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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
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Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
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v. : ; 32-59 cm.

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Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
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newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Bicycle Mans Property A Legal Mess

(Editors Note: This is the third of a
series on the Bicycle Man, Ray Brannan,
who was a familiar figure to several
generations of UF students.)
By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Hold the cranes!
The crumbling, junk-ridden buildings
on Ray Brannans property have been
given until April 21 to exist in an
extended order by Circuit Court Judge
John Murphree.
The Bicycle Mans dogs will have a
peaceful resting ground for a little while
longer.
Cleanup work was scheduled to begin
this morning by an independent
wrecking company hired by the city.
But James E. Clayton, resident agent
for Ray Brannans guardian, his sister,
Mrs. Katherine McAlpin, asked the
court for an extension on the clean-up
time Wednesday.

Pace-leaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 112

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NICK ARROYO
FILLING OUT FORMS
Cydney Aronson does a fine job of filling out forms, that is the
forms for the Regents survey. All students are asked to complete these
questionnaires with thought (note Cydney's concentration). See
story page 2.
Gv/ffe Businessmen
Donate SG SI2OO
Five Gainesville businessmen banded together Wednesday to donate
more than SI2OO toward Carnigras.
They took this action after Student Government was forced to pay
the SI2OO fee to obtain a carnival license after Student Body
President Clyde Taylors request to have the fee waived for the
university project was turned down by the Gainesville City
Commission Monday.
The SI2OO fee would have been taken from the Carnigras profits
which are being donated to the Gator Loan Fund for scholarships.
The federal government is matching the carnival profits nine to one.
The five businessmen, who are scheduled to present the check for
$1275 to Taylor today, are: Selig Golden, Golden and Jones Attys.;
Ronald Neder, owner of a local hardware store; Steve Shey, owner of
Summit House apratments; Robert Howe, a local insurance agent; and
David A. West.
The five said they want UF students to know that Gainesville
businessmen are solidly behind any worthwhile projects they are
behind.

. . friends of Brannan had often discussed helping him sell
the property for a good price so that he could live
comfortably somewhere else. But what would happen to
my dogs? Brannan asked. They are buried here. Thats
why Brannan did not want to sell.

He thinks he has a sale tor that
property, Judge Murphree told the
Alligator Wednesday. \ r
The purchaser would have to clear
the property, Murphree said.
The citys efforts to clean up his
property and the subject of sale would
have driven the Bicycle Man frantic,
friends say.
For Brannan had often expressed
fears that someone or some group of
forgers were trying to take his property
away from him. Fears that his friends
quietly and confidentially say caused his
apparent mental condition, his lack
of concern for self, to deteriorate and
overpower him.

The.
'
Florida Alligator

University of Florida, Gainesville

PLANNED FOB WRUF
Blue Key Schedules
Candidate Debates

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
A series of SG campaign
debates, thought to be doomed,
came to life Wednesday.
The problem was that no one
knew how to sponsor the
debates. The ones that were
sponsored were ill-timed, so all
candidates could not appear.
One debate, which would
have reached the largest
audience of any, was cancelled.
Summit 69, a Student
Government sponsored
leadership conference, was
cancelled until a May date, and
so plans for a live debate carried
by WRUF fizzled.
That debate, however, may
now become the charge of
Florida Blue Keys Dialogue
program. FBK spokesman Jack
Harkness said if time permitted
the debate would be on for
Sunday evening.
Everything depends on
time, Harkness said. First, we
need to make sure we can get air
time. Then, we will need an
impartial moderator. If these
things go well, Dialogue will be

JOAN WARREN

And m that respect, perhaps observers
were right. For Brannan was committed
to a mental institution.
But a cross-claimant suit was filed in
circuit court in February alleging that a
local dentist, Dr. D. S. Schnell, violated
an oral trust with Ray Brannan and
sold the property without permission to
third party Henry A. Sand in
Cincinnatti, Ohio.
Schnell is the son in-law of wealthy
Gainesville resident Paul Smysor who
owns the property the University Plaza
is on, the lots next to on the other side
of Brannans property to NW 17th
Street, Rose Lawn Apartments,
Antoines and numerous other
holdings.

*
JOHN MICA

the sponsor.
Prodding for the debates
which have now been scheduled
has come at least in part from
the campaigns.
A tentative date for
Wednesday night had been
planned by Gamma Beta Phi for
a Rathskeller debate, but First
Party candidate Charles
Shepherd has a Wednesday night
law class.
Plans are now under way to
move that date until later in the

JIfVnS^ANEY

... not sure, but probably will get in on the action eventually

... definite foes for Hume debates Thursday

Carl Opp, off campus housing
director, said that he and other friends
of Brannan had often discussed helping
him sell the property for a good price
so that he could live comfortably
somewhere else.
But what would happen to my
dogs? Brannan asked Opp. They are
buried here.
Thats why Brannan did not want to
sell.
Brannan also told Alan Lederman of
Alans Cubana, The bicycle business is
my livelihood and nobody is going to
take it away from me.
Brannans sister and guardian, Mrs.
Katherine McAlpin of Trezevant, Tenn.
told the Alligator Tuesday night, she
had not discussed selling the property
with Brannan Because he has enough
other things to worry about.
She said he was better. The sale
would make him happy and ease his
mind because hes been worrying about
it.

Thursday, April 10, 1969

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week, according to First Party
spokesman Walt Morgan.
Student Government a
' traditional sponsor for debates,
has bowed out this year, and the
burden of organizing debates has
fallen to inexperienced
organizations. Among these are
dorm councils, who must
go through the process of
contacting every candidate.
The first two organizations to
(SEE BLUE KEY PAGE 2)

VIC HAlVlfcy

America's
Number One
College
Daily



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10,1969

Employes Claim
Record Tampering
By LEE HINNANT
Alligator Staff Writer
The Florida Board of Regents has advised state universities of
complaints made by university employes that supervisors are
falsifying the employes work-time records.
The complaint was published in the March 31 edition of the
Boards weekly publication, Memo, which is sent to all state
universities.
Employes told a consulting firm researching for the Board of
Regents that supervisors had advised them to record only 40 hours of
work a week, though in fact they had worked as many as 50 or 55
hours. The Memo did not identify any particular state university or
state whether the complaint was made at more than one university.
Falsification of an employes work-time record by a supervisor is a
violation or the Federal Wage and Hour Law of 1966.
Since January of 1967 the UFs Vice President for Business Affairs
William Elmore has sent memorandums advising supervisors of their
responsibilities under the 1966 law.
By this law non-professional university employe were made
eligible for established minimum wages and for time and a half
payment for overtime hours. Supervisors may not allow their
employees to work overtime hours unless this is first approved by
Elmores office.
A March 6 memorandum to supervisors from his office said
requests for overtime hours will be approved only to meet emergency
conditions.
If there are employes at UF who feel their supervisors are
falsifying their work-time records they may complain to the superiors
of their supervisors, according to Thomas Bloodworth, assistant
director of the personell office. In addition, there is a Federal Wage
and Hour Office in Gainesville which receives complaints of
employees covered by the 1966 Federal Wage and Hour Law.

Memorial Monument
Condemned By City

A brick chimney-like
structure erected Easter Sunday
in memory of Alachua County
natives killed in Vietnam has
been removed at the request of
the City Commission.
A group of students appeared
Monday night before the
commission to request the
memorial be left as a permanent
monument.
Each brick represents a soldier
from Alachua County killed in
Vietnam.
Jim Cook, who told the
commission he represented the
Gainesville Veterans for Peace in

Blue Key To Host
Presidentials Hopefuls

f FROM PA6E ONE
Announcements came within
announce definite dates were
two dorm councils,
five minutes of each other late
Wednesday afternoon.
The first definite debate was
scheduled when the Hume Area
Council received acceptances
from the Shepherd and Mica
organizations for next Thursday
evening. Other candidates are
still indefinite on that date.
John Kesler, president of the
Hume Council, said the debate
__ would be set for 8 or 9 p.m.

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address cot-pondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second clas iatter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is $ 10.00 per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of aU advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Vietnam, said the students
wanted to maintain the
monument and add new bricks
as other county residents die in
the war.
City Commissioner Ted E.
Williams said he objected to the
monument being erected on
private property and he thought
the monument was not to honor
the dead but to honor the
protesters.
City Commissioner Perry
McGriff seconded Williams and
said he had received numerous
phone calls from residents
objecting to the structure.

This depends on when the
candidates can arrange to be
there, Kesler said.
The second debate to be
confirmed will be sponsored by
Broward Hall. Broward
Executive Council President
Sally Reed said the debate
would be held Tuesday night.
More debates should be
underway.
There is still two full weeks
before the election, said
Interior Secretary Bill Modlin.
The candidates should be
taking the initiative to seek out
organizations which can sponsor
impartial debates, he said.

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CABBAGE BALL
Played lying down, Cabbage Ball may be considered one of the most relaxing of the popular
spectator sports and is an excellent exercise for the toes. Winner gets the cabbage.
Completion Os Regents
Questionnaire Urged

In an effort to improve the
quarter system in Florida
universities, surveys have been
distributed to frll Florida
university students to give them
a chance to voi6e their opinions
on the quarter system.
All students are being urged
to complete these questionnaires
and return them by campus mail
to Student Government or leave
them in the drop boxes at the
College Library, the Hub, or the
Reitz Union information desks.
Clyde Taylor, president of the
student body, said Wednesday,
Its imperative that students
participate in this evaluation
because the quarter system
deeply affects them and any
changes that will be made will be
forr their benefit.
If anything is wrong with the
quarter system then it is
important that we find out
about it.
I urge all students to
participate realistically in this

APPLICATIONS I
ARE NOW BEING TAKEN FOR |
EDITOR, SEMINOLE
MANAGING EDITOR, SEMINOLE
For 1970 Yearbook I
EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
MANAGING EDITOR, THE
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR I
Summer Quarter, 1969 I
Fall and Winter Quarters, 1969 70 I
Applications may be picked up from Norm Going, I
Editorial Adviser, Room 339A, JWRU I
Application Deadline is April 21, 1969 I

evaluation.
Manny James, Florida Blue
Key president, said, Each
students personal opinions on
the quarter system is needed to
prove to the Board of Regents
that the students want a change.
The Regents will bring
pressure to bear for inequities in
UFs system if there is indeed

I National SDS Secretary I
I To Speak Here Friday |

SDS National Secretary Mike
Klonski will be featured speaker
at a SSOC rally Friday afternoon
at the Plaza of the Americas.
Steve Fahrer, SSOC steering
committee chairman, said
Wednesday, Klonski would talk
about the national goals of SDS,
its relation to the South and its
plans for initiating new chapters
in the Southern United States.
Fahrer said he and Ed

strong feeling by students,
faculty and administrators.
Students dont seem to care.
They want changes, but they
dont want to be involved.
To change the quarter
system, theyve got to care, have
to get involved, have to be
concerned, he said.

Freeman, SSOC spokesman,
would also speak and would
present an interesting
statement, although he would
not reveal what it would be.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell was out of town
Wednesday and his aides
declined comment, but
Administrative Asst. Mel Sharpe
did say there would be no
attempt to stop the rally.



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,
Jan Peerce, noted opera singer will appear in the Florida Gym
Sunday. Tickets for the performance will be anailable at the Reitz
Union Box Office, Belk-Lindsey and the Record Bar in Gainesville.
They will also be available at the door.
Surprise Haircuts
May Be Illegal
By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
<0
Charles Fulwoods newVhaircut designed to prevent a rash of
disease or bugs, may be illegal.
Fulwood, leader of the Junta of Military Organizations (JOMO),
has his hair cut off while being held in the Hernando County jail with
four other black militants Friday.
The Five, charged with transporting an obscene Film, were released
on bond Saturday. The Film was a Black Panthers propaganda piece
with an obscene word in the address. Fulwood said the persons last
name was judged to be obscene.
Sheriff Sam Lowman was unavailable for comment Wednesday, but
a deputy who wished to remain anonymous said that Fulwoods hair
was cut for sanitary reasons.
Anybody that we feel may cause us to have a rash of disease or
bugs, we do all of them that way, he said.
The legality of the action is questionable. Law professor Fletcher
Baldwin called it highly irregular and suspect under federal laws. He
said that earlier cases would have to be reviewed, but there is little
precedent for this sort of case.
The last case of this type was at the turn of the century when the
queues, or long braids, of Chinese coolies under arrest were cut off. At
this time there were none of the procedural due process laws that
exist today.
The deputy said, I dont know whether theres any law that says
we can or says we cant cut someones hair we just do it.
Baldwin said that from the evidence, the haircut seemed to him to
be a punitive measure and, if so, would be a violation of civil rights.
If this is going to start a trend, Im sure it will be challenged in court
under procedural due process.
Fulwoods reaction to the head shaving was bitter. I have nothing
but contempt for the whole thing. Its a method of degrading a
person.
He said he was told that orders had come from the office when
he protested the haircut.
Other alleged irregularities in procedure were cited by Fulwood. He
said the police never showed them a warrant at any time, they were
not informed of their rights or why they were taken in until more
than seven hours had passed, and their shoes were taken away from
them for about eight hours.
I see the whole thing as a set-up thing, Fulwood said.

Samson Workshop Saturday

By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Project SAMSON is sponsoring a community
involvement workshop-conference Saturday at 9
a.m. in the Constans Theatre.
K.Z. Chaves, a specialist in community
sensitivity, will speak to current and prospective
volunteers. Faculty members and representatives of
all campus organizations have also been invited to
attend.
Chaves was formerly associated with Duke
University and Westinghouse Corporation. His
speech is sponsored by the state through the Office
of Economic Opportunity. He is the regional
representative for the Leadership Development
Program.
Following Chaves speech, the conference
participants will meet in small groups to discuss
problems of community work. VISTA workers and

graduate students in education will lead the
discussions.
Other small groups will then be established
according to volunteer interest. Discussions will be
held on arts and crafts, administration, and tutoring,
for students working in these fields.
The meeting will serve several purposes. Besides
informing new volunteers and talking over problems
with current workers, the conference will lay the
foundation for a new faculty advisery board. The
proposed board is to serve as a link between
SAMSON and the various academic departments.
SAMSON is also studying a program in which
work on SAMSON projects would be included in
the curriculum of several colleges and departments
including education, sociology, history, physical
education and University College. Next year
SAMSON work may be part of some 500 level
courses.

