Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Bicycle Man GoneBut Not Forgotten

(EDITORS NOTE: The Bicycle Man, Ray
Brannan, legendary personality at UF, has been
absent from Gainesville for more than a year. He
lived and ran a bicycle business in the two-story
white house on University Avenue for more than 20
years.
This is the first of a series on the man himself, the
legal conditions which have allowed the house to
exist in its substandard state and the legal battle
over ownership which is developing in circuit court.)
By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
Walking past the Bicycle Mans house on West
University Avenue is like avoiding the blind

IP Names Slate
At Gentle Monday

By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
The first of three Gentle
Mondays was held in the Plaza
of the Americas.
John Mica, Issue Party
candidate for student body
president introduced himself and
the other major Issue Party
candidates during the rally held
during class breaks fourth, fifth
and sixth periods.
Gene Middleton and his band
played rock music during the
class breaks. Cokes sold for five
cents and hot dogs went for 10
cents.
Except for the Gentle
Mondays the rest of the Issue
Party campaign will be
conducted in the dormitories,
Russ Bobo, IP slate chairman
said. He said Mica wants to
discuss issues with the students.
The two newest candidates
on the Issue slate are Jack
Klausner, 4LW, running for
Chancellor of the Honor Court
and Carol Anderson, ILW,
running for Chief Justice of the
Traffic Court.
Klausner wants to change
procedures in the HC to insure
every defendant a fair and
speedy trial. He also wants to
extend the courts authority
over civil claims against student
organizations and their officers.
Miss Anderson is a graduate
of Wellesley College and now a
member of the John Marshall
Bar Association. She is also a
member of Phi Delta Delta
womens legal fraternity. At
Wellesley she participated as
judge and justice in student
courts.
Marty Haber is the Issue
candidate for SG treasurer.
Haber, a senior in accounting,
wants to divorce the treasurer's
office completely from politics.
Haber is running on his
experience in the accounting
field.
Filling the two top spots on
the Issue slate are John Mica, a
graduate student in education,
and Steve Hull, a senior in
business administration and
former Alligator editor.
Mica wants more student
participation in university
committees, a thorough
restructuring of SG including
elimination of what he termed
the spoils system and putting
student funds to better use
and academic changes.
Students want to deal with
real issues, Mica said, and not

CITY TO FINALLY CLEAN UP BRANNONS LOT

MARTY HABER
... SG treasurer aspirant
4- Wm£
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JACK KLAUSNER
... Chancellor hopeful
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CAROL ANDERSON
... seeks traffic court post
play political games.
Hull, Issue candidate for VP,
is a former secretary of Blue Key
and one of the organizers of the
now defunct New Movement
Party.
Mica said Hull is a proven
leader because of his work while
editor of the Florida Alligator,
which won the Pacemaker award
as the best student daily in the
country for the first time last
year.

I DEPTH REPORT |
beggarman on a city street.
You glance briefly with disgust, with morbid I
wonder how it got that way curiosity. You reflect
on the sad condition for a second, then walk on,
forgetting what you just saw.
You go to the closest store and buy some gum or
cigarettes.
But in the coming weeks, perhaps in the next few
days, you may be seeing a wrecking company
removing the building and junk.

The
Florida Alligator

Vol 61, No. W

COSTLY VOTE MACHINES
Senate To Consider
SIO,OOO Bid Tonight

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
A SIO,OOO request for
the purchase of voting
machines for student
elections comes before the
Student Senate tonight.
Secretary of the Interior Bill
Modlin, in a letter to the Senate
making the request, said since
SG presently spends $4,500
renting machines the purchase
would save money in the long
run.
The meeting is set for 7:30 in
room 359 of the Reitz Union.
Senate Majority Leader
Charles Harris will introduce a
bill clarifying and expanding the
powers of the Senate in
chartering student organizations.
This measure comes as the
result of a conflict between the
Union Board of Managers and
the Senate over which body had
the power to amend the
Managers charter.
An additional bill amending a
chapter of the Student Body
Statutes will be introduced by
Bruce Boudreau. The bill is
designed to clear up the conflict
between the new constitution
and the old law saying the Chief
Justice of the Traffic Court must
be a law student.
Another bill, proposed by
Harris, would amend the
election laws to allow candidates
banners to be posted on private
buildings.
Student organizations whose
charters will be reviewed tonight
are:
Association of Political
Science Graduate Students
Masters of Business
Administration Club
The Afro-American
Students Organization
Circle K.

America's Number 1 College Daily

University of Florida, Gainesville

STEP RIGHT UP? NICK ARROYO
Carnigras employee Bruce Erbs is perched atop one of the spinning,
whirling-type rides, which opened for business Monday. Something
seems to be missing, or maybe its one of those real scary ones.
Aldrich Steps Down
As Alligator Editor

Alligator Editor-In-Chief
Harold Aldrich resigned from his
position Monday afternoon.
In a letter to the Board of
Student Publications, Aldrich
said he was resigning because his
declining academic status
v
s
HAROLD ALDRICH
. . resigning editor

The City of Gainesville has finally succeeded,
after more than a year of formal litigation, in
obtaining a decision from circuit court declaring the
Bicycle Mans property a public nuisance.
The court has given the owner (ownership is
currently being contested in a cross-claimant suit)
15 days from the date of the order March 26 to
meet the housing ordinances his property has
violated.
This means that after Wednesday, the city has
been authorized to enter and remove all buildings,
junk, weeds, etc. except the building facing NW Ist
Avenue.
But today you stop in front of the rotting,
run-down two story structure and stare. You
(SEE 'BICYCLE' PAGE 3)

Tuesday, April 8, 1969

made it necessary for him to
devote as much time as
possible to his studies. He said
he needed only a few hours for
graduation.
Aldrich also said his health
has been steadily declining
since he assumed his position
last September.
The continuation of the
vigorous pace required of the
editor may cause long-lasting, if
not permanent, damage to my
future good health, Aldrich
said.
Dave Doucette, present
managing editor, will assume
Aldrichs duties as acting editor.
BSP has an editors selection
meeting set for April 25.
Aldrich said he had watched 3
with pleasure the growth and
maturity of the newspaper and
expressed confidence that the
Alligator will continue to be
Americas No. 1 College Daily.



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 8.. 1969

'Soul' Rascals
Coming May 2
By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The soul-singing Rascals will be brought to the UF May 2 by the
Interfratemity Council in an effort to raise money for the UF
Coliseum Building Fund.
All profits from the concert, scheduled for 8 p.m. on Florida Field,
will be placed in the fund on behalf of the Order of Omegas Project
SCAT (Student Coliseum Action Team).
Tickets will go on sale April 14 for $2.50 per person at the Reitz
Union box office.
IFC donated SSOO from the Beach Boys concert last spring, the
first coliseum fund-raising concert.
Student interest in a coliseum grew this fall, when the capacity of
the Florida Gym was reduced from 7,000 to 5,500 because of fire
hazards. This is slightly over 25 per cent of the student body.
Head basketball coach Tommy Bartlett said the gym is a little
outdated, not adequate and right now probably the worst such
structure in the Southeastern Conference.
The gymnasium was opened in 1948 and since that time every
other school in the SEC has built a new field house or gymnasium,
Bartlett said.
The present Order of Omegas Project SCAT is a result of the
coordination of two student fund-raising efforts. Jim Devaney,
president of the Order of Omega, is general chairman of Project SCAT
and Steve Rohan, SCAT organizer, is assistant general chairman.
Projects for the group include a Student Activities Center Day, an
Orange and Blue Day, a concert, a raffle, a letter-writing campaign,
and a 25 cent membership drive.
The latter began with the UF swimmers each giving a quarter to
become the first members of SCAT.
Project SCAT plans to work closely with the UF Planning
Department, Rohan said.
Walter Matherly, director of planning, has organized a feasibility
study for joint operation of a coliseum between the UF, the city of
Gainesville and Alachua.
The Rascals, a major box office attraction, have written and
recorded hits such as How Can I Be Sure, Groovin and Good
Lovin.

COURSE OFFERINGS GROW

FEC Program Expands

The challenge to assume
responsibility for ones
education among a group of UF
students is growing.
The number of course
offerings has increased from 13
during the inaugural winter
quarter of Florida Experimental
College to 32 for its spring
quarter.

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MORE MONEY FOR COLISEUM
Steve Rohan (left) gets a $301.95 check from Joe Hilliard,
chairman of the Rathskeller Committee, for the UF Coliseum Fund.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
I entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
Thf Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of afl advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

Enthusiasm for the
educational experiment has
spread through the Universitys
faculty about a dozen were
involved with the first quarters
classes. That number has swelled
to 35 for the current session.
Topics for classes range from
The University Today, and
Social Responsibility and Mass

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RASCALS COMING MAY 2
... to raise money for UF Coliseum Fund
Uniform Punishment Bill
OKed Monday By Hale

An Interhall Council bill
establishing residence hall and
area judiciaries and uniform
punishment of violations was
approved Monday by Vice
President for Student Affairs
Lester Hale.

Communications to American
Jazz: An Overview, according
to Hank Gooch, one of the
coordinators and a member of
the executive committee.
Coordinators for the classes
come from varied
fields medicine, law,
philosophy, education, English,
sociology, journalism and
history. All are faculty members
of the University except for one
who teaches at Santa Fe Junior
College.
The underlying philosophy
for the FEC is that a person will
learn more effectively that
which he wants and needs to
learn if he has a degree of
control over the learning
environment.
Sessions are informal and
unstructured, with the student
raising questions that will be
discussed and providing much of
the direction of the course. The
coordinator serves as a convener
and resource person for the
group.

