bow obsequiously as he
evicts you.
Lets take an example: Booker T. Kenyatta was
born in Harlem of poor, but indigent parents.
Though he came into daily contact with all sorts of
undesirable characters, young Booker T., like all
slum children, grew up without a trace of bitterness,
without an ounce of rage.
One day a junkie lent him a copy of The Souls of
Black Folks. He read this eagerly, then went to the
library and read Native Son, Invisible Man, An
American Dilemma, and other war novels.
He became so knowledgable that he shuffled

MR. EDITOR:
Your editorial of April 7 is an
example of self-delusion that
maintains the corrupt and
abusive fraternity system from
completely dying out.
Most hypocritical (Sic) is the
benelovence (Sic) of Maas, Sears,
Wilsons, University Gardens

They Ignored Facts And People

MR. EDITOR:
* tC|U 1
Last week we attended the City Commission
meeting in order to view their discussion of the
peace monument. After hearing the Veterans for
Peace present their petitions, Commissioners Neil
Butler, Ted Williams and Perry McGriff expressed
their opposition to the memorial.
Ted Williams said that the memorial eulogized
the peace marchers rather than anyone who had
died in Vietnam. Perry McGriff, turning the
discussion into a name-calling session, called the
peace marchers misfits expounding anti-American
sentiment.
It was interesting to note that all three had
previously prepared written statements. They came
to the meeting ready to speak against the Veterans
for Peace. They ignored the facts that:
(1) the veterans had, in a brief 24 hours, collected
the signatures of several hundred Gainewille citizens v
supporting the peace monument
(2) several hundred residents took their Easter
afternoon to express their grief in the losing of 33
Alachua County residents and to express their hope
that no more will have to die in Vietnam.

Fraternity Bitterness

along to college, majoring in Agriculture at Simba
U. He did so well there that he was awarded Stepin
Fetchit Fellowship. Today he is a janitor, another
example of the respect white America has for its
black people. Tears come to my eyes when I recall
the All-American story of his life.
I wish to remind all blacks reading this letter that
there is still time for you to become a house nigger
or field nigger.
Just keep earin watermelons an let white folks
boss yall around. Lift dem barges; tote dem bales,
boys. Be proud to be a part of The Other America.
Remember Spiro T. Agnews immortal words: If
youve seen one slum, youve seem em all. Dont
make waves; dont rock the boat, or else you might
upset the sanctified system. When you have
accomplished all this, something wonderful will take
place. You will cease to be a man.
DAVID MILLER

Apartments, and Church of
Christ who use the unfortunate
house burning to advertise
themselves while catering to
their customers: the spoiled, big,
rich boys whose booze, jocks
and marihuana (Sic) were
burned.
Where have these
organizations been in local

Monday, April 14,1969, The Florida Alligator, I

within the system seems rather ridiculous for
liberals to believe in when one considers that liberal
leaders are either shot, as Martin Luther King and
the Kennedy brothers, or are unable to achieve goals
within the system, as McCarthy lost at the fiasco of
the Chicago convention.
And if the Alligator believes that Dr. Megills
continuance as a professor at this university would
have been maintained without the rallies initiated
by radicals and the pressure exerted by Dr. Megills
colleagues, it is not only idealistic, but also naive.
The Alligator further seems to believe that money
will make a great university and somehow identifies
money with the acquisition of academic freedom.
The fact that this seems to invite coercion by the
state legislature does not seem to bother the editor
who is sure that if we play the game and be good
little boys and girls everything would probably
turn out right.
Far from accusing SSOC of idealism I would
suggest that the Alligators editorial is a classical
example of liberal idealism which simply doesnt
face up to the fact that although minor accesions
are granted to keep the students quiet, no
meaningful action can be gotten within the system.
MICHAEL TESH

Obviously these politicians did not only disregard
the electroate but they also were unwilling to listen
to non-violent constructive suggestion.
Gainesville already has a monument eulogizing
the Confederate dead.
I suppose we will have to wait another hundred
years before the politicians recognize, as symbolized
by the veterans peace monument that our
neighbors are dying in the war.
DAVID SCEUNDA 3AS
BECKY CARPENTER
It) order to appear in the Alligator, letters
to the editor must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers* names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor editorreserves
reserves editorreserves the right to edit all letters in the:
interest of space.

community aid programs?
Their brotherhood is aimed
only at their ideal customer the
white, clean cut, Joe College.
Had the victims been poor,
black, long haired, or intelligent
neither the Alligator nor the
Samaritans would have devoted
so much drivel to the vent.
ROBERTO IBARGUEN

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14,1969

1969
SEMINOLE

What will you
REMEMBER
about your college days?

m ii HiKS
Hul
,V I 'l,-*-' 1 j--.^ is- V i . ,

DEADLINE-APRIL 18

MAIL IN COUPON, OR COME
BY ROOM 330, JWRFU 10 a.m.-
4 p.m.

EB in my name. copies of the 1969 Seminole
Rfl ha ve enclosed *____(ss.oo per copy) B
A| Name
91 Student Number
Ms Address
m You w,n be notified In the Alligator T 1.
Ml arrived. Mall.. M) s OT lm,k. qnTalJo?. J l n * mooM h " [fc