( No Coins Sad End
For Many AC Plans

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
(Editors Note: This is the
second in a series of articles
about Action Conference.)
Action conference proposals
seem to be easier said than done,
judging from problems that have
arisen in bringing about the
changes. Foremost among the
problems is that old familiar
friend money, or, rather, the
lack of it. Here are some more of
the proposals:
9 Faculty-student lounges in
every department of the 13
colleges on campus, is the plan
of one recommendation. Action
conference members believed
such lounges would increase
communication between various
groups.
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell referred the proposal
to Director of Physical Planning
Walter Matherly, who is studying
it now. It is doubtful the plan
will become reality anytime
soon, due to a shortage of funds.
9 Air-conditioned classrooms
are at a premium during the
summer, so another proposal
would direct the Registrar to
allot all such rooms before
assigning any that are not
air-conditioned.
This recommendation was
sent by OConnell to the Office
of Academic Affairs, which is
making suggestions to the
Registrar.
9 An Activities Complex

Nine Losers To Be Found
In 69 Gator Gras Finale

Finals for the Gator Gras
Beauty Contest will be held at 9
p.m. in the Rathskeller. Judges
will choose Miss Gator Gras
1969, from the 10 finalists
pictured here.
The beauty contestants will
model bathing suits, evening
gowns and street clothes. All
street outfits are being provided
by Stag and Drag, Donigans, the
Twig, Regalia and Silvermans.
Crowning the new Gator Gras
queen will be Miss Gator Gras
1968, Mary Long. Miss Carolyn
Cole, chairman of the 1969
Gator Gras, will present the
trophy.
Commentators for the evening
are Jack Shaw, WGGG and Miss
Toni Jimenaz.

STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... proposals and more proposals
which would be suitable for
commencement excercies,
concerts, lectures and basketball
games, was approved in another
proposal. Students, faculty and
spectator interests would serve
on a planning committee for the
complex.
OConnell sent this proposal
to Matherly, and it undoubtedly
will suffer from the same
problem as many other campus
construction projects: a shortage
of funds for capital outlay.
OConnell said in February
that construction would come to
a grinding halt in about two
years with the completion of
current projects. With a sports
coliseum currently under study,
it seems unlikely an activities
complex will come to fruition
any time soon.

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GATOR GRAS FINALISTS
... Dee Ann Kuzma, Maria Junquera, Pat Marschner, Cheryl Watson,
Sharon Keller
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GATOR GRAS FINALISTS
... Susan Harris, Joan Spiegel, Carolyn Jones, Walda Williamson,
Cydney Aronson

Thursday, April 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

9 One of the most
complicated and far-reaching of
Action Conferences proposals is
a call for a complete evaluation
of the UFs curriculum as a
whole, so there may be
recommendations for changes,
experiments and innovations in
course offerings.
OConnell referred the project
to Assistant Dean for Academic
Affairs Roy Lassiter, who has
the main administrative
responsibility for curriculum and
scheduling. Lassiter told the
Alligator Tuesday at least
$200,000 would be needed to
do an adequate job, including a
complete computer information
system on all courses; outside
consultants should be hired for
the project, too.
Lassiter applied to the Esso
Foundation for a grant for the
curriculum evaluation, but was
turned down; he is now applying
to the federal government. The
earliest time the project could
begin, he said, is in the fall.
The evaluation would entail
three points: effective use of
instructional resources; effective
review of existing course
offerings, and data to make the
budgeting process more
rational.
The high cost of the
evaluation is due, in part, to the
fact that key UF personnel
involved in the project would
need to be freed from other
responsibilities and would need
a clerical staff.

Page 3



~ The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10,1969

Page 4

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CARNIGRAS CRISIS?
Two unidentified UF revelers seem to have a problem at the
bumper-car attraction at the Carnigras. She appears to bethinking, "I
don't know how to say it, but we're out of gas." Carnigras runs
through Saturday on the ROTC field.
Literature Distribution
Gets New Guidelines
Sale and distribution of literature on campus must be registereu
with the Student Activities Center, room 305, Reitz Union rather
than with the Us administration.
Under this new directive by the Student Affairs Committee, the UF
takes no responsibility for the content of the distributed literature nor
does it reflect the opinion of the UF.
Registration of literature must include a sample of the literature to
be distributed and this will be kept in a file.
The registration is good for 30 days and a new application must be
made after that time.
Besides city, state and national laws regarding content the
distributor will be subject to the Student Code of Conduct.
The new policy for UF students, faculty and staff will be included
in the new issue of the Student Handbook.
Distrubition instructions are available in the office of William Cross,
asst, director of union activities, room 305, Student Activities Center,
Reitz Union.
College Preview Weekend
Brings Guests To Campus
College Preview Weekend, a chance for junior college transfer
students and Florida high school seniors to survey the UF college
community, will coincide this weekend with Gator Gras and Carnigras
activities.
About 250 guests will be staying in dorms, fraternity houses and
sorority houses during their two day stay. Most will be arriving Friday
evening.
This preview weekend should be of lasting benefit to both the
prospective student and the university, said Robert C. Dawson, Reitz
Union program director.
Hopefully, Dawson added, registration confusion in the fall will
be reduced and the student aided in his adjustment process.
The visiting students will participate in the Gator Gras and
Carnigras festivities, be taken on a bus tour of campus and receive an
orientation at 330 p.m. in the Constans Theatre.
Franklin A. Doty, dean of University College, will speak on An
Education Designed With You In Mind.
Clyde Taylor, student body president will also address the visiting
students and answer questions.
Union Program Council coordinator is Archie Maldonado.
Communicate
- GATOR ADS Wmr ~

Death By Committee
Often Ends Projects

(Editors Note: This is the
second of a two part series on
the plans of the Student
Government Department of the
Interior for landscaping the
campus.)
By LARRY JORDAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Death by committee is
the fate of many student
projects.
Two factors have a great
influence on SG projects time
and money. A haphazard
balance must be maintained
between these two factors in
order to get the project off the
drawing boards and completed.
Peru's People
Under Study
By UF Prof
By HELEN HUNTLEY
Alligator Staff Writer
Peruvian population problems
are of special interest to Dr.
John Saunders, UF sociology
professor.
Saunders spent July, 1967
December, 1968, working in
Lima, Perus Center for Studies
of Population and Development,
as a Ford Foundation
consultant. This year he will be
making four more trips to the
center, continuing his advisory
work.
The Peruvian center is Latin
Americas only agency for
population studies.
Saunders was the only U.S.
citizen working in the center
during the 18 months he was in
Peru. His interests were in five
main areas research, fellowships
for Peruvian students,
publications, education and
family planning.
Research focused on Perus
major population problems: a
large urban migration, a high
rate of population growth, and
the large percentage of
dependent population.
He originated the idea of
fellowships for undergraduate
students studying population.
Peruvian universities require a
thesis for the bachelors degree,
and last year 15 students
received grants through the
center. Saunders established
policy for the selection of
students and interviewed
applicants for these fellowships,
as will as applicants for a
graduate fellowship program to
study abroad.
In publications, he established
a Spanish-language journal on
population studies and worked
on two films which depict the
advantages of family planning.
The
Florida
Alligator

Our biggest problem is
coordinating our actions so that
when something can be done, we
have the money to do it,
Davidson said.
Davidson, who handled
almost all of the work for SGs
pool project, talks in a tone of
despair about the bureaucratic
maze, budget set-up, and
administrational lag that mya
kill a project in its infancy.
With the existing procedure,
Davidson said, a person can
start a project of seemingly
minor complications and not see
it finished until he graduates.
Ric Katz, Director of SG
Projects, has seen many projects
lost in the confusion that usually,
accornapnies SG administra administrational
tional administrational changes.
One project that may have a
similar fate is SGs proposed
amphitheatre, slated to be built
in the area between Tolbert,
Graham and Flavets 111.
The amphitheatre will cost
about $lB5 ,000 and would fit in
well with the natur incline
between the three living areas. It
would be used primarily for free
and low cost functions.
Katz does not think the

Sigma Nus Find
Help Everywhere
By MARGO COX
Alligator Staff Writer
Sigma Nu brothers left homeless after Fridays fire in their
fraternity house are finding new homes this week, said Jay Gebhardt,
Sigma Nu faculty advisor.
Some have made plans to move into dorm housing, apartments
and other fraternity houses for the remainder of the quarter, he said.
Besides 30 homeless Sigma Nus, Gebhardt has five jobless kitchen
help, including two cooks, an assistant cook, a house man and a
dishwasher.
Although many donations of clothing have come in, the boys are
still hurting for shoes of any kind. This is a real problem, he said.
Local bookstores have arranged to sell books to the brothers at cost
and on a deferred payment plan. Arrangements have been made for
them to receive duplicate identification cards from the UF and from
the national Sigma Nu office.
Through the Dean of Mens office, the brothers needing cash will be
allowed to apply for loans from the Interfratemity Council and the
student depository with Gebhardt as the co-signer. Normal procedure
for loan requires signature of parents.
In addition to donations of clothing, the Sigma Nu brothers have
been welcome in other fraternity houses and sorority houses for
meals, he said.
Housemother Mrs. Mary V. Avera has moved to the home of her
son and daughter-in-law in Gainesville, Mr. and Mrs. William Avera.
She has received an offer from one fraternity to serve as house mother
until the end of the quarter.
Gebhardt hopes the Sigma Nus will have a new house by the fall
and that Mom Avera will be back with them then.
Alumni response started immediately after the reports began
appearing on television, radio and in newspapers, Gebhardt said.
My phone has been ringing with calls from California, New York
and all over the United States. I received one from a UF alumnus and
Sigma Nu who is stationed in Formosa with a government service
agency, he said.
Gebhardt said a meeting was planned for Tuesday night of the
board of directors to organize a fund raising drive to include all
alumni of the UF Epsilon Zeta chapter of Sigma Nu.
Then we will begin our plans by finding an architect, locating
mortgage money and conferring with a builder, he said.
We are going to push hard to receive insurance payments as soon
as possible, he said.
The charred remains of the Sigma Nu house will be left standing
until the insurance adjustors have completed their investigation. The
fraternith will then make a request to have the building torn down.
In the meantime, Gebhardt has requested regular police patrol of
the area around the property and a rope rings out the property.
We have nailed all windows and doors shut and anyone who is
caught within the property is guilty of trespassing and anyone within
the walls of the building is guilty of breaking and entering, Gebhardt
said.
Sigma Nu brothers are permitted to go to the property and search
for any personal effects which can be salvaged, he said.
They are required to show fraternity identification if stopped by
police on the scen§, Gebhardt said.

amphitheatre would conflict
with the proposed coliseum now
being sought by students.
The type of function you
would run at the amphitheatre is
different from the type of
function you would run at the
coliseum, Katz said.
The cost of many student
functions would make their use
of a coliseum economically
unfeasible. Katz believes the
amphitheatre would serve as a
place for functions which are
low cost and also those that are
free.
But, like most SG projects,
the amphitheatre is only in the
tentative planning stage.
Katz said the present SG plans
to appropriate funds for the
amphitheater but, a lot of
existing programs may be lost in
the confusion as a new
administration takes over.
There is a normal delay that
makes SG administrations wait
until September before they
really get rolling.
Add to this the time it takes
to get a project out of all the
necessary committees, and it
usually is 18 months before the
project is completed.



Some U.S. Troop Withdrawal Expected

WASHINGTON (UPI) The United States is
expected to begin unilateral withdrawal of some of
its military forces in South Vietnam within the near
future, official sources said Wednesday.
They said such action, taken without any
agreement by North Vietnam to reduce its forces in
the South, depended on:
No significant increase in Communist military
activity in Vietnam.
, Some hint of progress at the Paris peace talks
which could be cited to justify a limited U.S.
pullout without any reciprocal action by Hanoi.
These sources declined to give any timetable, but
they spoke in terms which indicated some UJS.
forces would be coming out of Vietnam by early

BRISTOL, England (UPI) An airliner built to
fly faster than sound, twin of an aircraft already
tested under an Anglo-French program in France,
flew Wednesday for the first time.
Its a wizard, the pilot said after the test of the
Concorde 002 whose engines were as powerful as
the rocket that launched the first American into
space.
The flight of 22 minutes from Filton Aiport near
Bristol to the Royal Air Force Station at Fairford
SO miles away propelled Britain into the race to
build and operate commercial aircraft carrying
passengers and cargo beyond the speed of sound.
Russia flew a model of its own last year. The
United States, now the leader in travel by jet, has its
model only on the drawing board.
Concorde 002 completed the flight without a
flaw, Brian Trubshaw, the pilot who headed a group
of six, said.