INTRODUCTORY SPECIAL
LARGE DR| NK FREE
ALL NEW TURKEY PORE-80y95$
MINI-TURKEY 65<
DONT MISS OUTI TODAY ONLY!
FREE /W*
DELIVERY PORE-BOY * 37 8-1492
- UNIV AVE. across from Univrsitv City Bank

The judiciaries, composed of
five or ten members from each
area, will replace honor councils,
and take all disciplinary action
power out of the hands of the
housing staff.
The areas of jurisdiction
include violation of housing,
interhall, and area council
regulations; disturbances which
disrupt the area, hall, floor or
individual residents; assessment
of property damages through the
university billing system; and
referrals and appeals from lower
bodies.
The possible actions that may
be taken against a violator, as
outlined in the bill are,
suspension of the privileges of a
resident for a given period of
time (for example, open house
or curfew), conduct warning,
disciplinary room transfer, and
referral to a higher body.

FO

The primary objective of
residence hall judiciaries is to
provide a means for the
development and maintenance
of a living environment that
supports and enhances the
educational goals of the UF.
Military Queen
Contest Slated
The deadline for entries in
the Military Ball Queen Contest
is 5 pm. Friday. Applications
should be turned in to room 104
in the ROTC building.
The Military Ball Queen will
be crowned May 3, at the
Military Ball, the only formal
ball on campus all year. The ball
is an annual event for advanced
ROTC cadets and members of
special ROTC units.



Bicycle Man GoneBut Not Forgotten

PA6E ONE^IP
notice the paneless windows on the second floor,
the half-closed Venetian blinds, screens dangling,
hundreds of bike frames and charred bedsprings.
You kick away some of the litter of paper cups at
your feet. It might be your own. And you close
your eyes.
The house is quiet. But it wasnt always that way.
Imagine.
It is 10 years ago or maybe 15. You open your
eyes, amazed because the house really doesnt look
much different. Its still covered with bikes and
parts and other things.
But its so noisy! The house is alive with the
barking of happy dogs you see at least six running
around. You hear the bubbling of little kids and UF
students, the miews and purrs of stray but well-fed
cats. You see the nervous hide-and-seek of rabbits

| Australian I
I Marriage: A I
I m i :|
Anthony Barker, from |:
, l ):
the **' *\ [ :
i trimmings. Following one of the I jlt jfl Rj
A customs the bride rides to
church in a horse drawn carriage Jflj >
to meet her groom, and the
| carriage. 5
The bride, the former Miss |f # SS ,*
Peggy Tong from Malaysia, sat k v
\\ beside driver Jake from the ViP^
\l Cowboy Riding School. The j^
couple were married
|i Trinity Episcopal Church K a HHI IjjjK M i
Saturday.
Barker post-doctorate 1
>: fellow in physics, and his wife is
I Jj^ 0 Candldate m physics at MAKE'DRIVES THE BARKERS WICK ARROYO |
:jj ... from the church in Australian style §
K^XWX>>:<^?X ; : >KWK*>>X W*i*>><*>*>XW?MCCCO>:*MgflCCOOWO | BOMOOOOW>OC | OOOOOC<VV*--*!*-
Journalism College
Begins New Program

Going practices in
journalism fresh to the
classroom in an experimental
program at UF started
Monday.
During the spring quarter
staff members from Florida
newspapers will visit the College
of Journalism and
Communications for a week
each to give special lectures and
laboratory instruction to student
journalists.
Kicking off the new program
will be Fred Pettijohn, assistant
to the president of Gore
Newspapers, publishers of the
Fort Lauderdale News and the
Pompano Beach Sun-Sentinel.
Pettijohn will lecture
graduating seniors on the role of
the newspaper in modem
society, the organization and

GATOR
GRAS
W
TUG of WAR
Contest
ROTC field
APR. 12 pm-

operation of a newspaper, ethics,
responsibility and problems of a
newspaper and the future of
newspapers in Florida.

After 5 dinner special
4 Tender Plump
Chicken
M *-
£ Pipin Hot French Fries o M
f >'
Butter S
Honey Packet
2035 N.W. 13th Street/GainejyjUf/Phone 378-2304

and the excited chatterings and flapping of wings of
the sparrows overhead.
In the middle of this misplaced jungle an
unshaven, unwashed, tall and friendly looking man
is fixing a broken tire frame and talking to a group
of students.
He pats the head of the child whose bike he has
just repaired and sends him home. Smiling, he
watches the youngster ride off, down University
Avenue. He didnt ask for payment.
The man is Ray Brannan, fondly known as Dirty
Dan the Bicycle Man to generations of UF
students, Gainesville residents, and children.
Since 1946 Brannan, a former UF student and
tennis star, ran a bicycle business of such volume
and diversity that he acquired a national and even
international reputation.
For more than a year now, the Bicycle Mans
house, located between University Plaza and
Demians Leather Shop on West University Avenue,
has been sealed up and nobody has seen Dirty

I DICK HoiMii
JcWfI.EC/ §
I JLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY I
fl REPAIRS S
I TROPHIES-ENGRAVING 1
I 1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
ItoBLOCKFROMCAMRJS

Dan in all that time.
Neighbors and friends will, for the most part,
freely tell you stories of his kindness to animals and
children, of his pure pot appearance, and of his
peculiar attitudes and ways.
Some will confidentially discuss his apparent
mental condition while others will come right out
and tell you about his mental deterioration and his
fears that the town was closing in on him.
Two neighbors, both long-time Gainesville
residents, refused to discuss the Bicycle Man at all.
For the story is a tragic one, though Mr.
Brannan never asked anybody for anything,
recalled Mrs. Claudie Mae Hamilton, a maid with UF
for more than 20 years at Flint Hall, just across
from the Bicycle Mans house.
It wasnt that he was without money that he
was the way he was. He just wouldnt spend it on
himself, she said.
Neighbors and friends havent seen him in about a
year. Theyll tell you they heard Brannan is visiting
his sister in Tennessee.
But Alachua County Court records show that the
now legendary, varily called eccentric, unusual,
kind, withdrawn, friendly, intelligent, Ray
Brannan was committed to a mental institution in
Tennessee on April 16,1968.

?
I Travel
easy...
mu bus
lonfgomery 'l' I
T Dallas I
Ft. Myers I
No change of bus or baggage
Routed over Interstate Highways I
Climate controlled Silver Eagle I
coaches for all seasons I
Rest rooms aboard
/From Gainesville 1-way 1
' Tampa $4.35
only 2% hours non-stop 1
Ft. Myers SB.OO I
the only thru service 1
Washington $26.75
faster thru service express route 1
St. Louis I
the only thru service 1
l TRAILWAYS ) 1
V 527 W. Univ, Ave. 372-6327 y 1
Trattwiys
easiest travel on earth ~

TuMday, April 8,1969. Tha Florida Alligator.

Page 3



i. The Florida Alliftor, Tuaaday, April 8,1969

Page 4

Architect Speaks
Here Tonight
Larry Medlin, a UF graduate
in architecture will lecture on
Tension Structures, at 8 pm
tonight in Room 105 B of the
AFA complex.
Medlin is currently teaching
architecture at Washington
University in St. Louis, Missouri.

SET FOR APRIL 15
Free Concert Scheduled

UFs Mens and Womens glee
clubs will combine April 15 to
present a free spring concert at
8:15 p.m. in University
Auditorium.
Directed by John Grigsby,
the musical groups will perform
the numbers they sang during
their recent tour of the Florida
Panhandle and parts of Alabama
and Georgia. The program
includes selections ranging from
Bach and Brahams to spirituals,

Bus Ad Analyzes
Floridas Growth

A special analysis of Floridas
growth markets, based on
research by UFs College of
Business Administration, is
featured in the April issue of
Florida Trend Magazine.
The magazine, designed for
the business community,
presents an area-by-area analysis
of the background and economic
prospects in what it calls the
fullest review of Floridas
business and financial
development that ever has been
assembled.
Roger H. Gates, a Ph.D.
candidate in economics, served
as special analyst for the study.
Gates is responsible for the
survey conducted and the date
collected.
Throughout the report an
attempt was made to use the
most recent and reliable date,
Gates said.

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ISTACKS of Slacks!!* I
I Wild And Wide < I I
I Second Pair Offer J I I
lany pair in stock II
I 10AM I

DROPOUTS
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folk songs, and popular tunes.
The glee clubs, 82-voices
strong, practice four times
weekly for concerts on and off
campus. During the break
between winter and spring
quarters the clubs take their
annual tour, performing mostly
for high school, civic and alumni
organizations.
Club members, who receive
one hour academic credit for
membership, are chosen by

The magazine reports that
Florida is rapidly maturing in
five great growth markets.
Highlights of these markets
show:
Miami and the Southeast
with continued dominance in
business and construction;
St. Petersburg-Tampa and
the Southwest having a fast rise
in industry;
t Orlando and Central
Florida experiencing rapid
increase in population;
Jacksonville and the
Northeast setting new retail
trade records and
Pensacola-Panama City and
the Northwest with the fastest
increase in personal income.
Florida Door
Floridas Key deer stand
about two feet tall and weigh 50
to 80 pounds.

BY HOWARD POSTI
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audition. Most are non-music
majors.
The Mens Glee Club, the
oldest musical organization on
campus, was organized in 1907;
the Womens Glee Club in 1948,
when UF became coed. They
have both traveled in many parts
of the United States and the
Caribbean.
The glee clubs are sponsored
jointly by Student Government
and the Department of Music.

Be the first on your block to get the
Geezinslaws.
Wanna smile?
We ll send em to you
to look at
...and keep.
(actual size)
Wanna laugh out loud?
Clean out your ears and
let the Geezinslaws in
to dirty them up.
(And they sing too, somewhat.)