CLASSIFIEDS

Monday, April 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

FOR SALE 1
:: ::
Aiwa TP 704, 1-7/8, 3-3/4 ips, 5
reels AC/Battery 4 mo old S4O; 12
spkr in walnut enclosure S3O; 2/SSO.
378-8305. (A-SMIO-P)
67 Yamaha 250 just $444.45, will
take smaller motorcycle as trade-in.
Call J. Fernandez at 378-3216 before
it's too late. (A-st-110-P)
Air conditioner 10,000 BTU.
Excellent condition, 1 year old $125.
Call 378-1129. (A-SMIO-P)
Hofner bass guitar only 10 months
old in beautiful condition! Call
378-8756 and ask for Rich or come
by French Qtr. 78 BEST Offer.
(A-SMIO-P)
196 b Yamaha 350, driven 2600
miles, excellent condition, helmets
includ. Owner in service. Call
372-0148. (A-SMIO-P)
Basenji puppies AKC
Registered Red and white.
Reasonable. Call 376-2630.
(A-7MOB-P)
1964 Sunbeam Alpine good
condition $620. Wallensak stereo
deck $l2O. 8-three way
speakers cabinets S3O the pair.
392-0929 ask for George.
(A-st-l 11-P)
Super 8 movie camera. All automatic
perfect running condition. Complete
with valuable acc. Call Bob
378-7479. (A-st-111-P)
Beach buggy 'Chrysler slant 6, afb4
barrel, cam, modified torqueflite,
chrome reverse wheels, M&H racing
slicks. It will go S6OO. Phone
378-4328. (A-st-111-P)
VW Bus 61 recently painted needs
tune-up 400 or best offer or will
trade for Triumph motorcycle. Call
Dave 378-9445. (A-3M12-P)
Sears 18 portable b & w TV.
Excellent working order. Call
378-7169 after six. (A-3t-112-P)
1967 TR Spitfire excellent shape.
Good tires (radials) radio, luggage
rack, 28,000 miles, British racing
GRN. SIOSO or best offer. Tim
376-7647. (A-5M12-P)
'66 Honda S9O excellent condition
$150; 4 track tape player and 30
tapes $100; 66 Harley Davidson
sprint. Excellent condition S4OO. Call
Tim at 392-7951. (A-3t-113-p)
SURFBOARD HANSEN very good
condition, 96, 50-50 model, very
stable, good riding. 372-5007 after
6:00 p.m. (A-3t-113-p)
GUNS-GUNS-GUNS- Inventory over
450 Buy-Sell-Trade-Repair.
Reloading supplies, custom, reloading
Harry Beckwith, Gun Dealer,
Micanopy 466-3340. (A-ts-104-c)
Diamond Ring. Save money. Look
this beauty over before making that
trip to the retail jewelry store. COST
$250. Make me an offer soon.
376-4082. (A-2t-114-p)
Air Conditioner 12,000 BTU SSO can
be seen at 3101 S.W. 34 St. Lot 46.
Or Call 372-6513. (A-2t-113-p)
Sears Crusair Scooter helmet and tool
kit included. 3 yrs. old still in
excellent cond. Asking $l5O or best
offer. Call 378-8189 after 1:30.
(A-2t-113-p)
BRACE yourself for a thrill the first
time you use Blue Lustre to clean
rugs. Rent electric shampooer sl.
Lowry Furniture Co. (A-lt-224-c)
1968 Suzuki 250 x 6. Excellant
condition. $450. Call 372-5552.
For sale 1800 BTU air conditioner
Frigidare $235, vintage refrigerator
$35, Leather recliner. Great for study
$75. Phone 378-3793. (A-st-114-p)
COLOR TV beautiful danish modern
walnut cabinet. 1968 model, perfect
condition. Must sell for school
expenses SSOO or best offer
378-4507. (A-3t-114-p)
Championship Slazenger tennis
racket. Never been used; finest gut
strings. Was $45, will sell for S3O.
Call 376-5695 after 2:30.
(A-2t-114-p)
Free kittens Black 378-7977.
(A-3t-l 13-p)
STATE DAILY
[Queen
An Evergreen Film COLOR

| FOR SALE 1
59 TR3 exc. mech., new tires, will
take best offer. 150 cc Suzk. elec start
new tires. MUST SELL BOTH.
378-7197 leave No. will call
(A-3t-l 13-p)
Beautiful seal-point Siamese Kitten 9
weeks old. Female. Purebred. sls
Call 372-7204. (A-3t-113-p)
FOR RENT |
**#xo>xx*x*x*xtfft;ssra^x< Peace and quiet is yours for the
asking by living in one of our
secluded luxurious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for an
appointment to see them. Immediate
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, In.c,
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-c)
1, 2 or 3 for summer & ? 50* trailer
with 45 cabana, AC, own bedroom,
pool, tennis courts, 4 minutes from
campus, SSO/month. Call 378-0748
evenings. (B-7t-112-P)
Furnished upstair apt. 2 br, air cond.,
wall to wall carpet. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-ts-107-C)
Summer Rates. From $45 and SSO
for efficiencies to SBS for two
bedrooms. Close to campus. Air.
Modern. Also renting for fall.
University Apts. Call 376-8990.
(B-25t-111-P)
Furnished A/C trailer to sublease.
Large, like new, two bdrm. Less than
5 min. from campus off the Archer
Rd. $ 110/mo. Call 378-6709.
(B-3t-113-p)
Need roommate desperately! Coed
for VP apartment. 41.25/mo. April
and May rent paid. Call Sandy
378-3527 before 5 p.m. (B-st-113-p)
2 br Wmsburg.-'Apt., a.c., pool, to
sublet for Summer qt. Available in
June. Lease runs thru July. Call
378-6013. (B-st-114-p)
1 male roommate for 3 bedroom
house. Woodpaneled, fireplace, cable
TV, bar. Call 378-1112 after 6.
(B-SMIO-P)
i i i
WANTED f
&SXSSS;K4WSMtoSW6S*; i WX'KXfIS?Wv
1 female roommate needed
Gatortown Apts., 2-bdr., SIOO for
rest of quarter. Call 378-6966 or
378-0756. (C-5M12-P)
Tonneau cover to fit '65 MGB.
Reasonable condition & price. Any
color. Call 378-9512 between 6-7:30
p.m. (C-3t-112-P)
Need female roommate for spring
qtr. Come by apt. 304 College
Terrace or call 372-0627.
(C-5M12-P)
Male roommate to share new
convenient apt. one blk. from
campus. AC, nicely furnished. Call
after 5 p.m. 376-4768. (C-3t-112-P)
WANTED: Quiet male roomate for
air-conditioned apartment. 4 blocks
f m campus. Pool $42.50 month
plus */2 utilities. 376-0949 after 3.
(C-st-113-p)
MODELS We are interviewing for a
Playboy Playmate from the state of
Florida. It's high time IF interested
in hard work and can meet
requirements. Contact Bill R. Horne
or Gus Mustelier. All interviews by
appointment only we are
sincere Roy Green Studio, 'nc.
372-4656. (C-10t-109-p)
IIItWmI last
nr* uih v -1
J 2 £)/\YS
Calendar Calendara
a Calendara dull Town until
Sheriff McCullough
took over
4 DAYS