Kirk Suspends Three County Officials

TALLAHASSEE
(UPI) Gov. Claude Kirk today
suspended officials in three
counties who are under
indictment for charges varying
from bribe to embezzlement.
Kirk took the action
following clarification he
requested on the Senates
position in suspension
procedures. Senate President
John Mathews said suspensions
will not be considered by the
Senate pending completion of

Bulk Os Eisenhower Estate
Entrusted For Widow's Use

GETTYSBURG, Pa.
(UPI) The last will and
testament of Dwight David
Eisenhower, 34th president of
the United States, was opened
for public inspection Wednesday
at the 106-year-old Adams
County courthouse.
The bulk of the estate, which
has not been assessed, was left in
trust for the primary benefit of
his widow, Mrs. Mamie Doud
Eisenhower.
Most of the late presidents
papers and other documentary
materials were bequeathed to
the Eisenhower Center at
Abilene, Kan.,- his boyhood
home and final resting place.
The 11-page will, dated May
24, 1965, was filed about 4:30
pm., 30 minutes after the

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court action.
The officials were Dade
County Commissioner Earl
Jackson Carroll, Polk County
Constable Lonnie McClelland,
and Duval County Constable
Niles Keen.
Kirk said the suspensions on
grounds of malfeasance and
incompetency in office would be
in effect until the charges are
disposed of in the usual course
of due process.

courthouse was closed for the
day. No date has been set for
probate.
Had Mrs. Eisenhower died
before her husband, the
principal beneficiary would have
been John S. D. Eisenhower, the
couples son, who recently was
named U. S. Ambassador to
Belgium by President Nixon.
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June, at the latest.
They also refused to talk about specific numbers.
They said the figure of 50,000 troops used by some
congressmen was primarily a guess made sometime
before the Nixon administration began more
specific discussions about the war which have been
held in recent days.
The administration originally assumed that it had
at least six months to gain some major evidence of
de-escalation of the Vietnam conflict.
However, increasing congressional and public
impatience has convinced some of the Presidents
top advisers that the time for showing results is
much shorter than that.
This has led to a hard new look at the military

The aircraft was completed serviceable
throughout. There were no troubles, Trubshaw
said.
Trubshaw held Concorde 002, which in service
will jet passengers along at speeds up to 1,400 miles
an hour, to about 300 miles an hour on the flight
Wednesday.
Under the Concorde program, France built and
flew the first prototype, 001, March 2. The 002 was
the version by Britain although almost identical.
Britain thus became the third nation to fly a
supersonic transport. The Russian TU-144wasthe
first SST to be flown and made its flight Dec. 31,
1968, near Moscow.
The SST planned by America, although perhaps
one-third against as fast as Concorde, will most
probably trail the Anglo-French airplane by at least
five years in development.

Carroll was charged with
conspiracy to solicit a bribe and
soliciting a bribe. Keen was
indicted on seven counts of
grand and petty larceny and
falsifying records. McClelland

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Beautiful print of Dacron Cotton Cu/otte and
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situation, resulting in a determination that the
United States can safely undertake limited unilateral
withdrawal before there is any major breakthrough
at Paris.
Senate Democratic leader Mike Mansfield said in
an interview that Nixon should take advantage of a
present lull in enemy offensive actions to withdraw
50,000 troops from Vietnam and pull remaining
U.S. forces back into defensive enclaves.
This could lead to a ceasefire, encourage serious
talks in Paris and serve notice to the Saigon
government that any further fighting would have
to be taken over more and more by them, less and
less by the United States, he said.

was charged with six Counts of
extortion, malpractice and
embezzlement.
The indictments were brought
during the past two months by
county grand juries.

Thursday, April 10,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Joan...-this is
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Page 5



>. The Florida Alligator. Thursday, April 10,1909

Page 6

DROPOUTS
SG Productions rZZT I
Chairman Sought L_"Tj
The Public Functions \f
Authority is accepting y
applications for chairman of
Student Government
Productions. jCW-_
Applications may be picked |\
up from the SG office third 11\
floor of the Reitz Union, and JiilV V^ly
must be in by 3 p.m. Thursday, jrT ... jfy
April 10.

Legality Os UF Employe
Parking Plan Questioned

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Gainesville attorney Richard T. Jones, Tuesday
said there is a misunderstanding between his office
and the State Attorney Generals office on the UF
parking plan which is scheduled to begin Sept 1.
Jones wrote State Atty. Gen. Earl Faircloth
about two months ago, asking whether or not his
office approved the parking plan at UF. He did not
ask for the states legal opinion on the matter, Jones
said.
In a letter to former Alligator Editor Harold
Aldrich, a spokesman for Faircloth said the
Attorney General is prohibited by law from
rendering legal opinions to private citizens.
As it has been two months since the request was
made, it may well be the millennium before an
opinion is rendered, claimed Richard B. Knight,
director of information in his April 7 letter to
Aldrich.
Jones is a private citizen within the purview of
Florida law and thus not eligible to request or

W HATS
HAPPENING
ACTING HOPEFULS
Tryouts for seven one-act plays
begin Thursday and finish
Friday at 7 p.m. Those
interested are asked to come to
the Constans Theatre and give
their talent a try.
BOOK EXCHANGE Will
continue through Friday from 3
to 5 pjn. in the Reitz Union
colonnade. Unsold books will be
returned during this time.
GERMAN FACULTY Will
sponsor a one-man rendition of
The Three Penny Opera April
23. Gerhard Lenssen is cast in
the leading role. The 8 pjn.
performance, open to the public,
will be held in the Reitz Union
Auditorium.
NY. ROCK AND ROLL
ENSEMBLE Concert here will
be repeated on WRUF-FM
radio April 17 at 8:30 pjn. on
the premier show of
Experiment One.
Black Sea
The Black Sea is black
because of a high concentration
of hydrogen sulphide, says the
National Geographic.

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TONIGHT
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receive an attorney generals opinion.
Representing an undetermined number of
Physical Plant Division employes at UF, Jones says
he will not take any legal action until he hears from
Faircloths office as to whether or not the plan to
charge employes to park on the UF campus has the
attorney generals approval.
He is writing another letter to Faircloth and the
Board of Regents, not for a legal opinion, but to
determine when and by whom approval was given to
the parking plan.
Chancellor of the Florida Board of Regents,
Robert B. Mautz, Tuesday said the parking plan at
UF was referred to ? representative of the attorney
generals office last December for approval.
We were advised that the plan was legal, Mautz
said.
Most everything we do is referred to the
attorney generals office for approval, Mautz said.
Jones said he has no plans to go to the university
president with his questions.
However, he would like to receive a reply from
Faircloths office even if it means being denied an
answer to his question.

BY HOWARD POST
.'..'its I
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Thursday, April 10,1969, Ths Florida Alligator,

Grade f A f Fla. or Ga. Fresh
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191

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10,1969

The Florida Alligator
'The price of freedom is the exercise of responsfcHity
Dave Doucette
PoMtollJuto Acting Editor-In-Chief
jAll Carol Sanger Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Assignments Editor Acting Managing Editor News Editor

(EDITORS NOTE: The following editorial
appeared recently in The Daily Cougar, The
University of Houstons student newspaper. It
concerns a problem students in Texas are facing on
at least one campus there. Its similarity to the
situation of alarmism among legislators in Florida is
amazing. We are not alone.)
The custodian of decency in public education,
Ronald Death Valley Days Reagan, is alive and
well in California. Or is he?
Texas Sen. Henry Grover, acting very much like
the former star of stage and screen, recently asked
for a legislative investigation on whether the UH
Administration needs strengthening and if there
has been a breakdown of campus discipline.
His major concern lies in conducting an
investigation determining the extent of laxity on

Speaking Out

Off-Campus Nirvana ?

Cute freshman girls chew their
gum, amidst the company of the
other prog-takers as they enjoy
the facilities of on-campus
Florida dorm life. The 2UC
(sometimes known as upper
lower division or
lower-almost-upper division)
students count the quarters they
must remain on campus with less
than nostalgic speculations.
For the few lucky
sophomores who make it off
there is only a blind envy. To
live off campus has gotten to be
such a status symbol that to the
pre-upperdivision student it
remains as the final step to
Nirvana.
However, there are the
unknown perils in apartment
living that few people consider
because even fewer people have
the chance to speak about them.
These advantages include a
twelve months lease which is
almost impossible to get out of

We Are Not Alone

without losing a whole month
rent (exceptionally high rents)
and poorly designed paper-thin
walls which allows one to hear
all the varied music that his calm
and sedate fellow apartment
dwellers are prone to play at the
smaller hours of the moring.
(How about Dixie at 2:00 in the
AAI. when many weary people
are trying to rest?)
Some of the smaller and older
complexes have their own
distinct trademarks that set
them off from the more
status-packed places.
The most common complaints
of the students about these
super-dwellings run from the
wooden shabbiness of the back
apartments (hence: the
splintering back staricases), to
the monopolies mn by one or
two landlords to keep the rent
high and the upkeep low.
Some of die apartments
over by Santa Fe Junior

the part of the UH Administration in dealing with
militant student groups, determining the extent of
acquiescence to their demands.
Grover, one of the two Republican senators in
the Texas Legislature, was forced out of bypassing
normal procedures because several fellow senators
objected. He originally wanted to bypass committee
to expedite his resolution which makes a case
against the UH Administration.
We question Sen. Grovers motives for presenting
such a deliberate slam against UH. For one who
acknowledges a dislike of federal intervention in
state affairs, he ought to realize the parallelism
evident in state intervention in unique university
administrative affairs.
But even more perplexing, why did Sen. Grover
initiate this action when UH is in Chet Brooks
district?

By Iris B. Glazner

College-are having problems
getting die telephone company
to put in those urgent little
bell-ringing boxes commonly
known as telephones.
Gripes shared by all included
utility expenses (with electricity
in Gainesville running
enormously high), the difficulty
in finding an apartment if you
are a student, the amount of
solicitors that constantly bother
you cm tiie telephone (if you are
lucky enough to have one), the
occasional (?) breakdown of the
sewage systems, and the deposits
on apartments that somehow get
forgotten by the landlords when
the student is ready to move
out.
So you bright-eyed 2UC
student looking for freedom
keep in mind these small
warnings about your
newly-found haven or you may
be looking back to your good
old dorm life and remembering
it as in the good old days.

EDITORIAL
Just 5 Minutes
The questionnaire being distributed today by the Board
of Regents is a move on their part to let all students and
faculty members at Florida universities voice their opinion
on proposed changes in the quarter system.
The quarter system has caused little enchantment for
students and faculty. Criticisms of the quarter system come
forth continually.
Several interesting questions on the quarter system are
discussed in the survey:
Academic advisement by faculty members and their
orientation to counseling theory.
t Increasing the credit hours for courses so that students
may take fewer courses for similar credit hours.
Increasing the length of time between quarters.
t Required class attendance.
the offering of the same range of classes during the
summer quarter as during the other three.
Doing away with the program of giving one hour of
credit for one hour of class and developing academic credits
on the basis of the total learning experience of the student.
These suggestions and others on the survey have a direct
relation to the problems involving the quarter system and
now is the perfect time for students and faculty to voice
their opinion to the people who will make the changes in
the quarter.
The results of this poll will be returned to the Board of
Regents and analyzed. Returns from students will be
forwarded to university Student Governments for additional
analysis.
Complaints are always being registered because of a lack
of communication between the students and the Board of
Regents. This survey is a perfect way to communicate
effectively with them.
So take five minutes today, fill out the questionnaire and
return it to the proper place Itll be worth it.
12,000 Thanks

To the five Gainesville merchants who paid the $ 1200 fee
to obtain carnival license for Camigras after the Gainesville
City Commission turned down a request to waive the charge
goes a hearty thanks.
These businessmen made it possible for more than
$12,000 to be added to the Gator Loan Fund. Thanks.
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This Wars Costing Too Much Money
The Florida Alligator
01 F,orida under * 01
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or of th. writer l^^ n a rtte|e and*iKit ,^ or *"* tho of tl,# 0
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Another Kind Os Campus Discontent

OPEN FORUM:
j\Aa)UI
-A
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There is no hope

for the complacent
man.
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Infernal Machine
MR. EDITOR:
Wometco Vending is without
a doubt, the sorriest outfit on
campus.
First, if the machine is even
turned on, youve got to worry
about whether or not it will take
your money. If it does, chances
are theres no change, and you
have to run around trying to
find somebody with two dimes
and a nickle whos willing to
trade for a quarter. (And those
people are rare.)
If it takes your money and
makes change, thats a good
start. Now youve got a 50-50
chance that your particular
selection isnt out.
If youre privileged enough to
get this far, and you actually get
what you want, be sure to check
your coke for swimming roaches
and your candy bar for those
cute little worms that love
chocolate.
If you dont find any, pat
yourself on the back; today is
your lucky day.
If anybody wants 4o organize
a protest or riot against
Wometco, let me know. Id like
to be out there oh the front line.
TOM SPAIN 3JM


Two-Wheel Traffic
MR. EDITOR:
I fail to see why it is necessary that motorcycle owners must be
intolerently treated. This morning I walked to my cycle parked in the
street in front of my dorm (where there has been motorcycle parking
all year) only to find a nice surprice inserted into the seat
strap -a ticket also on about ten other machines.
It seems like these annoying vehicles were parked up to (gasp!!) 20
yards out of the normal scooter parking area the university has
provided for our convenience. Why the hell cant a simple warning be
issued to the unsuspecting erring motorists if it is so damned
necessary for the bikes to be in a certain spot? How pickyune can you
get?
And why is it that, although the Jiumber of motorcycles on campus
has increaded, the amount of space available for parking has
decreaded? (e.g. a large area in front of my dorm was deleted at the
beginning of last quarter and again another area on University Avenue
recently, to name two.)
I would like to call the attention of the university traffic planners
and anyone else it may concern to how utterly dangerour to life and
property it is for parking of motorcycles on University Avenue at
least behind the Graduate Research Library.
One morning last week I was terrified as I watched a near disastrous
accident. A young lady nearly woke up too late before she realized a
young man on a motorcycle stopped in the lane in front of her
waiting for a break in traffic to back into an already crowded space.
When she locked her wheels, her car squeeled towards the whole row
of defenseless motorcycles to a stop only inches from the first!
Personally I have found it difficult to maintain my composure
while waiting for a break in the line of onrushing cars in order to park
or depart.
And I have suggestion why cant a short area (maybe ten or 15
car spaces) in parking lot of the Graduate library near the stone fence
be set aside for safe cycle parking? This would decrease the danger
faced by drivers of the two-wheeled vehicles trying to park and leave
this area and certainly there will be little more noise disturbance
than already previously existed with parking out on the busy street.
Im sure there are hundreds more motorcyclists at the U of F who
share my feelings.
JIM BELLINGER 2UC
P.S. If you drive a car, please have consideration for your
two-wheeled friends and acquaintances -if you only knew how
harrowing it is to be driving along and all of a sudden to have a car or
truck pull directly in front of you, you would be sure to be more
careful before entering a roadway, especially from a hidden or
hard-to-see spot.
Come on, now, lets have some consideration!