DIAMONDS
and JEWELRY
SAVE Rfl %
UP TO VW
rWilliston Road cl S W 1.1 in s*^

meagjttgyemve T

Capitol Records, Inc.
1750 N. Vine, Hollywood 90028
I Please send me some Geezinslaws. The looking at i
i ir VeH ot the ,ist^nin 9 to kind. Offer expires May
I, 1969. ~
| Name
j Address <£> I
City State Zone



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NEW CAMPUS OUTHOUSE?
No, this really isn't... it's a weather protection booth for UF
campus policemen who check decals at various control points for
reserved area parking. This booth is located at the University Avenue
end Buckman Drive entrance to the campus. It measures four ft sq.,
has a bulletin board attached to it and will have a "University" sign
when completed. Officer K. W. Overstreet operates the "controls" at
this booth. Two similar booths will be located at the North-South
Drive-Stadium Road and Newell Drive and Inner Drive intersections.

Registrars
Meet Today
Registrars and admissions
officers for 69 institutions of
higher learning in the state meet
at UF today and Wednesday.
The Florida Association of
Collegiate Registrars and
Admissions Officers is devoting
its sessions to problems,
procedures and possible
solutions in areas that are
common to registrars and
admissions personnel. Subjects
under discussion include
certification of student
enrollment to Selective Service;
disadvantaged group problems,
year-round operation and how
to evaluate foreign transcripts.
All sessions will be held at the
Ramada Inn with regisrtation
from 8:30 to 10 ajn. today.
Kenneth N. Vickery, dean of
admissions at Clemson
University, is featured speaker
for the 12:30 p.m. luncheon
Wednesday.
Other speakers include Dr.
James P. Satterwhite, medical
missionary on leave who is a
physician in UFs Student
Health Service, and Dr. Roy
, Lassiter, associate dean of
academic affairs at the university
and president of the Florida
Association of Colleges and
Universities.
A demonstration of the
universitys unique
computer-assisted registration
program also will be included
during the two days. The
program has received national
publicity because of its features
permitting individual student
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HIS LAB FILLED WITH SPIDERS

UF Prof Studies Venom

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
Can a soft-spoken pun with a
fear of snakes becpme a
sucessful arachnologist?
Dr. John McCrone, associate
professor of zoology and biology
at UF did
His laboratory is filled with
thousands of bottles containing
spiders, scorpions and tarantulas.
He is studying the biology of
arachnids and the components
of their venom under a National
Institute of Health grant.
For the last few years I have
been studying the venoms of
widow spiders in the United
States their biochemistry and
toxicology. Then last spring I
decided to expand my work to
include spiders and scorpions
from Central and South America
and Mexico.
McCrones goal is to discover
the cause and effect of reactions
from venom.
Im basically interested in
the animals for non-medical

purposes. But during the work
we have isolated various
components from venoms and
have been able to make very
good anti-venoms from them.
Because spider bites are not a
major problem in the United
States and currently marketed
anti-venoms are satisfactory,
McCrone is not working on the
venom for commercial use.
Commercial anti-venoms
attack the whole venom, but
McCrones anti-venoms are
directed toward isolated
components; this quality makes

tuesmv STEAK SPECIAL
LON SON BROIL
Ajjtfltr W#
I ¥ 1225 W UNIVERSITY AVI |-
Jr Vi BLOCK FROM CAMPUS_^^_^_^S

TtiMday, April 8,1969, The Florida Alligator.

these anti-venoms important for
research.
McCrone said there is a
possibility he will eventually
work on a marketable scorpion
anti-venom, because in Mexico
scorpion bites cause a number of
deaths every year. But his main
interest is the basic biology of
the arachnids rather than finding
anti-venom.
Sinking City
Mexico City, built on mud,
has been slowly sinking for 600
years.

Page 5



Page 6

i. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 8. 1969

Pfttl/wJuto
All
AoWVtM.

EDITORIAL

Best We Get Busy

The recent fire in the off-campus Sigma
Nu fraternity house, after which damage was
estimated at $150,000, brings up much
concern for fire safety.
Although it is a shame that such a tragedy
should have to be the stimulus for this
concern, it is apparent there may be
currently existing conditions in both
on-campus and off-campus buildings that are
similar to the one which probably ignited
the Sigma Nu fire.
Gainesville fire officials have, from
statements made by fraternity members,
attributed the fires probable cause to faulty
electrical wiring. The Sigma Nus stone
masonry house was built in the late 19205.
Predating its construction are many of UFs
Gothic and Tudor designed older academic
halls and dormitories, some of which are
located only two blocks away on University
Avenue.
Only one blanket fire inspection has been
made of all campus buildings within the last
10 years, although spot checks are made
every four months.
The hang-up in these periodic inspections
is that they are made by either physical
plant employes or local firemen, not, as they
should be, by what Physical Plant Director
Calvin Greene calls interested but
disinterested officials such as the state fire
marshal.

Silent Observer

Its That Time Os The Season

Some say its the time of the
season for loving ... at UF its
the time of the season for
anything but.
The sweet nothings you will
have whispered in your ear for
the next three weeks will not be
platitudes of undying love
although the whisperers would
have you believe so. Like true
gigolos they will promise you
the world for they court you,
and then disappear almost
without a trace. In this case,
three weeks will be about as
much as- you can stomach
anyway.
Student politicos have the
unique talent for tuming-in once
a year and making everyone else
turn-off. And this is the season
they come out of the woodwork

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the auspices of
the Board of Student Publications.
4 4 ~
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union.
Phone 392-1681, 392-1682, or 392-1683.
w
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors
or of the writer of the article and not those of the University of
Florida.

The Florida Alligator
The price of freedom is the exercise of responsibility."
Dave Doucette
Acting Editor-In-Chief

Carol Sanger
Assignments Editor

and pounce on the fertile
grounds of the Florida campus
en masse.
If you are one of the many
students who feel left out, like
youre in a world far different
from the world of the politico
and that is the reason you cant
understand the strange sounds
coming forth from their frothing
mouths, take heart.. .its them,
not you, who are really out of
tune.
And the un-tune tunes they
are singing now dont leave too
much hope for the strains youll
be hearing the weeks ahead.
Political deals are nothing
new and unfortunately, theyre
almost accepted, but that still
doesnt make them right.

Raul Ramirez
Acting Managing Editor

A complete survey of fire hazards in all
campus buildings is scheduled this year by
the state fire marshals Jacksonville office.
Greene thinks an inspection of this
all-pervasive type should be made every year.
We agree. And the upcoming one should
be moved up. The UF needs a complete,
detailed inspection right now.
It is highly likely that older buildings on
campus such as Buckman, Thomas, Peabody,
Floyd, Flint and Anderson, like the Sigma
Nu house probably did, all have inadequate
electrical systems, even though most have
had some remodeling since their
construction.
Until a fire marshals inspection can be
made, and we hope this will be in the
immediate future, we urge all students,
faculty and administrators to curb their use
of electrical circuits, lest another catastrophe
erupt.
In addition, all building administrators
and resident hall advisers should plan now
for holding fire drills during hours of peak
occupancy.
The Sigma Nus apparently thought they
were safe. We dont know the conditions of
their house before the fire.
But we do know that as of right now
neither fire officials nor building occupants
know the full condition of all campus
circuitry and other possible fire hazards.
Best we get busy.

By Carol Sanger

At this point, no one would
deny the fact that Charles
Shepherd is the front-runner in
the campaign. There really isnt
any reason why his campaign
cant tell it like it is, and it
may.. .only time will tell.
But right now, the tale of
time is pretty strong already.
Promises have been made and
are in the process of being kept.
One is the unqualified,
qualified candidate for the
office of Chief Justice of the
Traffic Court on the First Party
ticket.
According to the statutes, the
post is to be filled by a law
student. Somehow the First
Party candidate doesnt quite fit
that simple description. Hes a
business major. And somehow,
the statute is scheduled to be
brought up before the Student
Senate tonight to be changed to
make the description fit the
man. How convenient.
And the seasons young ..
and the beat goes on ... until
April 24 ... and when you get
sick enough you can always start
laughing at them ... for a
change.

Glenn Fake
News Editor

xgmgS **
Tow ,4re Under Arrest For Fishing In Peruvian Waters
FThe Spectator ************************
Nazi Decency
5y Stephen Robitaille*
MIAMI lt all began when Jim Morrison, lead singer of The
Doors decided hed do his orgasmic thing before a crowd of young
fans who had expected a little less skin and a little bit more music.
Morrison was exposed, the police just froze, the fans were repulsed
and the Doors left town free and easy.
But Morrison had been a bit much and Miamians were concerned
the decent entertainment would become a thing of the past.
Unless something is done to defend decency, many said, our
nation will go to pot.
Several high school leaders decided to organize a Decency Rally
to further the cause good clean entertainment. And just because
they were such good Americans they decided to throw in some
support for God, Country, and the better things in life.
Jfhe battle of the ridiculous extremes was just beginning to shape
up. A hard rock singer had pulled a fast one on some innocent young
people, and he was wrong. But no one ever said that he represented
the moral judgment of American youth. Yet the incident provided a
cause for those who believe that the answer to lifes problems lies in
denouncing all that is not short-haired, God-fearing and red, white and
blue.
They gathered in Miamis Orange Bowl on Sunday, March 23,
30,000 of them, and were presented with several hours of good, clean,
entertainment. The rally itself was not overdone, yet it was indicative
of a growing mass closemindedness concerning radical or
unconventional beliefs in this country.
It is not healthy for 30,000 young Americans to suspend judgment
on American military involvements, Negro unrest, and antiquated
social institutions, and to replace consideration of these issues with
flag-waving rallies exhibitions such as the Up With People nonsense.
Incidents such as the Morrison-Decency Rally affair are polarizing
the citizens of this nation, and the vacuum left in the middle will
surely suck us all into a bitter conflict with each other.
I gasp with horror when I think of what could have happened at
the Rally if a group of dirty-hippy-types had been put on display at
the mid-field stripe as examples of growing indecency. It is not
inconceiveable that the crowd of flag-waving, concerned young
patriots would have launched a mass attack from the stands, using
their pointed flag tips as weapons of decency to destroy the
long-haired, barbarian enemy on the field.
Sure, this is a little far fetched. But I still shudder just a little when
I recall seeing thousands of screaming chanting young Americans
defending their own viewpoints in such an overt and obviously naive
manner. If their Communist enemies were in the crowd, they were
probably busy stirring them up for the great big Decency Rally of the
future.
Shades of Nazi Germany?



