Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol. 61, No. 104

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SOMETHING AMUSING

This scene from last year's annual Carnigras
shows the rides and amusements available for this
year's special Student Government
Productions-sponsored Carnigras, April 712.
Tickets for the Carnigras will go on sale today at the

Former City Manager
Appointed Ombudsman

m
H. R. Thornton, ILW, former city manager of Auburn, Ala., has
been named new UF Ombudsman head by Student Body President
Clyde Taylor, pending approval by the Senate Tuesday night.
Taylor said he made the appointment upon the recommendation of
Gary Goodrich, recently resigned vice president of the student body,
and last quarters Ombudsman head Bob Young. Young resigned
because of graduation from law school.
Thornton, who entered law school in September, formerly served
as city manager of Auburn, Ala., the home of Auburn University, a
state institution of over 14,000 students.
Because his appointment was made late in the winter quarter,
Thornton said his main effort will be to investigate the structure of
the UF bureaucracy and how students problems can best be solved.
The Ombudsman office, room 232 Reitz Union, is open from 25
pjn., Monday through Friday. The phone number is 392-1650 and a
recording unit permits students to call in their problems at any hour.
Legislature Nixes
Tillman Probe
Representative James Tillman, R-Sarasota, lost his bid last week to
investigate student activities at Florida universities and junior colleges.
The House of Representatives Higher Education Committee voted
6-5 not to pass the measure which stemmed from the UF Megill
controversy and the SSOC charter denials at three Florida universities.
' These universities $> not belong to the students, they belong to
the taxpayers of this stale, Tillman said in defense of his bill.
Board of Regents Chancellor Robert Mautz said the Board of
Regents already has all the legislation it needs to deal with student
problems. A legislative investigation might actually aid disruptive
elements.
Dade Rep. Robert Graham said such a bill would serve as a
rallying point whereby radical students could radicalize moderate
students.
Philosophy Professor Kenneth A. Megill came under attack from
Tillman and Sen. Tom Slade, R-Jacksonville, in February after Megill
called black power the most significant political development of the
20th Century.
Slades remark came because the university system operates with
taxpayers money.
TTiere is no place on our campuses for filthy literature or for
radically orientated organizations or speakers, or for anyone that
cannot take an oath that he does not believe in the overthrow of
government.
Another bill, which would have given the Board of Regents powers
over student conduct, was defeated by a vote of 8-3. The bill was
termed reduftdaht since the Boarddfegeritsak6adyHa& disciplinary >
power over students.

The
Florida Alligator

Reitz Union box office. Record Bar, and Belk
Lindsey. Five tickets can be purchased for the price
of four sl.OO. Proceeds will boost the Gator Loan
Fund.

University of Florida, Gainesville

i; Frolics Tickets |
| On Sale Today |
Tickets for Student £
£ Government Productions £
£ presentation of Diana Ross
£ and the Supreme s go on sale £
at 2 p.m. today at the >
£ stadium ticket windows. £
The Motown recording j;j
artists, winners of five >:
£ consecutive Gold Records,
£ will appear at Florida Gym £
Wednesday night at 8:15 p.m. £
£ Students wishing to £
£ purchase tickets must have
their picture IDs with them. £
£ Purchases will be limited to £
£ one couple ticket per student. £
£ Ticket prices are $3, $5 £
$ and $6 per couple. The £
£ windows wifi stay open until £
£ either all tickets have been £
V
£ sold or the last person in line £
£ has been served.
ly.v.'.v.v.*.*.v.v.v.v. .* v.*.'