Shuffling And Choking In Matherlys Dirt

MR. EDITOR:
Matherly Hall is a horrible place to be. You cant
see out of the first floor windows. Thats not
because they havent been washed, because I
remember watching the workmen wash them during
class just last year. Its the screens that you cant see
through. The dirt, dust and grime has been caking
on for years.
Some screens are so bad that they look like
boards with pin holes in them. Sometimes the light
gets through, and thats always welcome because it
adds heat to the rooms where the heaters wont
work. And if the light gets into the halls you can
just about see where youre going, for many
hallways are dimly lit.
This however has its disadvantages, for much of
the dirt, dust and grime that got through the screens
can be seen settling on the floors. In Matherly Hall
many people appear to have colds because theyre
always coughing, but thats only because of the dust
that is being kicked up by students and teachers
shuffling to classes through these dimly lit halls.
There is no choking in Matherlys west
end except maybe on the stale food and
cigaietts because the spilt drinks and candy at the
vending machines keep the floor all sticky and trap
the dirt, dust and grime.
Matherly Hall houses the College of Business
Administration which I must say has some very

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MOTORCYCLES LINE UP
... Owners intolerantly treated
Obituary To OB

MR. EDITORS
One of the buildings recently
reported to be scheduled for
razing (Alligator, March 31) is
building 08, erstwhile dorm B.
Your article neglected to
mention that this building was
for a few years used as office
space by the department of
Mathematics.
I had the pleasure of having
my office in building OB for two

good teachers and their fair share of the bad. They
get their exercise each day by climbing up to their
4th floor offices, for Matherly Hall has no elevators.
Sometimes the teachers are panting for breath by
the time they reach class.
In any case, if the lectures are boring you can
gaze at the bulletin boards and read that you missed
the Alpha Kappa Psi and Delta Sigma Pi smokers
held last month, or the magazine advertisements, or
other outdated news items. Last quarter's grades are
still posted, as no one ever bothers to clear the
boards.
People clean their erasers on the walls and write
on the desks, but I suppose that is typical
everywhere. In the classrooms there's always
cigarette butts and spilled coffee everywhere
because some professors, notably marketing and real
estate, wont enforce the rules. The tile is ugly and
there are yeflow spots on the cealings. Pencil
sharpeners are rare, and the heating pipes make
noise. University Avenue traffic also makes a lot of
noise as it parallels the building.
All toll, two undergraduate years at Matherly Hall
are not unbearable for whatever you may think,
there must be worse places on campus. Presently
however, I'm convinced that Matherly is no more
than typical for education, unlike beauty is not
just dirt deep.
ERIC PENNAME 4BA

Thursday, April 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

years, and I should like to report
that the accommodations, while
inconveniently located with
respect to Walker HaH, were no
more overheated in winter, no
less insufficiently cooled in
summer, no more shabby and
ramshackle than those parts of
building E presently occupied by
the mathematics department.
E.M. NORRIS
DEPT. OF MATHEMATICS

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10,1969

Riot Areas To Get Funds

WASHINGTON (UPI) Hope,
skepticism, surprise all these
were expressed Wednesday
about President Nixons plan to
spend $209 million to help cities
clean up their riot damage.
In Memphis, it was hailed as
hope for rebuilding Beale Street.
In Newark, it was called only
a drop in the bucket.
In Providence, it came as a
surprise, We didnt have any
riot damage.
The White House announced
Tuesday that Nixon was making
available $9 million immediately
and was instructing the
department of Housing and
Urban Development to release
S2OO million more to help
rebuild damaged districts in the
20 cities hardest hit by rioting.
The 20 cities selected to
received the money on the basis
of a HUD survey were Newark,
Baltimore, Washington, Boston,
Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Detroit,
Chicago, Kansas City, Los
Angeles, Akron, Louisville,
Memphis, Nashville, New Haven,
New York Providence,
Rochester, Tampa and
Wilmington.
Im glad to see this action,
said Orelle Ledbetter, director of
the Memphis Housing Authority.
Some of the owners need help.
They have simply boarded up
their buildings. On Beale Street a
number of buildings have been
boarded up a year. Owners have
old me they didnt plan to

MODERN APPROACH TO EASTERN
PHILOSOPHI
After an initial uelving into the Hindu Vedas and
Upanishads and into Zen scripture and poetry, I
would suggest reading of German idealists and
existential reformulation of Eastern thought:
Schopenhauer, Buber, Heidegger.
Coordinator:HAY MAGEE. 392-2081. Monday,
7:30 PM. Sheffield Trailer Park, 4700 S.W. Archer
Road, Lot no. 29.
A REAPPRAISAL OF CHRISTIAN FAITH
Can one make any sense out of religion, religious
language, faith? Co: DAN BEARDSLEY. 376-3851.
Tuesday, 7:30 PM. Presbyterian University Center.
SENSITIVITY GROUPS
Dealing with personal feelings in the here and now; an
attempt to become more aware of the self, the body,
and our thoughts; these are not therapy groups. Co:
Carol Butler, Co: JOHN RAPISARDI, 392-1171.
Thursday, 9:30 to 11:00 AM. Presbyterian University
Center.
RADICAL CHANGE
Drugs; student power, the tactics for change. Co:
DAVID MILLER 372-7560. Sunday 8:00 PM.
Presbyterian University Center Auditorium.
RACE
An examination of racial attitudes vis a vis
contemporary trends. Co: WILLIAM MANIKAS.
378-8252. Tuesday, 8:00 PM. Presbyterian University
Center.
CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE: THE HISTORICAL
PERSPECTIVE
Critical evaluation of an important social problem
using literary selections for the historical perspective,
including the Gospel according to Matthew,
Sophocles' Antigone, Thoreau's essays, Becket etals.
Co: ROBERT CANNEY. 378-0659. Sunday, 8:00
PM. Presbyterian University Center.

Miss Out on Late Registration for
FLORIDA EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE?
The following courses are still open for registration.

for registration, Call Coordinator at number listed above or 376-3851

repair that they were just
waiting for us to buy them out.
Mayor Hugh J. Addonizio of
Newark, scene of some of the
most destructive rioting, said he
was delighted at Nixons plan
but that the amount specified
amounted to only a drop in the
bucket.
Detroit Housing
Commissioner Conrad Mallett, a
Negro, said anything would help
in the task of post-riot
contruction.
As things are, well take a
dollar and be grateful for it, he
said.

Nixons Brother Turns
Down Commerce Job

WASHINGTON (UPI)
President Nixons brother turned
down a $30,000-a-year job in
the Commerce Department to
avoid any legal hint of family
favoritism, a White House aide
said Wednesday.
John Erlichman, special
counsel to the President, said
Edward C. Nixon, 38, made the
decision after Erlichman raised
the question whether acceptance
of the job would violate a 1967
law prohibiting government
officials from putting relatives
into jobs under their
jurisdiction and control.
The Commerce Department
announced Tuesday night that
Nixon, a geologist and telephone

In Providence, there was
dismay. We didnt have any riot
damage, said an aide to Sen.
John O. Past ore, D-R.I.
I was greatly surprised when
I heard the news, said Rhode
Island Gov. Frank Licht. He
checked Providence officials,
Licht said, and they were
surprised as well.
Charles R. Wood,
administrative assistant to
Providence Mayor Joseph
Doorley, said the request must
have been initiated somewhere
but the city has not asked for
riot damage funds.

company supervisor in Seattle,
Wash., had decided for personal
reasons not to become
chairman of the federal field
committee for development
planning in Alaska.
In Seattle, Nixon refused to
elaborate on his reasons. He had
returned from Anchorage early
Wednesday.
Erlichman, who said he was a
personal friend of the younger
Nixon, said he was not certain
that the appointment would
actually have violated the law,
which he said was unclear.
In any case, Erlichman said,
Edward decided to withdraw to
avoid any hint of favored
treatment.

BASIC MARXISM
Continuing from the winter quarter openings. Co;
DAVID SMITH. 376-0320. Thursday, 7:30 PM. 203
NW 11th Street.
CHANGE IN FRATERNITY SYSTEM
Co: JERRY ABASCAL. 376-9559. Tuesday, 7:30
PM. Presbyterian University Center.
SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC BASES OF THE
CITY
To deal with the problems of financing the city and
involving the total urban community in dealing with
urban social problems. Co: STAN BRUNN.
392-0494. Monday, 7:30 PM. Baptist Student Union
no. 207.
URBAN HEALTH
A study into the problems of mental and physical
health deriving from and related to the urban
environment. Co; RUTH STEWART, and CAROL
CROSBY, Monday, 7:30 PM. Baptist Student Union
no. 203.
CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FICTION
Continuing from winter quarter. Group One: Bellow,
Mailer, Baldwin, Capote. Limit: 15 people. Co
JUDITH TEDARDS.. 392-0790. Thursday, 7:30 PM.
Presbyterian University Center. Group Two: Mailer
Malamud, Nabakov, West, Williams, et als Co
BARBARA BEARDSLEY. 376-3851. Wednesday,
7:30 PM. Presbyterian University Center.
20th CENTURY AFRO-AMERICAN
LITERATURE
Toomer, Wright, Ellison, Baldwin, Hansberry,
Johnson, and poetry. Co: LESLIE WORLFE,
378-8494; and SALLY PREVE, 372-3247
Wednesday, 7:30 PM. 120 Building D.

/1 essN UPI
NEWS
Fighting Continues
On Jordan River
By United Press International
Jordanian and Israeli forces Wednesday fought two artillery and
inorta| duels across the Jordan River cease-fire line. It was the sixth
straight day of clashes between the Jewish state and its Arab
neighbors.
The continued fighting between the Israelis and Jordanians and
Egyptians added new urgency to diplomatic efforts abroad to find a
solution to the Middle East crisis.
In a surprise announcement, adding emphasis to the Big Four
powers search for peace, Secretary General Thant announced a halt, at
least temporarily, in the operations of his own special peace mission in
the Middle East.
Diplomatic sources said Swedish diplomat Gunnar Jarring would
not resume his efforts unless the Big Four came up with a workable
solution that he could submit to the Israelis and Arabs, or until such
time as the two sides changed their hard-line positions.
The clashes were the fifth and sixth along the Israeli-Jordanian
border since Saturday. The Suez Canal, where Israel and Egypt fought
with artillery, tank guns, mortars and machineguns last Friday and
again Tuesday was reported quiet during the day.
A Jordanian spokesman in Amman said the Israelis opened fire first
on Jordanian positions east of Aub El-Sus Ford, about nine miles
north of the Sheikh Hussein Allenby Bridge across "he Jordan Riber.
He said Jordan returned the fire and silenced an Israeli artillery
position. There was no report on casualties.
Later, spokesmen in Amman said Israeli troops opened fire with
mortars and machineguns at Jordanians in the Al-Mendassa area of
the Jordan Valley. There were no casualties among our forces in the
15-minute clash, they said.
The most serious incident took place Tuesday when Israeli jet
planes bombed the Red Sea port of Aqaba in reprisal for the shelling
of its port city of Elath from Jordan earlier in the day. The El Fatah
Arab commandos claimed they launched the Russian-made rockets
which hit Elath and wounded 11 Israeli civilians.

THE CREATIVE ARTIST TODAY: WHY AND
HOW HE WORKS
Continuing from the winter possible openings. Co:
PAT ANDERSON 378-3654; and LEE SHAW,
372-3229. Thursday, 8:00 PM. Unitarian Church.
POETRY SHORT STORY WORKSHOP
Not a creative writing course, but an opportunity to
share critical comment about each other's creative
efforts. Co: RICK BATTEIGER, 378-6633; and
DOUGLAS TEDARDS, 378-9752. Wednesday, 7:30
PM. Building D.
READINGS IN AYN RAND
An inquiry into objectivism and freedom of the
individual. Co: 808 KEISER. 376-5044. Tuesday,
8:00 PM. n 0.64. Williamsburg Apts.
American Jazz: An Overview
From blues to rock 'n rool to soul: styles and trends
in contemporary jazz. Co: ANN GOOCH. 376-8322.
Tuesday, 7:30 PM. Baptist Student Union no. 202.
WHY SSOC?
An opportunity to learn something about the
philosophy and goals of the Southern Studnets
Organizing Committee at this university and in the
South. Co: MARGARET HORTENSTEIN. 376-5044.
Sunday, 2:00 PM. Plaza of the Americas.
YOGA
Co: MIKE GEISSON

WHY AND



What will you
REMEMBER
about your college days?.

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DEADUNE-APRIL 18

1969
SEMINOLE

MAIL IN COUPON, OR COME
BY ROOM 330, JWRFU 10 a.m.-
A
4 p.m.

pi Please reserve Copies of the 1969 Seminole
£9 in my name. El
9 | have enclosed fIS.OO per copy) Hk
Name |||lP
JH Student Number
M Address V
City State & Zip Ej
!*J You will be notified in the Alligator when the yearbooks have V)
arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole, Rm. 330, Reitz Union.