Speaking Out

SG Sexless?

Having worked in the womens dormitories, the Senate, AWS, both
womens leadership honories, in political campaigns, and as Sec. of
Womens Affairs in Student Government, I have had much experience
with women screaming about the lack of womens leadership on
campus. The blame for this deficiency is generally placed on The
Blue Key Conspiracy or politics but never, never on the women
themselves.
While it is true that there are many women with the qualities of
intelligence and enthusiasm that would qualify them for positions of
responsibility, it is also true that because of their own refusal to
participate politically, and because of their fear to take a stand in a
controversy, they are denying themselves the respect and
opportunities to contribute that they so fervently crave.
Too many womens groups and women leaders mentally vomit
at the mention of the word politics. They would rather sit drooling
outside the door of involvement rather than taint themselves with
the selling of souls they ignorantly believe goes on in Student
Government or the ugliness of a controversial decision.
The womens organizations have avoided all conflict so
concientiously that they are rapidly becoming Ladies Tea and Toast
Societies (thats milk toast) who pass resolutions supporting the
football team but are silent when the Pill, SSOC, or Megill is being
discussed.
Actually, politics in Student Government is no nastier than the
sorority rivalries or dorm elections with which women are already
familiar. Politics anywhere is the method men use to obtain an
acceptable compromise of ideologies, actual policies, and the choice
of who shall lead. Anyone who is willing to reason with others in the
hope of obtaining a mutually acceptable agreement is a practicing
politician.
Campus politics seems more complicated because it involves many
groups making many compromises. There are selfish groups and
people who approach an election with a whats in it for me attitude
but by far the majority of students working in SG and elections do so
out of genuine convictions in the worth of a particular candidate or
project.
If women are disgusted with certain aspects of campus politics, the
best way to obtain reform is by activiely working in a campaign. Once
women have become politically active and aware they will find their
opportunities and effectiveness in Student Government greatly
increased. They will discover that for the most part positions are not
bought and sold in return for political support but are awarded with
concern for qualifications and abilities.
When a choice has to be made between two applicants of equal
ability, helping in the campaign is a point in your favor.
This same policy would also be true if the choice had to be made
between an equally qualified man and woman. Too frequently it is the
man who has devoted his time to the election so he gets the position.
Not because he is a man or because SG hates women.
Although political involvement is one way to become aware of the
opportunities SG offers women, it is by no means the only way to
offer ones services. Last year positions were open to work on the
Rathskeller, SG Productions, Project Samson, Accent and others.
Anyone interested could have worked in a responsible position on any
of these. If there is a project that a woman feels SG should initiate,
there is no reason why she cant present herself as chairman in charge
of seeing that it gets done.
Dont wait to be recruited for the ambiguous job of working in
SG. Too many of the women believed to be burning with a desire to
work in SG are mostly just looking for away to fill up their spare
time and meet boys rather than really interested in concrete programs
to benefit the Student Body.
No woman who really has something to offer besides sex and
complaints is going to be turned away.
She may have to be persistant, but if she truly has innovations that
she is willing to work for, she will be welcomed with roses by a SG
that is searching for a creativity that is sexless.
In order to appear in the Alligator, letters
to theeditor must be typed and signed and
should not exceed 300 words in length.
Writers names may be withheld from
publication for just cause. The editor
reserves the right to edit all letters in the
interest of space.

By Jeanne Johnson

OPEN FORUM:

Get Your Own 'Soap Box

MR. EDITOR:
This letter is in response and criticism to the
article An Issue For SSOC written by Steve
Fahrer and appearing in the Alligator on April 3. It
is not my intention to wade through the poppycock
in which Mr. Fahrer casts himself as the ideal
Regent, saying he knows what we need.
The Board of Regents, any one of them, is a
good deal more qualified to serve than Mr. Fahrer.
The correction I would like to make concerns his
statement that we do not have freedom of speech.
Because no professors of political science or
philosophy have bothered to define the right of
freedom of speech as they should have done, I feel
compelled to do so for those who are unaware of it,
like Mr. Fahrer.
The right of freedom of speech means that a man
may write or speak any ideas he wishes, as long as
he doesnt violate the rights of another person.
(These are defined in libel and slander laws.)
The right of freedom of speech does not mean:

Tomorrow Will Be Too Late

MR. EDITOR:
Re your editorial April 3 in
which you criticized the now
syndrome held today by black
militants and other left-wing
radicals. You say this
syndrome is directly against
the gain of American
Democratic tradition.
The American colonists, in
the 17705, finally got tired of
the English Crown and her
American Tories ruling them,
and said We want freedom and
we want it NOW! So they
wrote and signed the Declaration
of Independence and started
carrying guns.
We loyal Americans praise
them and then turn around and
condemn the black militants for

Great Service
MR. EDITOR:
Your printing of the complete texts of President
OConnells letters in regard to the SSOC and the
Megill affairs was a great service. Even greater,
however, was the service performed by President
OConnell who -by example showed the faculty
and the students how to approach problems
honestly, wisely, and judiciously.
I for one am proud to have him as President, and
nominate him for Teacher of the Year award.
VINCENT McGUIRE

the same reason. How do you
reconcile that?
You also state, persuading
the elements of power is not,
never has been and never will be,
the fastest of methods. We are
living in a controlled and
oppressed society (read Who
Rules America? by G.W.
Dumhoff), and the only way we
can eliminate this system is
through revolution. The
oppressors will not relinquish
control regardless of how many
Uncle Toms and other apologists
preach otherwise.
Returning now to the
American Revolution (1776),
you apologists can be compared
to the Tories. You expect a
goodly amount of material gain
through todays status quo, as
the Tories did. Naturally you

Tuesday, April 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

AtLnia

The right to say whatever one wants, wherever and
whenever one wants.
The University of Florida and the Board of
Regents are perfectly justified in their denial of
recognition of SSOC. The Communist Party, the
John Birch Society, and the SSOC are allowed to
meet, discuss, and publish their ideas in this country
because of the right of freedom of speech and other
rights in the Constitution. They are guaranteed
these rights.
They are not guaranteed the means to present
their ideas. The means are obtained by donations,
fund raising, and other such activities by such
organizations.
Do not misconstrue my remarks. I am not saying
the University or the Regents made the correct
decision, only that they do not have to give SSOC
or anyone else the MEANS to speak. In other
words, Mr. Fahrer, you must get your own soap
box.
PHILIP SCHWARTZ 4BA

Broken Key
* MR. EDITOR:
__ if the articles Mr. Miller submits are less
interesting and/or provocative than the trivia he
cites you have printed instead, then perhaps I
should bone up on my journalism, too.
i
ir' : |p
It is not that I have been driven to the
point of profanity. It is just that my electric
hyphen key is broken.
LINDA MIKLOWITZ

will defend the oppressive
society we live in today.
The now syndrome we
have is necessary not only from
the point of view of showing
you your errors and
shortcomings, but also for
changing your errors and
shortcomings. Tomorrow will be
too late. Each passing day
reveals more and more injustices
similar to the one outlined by
Jason Straight (April 3).
If you want a peaceful
transition, then join the radical
movement and urge others to do
the same, or expect a second,
violent American Revolution.
Give me liberty, or give me
death!
BUFORD PRUITT, JR.