Page 11

:£;s : X>xx*r-xNrw x*x-xwxNssss*x*c*x x<*
WANTED I
y-X<.yw XXXA%%xv; Coed wanted to share 2 bedroom
French Quarter apt. No. 72. Call
378-9934 anytime. (C-3t-113-p)
1 or 2 roomates for 16th Ave.
Apartment. Call Gayle or Sharon
378-5588. (C-3t-113-p)
Married couples wanted for
participation in an enrichment of
marriage group experience. If
interested in details, call the Marriage
and College Life Project, 392-1174.
Ask for Mrs. Thomstorff.
(C-10t-l 13-c)
Male roommate wanted Univ.
Gardens 1 bedroom 57.50 monthly
plus / 2 utilities. Call 376-6211. Vic.
(C-3t-113-p)
Immediately, one female roommate
for two-bedroom Landmark apt. 46.
Call 372-6853. (C-3t-114-p)
HELP WANTED 1
HELP WANTED FEMALE. Fu.
time position for experienced office
worker. Should be planning on being
in Gainesville at least two years from
date of hiring. Must be experienced
in office work and must be able to
work full time including
approximately two nights a week and
every other Saturday. Ideal working
conditions, 5 day week. WILSON
DEPARTMENT STORES, INC. 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-10t-106-C)
dale and female various part .imv.
openings noon hours and
eve nings arranged to your
schedule. Apply Kings Food Host,
1430 SW 13th St., 1802 W. Univ.
afternoon only. (E-st-l 11-P)
LISTENERS WANTED: Will pay
$1.50 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Miss
Hardaway University ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. Can make up to $6.00.
(E-15M07-C)
Alligator sports dept, needs an
experienced sports writer. Good
opportunity for ambitious writer.
Contact Marc Dunn. (E-3t-112-NC)
;X > :XX^ I 'XX : . . X XX*.V*V.N X'XvX*XXWK*X
AUTOS I
teWiWWSSv/K'ivX'XOX-IvWSSW'XWw
Corvette 1967 convertable, yellow
vinyl hardtop AM-FM, 4-speed disc
brakes, 16000 miles, never raced
$3150. 376-1088. (G-3M12-P)
Buick LeSabre 1960, 4 door,
automatic transmission, power
steering, $175. Call Flipper
372-0491. (G-3t-l 12-P)
1966 Chev. Impala 4 Dr. Ht. Loaded
Real nice. Must sell $1,695. Consider
Trade. Call 376-6943 after 7 P.M.
(G-st-113-p)
1963 Tempest LeMans V 8 clean
power steering good condition. $595.
Call 3 7 6-1525 after 8:00 PM
(G-st-114-p)
VW Van 1960 excellent condition.
Completely rebuilt and repainted.
Perfect for camping, surfing, working
or pleasure. 550. 376-9739.
(G-st-113-p)
FOR SALE Triumph tr-4, 64,
white, new motor, luggage rack, new
tires. Excellent condition. SIIOO.OO.
Would consider trade. 1020 S. Main.
Call 378-9086. (G-6M13-D)
| PERSONAL |
Coed to cook for four guys. Dinner
five days a week. No dishes. Call
372-5091. (J-3M12-P)

111 \ SPEaALS W&
Monday Spocial Wfi.
H baked macaroni & m
m MEAT SAUCE Ij
M ALL YOU CARE TO EAT ||
H| Tuotday Spocial ||l
H FRIED CHICKEN If
H All YOU CARE TO EAT H
I MORRISON'S 1
1 CAFETERIAS 1
||L GAINESVILLE MALL J||

PERSONAL
MEN, WHERES HOME NEXT
QUARTER! Try Georgia Seagle Hall.
Room and board $220/quarter. 1002
W. University. 378-4341 or
372-9410. (J-SMIO-P)
COED? Good Cook? Desire spacious
wood-paneled apt. for summer? Call
me at 378-3474 before its too late.
Enjoy this summer in Gville.
(J-3t-l 13-p)
STUDENTS, since last you visited
our humble domain we have been
busily engaged in accommodating 17
crates of ALL NEW merchandise.
Come and behold our unusual
accumulation of items for your
pleasure and purchasing at THE
SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Phone: 372-0667. Open til 9:00
(J-l 13-3 t-p)
Would you like to lose weight and
keep it off for good? Come to weight
watchers 1015 W. Univ., Mon 10
a.m. 7:30 p.m. Wed. 9:30
a.m. 1:00 p.m. or 7:30 p.m. ph.
anytime, 372-9555. (J-SMII-P)
MINIFESTIVALanyone wishing
to enter their arts or crafts for the
May 17th show, call Celebration, aft.
392-0299, eve. 3 72-5429.
(J-st-109-P)
DO YOU HAVE friends who are
getting married? Do you want to give
them something beautiful and useful?
Youll want to give them handmade
Rosewood Giftware from Brazil.
From 5.95 at THE SPANISH MAIN
105 W. Univ. Ave. OPEN Till 9:00.
372-0667. (J-l 13-3 t-p)
Such a Deal! Cowatt cont, 72 peak
monarch amp, solid state. For you
$95, Call 376-7380 or 372-9307 if no
ans. Only 4 months old. (J-lt-114-p)
Dear Concerned Citizens, Thank you
for your poison pen letter. You clean
up your ghetto, well clean up our lot
with a new house. Phi Taus
(J-lt-114-p)
Open TRAVEL MEETING for those
interested in Foreign flight, tour,
study & car plans. Thurs. nite April
17, 7:30 PM Union Auditorium.
(J-4t-l 14-c)
Interested in travel and/or study in
Europe, Asia or the Mid-East? Want
to buy or rent a car to use there. Call
392-16 55 Rm. 310 Union.
(J-12t-114-c)
Learn to fly at Stengle Field solo
course SIOO. Phone 376-0011.
(J-st-l 14-p)
Pidge B. Where are you??? F.H.
(J-lt-114-p)
1 LOST & FOUND |
Lost: Black and white pointer. 5
mos. 40 lbs. Fanthom last seen in
French Quarter area. Reward! Any
information Call 378-6863.
(L-10t-110-P)
Lost: white with brown spots, med.
size female dog. needs medical
CARE. Markings like St. Bernard-
Very friendly. Reward. Call
392-8023 392-7733. (L-st-113-p)
LOST: square silver earring at or near
gym on Wed. night after the
Supremes. REWARD. Call S*san a t
376-0509. (L-2t-113-p)
Lost: Mens prescription glasses,
black frames, torn black case, in
vicinity of 4th Ave and 16th i St.
NW. If found, please call Ken at
378-0960. (L-SMIO-P)
Found at Carnigras. A set of keys and
case. Call 392-8044 and identify.
(L-3t-114-nc)