Thursday, April 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 11



Fpubuxl Whafn if)
fc BAG
i inin
tel 1
~ -\ '* .rvr New-lofd eggs and weVagtd'chUse,
GREENT'x fc S; : VX'.X. p,oduce from * fields,
/IANT WHERE \ IllpSS- ' :: : ;; v : 'SiSSX : Fresh-baked bread and frozen freats,
l ARE YOU-WHEN ) jjjjjlfe&V--: Treasure-food, from overs*,,!
b ?
THROUGH 6 : fejjlbii /lAU/VAVS SAvN
WEDNESDAY \^SVtpJB;J IF YOU CANT JOIN^
JIOON', i6 J
Wheat. "Sr- 33 c
Assorted Flavors, Autocrat, by Saaltast Jp 'Xm _/ T Afl Rmmc 4-f. ra c
l#a fwAMMa * A7W Da s * 5*
c cream gat. 59* \ V[ \ y bii< *<*§k
rT. lto .sliced,h.i. .1.
#|! nM BamoLao J§ *2Vj < Laundry Rin.c (7c off)
Cling Peaches ... 4 .... *1 Sta-Pus <- cn, H, Ho 33'
Servo wall chiliad, FAR Fruit W eeeeee gal. DV'
Cocktail 4 cans Aunt Nellie's Tasty Sliced s. __^s.
F *t Solid Rack or Stewed pHj|fl|igjW|i3 Carrots *> |^ c iw^T^cm
Tomatoes s? J 1 );! +\U I B fUf
FAR loader, Delicious Cut White ACT PeCIS I #303 $1
Green Beans .. It"? 29* 1 ***********
Prune Juice £49* 2 ~ 29 I^WSHi
Serve with Cut OreoM Seans, Barden's lastaat A I g|l Por A Renn e VO '*Â¥
Potatoes ,4 j2r 49* w* v_ Lm Po k&Beans 7: a 3 n . os i KuQTTTu
Delicious Diet Cola, plus tax A deposit ^|| P Jue
Diet. Rite *£ 39* PWipfcrtiim 0,11 p,ckles "7 39* HQQS
Frans Contented Cows, Evaporated Milk Staley's Breakfast Treat! (5c off)
Carnation 6r. 98- Waffle Syrup .... T 44c
Dixos 3 .* *1 Beef Stew >*p Ih
Preserves ....... ir 29*
Sausage JSI RddV?addleS39- fwKSET.T.r:2S< OHOHi

Page 12

l. The FloHds Alligator. Thursday, April 10.1969



(Our SdedcateiSen Mepf.
Delicious Bar-B-Cuod
Beef Ribs T *1
Old Fashion German-Style
Bologna T 79'
Deliciously Different!
Health Salad ...r 39'
Always A Family Favorite!
Carrot Salad ... .r 39'
Our rr:en l)epl.
Thomas' Frozen
English Muffins 2,*7.49'
Patio Beef Frozen Enchilada
Dinner 59'
Pictsweet Frozen
Green Peas ... 6 P 7; *1
Birds Eye Frozen in Butter
Broccoli Spears '7' 39'
Booth's Family-Pack Frozen
Fish Sticks U l 59'
Singleton's Frozen Stuffed Fillet of
Flounder X 49'
rom (Our Sbalry o)ept.
Breakfast Club
Margarine V, lb 15'
Blue Bonnet Regular
Margarine e e e e ctn. 31'
Blue Bonnet Soft (4c off)
Margarine <;!!! 43'
Pillsbury Crescent
Dinner Rolls ... *<7 39'
Delicious Fresh "Dairi-Fresh"
Cottage Cheese .^59 c
Wisconsin Cheese Bar Mild Flavored
Longhorn CheeseT9'
Armour's Miss Wisconsin Horn
Med. Cheddar £7 67'
Kraft's Cracker Barrel
Sharp Cheddar 77'
*\C7
1 II I S X / N<
J W e IlfsnEp!^

PUBLIX--

1014 N. MAIN ST.
125 S.W. 34th ST.
2630 N.W. 13th ST.

With Pork Serve Cortlond'. Tasty
Normal, DAT, Extra Hold Suave SOUGfIC YOUt e e o e o e e pkg. 33
Hair Snrav AOc Swift's Premium Boneless Canned
js | | | 9 ~ (plus 200 extra SAH Green Stamps with Coupon)
Alcohol r.: 10'
Swift's Premium Tru-Tender Sliced
Ay. Beef Liver TT 69'
Fresh Seafood Treat! Swift's Premium Flavorful
Spanish Mackerel29' Ba 9 Sausage 69'
Ready to Eat! Delicious (plws 50 extra SAH Green Stamps with Coupon)
Smoked Mullet .. 7 89'
Sandwich Spread sX 35'
J Assorted Varieties of
wbl Tarnow's Pizza 7£r
(plus 50 extra SAH Green Stamps with Coupon)
AdRA6d|ftAAMBBRMBa6IHAAa. The
Tarnow Wieners ..
Rath's Black Hawk Boneless
Smoked Dainties .. H' 89'
Tasty
Bologna ... 25' 45' 59'
Smokie Links X 69'
'lnwr' Armour's Star Flavorful
Plump Franks ... pkg. 59'
| OHM A F Herman's Orange Band Assorted Sliced
L \ Luncheon Meats e 3 pkgs.
P (Olive Pickle
SWIFTS PREMIUM PROTEN GOVERNMENT [ffi
INSPECTED HEAVY WESTERN BEEF SALE!
Tt&
tic, BEEF tkt NEEDS LESS COOKING TlME!'TrmjF'
Shoulder Picnics ib.39
Boston Butts... .ib.49*
Fresh Pork i TKsBiT,
HIJ
-JLaiw
Yellow
Sweet Corn 10 69 c L^U3jd^u
Tender Large
Artichokes... 2 2t KI 1 L*^H
50 FREE S& H STAMPS NO COUPON Pint < IHffi
Strawberries Baskets
Crisp Salad-Perfect
Bell Peppers 2 ... 9*
Kraft's Fresh Florida Swi,, ' Pr mi * m Proton Steak
Grapefruit Juice ss 59 e Londenroil
New Florida Potatoes A A 29
Red Bliss 63* 1 89* |

Thursday, April 10,1969, Tha Florida Alligator, I

EXTRA P pH^|
jpj
I Swift's Premium Boneless Canned |
Hostess Hams
1. four pound can
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) ;
iflYll^GreenStamps^^
Treasure Isle Frozen
Jumbo Breaded Shrimp
2. two pound aka.
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) ;
xashMwiniiMwiuuuieeeeiuMmwasiisssaeenneJy
EXTRA
a
Wilkinson Stainless
< -*
Steel Razor Blades
3. 5-ct. pkg.
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969)
EXTRA I^^!
gj
Calm Spray
> <
Deodorant
6.5-oz. or 4.2-oz.
; (Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) ;
EXTRA iF"*!
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUtCHASI OF MhM
j; Swift's Premium Flavorful 1
| Bag Sausage I
5. 1-lb. pkg. I
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) j
M EXTRA
; Assorted Varieties of |
6. Tarnow's Pizza
; (Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) |
EXTRA BP" s *!
WITH THIS COUPON AND PUiCNASI OF Bttiafll
I Fox Deluxe Frozen ;*
Pepperoni Pizza Ij
7. 14-oz. pkg.
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) |
vfl9gagaaufteaaflftfteeftfeeeeftiuuu>ftftftaxi>Ae3y
EXTRA PF**^!
Stamps |s|
I Mrs. Smith's Frozen Golden
<
Deluxe Apple Pie
8. 46-oz. pkg.
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) ;
EXTRA PP^H
nsWGreenStampsP K ]
WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCNASI OF
IGleem
<
Tooth Paste
9. 3V4-01. tube
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) <
|s|
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUitH All OF B^feDiii^B
i Fantastik Cleaner
| | with Sprayer Jj
]) 10. 22-oz. bot. <|
(Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) ||
ETil^GreenStamps^^
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PUICNASI OF
| Wishbone Low-Cal Italian |
j> I or French Dressing |
j! 11. 8-oz. bot. I
j; (Expires Wed., April 16, 1969) |
Clip and USE
THESE coupons

S\
\

Page 13



Thw Florida Alligator. Thursday, April 10.190

Page 14

"NWG SIZE" SAVINGS
Can STOKELY SLICED OR J m
PEACHES 3/$l
19-oz. DIXIE DARLING LEMON, YELLOW, WHITE OR DEVIL FOOD
CAKE MIX 4/$l
13W DIXIE DARLING WHITE OR FUDGE MIX FOR--
FROSTING.... 4/$l
BATH TISSUE 5/$l
Jumbo ARROW WHITE & ASSORTED PAPER
ps 4/$i
WPU SAUCE 5/$l
No. 303 Con ASTOR FRUIT
COCKTAIL 5/$l
No. 2 CAN THRIFTY MAID SLICED OR CRUSHED
PINEAPPLE....4/$l
SAUSAGE 5/$l
4-Plc. G.E. WHITE
tter9* Light 8u1b5.... 97*
18-oz. TROPICAL 10-oz. WMP FIRE
bakery specials Grape Jelly 3/$1 Marshmallows 19*
Cookies 4/sl. Cake 29*
20-ox. Loaf DIXIE DARLING PRESTIGE 6-Pk. DIXIE DARLING LEMON HONEY I W -A
Bread 29* Buns 39* \jSj|&§2£ %
R0115.....2/33* Pie* 49* ._~g- =%
LOOK WHAT YOUR DOLLARS BUY jfiS 7D| -w
TUNA FISH 4/$l W|I |
Tomato catsup 3/$i \ Milk * I f
" B W llfWI 1 f- crater DETERGENT purchase Excluding Cigarette, ~J
TOMATOES 5/$l ( 1C 1 .r0W....39*|
GOLDEN CORN 6/$l V 210^
SWEET PEAS 8/$l V
KIDNEY BEANS 8/$l 'Z = Zl_ r S m ~\
i-.VITAUS King Sii* ULTRA BWTE LADIES B j| [ijlf TO* VaLuTsTAMPS >| [ill! Tofr j
Hoir Took 19* Toothpaste 49* PANTY WWM Wi
, DeUIMe HOSE S|
RAISINS 37* fill REAMS 33< QQ, ifeto
mm vn* DCAH3*tOv each mmmme r PRUNES 43* CORN. 2/37< LJ 1
2/ JS . n pple Juk:e ' 3/89< Chili with Beans 43*
Scisti***"' 33 Tomato Juice ... 39* Tiny Whole Beets 23<
PiiOilj:::::.27' WtW *r 3 Cut Green Beans . 27*
** *** n J C I t,n No. 303 Con BUSH



FREE DRAWING! YMk,
BAR-B-Q KEnLES W
DRAWING SAT., APRIL IZth / %
- TTZ- A USDA CHOICE W-0 BRAND CORN FED BEEF
\ Round Roast. 99*
# ; |ib Steak T
| / | Paimonicos... -T*
/ I Chuck Steak 69*
[ f£' Beet 3 L I Calif. Roast.. 79*
I >L llt if Roast *59 I strip Steak... T
V ttmS.*- 33 > Ribs 59* ChuckT
V
12-oz. SUPERBRAND Individually Wrapped Sli. American 8-oz. BORDENS SUNNYLAND FRESH FRESH BOSTON BUTT
CHEESE FObD 59* CREAM CHEESE 37* BREAKFAST LINK 3 L ..a $1.99 PORK ROAST 49*
SUPERBRAND COTTAGE 8-oz. KRAFTS SWISS OR SHARPE GRAUt A' QUICK FROZEN QUARTERS 2-lb. BANQUET BEEF STEW OR CHICKEN
CHEESE 2 1 59* STICK CHEESE 55* TURKEY LEG 29* N DUMPLINGS 99*
COPELAND All MEAT SLICED 10-Counl MERICO BUTTER-ME-NOT 12-oi. SUNNYLAND THIN SWIFT PREMIUM TRU-TENDER SUCED
BOLOGNA 59* BISCUITS 2/39* SLICED BACON 59* BEEF LIVER 59*
5-oz. TARNOW COOKED OR 2-Lb. Loot CHEF DELIGHT AMERICAN FRESH FROZEN BONELESS GROUPER 12-or. TASTE O SEA
BAKED HAM 59* CHEESE FOOD 79* FISH FILLETS 69* FISHCAKES 3/sl.
i DIXIANA SALE Quantity Rights Reserved Prices Good Weds. Noon thru Weds. Noon
9-02. DIXIANA FRENCH OR REGULAR CUT "TI-A
GREEN BEANS 5/sl. %
BUCKEYE PEAS 5/sl. FRESH m .\
WHOLE BABY 0KRA...5/sl. ,1 l.
TURNIP GREEKS.3/Sl.| MtjaVfh l .a kQ *%
JUICE 2/79 POTAYOES 2/77* fcdrsl Cof W f
RICH 4/sl. LEMONADE 8/sl. ... ** J
DINNERS 69' DINNERS... 2/89ir SitiiloesW ,
5HR1MP....51.99 MARGARINE2/89'|: Vtm ,oeS : 1 CeierY A/ \
PIZZA Pit MARGARINE 39' tofer *: 69
Eextra : IfTfif el7, VI V- bov | S H "!lMtrilClUS** LB
TOP VALUE ST AMPS ;I IN TOP VALUE ST AMPS J l* M TOP VALUE ST AAAPS \ aA ( ftCflQl t*3 J
...H M..MN. ww 0. I VtS oVri?Ji7s7 I WUH MWVAMS COWTM evtC2-M e m BOQ- 33 AQt W
5-UB W D BRAND LEAN 2 """thuTk SUCED HLL 100-CT. BOX UPTON $. NO- L TIL--"J
Ground Beet I Bacon Tea Bags Awol AftS*
GOOD THRU APRIL IS j A GOOD THRU APRIL 16 j j
wll V vau^~s^amps i I [lll¥ vaLuTstamps |
-TH M.y.ni loct.'n arc a J w.TH *HT nMAT ; *.TM mwvAPt caweoN AMD ruse ham o iXb GOOD LUCK (Qtrs ) Plus 100 Siam S W/Cou n
THREE 46-OZ. 1 16-OZ. BOTTLE mam
FrudD rinks I I Owner MARGARINE A/^l
GOOD THRU APRIL 16 \ THRU APRIL 16 #( MOD THRU APRIL 1 IVmflWmil IB t /
IsLIPTON 2-oz. FRENCH'S HUNT'S *K TiTIV EXTRA
Beef Stronganoff . 79? Vanilla Extract . 49? Tomato Puree 2/39 ? l|p4f
I/2-oz. FRENCH 11-02. BETTY CROCKER CHOCOLATE or LENON PUDDING 6-01. HUNT'S \ Margarine I
Spaghetti Sauce Mix 25* Cake Mix .... 41* Tomato Paste 2/37* I
12-02. GEORGIA MAID 22'/i-oz. BETTY CROCKER 8-oz. HUNT'S w/Onions
Hot Dog Relish . 29* Fudge Brownie Mix 53* Tomato Sauce . 2/33* OniorTsoup
12-0,. SUNSHINE ALL VEOETABLEII Lb 37,1.. 34A. to LtollPockCOMO AQr
Shredded Wheat . 29* Crisco Shortening 89* Bathroom Tissue 29* 'll
nBUH