Page 7



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

l jjViYAV ,^/3l*.*Vrrfrrrrri'VAM..Trr wwwwwmry
1 FOR SALE
V
HONDA 330 cc, Customized S3OO.
Excelent condition. Call 378*6810 or
see Elmer at 115 N.W. 10th St.
(A-st-107-p)
HONDA 350 cc. nearly new perfect
condition $550 plus free helmet. See
Bob at 115 N.W. 10th St.
(A-st-107-p)
6l VW
In good running condition, good
paint Job & good gas mileage, best
offer; call Bob at 372-3044.
(A-st-107-p)
1968 G.E. 15 in. portable T.V. with
all accessories. Used only 6 months.
475. Call 378-2703 after sp.m.
(A-st-107-p)
Reconditioned Allstate scooter, in
good running conditionl Leaving
school, must sell! $65.00. Call
372-0509 after 6 p.m. Good
transportation! (A-3t-108-P)
1967 Cheyenne trailbike 60cc
perfect, 1700 mi. Austrian made.
Sears marketed $l5O includes
helmet. Woman's Dunnelt bike hand
brake $25. 372-7503. (A-3MOB-P)
Basenji puppies AKC
Registered Red and white.
Reasonable. Call 376-2630.
(A-7t-108-P)
12x60 mobile home. 3 bedroom, IV2
bath, excellent cond., $350 down
and assume pyments. Call Beverly
376-4616; 481-2088 nights.
(A-st-108-P)
Lakefront, 2 bedroom cabin V 2 hr.
drive from Gainesville. Ideal family
retreat in Putnam Co. $6,000 fully
furnished. Call 378-2358 or
378-2089. (A-SMOB-P)
1962 Buick Special, convertible, V-8,
power steering and brakes, clean,
S4OO, call 376-1429. (A-SMOB-P)
Black '66 Honda S-90, with helmet
S9O, 378-9906, Bob. (A-3MIO-P)
Honda 50, Automatic clutch, runs
perfectly with less than 2 miles on it
since last tune up SBO, have two cars
& must sell bike 378-0748, 41.
(A-3MIO-P)
PAlNTlNGSBeautifully framed
oils on canvas. Action football shots.
Perfect for bar or restaurant. $lO.
Call Steve, 372-3717. (A-3MIO-P)
1968 Yamaha 350, driven 2600
miles, excellent condition, helmets
includ. Owner in service. Call
372-0148. (A-SMIO-P)
HONDA 1965, 150 cc. Excellent
condition, helmet included. Only
$225. Phone 376-8980 after 5 p.m.
(A-3MIO-P)
67 Yamaha 250 Just $444.45, will
take smaller motorcycle as trade-in.
Call J. Fernandez at 378-3216 before
It's too late. (A-SMIO-P)
Unright Frigidaire freezer needs some
repair; Zenith B&W TV large screen,
portable. 376-9971 after 6 p.m.
(A-3t-110-P)
Aiwa TP 704, 1-7/8, 3-3/4 ips, 5"
reels AC/Battery 4 mo old S4O; 12
spkr in walnut enclosure S3O; 2/SSO.
378-8305. (A-SMIO-P)
Air conditioner 10,000 BTU.
Excellent condition, 1 year old $125.
Call 378-1129. (A-SMIO-P)
Hofner bass guitar only 10 months
old in beautiful condition! Call
378-8756 and ask for Rich or come
by French Qtr. 78 BEST Offer.
(A-SMIO-P)
150 cc Suzuki, elec, start, new rubber,
very reliable $250 59 TR3, exc
mech, new rubber, S4OO. 378-7197,
leave No. will call. (A-5M06-P)
Adorable Siamese kittens, perfect for
Easter, potty trained, males and
female. Call 378-7638. (A-4MIO-P)
RED DOBERMAN good lines
excellent personalities 2 males 3
months old. Ideal for pet protection
and show SIOO. 378-4665 after 5.
(A-st-107-p)
1962 VOLKSWAGEN. Very good
condition. Recently inspected. $495.
376-3188. {A-3t-109-p)
WmziS*
|L a ACADEMY I
In award ; IPII
I 52 NOMINEE -liJi
|Z*Y 9 iPi 1
| IAI
,m 5
lElslr |
m maim mm mm mam mam mmm

FOR SALE |
v.v.SW-Wwi-XX-v-Yt
FREE! Cute kittens 1 mo. old 3
male, 2 female. Your choice while
they last. Call Lynn 378-5541 after
5. (A-3MOB-P)
COLOR TV. Beautiful Danish
modern walnut cabinet. 1968 model,
perfect condition. Must sell for
school expenses. SSOO or best offer.
(A-3t-109-p)
SONY TAPE DECK with tapes. One
month old, $135. Pickett Slide Rule
model N 4 Vector type log log dual
base, S2O. Call Steve, 378-6394.
(A-3M09-P)
YAMAHA 1968 lOOcc. Perfect
condition, only 1500 miles, $295.
Call 376-0936. (A-st-109-p)
TENNIS Closeout Sale Ladies
dresses, fancy pants; mens shorts,
shirts; Jackets, floppy hats, covers,
presses; etc. Call 372-5454.
(A-2t-109-p)
I FOR RENT ] j
Furnished upstair apt. 2 br, air cond.,
wall to wall carpet. Call after 5:30
378-7845. (B-ts-107-C)
Peace and quiet Is yours for the
asking by living in one of our
secluded luxurious one-bedroom
furnished town house apartments.
Only 5 minutes from the campus and
medical center. $155 per month plus
$35 for utilities. Call us now for an
appointment to see them. Immediate
occupancy. Ernest Tew Realty, I rue,
Phone 376-6461. (B-22t-105-c)
Tired of the rat race? ldr. Apt to
sublease. Air cond. & private patio.
Quiet area. Call 372-8855.
(B-st-107-p)
Subleting for spring quarter. 2
bedroom, 12x50 trailer or need 1
roommate to share with 2 other
males. Call 378-3786 anytime.
(B-SMOB-P)
MALE ROOMMATE wanted for
Summit House Apt. $41.75 per
month plus V* of utilities. Air cond,
pool, cable TV. Call 372-5552.
(B-3M09-P)
ONLY 1 blk from campus. 1 female
to share apt. with 2 girls. $122 for
quarter. Quiet. 378-8074.
(B-2t-109-p)
Private room private entrance, 3
blocks from campus, maid service,
$135/term, 115 NW 10th St., call
378-6810 fmale students only).
(B-st-107-P)
For rent: Cottages block
Just remodeled, Hefner-type
furnishings, carpet, 6 min. from
campus S7O monthly. Call: 372-4407
after 8:00 p.m. ask for Steve.
(B-3MIO-P)
1 male roommate for 3 bedroom
house. Woodpaneled, fireplace, cable
TV, bar. Call 378-1112 after 6.
(B-SMIO-P)
jf WANTED J
Male roommate for 1 bedroom
Summit House Apt. Pool, air cond.
$67 monthly. Immediate occupancy.
Apt E-26. 378-6784. (C-st-106-P)
Female to share small house behind
NRM starting spring quarter, $45 mo.
Call 378-5275 now, through finals
and the break. Late at night
perferable. (C-5M06-P)
Amiable female roommate spring
and/or summer quarters. Colonial
Manor Apt. 38. Rent $55 per mo.
plus utilities. Call 378-0295.
(C-5M06-P)

I SHOWTIME K
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I
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iVM .o Suggested for W
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(parental discretion
advised). HR
Dean Martin | PLUS Duffy I
\Yg I -TheStarring mm
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Page 8

t. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 8,1969

> > rrrrrr,Tl l t>Trrt *C
| WANTED
NEED ONE ROOMMATE to move in
immediately with 3 other boys.
Olympia Apt. 107. $34.50 per mo.
plus utilities. Call 376-9782.
(C-3t-109-p)
MALE ROOMMATES for
comfortable, spacious 3 bdrm. house
near University. All apt. advantages
and privacy. Call Steve, 376-9592.
(C-3t-109-p)
NEED FEMALE TO SHARE 1 bdrm.
apt. in Colonial Manor. Pool, air
cond., carpeted. $62.50/mo. plus V 2
utilities. Call 378-3514. (C-3t-109-p)
LANDMARK: One male roommate
wanted. 2 bdrm. Immediate
occupancy. $45 per mo. Pool, health
club, A.C. Call Rick, 376-4313
anytime. (C-st-109-p)
MODELS We are interviewing for a
Playboy Playmate from the state of
Florida. It's high time IF interested
in hard work and can meet
requirements. Contact Bill R. Horne
or Gus Mustelier. All interviews by
appointment only we are
sincere Roy Green Studio, 'nc.
372-4656. (C-10t-109-p)
RIDE WANTED to Ft. Benning, Ga.
every weekend. Will share expenses
and driving. Please call 392-7638.
(C-3t-109-p)
Couple to sublet new 1 bd apt, patio,
CH & ACtastefully furnished in rural
SW section. sll6/mo. Call 378-8801
after 6 p.m. (C-3MIO-P)
| HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED FEMALE. Full
time position for experienced office
worker. Should be planning on being
in Gainesville at least two years from
date of hiring. Must be experienced
in office work and must be able to
work full time including
approximately two nights a week and
every other Saturday. Ideal working
conditions, 5 day week. WILSON
DEPARTMENT STORES, INC. 22 E.
University Avenue. (E-10t-106-C)
LISTENERS WANTED: Will pay
$1.50 for one hour session. Must be
native English speaking and have
normal hearing. Please call Miss
Hardaway University ext. 2-2046
between 8 and 5 only for
appointment. Can make up to $6.00.
(E-15M07-C)
BABYSITTER Must be congenial
and reliable. Work with adorable
1-year-old girl MF 8:3012.
Excellent working conditions high
pay. 378-0387. (E-st-109-p)
NEED PART TIME and full time
salesmen for mens retail clothing
store. Experience preferred. For
interview apply in person at
Silvermans, 225 W. Univ. Ave.
(E-3t-109-p)
Figure Fair in the Mall needs sales
help in Lingerie Dept. If you love
beautiful lingerie, youll love working
in our beautiful shop. Married
preferred. Phone Mrs. Miller,
378-5136. (E-3MIO-C)
HELP WANTED j
Male desk clerk over 21 yrs. evening,
nights, weekends. Open, bondable,
neat, reliable in person. Tom Sawyer
Motel. (E-SMOB-P)
REITZ UNION GAMES AREA
WATCH FOR
WEDNESDAY
BOWLING
SPECIAL

AUTOS 1
* :
Bugeye Sprite, new top, tires, and
interior, needs trans. work, otherwise
mechanically sound. Must sell
immediately, $275. Call 376-0587.
(G-3MOB-P)
1963 Falcon Sprint 2 dr. nt., radio,
heater, recently rebuilt 260 cu. in.
VB, 4 speed, tach., new tires. Call
378-8802 or see Bill at 211 T Flavet.
(G-st-109-p)
VW 65 with 68, 1500 engine,
replaced 2 month ago $950 firm.
Call at 378-7573. (G-5M07-P)
For sale or trade 67 VW deluxe bus
excellent condition throughout.
Looking for Mustang. No longer need
room. 372-8880 5:30, Scott
(G-3MIO-P)
SERVICES I
a
NEED A PAINTER? Free estimates
Professional Painting Interior and
Exterior call after 5 or anytime on
weekends 378-4855. (M-10t-105-p)
Alternators Generators Starters
Electrical systems tested repairs.
Auto Electrical Service, 603 SE 2nd
St. 378-7330. (M-tt-iU^-C)
Income Tax. Experienced tax
specialist. Accuracy guaranteed. Call
392-1517 after 7:30 p.m. $3.00 and
up. (M-5M06-P)
On his neck 0L
he wore the
brand of a killer
On his hip Jmjjmt
he wore /AMa HP
vengeance.
National General
ELVIS?!
PRESLEY
as
CHARRDI
fclife lEimomvisior (g
ALSO AT 9:15
"HOW SWEET IT IS!"
JAMES GARNER
DEBBIE REYNOLDS