v.l.y.j.y.v^v.vMWW'XvXvXwXvX'XvX
l LOST A FOUND 1
LOST: Mens glasses, grey & clear
frames, green leather case, between
Graham Area & Anderson. If found,
call 392-3296. Lost Wednesday 9th
PM. (L-lt-114-p))
Tennis Racket Restringing.
Satisfaction Guaranteed. Free pickup
and delivery on and near campus.
Call 378-2489. (M-19t-107-p)
1 SERVICES §
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (across from Ramada Inn)
& 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-12M04-P)
Volkswagen Service & Parts. Spe ji
engines rebuilt. Call 376-0710.
(M-6t-l 13-p)
NEED A PAINTER? Free estimates
Professional Painting Interior and
Exterior call after 5 or anytime on
weekends 378-4855. (M-10t-105-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-ts-104-C)
rn/l
I "YOUR (MATOT HURT I
I Os CHOI HAMILTON M
"BULLITT IS NEXT 1
, % The'PaperUolT
* u is about to
*§l# get creamed!
w/n\J |H|
f ion st VM
/ 1969s most |. jMp
/ spectacular
adventure
I Richard Burton
\Cllsit Eastwood
" Mttrocetof
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RfjrAPatricia/i;
Metrocolor^^*
*
*
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* |M|
* Their bag-
* a supplying Ul[ *+
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- A n



Page 12

\, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14,1969

Campus Crier
\ i\ SPONSORED BY STUDENT GOVERNMENT

WANNA
THEM? 4f|M
* ****
. eile' aeigoew

There is something you can do. Perhaps it may not seem like much when
you consider their problems. It probably wont be easy. You may be called
anything from whitey to hunkie to "pig. But if youve got enough guts to try,
if youre tired of talk without any action, then youre just the person were
Hooking for. Project SAMSON Afro American Students 392-7712

I tonight
I Medicine
HRP
I Nursing
I Pharmacy
I Youre some of iho "Rat's" best supporters. For that we're
I going to honor you tonight at the Rat. Discount on beverage
I and hot fresh popcorn cheap. Bring your friends teachers
I students. Have A Ball
I tomorrow night
Dorm night at the "RAT.
BROWARD HALL
NIGHT
Everybody come over and "Broward" around. Bring guitars ;
sing; study? Discount on beverage and weve got hot popcorn
to munch on. Everybody Come Over.
Never a cover charge on Mon Tues -Wed.

SAMSON needs STRENGTH
YOU can be the STRENGTH
SAMSON needs YOU
Volunteers for community involvement
needed immediately
(
i
Come to the SAMSON office, 324 Reitz
-^Unior^jDj^Call^PZd^Z


Y ijP 1
*- J #-> iflrAi *gip
-V|L v inf f I
* -wtodm Kmr aPtvnH^HHR, fe
* n JF~Jf* ~
r i il *lr>ni *- 7 0;
t J? r "^rT J^ ,^0 -!rT 71P

Today is the LAST DAY for unsold books to be claimed
at the STUDENT BOOK EXCHANGE. If your number
does not appear below, assume that the book was not
sold and claim it at the Exchange between 3 and 5 PM.
2 183 250 329 424 504 577 714 827 892 1010 1162 1259
3 185 253 330 425 505 584 716 828 904 1028 1167 1277
12 189 254 331 426 506 591 717 83, 102 g m 8
13 196 256 332 429 M7 593 722 JS
27 199 257 333 430 492 629 723 ooc 1042 1169 1282
36 200 262 334 433 496 632 724 915 1044 1177 1284
41 202 265 335 434 ** 735 887 918 1063 1179 1290
55 203 268 335 435 736 828 920 1064 1180 1292
59 204 269 338 439 499 888 840 93, 1Q65 1182 1293
60 205 270 345 440 501 640 738 843 1065 iOQ(
63 206 272 356 443 502 642 739 347 1068
65 207 274 363 444 509 645 744 848 ZZ 1071 1192 1399
72 211 276 365 445 511 646 745 851 1083 1194 1307
76 212 279 369 449 512 647 746 8 54 946 1085 1199 1320
79 215 280 370 45 0 519 648 748 857 947 1096 1197 1325
88 VZ fZ 2 829 889 784 861 1097 1199 1326
89 219 284 384 .... 505 655 761 99 1 1329
go 220 2QO *lO 454 863 Q 62 1109 1203
99 Z2O 290 390 526 656 733 962 1336
101 222 292 392 rkr 77R 981 1110 404.
104 223 293 393 460 888 778 855 1112 1210 1346
114 224 294 395 463 838 f ] 777 866 884 1114 1211 1348
118 227 296 396 464 531 664 795 357 986 1349
121 228 297 399 467 533 670 798 309 991 1350
122 230 299 401 468 550 673 805 373 992 1351 k
123 231 303 403 473 553 676 807 8?4 993 1140 1217
125 235 306 409 474 554 677 811 994 1143 1219
127 236 310 412 476 555 682 813 QQQ 1142 1220
130 237 315 413 553 686 816 377 1147 1226
134 238 316 415 557 68? 818 881 1000
s22s- -- 2 S' 1149 9
167 1 245 322 420 481 569 691 889 oo R 1008 1186 1243
168 247 323 421 42 570 698 |22 8 1157 1244
ITO 248 324 422 485 575 712 886 1996 116 0 1252
179 249 327 423 493 576 713 890 1007