Thursday, April 10,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 15



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

FOR SALE
'.} V
Aiwa TP 704, 1-7/8, 3-3/4 ips, 5"
reels AC/Battery 4 mo old S4O; 12
spkr in walnut enclosure S3O; 2/SSO.
378-8305. (A-st-l 10-P)
Honda 50, Automatic clutch, runs
perfectly with less than 2 miles on it
since last tune up SBO, have two cars
& must sell bike 378-0748, Al.
(A-3MIO-P)
PA INT INGS Beautifully framed
oils on canvas. Action football shots.
Perfect for bar or restaurant. $lO.
Call Steve, 372-3717. (A-3MIO-P)
1968 Yamaha 350, driven 2600
miles, excellent condition, helmets
includ. Owner in service. Call
372-0148. (A-st-l 10-P)
Unright Frigidaire freezer needs some
repair; Zenith B&W TV large screen,
portable. 376-9971 after 6 p.m.
(A-3t-l 10-P)
HONDA 1965, 150 cc. Excellent
condition, helmet included. Only
$225. Phone 376-8980 after 5 p.m.
(A-3t-l 10-P)
67 Yamaha 250 just $444.45, will
take smaller motorcycle as trade-in.
Call J. Fernandez at 378-3216 before
its too late. (A-SMIO-P)
Hofner bass guitar only 10 months
old in beautiful condition! Call
378-8756 and ask for Rich or come
by French Qtr. 78 BEST Offer.
(A-SMIO-P)
Air conditioner 10,000 BTU.
Excellent condition, 1 year old $125.
Call 378-1129. (A-SMIO-P)
Basenji puppies AKC
Registered Red and white.
Reasonable. Call 376-2630.
(A-7MOB-P)
12x60 mobile home. 3 bedroom, IV2
bath, excellent cond., $350 down
and assume pyments. Call Beverly
376-4616; 481-2088 nights.
(A-SMOB-P)
Lakefront, 2 bedroom cabin V 2 hr.
drive from Gainesville. Ideal family
retreat in Putnam Co. $6,000 fully
furnished. Call 378-2358 or
378-2089. (A-SMOB-P)
1962 Buick Special, convertible, V-8,
power steering and brakes, clean,
S4OO, call 376-1429. (A-SMOB-P)
YAMAHA 1968 lOOcc. Perfect
condition, only 1500 miles, $295.
Call 376-0936. /A-st-109-p)
1964 Sunbeam Alpine good
condition $620. Wallensak stereo
deck $l2O. 8-three way
speakers cabinets S3O the pair.
392-0929 ask for George.
(A-st-l 11-P)
Super 8 movie camera. All automatic
perfect running condition. Complete
with valuable acc. Call Bob
378-7479. (A-SMII-P)
1964 Rambler. 2-door, air
conditioned, white-wall tires. Call
378-9004 after 4 p.m. (A-3t-111-P)
Beach buggy Chrysler slant 6, afb4
barrel, cam, modified torqueflite,
chrome reverse wheels, M&H racing
slicks. It will go S6OO. Phone
378-4328. (A-SMII-P)
Double bed box springs & mattress.
Good condition, sell for S3O. Phone
372-5267. (A-3MII-P)
HANNAHS husband Hector hates
hard work so he cleans the rugs with
Blue Lustre. Rent electric shampooer
sl. Lowry Furniture Co.
)A-ltll2-C)
VW Bus 61 recently painted needs
tune-up 400 or best offer o,r will
trade for Triumph motorcycle. Call
Dave 378-9445. (A-3M12-P)
Sears 18 portable b & w TV.
Excellent working order. Call
378-7169 after six. (A-3t-112-P)
1967 TR Spitfire excellent shape.
Good tires (radials) radio, luggage
rack, 28,000 miles, British racing
GRN. SIOSO or best offer. Tim
376-7647. (A-5M12-P)
ITT*

| FOR SALE I
s^*x*x\x-x-x-v.%v:xx*x*x-xx-v.w-:*xx?
Furnished upstair apt. 2 br, air cond.,
wall to wall carpet. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (A-ts-107-C)
rxsxw<'>x-x-x.xw FOR RENT 1
ftx*x*xcyx-x-x-x.x-xxx;*x*x*x*x-x*x:is
Peace and quiet is yours for the
asking by living in one of our
secluded luxurious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for an
appointment to see them. Immediate
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, Ih'.c,
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-c)
Subleting for spring quarter. 2
bedroom, 12x50 trailer or need 1
roommate to share with 2 other
males. Call 378-3786 anytime.
(B-SMOB-P)
1 male roommate for 3 bedroom
house. Woodpaneled, fireplace, cable
TV, bar. Call 378-1112 after 6.
(B-SMIO-P)
Landmark Apt. to sublet for summer
SIBO per mo. 4 people, furnished,
kitchen utensils, linens, etc., includ.
Call 372-5041. (B-2MII-P)
1, 2 or 3 for summer & ? 50 trailer
with 45 cabana, AC, own bedroom,
pool, tennis courts, 4 minutes from
campus, SSO/month. Call
evenings. (B-7t-112-P)
Furnished upstair apt. 2 br, air cond.,
wall to wall carpet. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-ts-107-C)
Summer Rates. From $45 and SSO
for efficiencies to SBS for two
bedrooms. Close to campus. Air.
Modern. Also renting for fall.
University Apts. Call 376-8990.
(B-25M11-P)
MODELS We are interviewing for a
Playboy Playmate from the state of
Florida. Its high time IF interested
in hard work and can meet
requirements. Contact Bill R. Horne
or Gus Mustelier.* All interviews by
appointment only we are
sincere Roy Green Studio, *nc.
372-4656. (C-10t-109-p)

BLOW YOURSELF UP
TO POSTER SIZE **f
Gc j *** * Poster. Send any Black 1 525 00 Value for ml
and White or Color Photo. Also any news newspaper
paper newspaper or magazine photo. A A $0.50 $|
PERFECT POP ART *XO- O' 9
Poster rolled and mailed in sturdy tube. ova <+ £7.50 £§
Original returned undamaged. TX 888
' li* m
(photo JIGSAW PUZZLE mi. x i Get your own Personalised Photo Jigsaw Puzzle. Send any black and white or
color photo. Mailed in 40 easy to assemble pieces. Great gift or gag for anyone. SSh
Add 5Cc for postage and handling for EACH item ordered. Add local Sales
Tax. Send check, cash or M.O. (No C.0.D.) to:
PHOTO POSTER, Inc., 210 E. 23d St., Dept. T-24, N. Y. 10010 B
Hi \f/ \ SPECIAL m
111 ) J FRIDAY HI
l FRED I
I SHRIMP I
H WITH FRENCH FRIES, HOT |||
II SLAW A HUSH PUPPIES 5|
I $1.09 I
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS |
OAIIESVIUE MALL

Page 16

i. The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10, 1969

1 WANTED^^j
....'.'-v-.Tiffi Oiffi WinoniHi rrrron lYMXft^vreto
1 female roommate needed
Gatortown Apts., 2-bdr., SIOO for
rest of quarter. Call 378-6966 or
378-0756. (C-st-l 12-P)
Tonneau cover to fit 65 MGB.
Reasonable condition & price. Any
color. Call 378-9512 between 6-7:30
p.m. (C-3t-l 12-P)
Need female roommate for spring
qtr. Come by apt. 304 College
Terrace or call 372-0627.
(C-5M12-P)
Male roommate to share new
convenient apt. one blk. from
campus. AC, nicely furnished. Call
after 5 p.m. 376-4768. (C-3t-112-P)
For rent: Cottages concrete block
just remodeled, Hefner-type
furnishings, carpet, 6 min. from
campus S7O monthly. Call: 372-4407
after 8:00 p.m. ask for Steve.
(B-3MIO-P)
LANDMARK: One male roommate
wanted. 2 bdrm. Immediate
occupancy. $45 per mo. Pool, health
club, A.C. Call Rick, 376-4313
anytime. (C-st-109-p)
Books, all kinds to be sent to Israel.
Call 327-9404 anytime will pick-up.
AEII. (C-3t-l 11-P)
Couple to sublet new 1 bd apt, patio,
CH & ACtastefully furnished in rural
SW section. sll6/mo. Call 378-8801
after 6 p.m. (C-3MIO-P)
Coed wanted to share two bedroom
mobile home, A/C, shady lot, close
to campus, phone, $35 per month.
Call 372-2715. (C-3MII-P)
j:ffxxxiw*xwx*^x-x*x*x.x.x-x.xx?^
I HELP WANTED
Rathskeller delivery service
franchise commission basis evening
work. Ambition person apply at
Rathskeller. (E-3t-111-P)
BABYSITTER Must be congenial
and reliable. Work with adorable
1-year-old girl MF 8:3012.
Excellent working conditions high
pay. 378-0387. (E-st-109-p)

HELP WANTED 3
ywwc4yxwwxy:yx*x.>xqWMW
NEED PART TIME and full time
salesmen for men's retail clothing
store. Experience preferred. For
interview apply in person at
Silvermans, 225 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-3t-109-p)

I ROBBIES I
The Best In
Meals. C[Y^andwiches|
TV & BILLIARDS!
1718 W. University Ave.|
'On The Gold Coast 1 1
I ALLIGATOR CLASSIFIEDS
To order classifieds, use the form below. Fill in the boxes
allowing 1 box for each letter, space and punctuation mark.
Count 2 boxes for capital letters. Dont use hyphens at the end of
a line (which contains 35 characters). Use additional form if more
than 4 lines are required Minimum charge is $ 1.00 for 4 lines. For
each additional line, add $.25. Multiply the total by the number
of days the ad is to run. Subtract the discount for consecutive
insertions (if applicable*). Mail the ad, with remittance (check
preferred) to: Alligator Classifieds, Room 330, Reitz Union,
Gainesville, Florida, 32601.
Deadline -MO pin. 2 days prior to starting day
DO NOT ORDER BY PHONE

CLASSIFICATION DAYS TO RUN NAME DATE
Q .1. (consecutive) STUDENT # PHONE
O sos rent O 1 d y
I*] wanted D 2 ***** ADDRESS I
help wanted 3 days (*lO% diacount)
auto* 4 days (*lO% diacount) Qjy STATE ZIR
personal Q 5 days and over
Q lost-found (*20% discount)
D r ,lc WORDING j
ill 111 I 1 I I I I II I I M I I I I I II 111 M I II MI MI-21
-21 MI-21 II I I I 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I II I I 111 I I M I
am 11 1 1 1 it 11 n r
4fl II I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ITT

Use our handy
mall in order
form.

| HELP WANTED |
Figure Fair in the Mall needs sales
help in Lingerie Dept. If you love
beautiful lingerie, you'll love working
in our beautiful shop. Married
preferred. Phone Mrs. Miller,
378-5136. (E-3MIO-C)



CLASSIFIEDS

6MTO!IIWiWOWW Q Q 8 iWWWt
I HELP- WANTED |
HELP WANTED FEMALE. Full
time position for experienced office
worker. Should be planning on being
in Gainesville at least two years from
date of hiring. Must be experienced
in office work and must be able to
work full time including
approximately two nights a week and
every other Saturday. Ideal working
conditions, 5 day week. WILSON
DEPARTMENT STORES, INC. 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-10t-106-C)
LISTENERS WANTED: Will pay
$1.50 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Miss
Hardaway University ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. Can make up to $6.00.
(E-15M07-C)
dale and female various pari .ime
openings noon hours and
eve nings arranged to your
schedule. Apply Kings Food Host,
1430 SW 13th St., 1802 W. Univ..
afternoon only. (E-st-111-P)
Talent night at the Rat Mon., April
14. If you want to show what you
can do, call Fran Belous 378-3234
free to come and watch and listen.
(E-3MII-P)
Male desk clerk over 21 yrs. evening,
nights, weekends. Open, bondable,
neat, reliable in person. Tom Sawyer
Motel. (E-st-108-P)
Alligator sports dept, needs an
experienced sports writer. Good
opportunity for ambitious writer.
Contact Marc Dunn. (E-3t-112-NC)
i o i aigmiw;
AUTOS
1963 Falcon Sprint 2 dr. nt., radio,
heater, recently rebuilt 260 cu. in.
VB, 4 speed, tach., new tires. Gall
378-8802 or see Bill at 211 T Flavet.
(G-st-109-p)
Falcon 63, 2 dr. sedan std. trans.
good tires, no rust, one owner $285.
378-6045. (G-2MII-P)
1959 PORSCHE coupe 1600, new
paint job, recently overhauled engine,
slosp. Call 376-9420, Jim Acker,
after 6:15 p.m. (G-3t-111-P)
65 Monza conv. 4 on the floor radio,
heater, burgandy, white interior,
body and engine in excellent
condition. Must sell S6OO. 376-2381,
376-4677. (G-lt-112-P)
Corvette 1967 convertable, yellow
vinyl hardtop AM-FM, 4-speed disc
brakes, 16000 miles, never raced
$3150. 376-1088. (G-3t-112-P)
Buick LeSabre 1960, 4 door,
automatic transmission, power
steering, $175. Call Flipper
372-0491. (G-3M12-P)
1 ' '' V"
[ PERSONAL 1
Are you a newie? We need newies
and oldies for hands, spirits and Just
plain actors. Come to tryouts,
Theatre, April 9-11, 7:00
p.m. (J-6MOB-P)
Girls! Most of you know how hard It
is to meet interesting older guys
around this large and impersonal
campus. The Friday Afternoon Club
was organized by 4 grad students to
get single guys & girls, over 21,
together. We have 2 priv. rms. at the
Lamplighter from 5-7:30 every Fri.
Drinks for you s.2o. Come, bring
all your friends, escape the heat &
meet some guys. (J-3t-111-P)
PLEASE! Will whoever has the Zeta
scrapbook return it or call 378-7846.
No questions aked. (J-st-108-P)

BJidiLiflLH BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:45
DBBBBBH show starts 7: 15
FIRST GAINESVILLE SHOWING
U *t£ f
Peter Lawford anneFrancis
4s Scott Carter TECHNICOLOR |G^'