I
It. at 23rd RD i 1 HT!7TV
Out of violence, compassion.
Out of suspicion trust.
Out of hell, hope.
MM ' MM
LALO SCHIFRIN ALEXANDER JACOBS ERIC BERCOVICI REUBEN BERCOVITCH
aicunirtPMoucors moouatur tmcmn
HENRY G. SAPERSTEIN SELIG J. SELIGMAN REUBEN BERCOVITCH JOHN BOORMAN
FANAVISfON TECHNKXXDR
RELEASING CORPORATION m Suggested for GENERAL audiences
LAST pAY SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL SHERIFF
| NOW
WALT DISNEY'S / THE GREATEST
P 1 //'ADVENTURE OF
Au |g

SERVICES
V v
v.:.T;ssw*xs:-rw -^K INCOME TAX $4 up. Expert service
2 locations to serve you: 1227 W.
Univ. Ave. (across from Ramada Inn)
& 107 N. Main St. 378-9666.
(M-12t-104-P)
X -bkims with /L_J
7 LAUCHTER bV.
Yjr\ T,AM iN-sd.v.
Jf_-APatriciaA*
if I
'^S^^elrocolo^^*
**>
Crwalcwii Oaiwuylll*. |
r mW.WwsVVv*.
VONEOF (TVj.
* the v^
* YEARS \ l VL
* TEN BEST! T
I KlSof / V
\ Sister
**rn++* w
Jf \
these two Allied agents
rld^jjgr^j^^
exfil team parachuted into the
Bavarian Alps behind enemy
lines^urinif^WorhiWQrll.



r i PERS ONA L 1
Steve: Still going to Tennessee?
Please call Karen! 392-7641. have 2
other passengers for you too.
(J-2MIO-P)
Music to study by music to relax
by music to do anything by! Its all
happening on WUWU radio! Dial
1390. (J-lt-110-C)
Phil: Thanks for the bestest year of
my life. Lets stay happy forever and
ever. Just be my friend and I'll be
yours. Your wife, Jo. (J-lt-110-P)
MEN, WHERES HOME NEXT
QUARTER! Try Georgia Seagle Hall.
Room and board $220/quarter. 1002
W. University. 378-4341 or
372-9410. (J-st-110-P)
Spanish Tutoring Grad Student.
Bilingual experienced teacher. Baby
sitting also span conversation at your
convenience. 392-7680. (J-2t-110-P)
Graduate student needs female
roommate for summer quarter. Such
an apartment! Call 378-3474. Only
good cooks need apply. (J-3M06-P)
PLEASE! Will whoever has the Zeta
scrapbook return it or call 378-7846.
No questions aked. (J-SMOB-P)
Are you a newie? We need newies
and oldies for hands, spirits and just
plain actors. Come to tryouts,
Constans Theatre, April 9-11, 7:00
p.m. (J-6t-108-P)

T.G.'S
SPRING BEER BUST
FOR A BIG PlTC^^^
TONITE
8-10
THI&STY
I* VV \ SPECIALS ||
B§sl I Lunch and Dinner
SPKIAL §§
II FRIED 1
I CHICKEN I
H ALL YOU QQA If
111 CARE TO EAT 7#Y |||
|l| WEDNESDAY SPECIAL ||
I CHICKEN STEW §
1 DUMPLINGS 49*1
1 MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I
|||^^GAINESWIJ£^

GAINESVILLE FLORIOA CAMPUS FERERAL CREDIT UNION
r ~ftl O,LLS?0 ,LLS ? taxes? debts?
~ L 7 rj\ it's ncome Tax t,me a 9 a n anc this y ear s even worse mm j!
MJ.3. ru J \ / Besides this, all of those nagging bills catamount to
i'MAiivH fjftfrgfif.yy enough to leave little or nothing for the other neces neces/
/ neces/ r si /Y sities of life! CONSOLIDATE all of those bilfs, pay
71 \ Your taxes and end up with less of a monthly output.
I J \ M m Come n t 0 ** over...we're specialist at solving
kUZ. J~7 A l

]**** unnrn ,j )..
LOST A FOUND

L s : B lack and white pointer. 5
French r bS + Fanthom ,ast seen "
i nfn r m QU arter area> R *rd! Any
Ca 378 6863
LOST: Beloved part houna named
!r UK b rown with white chest,
brown floppy ears, fifty pound male.
J} e ard p lease call 378-4352.
(L-st-109-p)
Lost Yorkshire Terrier N.W. 27 Ave
area. Female, long hair black, tan.
silver. Buffiee Very samll. S4O
Reward. 378-6803. (L-108-st-p)
Adorable, playful, healthy kittens
One month old- free.
Lea 376-4053. (J-2t-110-P)
Lost: Mens prescription glasses,
black frames, torn black case, in
vicinity of 4th Ave and 16th St.
NW. If found, please call Ken at
378-0960. (L-SMIO-P)
FOR BEST AD RESULTS
flORI&A
AIIIQAtOR
ph. 392-1681

UrStllffC and
i j

BLUE
BULLETIN

Address all Administrative
notices and general notices
to Division of Information
Services.
Address all Campus Calen Calendar
dar Calendar notices to Public Func Functions
tions Functions Office, Reitz Union.
Admin *-
istrative
Notices
SIGMA TAU SMOKER:
Sigma Tau fraternity will
sponsor a smoker for engineers
to meet the Engineering Queen
contestants Wednesday, April 9,
from 7:30-9:30 p.m., in Room
122 of the Reitz Union.
POETRY-JAZZ CONCERT:
A benefit for emotionally
disturbed children featuring the
poetry of Bob Sokol and the
jazz of the Bruce Ergood
Quartet will be held Thursday
and Friday, April 24 and 25, at
the following times and places:
April 24, from 7:30-9:00 p.m. in
the Medical Center Auditorium;
April 25, half-hour periods
running from 9:30-11:30 p.m. in
the Rathskeller.
SUMMER SWIM PROGRAM:
The University of Florida Golf
Club pool will open May 1-Sept.
14. The pool will be open from
9 a.m.-7 p.m. daily except
Sunday, when it will be open
from 1-7 p.m. There is no
recreational swimming before 12
noon, Mondays through
Thursdays due to class
instruction. The swimming
lesson program will be divided
into three sessions for
instructional purposes. The first
session will be from May 1-June
19. Those eligible to swim must
be bona fide University of
Florida married students,
faculty, staff, their wives,
husbands and their children.
Membership applications are
now being accepted on a first
come, first serve basis. Fees will
include swimming lessons but
not golf privileges, and may be
mailed to "U of F Golf Club,
P.O. Box 14106, University
Station, Gainesville, or brought
to the Pro Shop at the golf
course.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
Thursday, April 17, at 1:30 p.m.
in Room 235, Tigert Hall.

FOREIGN LANGUAGES
FUNCTIONAL KNOWLEDGE
EXAMS: April 18 is the deadline
for receipt in the Office of
Foreign Languages for
applicatoions for all foreign
language functional knowledge
examinations to be given
Saturday, April 26.
PLACEMENT
Sign-up sheets are posted in
the Placement & Career Planning
Center, Room G-22 Reitz
Union, two weeks in advance of
interviews. Companies will be
recruiting for March, June and
August graduates unless
otherwise indicated.
APRIL 8: HURON VALLEY
SHCO OLS (Milford,
Mich.) Teachers for high
school: bus. ed, English, reading,
counselor, instrumental music;
junior high school: math, home
econ, art, math & sociology
combination, science, English &
Spanish, girls PE & instr. music:
elementary: music vocal, early
elementary kindergarten, first
and second grades, middle
elementary, third, fourth, latter
elementary, fifth, sixth; PE and
elementary library.
APRIL 9-10: REYNOLDS
METAL COMPANY ChE, EE,
IE, ME, Chem, Matallurgy,
Acctg.
Campus
Calendar
Tuesday, April 8
Textbook Exchange, returning
books, C-4B Union, 3:00
5:00 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi, 363 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Student Senate, 349 Union,
7:00 p.m.
Gator Gras Beauty Contest,
Semi-finals, 122 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Education Dames Meeting,
Home of Mrs. Gordon
Greenwood, 3962 S.W. 4th
Place, 8:00 p.m.
Fine Arts: Bhaskar & Shala,
Union Ballroom, 8:15 p.m.
Wednesday, April 9
Textbook Exchange, returning
books, C-4B Union, 3:00
5:00 p.m.
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 4:00 p.m.

Tuesday, April 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Engineering Fair, Smoker &
Meeting, Candidates for Fair
Queen, 122 Union, 7:30 p.m.
Student Chapter of the Wildlife
Society Meeting, 118 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Florida Engineering Society
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Circle K Meeting, 361 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Latin American Colloquium,
Lecture: Dr. Victor Alba,
Latin American Colloquium
Room, 8:00 p.m.
MENSA Meeting, Flavette Rec.
Hall, 8:30 p.m.
Thursday, April 10
Textbook Exchange, returning
books, C-4B Union, 3:00
5:00 p.m.
Scabbard i & Blade Smoker.
Army ROTC Room 107,
6:30 p.m.
Christian Science Organizations
Meeting, 357 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Gamma Beta Phi Meeting, 150 G
Union, 7:15 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Association, 349 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Association of Women Students
Meeting, 118 Union, 7:30
p.m.
Gator Sailing Club Meeting &
Movie, 150 B Union, Free
Film on "Flying Scot Class,"
8:00 p.m.
Gator-Gras Beauty Contest
Finals, Rathskeller, 9:00 p.m.
Friday, April 11
Textbook Exchange, returning
books, C-4B Union, 3:00
5:00 p.m.
Gator Gras Ugly Man Contest,
Plaza of the Americas, 3:30
p.m.
Union Movie, "The Group,"
Union Aud., 6:00, 8:30 &
11:00 p.m.
Hi I lei Lecture, H illel
Foundation, 8:00 p.m.
Gator Gras, Battle of the Bands,
Plaza of the Americas, 9:00
p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE: Univ.
Film Series, 10 films: faculty,
staff & general public, $5.00;
Univ. of Fla. Students, $2.50;
5 films, Univ. of Fla.
students, $1.50. "Bhaskar &
Shala," Univ. of Fla. Student,
$.75; faculty, staff, $1.00;
general public, $1.50. SGP:
"JAN PEERCE," tenor,
faculty, staff & gen. public,
$2.50, $1.50 & $1.00; Univ.
of Fla. Students, $1.50,
$1.25 & $.50.