__ wa w
ATTENTION CABINET OFFICERS
AND AGENCY HEADS
Final Reports have not been turned in by the following heads of Student
Government Agencies and Cabinet Departments:
Alumni *Accent
Athletic Course & Teacher Evaluation
Health & Insurance *Gator Loan Fund
* International Affairs Intercourse
* Labor Ombudsman
* Legal Rathskeller
Legislative Affairs Samson
Married Student Affairs Student Government Productions
Public Functions
University Relations (indicates no contact made at all)
Recognition of Agency Heads and Cabinet Officers will be limited to those
who have completed Final Reports.



A strong wind moved across
Florida Track early Saturday
afternoon threatening to stifle
an y outstanding competition
from Olympians who had
gathered for the first Florida
Invitational Track meet.
But try as it might, the wind
couldnt stop the Fmest track
meet ever held in the south.
Norm Tate set a long jump
record, tossing Yales Calvin Hill

->o| $Jp
1 m i i 11 i 1 '" (' < Ssss; 5 -s' % -, s
, "' V w.tvfr-- v ix
ip §§
'* >-'*' '**.s
<-' 'ps~*p : Wfmmm£msmMmMWzMmWmk .WkWSk'
- gjjjggg*

Archer Wins Masters

AUGUSTA, Ga.
(UPI) Lanky George Archer,
tallest of all the touring pros,
staved off a four-way challenge
Sunday with a steady stretch
finish to win the Masters golf
championship by a single stroke,
with a 72-hole score of 281.
The 6-foot-6 Californian shot
an even-par 72 in the final round
over the cloud-shielded Augusta
national course for a 7-under-par
finish that edged out faltering
Billy Casper, Tom Weiskopf, and

h
H'l'i'iS

DIAMONDS
and JEWELRY
50
! c
The Furniture Manufacturers |
13thS^

Carnes: "It Was A Success"

PENDER FLOATS
... to win the 100-yard dash

out of the record book with a
25 2Vi' jump.
Jack Bacheler didnt set any
records but he easily ran away
with the three-mile event in
13:27.1, that was a personal
best. Dave Ellis, who would have
been his strongest competition,
dropped out of the meet due to
illness. Ellis was a Canadian
Olympian.
Leon Coleman, of the

Canadian George Knudson all
in with 6-under-par 2825.
Archer started the final round
a stroke behind Casper, the
54-hole leader, but Casper, who
had been playing it safe for three
days, lost his cool Sunday and
suffered five bogeys in his first
10 holes.
Knudson had a final-round
70, Weiskopf a 71 and Casper,

Weekend Baseball

American League
Boston 000 210 000- 3 7 0
Cleveland 100 000 000- 1 8 0
Stange 1-0 and Gibson; Tiant 0-2
and Azcue. HRS-Petrocelli Ist, Smith
Ist.
Ist game
Washington 000 000 000- 0 5 1
Baltimore 002 000 OOx-2 4 0
Coleman, Cox 8 and French;
Palmer 1-0 and Hendricks.
LP-Coleman 1-1. HR-F. Robinson
3rd.

UF FANNIN SETS RECORD

California Striders, ran through
the low hurdles in 13.6, tying
the record set by Richmond
Flowers in the Florida Relays.
UFs Jerry Fannin got in his
licks against the wind also,
setting a new track record in the
intermediate hurdles. Fannin
recorded a 51.6, breaking the
old record by two-tenths of a
second.
Ron Jourdan, who was not
going to compete because of an
illness, took the high jump event
with a jump of 6-foot-10.
Milt Sonsky set the most
impressive record of the
afternoon by uncorking a 260-2
javelin throw, a new UF track
record.
The mile event was won by
Barry Brown, N.Y. Athletic
Club, in 4:03.6.
Mel Pender dashed to victory
in 9.8 seconds over the 100-yard
course and anchored the
Philadelphia Pioneer Club relay
team.
Gator Mike Gorham won the
shotput heaving the sphere
50-10 3 A. John Courtney was the
discus winner with a toss of
157-6.
It was a success, Head
Coach Jimmy Carnes said.
Plans are underway to do more
of this type of thing in the
future. Some changes will be
made in the basic format.

who made a belated comeback
rc v
with three birdies in a five-hole
span, had a 74.
Archer, who has won four
lesser tournaments in his six
years of pro golf, got $20,000
for his victory here and, more
important, is in line for the rich
bonanza of endorsements and
other benefits that accrue to a
Masters champion.