IMPERSONAL
I ~ J U *W %**VV.eSSW
Would you like to lose weight and
keep it off for good? Come to weight
watchers 1015 W. Univ., Mon 10
a.m. 7:30 p.m. Wed. 9:30
a -m. 1:00 p.m. or 7:30 p.m. ph.
anytime, 372-9555. (J-st-111-P)
The Friday Afternoon Club in its
2nd quarter invites all the single
university crowd (staff & sac., too!)
to beat the heat & meet your match.
Student organized and directed our
only guarantee a cool drink!
(J-3t-111-P)
W-3: Golden bees hum in turn with
the moon when it's full in April; this
year has been wonderful and I love
you. The Kid. (J-lt-112-P)
JO LYNN PI JOT: Congratulations
Miss U of F! Best wishes. Fourth
floor NW Broward. (J-2M12-P)
Enterprizing woman student to
develop own business among women
on campus. (J-lt-112-P)
Coed to cook for four guys. Dinner
five days a week. No dishes. Call
372-5091. (J-3M12-P)
Den Den Happy Birthday and 21
calls of the Wild D! the Reverend
Fathers Blessed Virgins at Broward.
(J-lt-112-P)
MINIFESTIVAL anyone wishing
to enter their arts or crafts for the
May 17th show, call Celebration, aft.
392-0299, eve. 3 72-5429.
(J-st-109-P)
MEN, WHERES HOME NEXT
QUARTER! Tty Georgia Seagle Hall.
Room and board $220/quarter. 1002
W. University. 378-4341 or
372-9410. (J-st-110-P)
l LOST A FOUND |
Lost: Black and white pointer. 5
mos. 40 lbs. Fanthom last seen in
French Quarter area. Reward! Any
information Call 378-6863.
(L-10t-110-P)
Lost: Men's prescription glasses,
black frames, torn black case, in
vicinity of 4th Ave and 16th t St.
NW. If found, please call Ken at
378-0960. (L-SMIO-P)
Lost Yorkshire Terrier N.W. 27 Ave
area. Female, long hair black, tan,
silver. Buffiee" Very samll. S4O
Reward. 378-6803. (L-108-st-p)
-
LOST: Beloved part hound named
KLIK, brown with white chest,
brown floppy ears, fifty pound male.
Reward. Please call 378-4352.
(L-st-109-p)
wre wn i n nn riii¥n a vu bq m m norm n non (w n toti isl
1 SERVICES ]
NEED A PAINTER? Free estimates
Professional Painting Interior and
Exterior call after 5 or anytime on
weekends 378-4855. (M-10t-105-p)
Tennis racket restringing satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call 378-2489
(M-19t-107-P)
INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (across from Ramada Inn)
& 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-12t-104-P)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-tt-iu^-C)

By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Staff Writer
Once again professors in Arts
and Sciences are making a name
for themselves by the printed
word.
From the division of
Humanities is:
Aubrey Williams essay,
Poetical Justice, the
Contrivances of Providence, and
the Works of William Congreve,
has been published in a A
Journal of English Literature
History.
C. W. Wilkinsons
commissioned article on M. E.
M. Davis has been accepted for
publication in Notable American
Women.
Melvyn News book, Laurence
Sterne as Satirist: A reading of
Tristam Shandy, will be
published this Fall by the UF
press.
Thomas Hanna, Chairman of
the Department of Philosophy,
published The Living Body:
The Nexus of Process
Philosophy and Existential
Phenomenology in the
interdisciplinary journal,
Soundings.
W.S. Brey Jr. has a new
publication, co-authored with
VP. Heuring, entitled NMR
Studies of Chemical Exchange:
the Moment Method.
J.D. Winefordner has a new
publication in the January issue
of Specitrochimica Acts
entitled Experimental Quantam
Efficiencies.
CP. Luehr co-authored a
paper called Intrinsic Spinor
Techniques with Applications to
the Lorentz Group and the Dirac
Equation.
Elizabeth Eddy, Director of
the Urban Studies Bureau, is
editor of Urban Anthropology:
Research Perspectives and
Strategies.
Barbara Kay, assoc, professor
of sociology and Assoc.
Professor of psychiatry,
presented her paper, When
Drug Use Becomes the Norm at
Mtp£ I
1 H=J| 2nd WEEK
| fel COLOR by DeLuxe UmtedArtist|
W^TDISNEY

ACADEMICS

the Southern Conference on
Corrections.

Money, money, money, and
the physical and mathematical
sciences departments are getting
their share of it.
The two-year extension to the
National Science Foundation
Science Development Grant
came through and the chemistry
department will receive about
$500,000 as a result.
Edward F. Malagodi,
psychology, received a
three-year, $50,000 grant from
the National Institute of Mental
Health, to study Extended
Behavior Sequences and Token
Reinforcement.
Dr. Mary McCaully,
psychology, has received a grant
from the Florida Council on
Training and Research of the
Division of Mental Health to use
I "YOUR (HEATH 1 HEART J
OEOtOf HAMILTON U
"BULLITT IS NEXT J
f 1969s most
/ spectacular vwr
adventure
ildumi Bublobls
* Clint Eastwood
r .-.1. 11 '.j. 1 i

j DAUGHTER I
; A MEMBER Ki
i t a
: IT
: 1 LIKE IT IS!
DAISEY.. KELLY. I OUM I MARK... C
0 me leader Hilling the nostage I lough punk- brutal. I hero easygoing. I
was easy for him' toy for the gang' I easily led' sadistic 1 I hell when corneredl W
. > . '> s e .< s *.,-..

Thursday, April 10,1969, Tha Florida Allipator,

for the analysis of psychological
data collected on pregnant
women and their husbands.
Henry E. Allison, philosophy,
has been awarded a National
Endowment for the Humanities
and Claude K. Abraham, foreign
languages, is the recipient of a
summer grant from the NEH.
A STUNNING MOVIE!
-N.Y. Times
AN UNFORGETTABLE
EXPERIENCE!
- Judith Crist. NEW YORK
A WONDERFUL MOVIE!
-The New Yorker
RAW, REAL, TURBULENT
EMOTIONAL
DYNAMITE! -cue
A CELEBRATION OF
HUMAN
RELATEDNESS!
-N.Y. Post
A MAGNIFICENT
DOCUMENTARY
ADVENTURE!- NEWSWEEK
A PROFOUND,
POWERFUL MOVIE!-time
Warrendale
* by COOV{ M£SS
SWTC £l.
XBRIMS
,7 laughter fir V #
TEARS iNewsd.vV.
mg Patricia/\;
PteOjealJ:

Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10.1969

"Mission Impossible Reaches Cinema Screen

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Reviewer
Where Eagles Dare is a
three-hour version of Mission
Impossible, so fans of that
unbelievable show (where you
find yourself saying oh come
on now more often than once)
should really make a point to see
this movie now playing at
Center I.
The impossible mission for
Clint Eastwood and Richard
Burton is to infiltrate German
headquarters in the Bavarian
Alps and find out which of the
allied agents are slipping vital
information to the German side.
German headquarters,

Sokol Poetry-Jazz Concert
To Reappear This Month

Those who heard Bob Sokols
Poetry-Jazz Concert fall quarter,
or have read some of his material
in the Campus Thing may
look forward to more of the
same the latter part of this
month.
Two performances, presented
form 7:30 until 10:00 pm.
April 24 at the Med Center
Auditorium and in segments at

Young Photographers
Now At UF Gallery

By ROY C. CRAVEN
Director, UF Gallery
Young Photographers, an
exhibition scheduled to run in
the University Gallery through
May 3, will seem, in part, like
old-home week for many of
us here in Gainesville.
The reason for this is the fact
that this exciting show not only
features works be four creative
photographers from Gainesville,
but the exhibition itself was
- arranged by Mr. Van Deren Coke
who is a former University of
Florida art faculty member. Mr.
Coke, who now is the Chairman
of the Department of Art at the
University of New Mexico,
invited the instructors of twelve
universities, where creative
photography is taught, to
participate by contributing a
total of one hundred and fifty
works by fifty-eight graduate
students.
The UF is represented by
Robert Louis Levin, Ann
Morgan Nunez, and Helen Wallis
as well as Douglas Prince who is
now an instructor in the creative
photography program here in
the UF Department of Art.
While a feeling of freedom
may be noted in many pictures
in the exhibition, there are a
number of photographs which
depend heavily on the work of
well-known photographers.
Despite this observation,
quite a few prints in this
Fraternity Sets
Meeting Tonight
There will be an
organizational meeting of all
members of Lamba lota Tau
English Honorary tonight at 7
pm. in the Rathskeller.
All members are urged to
attend.

REVIEWS

embedded in treacherous
mountains is the scene of the
best action in the way of
suspense. The scenes on the ski
lifts are tense, and for someone
with acrophobia, almost
unbearable.
As in Mission Impossible, the
timing is perfect as Eastwood

9:30, 10:30, 11:30 pm. April
25 in the Rathskeller, will be
offered to the public free of
charge as a benefit for the J.
Hillis Miller Childems Mental
Health Unit.
Sokol, production head for
the entire presentation, will read
his own poetry to the
accompaniment of jazz
improvisations by

exhibition point out the fact
that many young photographers
studying in universities stand
aloof from the crowd and are
not restricted by established
concepts. Their sometimes
hanuting, sometimes startling
pictures are provocative, not
because they give pleasure or
answers, but because they pose
new questions in a variety of
ingenious ways.
The University Gallery is open
free to the public Tuesday
through Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 5 pm. and on Sunday from 1
pm. to 5 pm. It is closed
Mondays and holidays.

PINT OF
cole slaw V
m7jJU[J|ji Frisch's Country
Chicken is great
whether
or
Buy it by the bucket
or
2035 N.W. 13th Street/Gainesville/Phone 378-2304

and Burton manage to outwit
and make fools of the Germans.
In one scene the German
commander stumbles over a trip
wire setting off dynamite which
destroys the building and
himself just in time to let Burton
and Eastwood escape for the
umpteenth time.

clarinet-playing graduate student
Bruce Ergood, back from the
last performance, and a combo
including Danny Bellack on the
trumpet and Chas Miller on the
base guitar.
Also participating in the
program will be Earl Williams
and Ed Ochester, the former
who works with Sokol in the
mental health unit and who will
read poems of negro authorship.
Orchester, a professor in the
English department, will be
reading a variety of material.
According to Sokol, the
majority of the programs
presentation will deal with how
various elements in the
environment effect children.
Sokol has stressed that although
the poems may not overtly
concern children, what they do
discuss certainly, directly or
indirectly, will affect them.
According to Sokol, the poems
wont be for children, but for
adults to help them understand
what it is for these children.
Sokol has had work published
in The College Anthology of
Poetry, a nation-wide
publication, and has performed
his poetry at The Bitter End
case in New York City.

The trio kills easily, often and
with deadpan audacity. In this
reviewers opinion violence and
blood was overdone and
repetitious.
Perhaps it was the audacity
that amused the audience
causing them to laugh when
Eastwood knocked off five or
six Germans at a time with his
machine gun, or dumped a
German corpse into a car before
he pushed it off the cliff.
The characterization is nil. It
is too bad a good actor like
Burton lets himself be seen in
this type of movie of good
guys and bad guys.
Eastwood plays the very
competant American who
doesnt know why the hell he
is in the war at all, but who is
tough and loyal in his duty.


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Burton is the cool, British
mastermind of the operation
who not only bluffs the German
officers, but the audience as
well.
The Germans are stuck with
the usual wartime
characteristics: haughty,
prominent cheekbone, thin
upper lip and a sensuous lower
lip. The eyes are unflinching,
almost inhuman.
Most of the plot cannot be
revealed without ruining the
value of the movie suspense
and the surprise ending to this
impossible mission.
Sack Sails
Fishermen in St. Lucia in the
West Indies use cotton flour
sacks to make sails for their
boats.



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you B K
Name Ig
fOrget Number %m
... Address K
the life City State & Zip fl
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OT Q GATOR yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole,
I BUY YOUR SEMINOLE

Thursday, April 10,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10,1969

UF swept past the Florida
State Seminoles Wednesday 8-1
in tennis.
Gator Frosh Charlie Owens
avenged a loss to Seminole Herb

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UF CHARLIE OWENS SERVES NICK ARROYO
(7
... as Florida Netmen defeat FSU

Porsches Run In Gainesville

Central Florida Region of the
Porsche Club of American will
hold a competitive speed event
for Porsches only on Sunday,
April 13.
This will be a one-car-at-a one-car-at-a-time
time one-car-at-a-time autocross of varing speeds
on a .6 mile course just North of
the Gainesville airport on Waldo
Road. There will be 11 classes of
competition.
Registration fees are $2.00 for
members and $3.00 for
non-members. Registration,
technical inspection, and
I Miller-Brown
I
I <4pNb>
ON?MILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL
376-4552 AUTHORIZED
DEALER

Gator Netmen Beat FSU, 8-1

Rapp at Tallahassee last month
by beating the Seminole 5-7,
64,8-6.
UF netter Paul Lunetta
played, despite a bad charlie

practice will begin at 10:00 a.m.
The public is welcome to
attend. For more information,
call Jim Johnston (468-1782).
Harmon Killebrew leads the
Minnesota Twins in home runs
with 313.

Gator PAWN SHOP
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
DIAMONDS
\J^QANS J guns
BUY SELL TRADE
"We specialize in Gator-Aid"
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575

SECOND TIME THIS SEASON

horse in his right thigh, Randy
Jobson and was defeated 6-2,
7-5.
Will Sherwood, taking
Lunettas place in the doubles

VETERANS
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match teamed up with Jamie
Pressly to beat Rapp and Scott
Bristol 64,4-6,6-3.
Pressly started off slow in his
match with John DeZeeuw,
losing the first set 7-9, closely
winning the second 8-6. But the
Gator All-American came on
strong to win the last set 6-1 and
take the match.
All-American Armi Neely
easily polished off Seminole
Dave Danielson in two sets 6-2,
6-2. Gator Steve Beeland also
made quick work of his
opponent Bob Marcher 6-3, 6-1.
Greg Hilley took two sets to
down Seminole A1 Procopio
6-3,6-3.