Page 9



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 8,1969

'Waleroon Soars With Verve
Of'New Theatre Excitement

By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Entertainment Editor
Those who believe the age of
theatre has faded and is all but
dead would most likely have had
their minds changed had they
been on hand to experience
Waleroon, a first-run
experimental play by UF
graduate student Victor Young.
Youngs effort sparked all the
dynamic and sharply original
magic that has made todays
avant-garde theatre as immediate
and totally involving as it was
when the Greeks started the
whole thing.
In fact, if Waleroons
introductiry performance
Monday and Tuesday are to be
taken as any indication, its
impact has increased
considerably since that
supposedly golden age all due
to the inventive talents of
youthful playwrights like Young
and his student director Richard
Oman, whose last production
was the rightfully popular The
Successful Life of Three.
The play was presented by
the Florida Players and
supported by a cast and crew
composed completely of
students a handicap of relative
inexperience one might assume

Gator Gras Here Soon

By CHRIS SCHAUSEIL
Alligator Staff Writer
Grotesque men, beautiful
girls, tug-of-war games and music
are signs of spring at the UF
when Gator Gars is celebrated.
The annual spring festivity,
planned by the Union Program
Council arrives April 10-12.
The first event is the beauty
contest, Thursday, April 10 at
the Rathskeller at 9 pun. Girls
have been invited from campuses
all over Florida, and the winner,
for the first time will be able to
represent the UF in the Miss
Florida-Universe contest. If she
wins the Miss Florida-Universe
contest she will represent the
state in the Miss U.S.A.
competition. Preliminary judging
for the Gator Gras contest starts
April 8, 8 pan. in room 122-3 of
the Reitz Union.
Any full time male student at
the UF is eligible for the Ugly
Man Contest, Friday 3:30 in the
Plaza of the Americas.
Contestants will be judged for
originality and ugliness, and
rewarded with a trophy from the
Gator Gras queen. John Mica
will emcee.
Friday, 9 pjn. in the same
place the Battle of the Bands
will barrage the audience with
their music in an effort to win
first place and receive the chance
to attend the state contest.
The Soap Box Derby, with
divisions for the fastest girls,
RED PIN
NIGHT
REITZ UNION
GAMES AREA
8-10 ptn
win freclames
shoes free
bring this ad 4-8-69

would lend a rather amateurish
air to the performance.
Yet, despite the fact that
only one of the plays six leading
characters had appeared with the
Theatre
Review
Players before only two had
had any previous acting
experience this play displays
more verve than any major
production the theatre group has
shown this reviewer to date, and
certainly more than most of the
more professional, traditional,
and popular playwrights have
done this decade.
That sounds like an
overstatement a contrived
compliment designed to help out
an aspiring artist on the way
up yet thats not the
intention. Sitting in the
Constans Theatre, almost
inside the action of marching
rabbles, tractors actually
manuevering about on stage,
blinking lights, thunderous
music and sound, platforms that
rise and sets that crumble, and
dialogue strong in both symbol
and clarity, its hard to believe
the show is premiering at the UF

fastest boys, the most original
decorations, the slowest car, will
be held outside the Med Center.
Challenges have been sent out to
other campuses to compete with
the UF drivers, Sat. 9-12 a.m.
A team of 10 full time
students can pull in the
tug-of-war contest Sat. 1 p.m. on
the ROTC Field. The winning
team will receive a trophy and
individual members will get
plaques.
To climax the events, a folk
festival will be held at the
Rathskeller Sat. 9 p.m. Bob
Savoum, graduate student in
Arts and Sciences and former
manager at the Bent Card Coffee
House will coordinate the show.
The Puget Sound will be among
the many acts appearing.
Beauty contest winners will
be judged on poise, personality
and beauty by Dr. R.N.

Folksingers Compete
)im 'Morrison of The Doors got his start by singing his own
compositions at St. Petersburgs first'Beaux Arts folk competition.
Easter Sunday, April 6, will be the fifth year for this Florida Original
Folksong Competition, a bout to be held at the Beaux Arts Gallery,
7711 60th St., Pinellas Park, Florida and giving fledgling folksingers
and composers their chance at the limelight.
There is no fee for composers to enter original songs and
instrumental compositions in the various categories of the folk
tradition. Composers or lyric writers must be present and may present
their own material or allow other entertainers to do it.
Grand prize for the best new song is the Jean Thomas Award,
named in honor of the noted Kentucky folk personality who was a
co-founder of this annual festival.

VETERANS
Be a commercial pilot!
NEW G. I. Bill pays for
Flight Training Call
CASSELS IN THE AIR
Area's only approved school
378-2646

and easy believe its the best
night in the theatre to reach us
in some time.
The play is so deep, if you
will, and delightfully intriguing
that one is greatly tempted to
offer what seems to be the most
feasible interpretation of what
the thing was all about, but then
in this case feasible would be a
matter of widely divergent
opinions. This is signigant,
however its much more
stimulating to hypothesize about
meaning than have it spelled out
(e.g., the reaction to 2001 A
Space Odyssey).
Young and Oman have a lot
to say, but so do their stars
and supers. If were fortunate,
Martha Gallub, Percy Brown,
Zoa Grady, Orlando Morfi, and
Rusty Sailing will be back for
productions the Players deem to
tag major, and hopefully
those in charge will allow
supers Susan Diner and
Fernando Fonseca to entertain
audiences in the larger roles they
deserve.
And further, if there is any
justice in the world Waleroon
will be brought back for another
run for those exceedingly
unlucky souls who missed it the
first short time around.

Braswell, chairman of the
Industrial and Systems
Engineering Dept.; Col. Jere H.
Hudson, Chairman of the Air
Force ROTC; Mr. Robins, owner
of the Stag and Drag clothes
shop; Mrs. Sharon Varn, director
of the Sears Charm School and
Jack Shaw of WGGG and Miss
Wilder, a professional model at
Maas Brothers Department
Store.
Semi-finalists will model
outfits chosen from Stag and
Drag, Regalia, Twig, Donigans
and Silvermans.
Two of three judges for the
Ugly Man Contest are Dr. Frank
Adams, dean of men, and
Professor Eugene E. Grissom,
chairman of the art department.
Applications for all events
may be picked up in the
program office, and are due by 4
p.m. April 4.

Miller-Brown
4pn^
NORTH OF 4DV
THE MALL Vmff
376-4552
AUTHORIZED
DEALER

mi k' ...wm
|B -Wi Bft: :.sm
1 Sr'S
r # mmmBBBBBBtKk., B '^w '^wejHRp
ejHRp 11 ^^KS^ayPf
* 1 x
rfj, 1
Vv>lK
HOW MUCH AM I OFFERED?" SAYS JOKER TO PLANKER
... in rehearsal scene from Young's "Waleroon"
jn IS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONg
8 CHILDRENS TAP §
is 1
| STARTS WED. APRIL 9th §
$ ROOM G-4 UNION |
4:OOPM §
0 -J
% $
j Preregistration Room 310 Union 392-1655
to $
LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LESSONS LE^J

Gator PAWN SHOP
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
DIAMONDS
IjOANSJ guns
, BUY SELL TRADE
"We specialize in Gator-Aid"
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575
DRY CLEANING
SPECIAL
MON. APR 7
TUtS. APR 8 WED APR 9
(WITH DRY CLEANING ORDER)
PLAIN DRESSES 99<
2 PANTS 99<
TROPICAL CLEANERS
402 NW. 13th ST.
209 N.E. 16th AVE



Rebels Play On Permanent Floor

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the seventh of an Alligator
weekly series of articles
describing the facilities at the
other Southeastern Conference
Schools.)
The Rebel Coliseum, the Ole
Miss basketball palace, is in its
third year of occupancy.
The new arena is large enough
to accomodate 12,000 or more,
on bleacher seats. But the
seating is plush fixed
theatre-type chairs and the
capacity for Rebel basketball
reaches 8500.
C. M. (Tad) Smith, the Ole
Miss athletic director, believes
that it is by far the most
elaborate and best designed
structure within the Conference,
or in the entire South for that
matter.
Spectator comfort is
projected into both the design

SCATMeeting Tonight

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
Omegas SCAT second
organizational meeting is tonight
at 7:30 in Rm. 150 C of the
Reitz Union.
The entire student body is
urged to attend, Assistant
General Chairman Steve Rohan
said. Our only index of success
is student enthusiasm and
response. By that standard our

j SUMMIT I
/ SUNDAY APRIL 13\ I
./ 1- 5..30 l I
/ UNION PROJECTS STUDENT \ j
£ COMMITTEE GOVERNMENT |
The annual leadership conference and awards banquet of
8 t 1968-69 will be held in the J. W. Reitz Union on Sunday, April
A 13 from 15:30 p.m.
All student organizations must have the names of their
0 \ representatives turned in to room 310 J. W. Reitz Union by
ft Wednesday, April 9. J
Outstanding student leader applications will be available in i
5 room 310 beginning Monday and must be in by Friday, April j
2 11m