New York 000 001 001- 2 8 2
Detroit 300 300 OOx- 6 7 0
Bahnsen, Talbot 4, Kekich 6 and
Gibson; Sparma, Lolich 7 and
Freehan. WP-Sparma 1-0. LP-Bhensen
0-2. HR-Kaline 2nd.
National League
Ist game
Cincinnati 000 000 000- 0 4 2
Atlanta 000 000 Olx- 1 2 0
Cloninger, Carroll 8 and Bench;
Niekro 2-0 and Didier. LP-Cloninger
0-1.
Philadelphia 000 302 000- 5 5 2
Pittsburgh 010 000 23x- 6 12 2
Wise, Wilson 7, Farrell 8 and Ryan;
Blass, Walker 6, Kline 8 and
Sanguillen. SP-Kline 1-0. O-Wilson
0-1. HRS-Stargell 2 2nd & 3rd,
Johnson Ist.
St. Louis 200 000 010- 3 6 1
New York 000 010 000- 1 3 1
Gibson 1-0 and McCarver; Seaver
0-1 and Grote.
MG LINE
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE
AUSTIN AMERICA
CRANE (MU)
IMPORTS
Factory Trained Mechanics
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373 \
t

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UF JOURDAN
... clears at 6'10"
MONDAY SPECIAL
14 SHRIMP IN A BASKET
AtfMr V#,
I >225 W UNIVERSITY AVI. V
14 BLOCK fROM CAMPUS
Zi LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS r.
1 PAINTING FOR FUN ~ |
% ROOM G-4 UNION £
O ni
l STARTS TUES. APRIL 15th §
§ l
1 7:3OPM |
UJ O
y) Preregister Room 310 Union 392-1655 w
z rj
WESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LEJw
LARGE QUARTER DELLS GRADE A
FRIED 4£KP
CHICKEN
NIGHTS ONLY
SELF-SERVICE NO TIPPING
West
iy*l:lIll?KCKll]:B University Ave.
Downtown
MBwMiiH Gainesville
TEHCT7
W.C. FIELDS
i n
TWO CLASSICS
"THE BIG THUMB"
"THE FATAL GLASS OF BEER"
SHOW STARTS AT 9
ITS FREE
This is '69 Bring A Friend

Monday, April 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 13



Page 14

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14,1969

Gators Split Pair With BufTdoas, 5-3.5-4

; ; >
m- s? ":'# > K ' J|
WtUumMlftl
View!
An unidentified track
enthusiast helps with the finish
line tape during Florida's
Invitational Track Meet held
Saturday.

( Cheering Trials (
[ Friday For 100 j
jj: Blood, sweat and tears, not a new singing group, but the real 5
J: thing, have been experienced this past week by some one $
:! hundred girls and boys working out for a varsity position on the
x UF cheerleading squad. >:
x Practice clinics for the interested students started last :ji
Monday and will end with try-outs Friday. Open to students
maintaining a 2.0 average and having at least a 2.0 from the :!
x previous quarter, the squad opens six varsity positions to girls :!
and boys, and three alternate positions for each (veteran J
v cheerleaders must also try out again for the squad). $
A Along with the aches and pains of getting in shape comes the >i
§ tension of tough competition. At the actual cheering try-outs $
$ twelve boys and twelve girls will be selected by the fifteen §
;S judges; the varsity and alternate squads will then be selected by
J their interviews with five of the judges on the following Monday ijj
afternoon. |
Cheerleading hopefuls will be required to cheer in a group, by
S themselves, and perform a stunt with a partner. Each afternoon |
S clinic is organized by the former varsity squad under the g
L direction of head cheerleader, Roddy Grubbs.
The last stage of two weeks of long vigorous afternoons and
evening of practice for a hundred spirited students will be x
Friday, at 3:30 on Florida Field. The public is invited. £
to make your flighfT'tour, study
or car reservations for
this summer. Travel abroad
Call 392-1655 Rm. 310 Union

By Alligator Services
UFs Jim Couriers strong
10-inning pitching performance
coupled with Dale Turlingtons
pitch hit double pushed the
Gators to a 53 win Saturday
over Georgia to salvage a split
with the Bulldogs after Fridays
costly 54 loss.
The Gators extra-inning win
Saturday along win Tennessees
54 loss to Kentucky kept the
Gators in a tie with the Vols for
the Southeastern Conference
lead.
In Fridays game, a 13-strike
out performance by Georgias
Doug Tucker and a pair of errors
in the outfield gave the Bulldogs
a 54 victory.
Although the Gators outhit
the Bulldogs 76, and Gator
Tony Dobies belted a 360-foot
two run homer, it was not
enough to keep the Dogs at bay
as the Gators fell at Athens.
The Bulldogs staged their
game-winning rally in the fifth
when Kirby Campanella and
Tom Cannon hit back to back
singles. Kit Bradshaw reached
first base when Cannon was
forced at second.
Then, with men on first and
third, Don Clark singled to right
field and Dale Turlington

IN TIE WITH VOLS FOR SEC LEAD

overran the ball, allowing the
tying and winning runs to score.
Bulldog Tucker retired 11
straight Gators from the fifth to
the ninth and gave up only a
single to Dobies in the fifth and
another base hit to Mike Ovca in
the ninth.
In Saturdays game
Turlingtons pitch hit 10th
inning double to right field
scored the winning run in
sending the Gators to a 53 win.
The double scored Dobies,
who had walked and stolen
second base. Rod Macon ran for
Turlington and scored an
insurance run moments later
on a single by Ovca, after
advancing to third on Lujacks
ground out.
UFs Courier scattered 10 hits
over the 10-inning distance to
gain his seventh victory against
only one loss.
The Gators appeared to have
the game won in regulation time
when a rhubarb developed and
Dobies was declared out for
leaving third base too soon after
a sacrifice fly.
Dobies singled in the eighth
inning and then stolen second.
He moved to third on an
overthrow and attempted to
score after Skip Lujacks drive to
right field.
However, Dobies was declared
out after much discussion. Had
Dobies scored the Gators would
have had a 42 lead, enough to
weather the Bulldogs lone run