THURSDAY SPECIAL
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In double action the other
two Gator teams of Neely and
Beeland and Owens and Hilley
won their matches.
The Gators record now stands
at 14-1-1, FSU is 144-1. The
Seminoles now have lost to UF
twice this season.
Friday UF is host to
Louisiana State at 2:30 p.m.
This match offers Neely a
chance to avenge a Southeastern
Conference Tournament loss last
season to SEC runner-up Steve
Falk.
A tri-meet / between LSU,
Tennessee and UF will be played
on Saturday.



Water skiing, like all sports,
has its ups and downs.
But the UF water ski team
hopes to stay up among the
national powers this year.
Already scheduled for the
coming season are eight big
tournaments including two at
Camp Wauberg. Coached by Mr.
Jack Eckdahl (Jackies Pa), the
club will have a major obstacle
along its path to prominence.
After winning the National
Invitational team trophy the
past two years, the Gators can
keep the trophy for good by
winning it for a third
consecutive season.
But the worlds best collegiate
skiers are no longer
automatically enrolling at the
UF. Smaller Florida schools as
well as some other southern
colleges are offering atheletic
schloarships to participants.
Here at the UF, team members
are strictly volunteer.
The scholarship status of

'***
"Pm. ¥ i**
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SKI TEAM MEMBERS AND TROPHIES
... from left, top row, Cleveland, Boutchyard,
Tillement; bottom, Gallizzi, John Bedingfield,
Honour

The Florida Invitational Track
meet Saturday will feature an
event for joggers.
There will be a womens half
mile at 1:15 and a mens
handicap at 1:30.
The entrants have to pay the
regular admission to the track
meet and should report to Jack
Gamble at the starting line.
Jogging, the latest health
craze to hit America, may come
to the Florida campus. Bob
Allen of the Intramural
Department who is organizing a
UF Joggers Club.

Clipboard

SKIING A Fun-In-Sun Sport

skiing advanced by some other
schools can be witnessed, for
example, at Tampa University,
where talented Alan Kempt on,
one of the top five skiers in the
world, was given an atheletic
scholarship last year.
Nevertheless, the Gators will
probably still make a big splash
as a club, led by current
European trick champion and
French overall champion;
Jacques Tillement.
A 25-year old native of
southern France, Tillement won
his countrys overall water skiing
championship two years
running.
The Gators also have former
Cypress Gardens show skier and
national inter-collegiate jumping
champion for 1968, Paul Gallizi
of Tampa. Gallizi is one of the
few individuals in the world whoi
can ski with one bare barefoot
foot barefoot backwards!
A national intercollegiate
slalom expert, John Bedingfield

I believe there are people on
this campus who would like to
keep their spirits and bodies in
shape and jogging is the way to
doit, Allen said.
All students, faculty and
other physical specimens
interested in joining the UF
Jogging Club should contact
Allen at the Intramural Office
room 229, Florida Gym or call
392-0581.
Ski Club Meets
UF Water Ski Club will have a
meeting tonight at 7:30 in room
C 4 of the Reitz Union.

of Tampa, rounds out the top
Gator trio.
Club president, Derek
Honour, who describes himself
as mostly an organizational
man hopes to bring home some
points in his specialty, the
slalom. He has been skiing for
only two years.
Though there are 120 club
members, only 15 men and 15
women at most enter
competition, 5 in each event
(slalom, tricks, jumps).
The girls squad, though not

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Completely
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See your Honda dealer for a color brochure, safety pamphlet
and Invisible Circle" film; or write: American Honda Motor
>u& Co Inc .. Dept C-14 Box 50, Gardena, California 90247

i By Bill Dunn*

having the credentials of its male
counterpart, make up for the
gap in potential, form and
beauty.
Former Gator Girl and
Cypress Gardens Girl, Kim
Anton, will grace the waters on
the slalom.
Patty Buchard is considered
the most promising newcomer in
the overall competition while
Margaret Blowers will have a few
tricks up her skis.
In addition to facing tougher
opponents than ever, the skiers

Thursday, April 10,1969, The Florida Alligator, I
a m rn m m mmmmmmm

other big problem is student
support. Honour claims that
there is a real threat. The club
budget could be axed by the
intramurals department if
member as well as fan support
slackens.
Ski team offers the fun-in-sun
student a chance to double his
fun with the added flavor of
watching the nations number
one ski team in action.
So bring your picnic basket
and head for Camp Wauberg.

Page 21



Page 22

?, Th* Florida Alligator, Thursday, April 10, 1969

Crusaders Down Gators

By CHUCK PATRUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
The Gators fell at the hands
of the Crusaders 4-2 Wednesday
in a game marred by erratic
pitching, sloppy fielding and
weak hitting.
Th6 Gators could only get to
Belmont Abbeys Ed Bates for
five hits in the windy weather at
Perry Field.
Struggling throughout the
game Bates seemed to pull
himself together in crucial
situation to keep the Gators
from scoring. Several good
fielding breaks also helped Bates
to the win.
The Crusaders started the
scoring in the top of the fourth
inning when first baseman Bob
HartselTs fly ball to right field
was dropped by UFs Dale
Turlington. Larry Ribcocks
double scored Hartscll with the
first Crusader run.
Doug Eastons single advanced
Ribcock to third base. Belmont
Abbeys catcher Don Giordano
then singled to right field scoring
both Rivcock and Easton when
Turlington committed another
error in the inning.
Belmont Abbey scored their
final run of the game when
Ribcock singled off Gator
reliever Tom Seybold. Easton
then tapped an easy double play
ball to the mound, but Seybold
dropped the ball and both
runners are safe.
With the Crusaders Giordano
at the plate Gator catcher Mike
Ovca picked Ribcock off of
second base. But Giordano
doubled to deep left centerfield
to score Easton.
The Gator scoring came in the
fourth and fifth innings. Guy
McTheny got the UF going by
drawing a walk. Tommy
Rookie Defined
A rookie in major league
baseball is defined as a player
with not more than 45 days on a
roster from opening day to Aug.
31 and has not exceeded 90
official at bats or 45 innings
pitched.

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ERRORS. POOR HITTING HELP

Blakenships hit and run single
advanced McTheny to third
base. Left fielder Tony Dobies
bouncer scored McTheny as
Dobies was thrown out at first
on a freak play that went from
the pitcher to the second
baseman to the shortstop to the
first baseman for the out.
The UFs final run of the game
came in the fifth inning when
Rich Scarborough walked.
Seybold singled and McTheny
scored Scarborough on a line
shot single past the Crusaders

Catcher Ovca Starch
Os Gator Defense

By ALLIGATOR SERVICES
Coach Dave Fuller has
developed many top catchers
over his 21 -year coaching span at
the University of Florida and
Mike Ovca is no exception.
Since Fuller took over the
baseball coaching reins in 1948,
eight catchers have been
honored with all-Southeastern
Conference recognition. Last
year Ovca was named to the
coveted all-SEC squad.
Ovca, captain of the 1969
Gator squad, came to Florida
from Panama City. Last season
the 6 foot, 180-pounder batted
.260 and caught all 38 games for
Fullers pitchers.
Mike has been one of the
most consistent players Ive had
here at Florida, says Fuller,
dean of college coaches in the
South. Last year he led the
team in clutch hitting and is an
outstanding defensive player.
In 1968 Ovca led the Gators
to an Eastern Division win in the
SEC and his mighty bat led
Florida in homeruns with four.
This year the likeable math
major is batting .200 but his
defensive plays behind the plate
have drawn the attention of
many pro scouts.
In 97 chances at the plate he
has only one error to his credit
and leads the team with an
excellent .990 fielding average.
While Florida runners have
stolen 36 bases against their

third baseman.
The Gators starter David
Kahn lost the game to bring his
record to 2-2.
The Gators are now 15-8 after
splitting the series with Belmont
Abbey. UF plays Georgia Friday
and Saturday away, and
Jacksonville away on Tuesday.
The next Gator home game
will be a double-header against
Kentucky a week from this
Friday. Followed by a single
game on Saturday also against
Kentucky.

opponents only eight have made
the mark against the Gators.
The great asset Mike has is
his endurance, says Fuller.
Last year he caught in every
game and this year he has been
in 19 of 21 games.
Fuller credits much of his life
time record of 404-208 to his
former catchers. Players like
Haywood Sullivan, Paul Bocher,
Bobby Barnes, Jerry Bilyk and
now Mike Ovca have made the
grade for Fuller.
Along with his outstanding
play, Mike has been an excellent
leader this year, says Fuller.
He will be a big help to us as
we go down the stretch in SEC
play.
Florida travels to Athens, Ga.,
to meet the Georgia Bulldogs
this weekend in a two game
series.

I
" * V*
. . ;; Sr
Im a masochist. I threw
away my instructions
on self-defense
/it r
A little pain is one thing, but sheer
disaster is something else. We put
instructions on self-defense in every
package of Hai Karate After Shave
and Cologne for your own safety, be-
cause we know what girls can do to 1
an under-protected, over-splashed
guy. So please read the instructions KaR
... even if it doesnt hurt.
Hai Karate-be careful how you use it,
1969 Leeming Division. Chas. Pfizer & Co., Inc. New York. N Y

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UF OVCA CONNECTS
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Bacheler To Face Canadian Olympian

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
Canadian Olympic long
distance runner Dave Ellis has
confirmed that he will compete
in the Florida Invitational Meet
Saturday, Head Coach Jimmy
Carnes announced Wednesday.
Ellis strongest competition in
the three-mile run will be Jack
Bacheler, Florida Track Club
Olympian.
I dont think Ive run against
Bacheler before, Ellis said.
Because Im sure I would
remember him since he is so tall

SCAT Fills Posts,
Plans Center Day
Omegas Student Center Action Team succeeded in filling empty
positions and planned Activity Center Day at a meeting Tuesday
night.
The more student enthusiasm we can generate, the sooner the
coliseum will become a reality, said Assistant General Chairman
Steve Rohar. The success of Project SCAT depends on every member
of the university community.
New positions were filled but some are still open to those who are
interested. Jean Solari volunteered to fire-up support of campus
living areas and in particular that of her dorm area, Rawlings Hall.
Among other key posts filled were Fraternity Coordinator, Wayne
Hieker; Public Relations Coordinator, Drew Straehley; Film
Documentary Coordinator, Ted Erk, and Quarter Drive Coordinator,
Ed Booze.
SCAT still seeks interested individuals to head up the letter writting
campaign as well as assistants for other key positions.
Our immediate task is to produce a successful Activities Center
Day, said Doug Duncan, Activity Center Day coordinator.
He urged all interested students to attend a brain storming
meeting to be held 7:30 p.m., Thursday at the ATO house, for
Activity Day, May 2.

Tigers Sign
Two Cagers
Auburn landed three of the
Souths top cage prizes this past
week by signing Dan Kirkland of
Columbus, Ga., and Bobby Nix
from Owen County, Ky., to
grant-in-aids and receiving a
committment from 6-7 Ralph
Smith of Woodlawn High School
in Birmingham.
Kirkland, ranked the No. 1
high school player in Georgia all
season, scored 940 points as a
senior and averaged 33.5 points
per game. In his last ten games
the average was 38.6.
Smith, Woodlawns towering
center, announced Saturday that
he will join Kirland and Nix on
next years Tiger frosh. Smith
was a three year starter. He
received over 100 contacts
concerning college basketball.
He also was picked as one of
the top 100 high school players
before the season started.
Ralph averaged 24.5 points
and 16.5 rebounds a game his
senior season and 22.5 points
and 16.5 rebounds a game his
junior year in high school.

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ELRODS AUTO REPAIR
Corvair Specialist
1031 So. Main 376-7771

and would stand out.
Ellis, a native of England and
student at Eastern Michigan, did
not start competing until seven
years ago when he was 24. He
went to a National Athletic
Intercollegiate Association
school instead of a larger NCAA
school because he was too old to
compete in the NCAA.
- 31-year-old runner is the
current NAIA Indoor Champ,
the three-mile and six-mile
winner at the Kentucky Relays
last weekend and the U.S. Track
and Field two-mile event winner.

| All-Campus |
Gagers
% BLUE LEAGUE &
4 i
{<
$: Steve Kaufman Chi Phi G
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:? Bob Peck Delta Chi F £
5 Ken Fowle Phi Tau F : : :
V. >!
V.
S &
4 ORANGE LEAGUE &
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v. :
:$
Chuck Schaffer SN G
Ken Hartsaw ATO G:s
Ralph Erickson Delts C :j:[
Paul Hughes Sig Ep F ij:
Rick Perillo TEP F 5
Good Sorvice Starts
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Ellis, unlike Bacheler who
became ill before the 5000
meter finals and didnt compete,
was able to run. He finished
17th.
Bachelers best time in the
three-mile run is 13:31, Ellis has
done 13:16. Currently Ellis is
running about a 13:20
three-mile. The world record is
12:52.4,
We are matching one
Olympian from one country

Bikes At Drags
A Motorcycle Happening will be this Saturday night as Gainesville
Dragway presens its bike inaugural.
Dick Ester will be towing his Norton dragster bike from Fernandina
Beach to take on Jacksonvilles George Adamec.
Adamec will debut his new 1200 c.c. Harley Davidson, with speeds
of 140 miles per hour expected. Ester has challenged Adamec in a best
3 out of 5 heads up match race, winner take all.
Seven separate bike classes will also be run with trophies awarded in
each division.
DRAG RACING
UNDER the LIGHTS
SATURDAY NIGHT
3% miles n. of G'ville Airport on SR 225

Thursday, April 10, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

with an Olympian from another
country, which will give
Bacheler a chance he missed in
the Olympics, Carnes said.
Bacheler has not had an
opportunity to run against any
of the top long distance runners
so far this track season.
This will be Bachelers First
true competition since he was at
the Olympics, Carnes said. It
should push him to a good
time.

Page 23



Page 24

I, The Florida Alligetor, Thursday, April TO, 1960

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