(BERRi r
f __ "' :
REBEL COLISEUM
... in use for three years

and accommodations. In
addition to the theater seats, a
peripheral concourse provides
easy circulation. From the
concourse, 18 ramps enter the
stadium area at mid-height
with 16 rows of seats above the
entry level and 13 below for
easy accessability.
The structure is a round,
domed building which ranges 89
feet above the playing floor. The
court level is 12 feet below

success has been good so far.
The meeting agenda will
include planning of Activity
Center Day and taking
applications as well as making
appointments for the remainder
of the positions, Fraternity
Coordinator, Organization
Coordinator, Documentary
Coordinator, Quarter Drive
Coordinator, Public Relations
Coordinator and assistants.
Doug Duncan has been

COLISEUM SEATS 8,500

ground level. The diameter
measurement is 272 feet.
Diameter of the circular floor is
130 feet.
The floor is permanent and
its unique construction a
player plus provides
exceptional life. The only
similar construction in the South
and Southwest is at Oklahoma
State.
A four-sided game clock
hangs from the ceiling. Smaller

named Activity Center Day
Coordinator and CeCe
Underwood Independent
Coordinator, Rohan announced.
SCAT has been busy gathering
information on possible projects
to raise funds for the Activity
Center.
The Quarter Drive, with the
objective of having every student
one quarter to the fund, will
proceed the Activity Center
Day.

clocks at each end of the court
alert players to the score and
playing time remaining.
The separate sections in the
seating areas are designated by
different colors red, blue and
yellow. A particular feature of
the Coliseum is the location of
the seats in each section.
Because of the circular design,
each row is equidistant from the
court.
The entrance lobby, ticket
offices and press facilities
project beyond the perimeter of
the main structure. Dressing
rooms for home and visiting

'<%VV*VV*V*V*V*VV*ViV V***V/*VVV MVVi'VVV%*Vy*VV*VVVtV i V4'
jGolf,Softball, Handball {
Slated For Intramurals {
; $
: Today is the last day for independents to sign up for softball j;
j: and dorms to sign up for handball. All entrants should contact >
: the Intramural Dept, at the Fla. Gym or call 392-0581.
: The Intramural Department is still looking for softball :
j: referees. There will be a referee meeting Wednesday evening at >
j: 7:30 at 216 Fla. Gym. j:
: Orange and Blue league golf begins Wednesday at 3:30. This :
year fraternities will have to attend scheduled matches or :
: forfeit. There will no longer be any changing of the schedules.
: The fraternities will have to play there three best or two best :
men who can appear at the slated time. >
ATO, number two contender for the Orange Presidents Cup
£ suffered a severe setback when it drew SAE for its first round :
j; golf match. The Es are predicted to win the tournament. Front j:
: running TEP meanwhile drew the Kappa Sigs for their first :
j: round match. Should the ATOs lose and the TEPs win, the TEPs :
: would stand a good chance of clinching the cup before track :
: and softball. :j
!
, *ViV.V.Vi%V.V.V.V.%V.V.V.%%V*V.V.V.V.V.V*V.V.V.V.V#V.VtVA!.V.%V.V#VAV*V

Tuesday, April 8, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

teams, coachs room, training
and equipment rooms as well as
storage and mechanical rooms
are located below the stadium.
Refreshment areas are spaced
around the concourse.
The entire building is
air-conditioned.
While the Coliseum is
designed primarily for
intercollegiate basketball, it is
being used for separate functions
which have included academic
and entertainment events. The
seating capactiy can be increased
to 10,000.

Page 11



Page 12

The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, April 8, 1963

Florida Invitational Attracts Top Stars

The Gatoi ill be warming
up for another Carnes
extravaganza, The Florida
Invitational, to oe held here
Saturday with some big names in
the track world being featured.
Former world record holding
long jumper Ralph Boston, now
a graduate assistant at
Tennessee, U.S. Olympic
sprinted Mel Pinder and a pair of
sub-four minute milers will be in
the spotlight.
Jourdan will also be given a

*
. M&m jayi

The UF pitching staff is
holding their own at the plate
this season, their batting average
is .322. The teams average is a
respectable .282.
Maybe our pitchers should be
batting at the top of the lineup
so we dont have so many men
stranded on base.
The Gators have been leaving
almost eight men a game on
base, 165 for 21 games.
The leading hitter currently is
outfielder Dale Turlington at
.345, he has 25 hits for 55 at
bats. But Dale doesnt get to
play all the time, it depends on
whether the opposing pitcher is
a righty or lefty.
This may be the reason he is
hitting at the average he is.
*
It looks like Gator Jim
Couuriers arm has healed. He
lias most definitely returned to
the form of his sophomore year.
Him has pitched 40-1/3
innings, given up five earned
runs, struck out 23 and walked
one. His ERA is 1.35.
Batgirls #4 At
Game Today
Batgirl squad No. 4 should
report to Perry Field today at 3
p.m. for the Gators game with
Belmont Abbey.
Due to a mixup in scheduling
last week, several squads were
left not knowing which game to
report to. Because of this
confusion, a meeting will be
called sometime at the end of
this week. Please watch the
paper for time and location.

PHOTO HDQTRS
FO rART & JOURNALISM
STUDENTS!
iJffOyL 1232 W. UNIV.
376-7657
Tt r-n ri.rrnrrm^rtfflrffirM^

stiff test from seven-foot plus Lew Hoyt. Seventeen foot pole
high jumpers Frank Costello and vaulter Peter Chen will be
The Florida Alligator
MARC DUNN £££"
Sports Editor Sports Editor

Spring Sports Notes

With Glen Pickren having arm
trouble it is a good thing Jim has
come through for the Gators.
* *
A good indication of how well
our golfers are shooting is by
looking at the averages in
competition:
Based on par 72 Steve Melnyk
is making the rounds in 70.4
strokes, Andy North in 72.6,
John Darr in 73.5, Richard
Spears in 73.9, David Barnes in
74, John Sale in 74.2, Ron
Mahood in 75.4, Mike Estridge
in 75.6 and Hal Hutchinson in
75.8.
The Gators will be getting in
an SEC practice round next
weekend when they play
Georgia at Athens, the SEC
Tournament is also in Athens.
They have also been invited to
play in the Pikes Peak
Invitational, which is on the
same course as the NCAA
Tournament.
$ a|c
Swimmers Andy McPherson,
Bill Strate, Jimmy Perkins,
Bruce Williams, Steve Hairston
and Mark McKee have been
named to NCAA All-American
squad. Congratulations!
Special note should be given to
Captain McPherson, who
finished higher in NCAA
competition than any one in
Gator historv.
* *
Nick Nicosia, former Gator
baseball player, has turned his
interests in another
direction karate.
Nick has been taking lessons
from Dirk Mosig at Gainesvilles
Universal Karate Dojo for three
months. He took first place last
weekend at the 1969 Southern
Open Karate Tournament last

CARNES EXTRAVAGANZA SATURDAY

By Marc Dunn,

Saturday in White Belt Sparring.
Dirk took a second in Black
Belt Kata and David Corson won
second place in the White Belt
Kata.
* *
All faculty and male students
interested in free karate lessons
should report to the Florida
Gym on Tuesday and Thursday
from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. and on
Saturday from 10 to 12 noon.
Competition with other
universities in the state is now in
the planning stages.
The classes are being run in
conjunction with the
Intramurals program, the
instructor is Richard Foster.
MG LINE
AUSTIN HEALEY SPRITE
AUSTIN AMERICAN
CRANE (jJlj)
IMPORTS
Factory Trained Mechanics
it.
Largest stock of parts in
North Central Florida
Crane Imports
506 East University 372-4373

APPLICATIONS
ARE NOW BEING TAKEN FOR
EDITOR, SEMINOLE
MANAGING EDITOR, SEMINOLE
For 1970 Yearbook
EDITOR, THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
MANAGING EDITOR, THE
FLORIDA ALLIGATOR
Summer Quarter, 1969
Fall and Winter Quarters, 1969 70
Applications may be picked up from Norm Going,
Editorial Adviser, Room 339A, JWRU
Application Deadline is April 21, 1969

making one of his first official
bids at the mark outdoors.
Milers Sam Bair (3:58) and
Barry Brown (3:59) will be
challenged by UFs John Parker
who himself will be shooting for
the school mark at 4:07.
NCAA half mile indoor
champion this year BobZemenski
will be challenged by Gator
record holder Bob Lang.
We wanted this big meet at
home, said Carnes, to give the
students something to see; to
show them what prestige our
team has brought to the sport.
Our few home meets were not
scheduled when most students
could see them (over the spring
vacation) so we hope they will
turn out for this.
It will be the first Florida
Invitational. If it is successful,

WONDER
HOUSE
RESTAURANT
SPECIALS GOOD MON. THRU FRIDAY
K.C. STEAK $1.50
w/ Salad, Potato, Veg
BAKED LASAGNA $ 1.35
w/ Meat Balk & Salad
LONDON BROIL $1.35
w/ Salad, Potato, Veg.
BAR-B-QUE CHICKEN $ 1.35
AND RIBS
French Fries or Baked Beans
DINNERS ONLY

Carnes will continue it annually.
Also winning at the relays this
past weekend was the two*mile
relay team of Bob Lang,
Eammon OKeefe, Ken Bumsed
and John Parker. The UFs
sprint medley team with Jerry
Fannin running a 47.5 leg took
first as did the mile relay
quartet.
FRUIT SALE
Indian River
Grapefruit
$3.00/carton (4/5 bu.)
Call The Citrus Club
392-1996
1:30 5:30 pm