I tl PM fIIVALDE III! MU I
'Trantym -BECKUM OPTICIANS
** Uwlvwlty Avt., Gaiwovillt, Fla. Phan* 376-3514
Lindsey
PEWTER MUGS
with a choice of an Interlocking
or Old English monogram at no
additional charge. sr
see-through glass bottom ..
a beautiful gift! a $13.00 value
If IjjH
in the Gift Department
Gainesville Shopping Center 1302 N. Main

in the bottom of the ninth.
The Gators are now 168
after the Bulldog split and face
Jacksonville Tuesday away.
The next home game is Friday
against Kentucky in a
double-header, the Gators, now
6-3 in the SEC, need to win
against the tough Wildcats, now
32 in the SEC.
Florida-5 ab r h
McTheny, cf 4 11
Bldwrth, 2b 5 0 1
Dovies, If 4 11
Harlsn, cf 5 0 1
Arthur, rs 0 0 0
Tringtn, ph 10 1
Macon, pr 0 0 0
Lujack, lb 4 0 0
Ovca, c 501
Wright, 3b 4 0 0
Blnknship, ss 2 11
Courier, p 3 12
Totals 36 5 10
Georgia-3 ab r h
Harmon, rs 4 0 2
Miller, If 5 0 2
Cmpnla, eb 5 0 1
T. Cannon, lb 5 0 2
Bailey, pr 0 0 0
Brdshw, rs 5 0 1
Clark, ss 5 0 1
Calhoun, 2b 3 0 0
Hutcheson, ph 11 1
Reeves, 2b 10 2
Carter, c 2 10
Wstbrk, ph 10 0
Huggins, c 10 0
B. Cannon,p 3 11
Totals 42 3 10
Florida 002 000 100 2-5
Georgia 000 000 201 0-3
RBlHarmon 2, Turlington, Ovca,
Filler, B. Cannon 2. E- Bloodworth,
Harmon, Blankenship, Campanella,
Carter. 28-Turlington, Blankenship,
B. Cannon. LOB-Florida 7, Georgia
11. SG-Dobies, Ovca, Miller, Clark.
WP-B. Cannon. DP-Georgia.
IP H R ER BB SO
Courier (W, 7-1) 10 10 3 3 2 6
B. Cannon (L, 2-2) 10 10 5 4 5 5
U-Anderson and Wiles. T-2:30. A-401.

r
SEC Standings
East Division
W L Pet. GB
FLORIDA 6 3 .667
Tennessee 6 3 .667
Kentucky 3 2 .600 1
Georgia 5 5 .500 1%
Auburn 1 3 .250 3Vi
Vanderbilt 1 6 .143 5
West Division
X-Mississippi 5 0 1.000
Alabama 3 3 .500 2&
Miss. State 3 3 .500 2 Vi
X-Louisiana St. 0 5 .000 3&
X-Late game not included.
FRUIT SALE
Indian River
Grapefruit
$3.00/carton (4/5 bu.)
Call The Citrus Club
392-1996
Rm. 116, McCarty Hall
1:30 5:30 pm
I Pizza I
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I SANDWICHES I
I BEING SERVED I
Now you can enjoy A., er er|
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freshly prepared from a
secret recipe ... flavor
baked to perfection with
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anchovies. I
SPECIAL
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I Reg. $1.65 I
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Now l 09
ONLY 1 7
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I April 14, 15,16,17
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I Bring this ad



Netters Keep Winning,
Tigers, Vols Downed

UFs tennis team swept to victory No. 16
Saturday afternoon by squashing Tennessee,
9-0, but not before the Volunteers put up a
hectic battle.
In the No. 1 singles, Armi Neely had to go 22
games to beat the Vols Jim Ward, 12-10. Neely
took the first set, 6-3. Jamie Pressly had to go
three sets to drop Bill Monan, 4-6, 6-2, 6-3 and
Steve Breeland likewise had a three-set battle. He
defeated Earl Freeman, 6-3,5-7,6-2.
In the doubles, Charley Owens arid Greg Hilley
were pressed before dropping Ward and Monan,
64,4-6,6-1.
The Gators, 16-0-1, travel to Athen, Ga. on
today to play Georgia.
Armi Neely (F) def. Jim Ward 6-3, 12-10;
Charley Owens (F) def. Leonhardt Schuerman
8-6, 6-3; Jamie Pressley (f) def. Bill Monan 4-6,
6-2, 6-3; Steve Beeland (F) def. Earl Freeman
6-3, 5-7, 6-2; Greg Hilley (F) def. Wayne

Graves Sports Camp Expands:
Ft. Lauderdale, Melbourne, Jax

By JOHN SHIRLEY
Alligator Sports Writer
For the first time since its
opening five years ago, the Ray
Graves Sports Camp will be held
at three different locations in
Florida on successive weeks in
June, according to assistant
camp director and UF assistant
football mentor Gene Ellenson.
Each session will provide a
separate and complete
supervised program of
instruction in sports skills for
boys ages eight to 16, Ellenson
said.
Theres a great need in
Florida for the kind of athletic
skills instruction and discipline
our camp offers, added
Ellenson.
Ellenson and UF athletic
director Ray Graves share
ownership in the private summer
sports-camp venture.
Approved by the Florida High
School Activities Association
and the only camp of its kind in
Florida, the first session runs
June 8-14 in Ft. Lauderdale. The
second session visits Melbourne,
June 15-21, and the final session
of the camp looms in
Jacksonville, June 22-28.
Boys aged eight to 16 are
eligible to enroll for any or all
sessions. Thos whove completed
any part of their senior year in
high school are ineligible.
Eyeing the professional
football stars and the UF
athletic coaches whove been
hired as instructors in football,

GAINESVILLE
AUTO PARLOR
SPECIALIZING REPAIRS
INTRODUCTORY! £
in all / OFFER I
CAR / FREE ( ON
BEAUTY I WAX l Volkswagen
1 ,rs D \ automobiles
NEEDS V JOB V &
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504 S.W. 14th AVE
(NEXT TO GREYHOUND STATION)

baseball, basketball and track
skills, Ellenson noted that
despite the emphasis on learning
skills the camp is geared to
provide the boys with an
all-around camping experience.
Movies and lectures will
highlight evening programs after
a full day of morning instruction
and afternoon game-type
competition.
On hand as instructors will be
virtually every member of the
UF coaching staff, plus pro
gridders Steve Spurrier, Richard
Trapp, Bob Griese and Hannon
Wages. Miami Dolphin
quarterback Griese will be at Ft.
Lauderdale, former Gator
backfield greats Spurrier and
Trapp will teach at Melbourne,
and Atlanta Falcon running back
and former UF signalcaller
Harmon Wages will stress
fundamentals in his hometown
of Jacksonville.
Besides learning
fundamentals in the four
sports, Ellenson noted, boys
compete for ribbons and
trophies after dividing into
Orange and Blue squads the first
day of camp ... we feel that by
awarding each boy at least some
prize we can send him home
with an attitude of optimism
toward success.
This attitude is basic in all
endeavors, Ellenson said.
Also new this year is one big
outing at each camp. Included
are trips to Cape Kennedy space
center, Lion Country Safari in
Ft. Lauderdale and the Mayport
Naval Station in Jax.

Pritchard 64,64; Paul Lunetta (F) def. Pete Hill
6-0,6-1.
Neely-Beeland (F) def. Schuerman-Freeman
6-3, 6-2; Owens-Hilley (F) def. Ward-Monan 64,
4-6, 6-1; Sherwood-Lunetta (F) def.
Prichard-McMonrough 6-2, 6-1.
The Gators had won their 15th match of the
season Friday afternoon, downing LSU 8-1.
Neely, anxious for a rematch with Steve Falk,
was given a rough time by Larry Back, who
played for the injured Falk. Fakl defeated Neely
in the Southeastern Conference championship
last year.
The first set was won easily by Neely, 6-0.
But then Back took the second deuce set B6.
Neely came back for s strong 6-1 decision and
the match.
UFs only loss was in doubles, Bourg and
Ducrest defeated Sherwood and Lunetta, 64,
64.

Enrollment for each session is
gaining slowly, according to
Eiienson.
Weve lined up around 100
youngsters for the Ft.
Lauderdale session, he related,
which is nowhere near capacity
turnout.
The big mentor added that
enrollment picks up once
families have decided on their
summer activities. He reports
that many parents send their
sons to the Graves camp to
coincide with their own
vacations.
MOONLIGHT
BOWLING
OC/ Per
At#y Game
Couples only
TONIGHT
9 PM TIL CLOSE
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
Miller-Brown
ONE MILE
NORTH OF jfSk
THE MALL
3764552 AUTHORIZED
DEALER

L
STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL x V
TTA-$ 25 UNION BOARD -S2O
s/r Ar M
CICERONES S.E. BROWARD HALL PAUL HOWARD & ME
aws £AE-S3O.
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X MRS. MADGE FALKENBERG
Ist FLOOR S.W. RBOWARD AO// pVJ
4>/H Arp r ATft-S3O
AKY UNIVERSITY POLICE DEPT. / J.W.R.U. BARBER SHOP AAIY DAUGHTERS OF THE DRAGON
A AA TK£ A Ei>
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Ts&

CLUB STUDENT GOVERNMENT JENNINGS HALL
_. r .
ALL HAVE DEDICATED THEIR PART OF
"FREINDSHIP WALK. HAVE YOU? CALL SHERRI COX
392-1655 OR 392-9409.
P. S. SIGMA NU YOUR FRIENDSHIP BRICK
HAS BEEN PAID FOR.

- X Jim Bartlett Tom Stewart
George Corl Mel Ward
[ Dan Sapp Arlle Watkinson
Fidelity Union ,Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
NO WAR CLAUSE 367-1208
DEFERRED PERMIUM PAYMENTS
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN
INCOMPARABLE...
CONTEMPORAY..
WORTH WAITING FOR ...
\\' Jflfl / M
\\ /Im\ I A
rAhne
apartments
1500 Northwest 16th Ave.
NOW LEASING FOR
SEPTEMBER
Ernest Tew Realty, Inc. 376-6961

\ 1
After s dinner special
M W \\l Cr isp Cole Slaw,
1 1 " S j
I
I

Monday, April 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator, I

Page 15



Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, April 14,1969

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I
utility bar stool sale!
regularly 16.88
sale! 13.88
Heavy steel construction, built to com commercial
mercial commercial specifications. Foam padded
seat on ball bearing swivel. Black
tubular steel frame, nylon floor glides.
Decorator shades of gold, avocado,
black or flame. Choice of 24 or 30"
height.
£

V o
Maas Housewares
SHOP MONDAY THROUGH SATURDAY 10 A.M. TIL 9:30 P.M.

Mam S/wt/ieu
GAINESVILLE MALL

Loroman Marbella
furniture that snaps
together easily!
Decorate your home with lovely metal furniture
that captures the romanticism of Old Spain.
Snaps together without hardware or tools. Alco Alcohol
hol Alcohol resistant, in antique gold or avocado.
Two step end table bookcase, 25 x 9 V\ .... 15.00
Hutch cabinet, 67" high, 24" wide, 4 shelves
9Vi", 3 shelves
Telephone table, 26 x 12 x 9% 14.00
Four-shelf bookcase, 36 x 36 x 9V4 20.00
Three-shelf bookcase, 26 x 24 x

CARLOAD
SAVINGS!
ready to finish furniture
Quality furniture ready to paint,
stain or decorate and theres no
sanding or smoothing necessary.
Deacons storage bench,
32 x 42 x 17" 24.99
Two door china,
42 x 39 x 14" 34.99
Two drawer server,
33 x 37 x 16" 44.99
Corner cupboard,
76 x 34 x 15" 64.99
Deacon bench,
31 x 44 x 19" 22.99
Six drawer lingerie chest,
54 x 19 x 16" 48.99
Mates desk 34.99