Charles Shepherd Announces Bid
For Student Body Presidential Post

v\/ .>
* V CHARLES SHEPHERD
... announces SG candidacy

Snowy Funeral
March Honors
Ike 'At Peace
WASHINGTON (UPI) The body of Dwight D. Eisenhower,
followed by his grieving family, the mighty of the land and a lone
riderless horse, was borne on a creaking Army caisson to the Capitol
Sunday to lie in state as an honored hero.
The silent funeral procession on a bleak, snowy Palm Sunday began
at Washington National Cathedral, proceeded down Constitution
Avenue and ended in the Capitol Rotunda.
There, for 24 hours, the former Presidents flag-draped casket will
rest on the same black catafalque used for Abraham Lincoln a century
ago, while the public again pays tribute to the World War II hero by
the hundreds.
When the doors of the quiet cathedral chapel were closed to the
public Sunday after more than 25 hours, an estimated 60,000 persons
had filed past Eisenhowers bier. Thousands more, including an honor
Classes As Usual Today
Classes will be held as scheduled today, the national day of
mourning for the late President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
UF President Stephen C. OConnell has asked the faculty to take
time from their classes and pay tribute to the Generals memory.
The decision to hold classes as usual was made by the Board of
Regents for all seven state universities.
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cordon of the Armed Forces the five-star general led to victory in
Europe, lined the procession route under gray skies with temperatures
in the low 40s.
Late Monday, Eisenhowers body will be returned to the Cathedral
for a state funeral attended by President Nixon, former President
Lyndon B. Johnson and dignitaries including representatives of 76
foreign countries.
A somber Nixon returned from Camp David, Md., where he
finished the eulogy for the man he served as vice president for eight
years, and went to the Cathedral to lead the procession of dignitaries
accompanying the Eisenhower family to the Capitol.
Before the body was removed from the Cathedral, a parade of
limousines delivered at the chapel door what amounted to a whos
who of government in America, as well as eight foreign
representatives. All were admitted inside for a brief visit at the side of
the casket.
There in full dress Naval uniform was Lord Mountbatten, personal
representative of Britains Queen Elizabeth. And as Eisenhowers body
was carried from the Cathedral, saluting with trembling hand was
Genera] of the Army Omar N. Bradley, wearing the five-star insignia
on the dress ( hlue uniform that only he is now entitled to wear. Nixon
held his right hand over his heart.
The Cathedrals mighty Bourdon bell tolled mournfully as the
casket was loaded into a hearse. Eisenhowers wife Mamie, fighting
back tears behind a black veil, was escorted to her limousine by the
generals only son, John, and his wife Barbara.
Other members of the family, including David and Julie Nixon
Eisenhower, entered their cars. The mixed rain and snow showers
stopped. The hearse slowly moved at 3:20 p.m., followed by the
family cars, the President and other government officials and the
foreign dignitaries.

m
Former Student Body President Charles Shepherd, a 25-year-old
senior law student, announced Sunday his candidacy for another term
as student body president.
Shepherd will run under the First Party banner, the name of the
party he led to victory two years ago. The party will announce its
upper slate of candidates at a 7:30 pjn. rally Tuesday in the
Rathskeller.
The presidential candidate and his running mate, Charles Harris,
who is currently majority floor leader of the Student Senate, plan to
qualify Wednesday.
Qualifying for candidates closes Friday. The election will be on
April 24.
Shepherd said in an interview Sunday that he decided to seek
another term primarily because of recent events both on and off
campus. He referred specifically to the recent controversies generated
when State Sen. Tom Slade demanded the dismissal of philosophy
professor Kenneth Megill and when the local chapter of Southern
(SEE 'SHEPHEttD' PAGE 3)

America's
Number 1
College
Daily

Monday, March 31, 1969



Page 2

!. The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 31.1968

Peace and Prosperity
President Succumbs
The peace and prosperity president is dead.
Dwight David Eisenhower, bom in the Gay Nineties era, died
Friday, at 12:25 pjn. in his hospital bed after contending with the
nuclear age and Cold War of the Twentieth Century.
He was both a peaceful man and a peace maker. An earth
smoother rather than an earth shaker.
Ike as he was known to prime ministers and Gls alike,
personified the American ideal of manhood. From a poor
Bible-reading family in Abilene, Kansas he rose to become Supreme
Commander of the Allied Expeditionary Forces in Europe during
World War 11, president of Columbia University and the 34th
President of the United States.
He was a strong, outgoing boy who loved sports, first baseball and
football, later golf which he played with rare concentration. In 1911
Ike entered the U. S. Military Academy at West Point where his
humility, humor and stark integrity made him one of the most
popular of the class of *ls. This popularity would cut across politics,
national boundaries and titles for the rest of his life and endear him to
the American public.
In 1916 Ike married Mamie Geneva Doud.
After World War I, when he was promoted to major, he had two
ambitions to be a colonel and to have the command of troops.
With World War 11, Ikes brilliance on the field and his powers of
inspiration came into world prominence.
After Pearl Harbor he helped plan the invasion of Europe and in
1942 President Franklin Delano Roosevelt appointed him supreme
commander of the allied forces for the invasion of Africa.
It was his leadership and popularity that prompted politicians and
admirers in all circles to speak of a political career for the military
man. Not only was Ike reluctant, but annoyed and exasperated at
times in having to repeat his decision to stay out of politics.
His sense of duty to his country was at the core of Eisenhowers
character, however, and he saw the campaign of 1952 as an answer to
a call from the country.
In his first political job as president, Eisenhower displayed an
aversion to aggressive politics and political string pulling. This quality
at the same time spoke for both his political integrity and one of his
chief weaknesses in the White House, according to some critics.
Nevertheless, his conviction that the U.S. must keep a strong and
influential role in the world steered him into more executive
leadership by extending alliances, giving aid to friendly nations, and
finally pledging military assistance to any nation fighting communist
aggression.
Influencing these actions was the overwhelming compassion that
was Ikes. It was his personal contact, warmth and devotion to peace
that commanded respect in spite of disagreement with policies.
But the last years of his administration were hard ones for Ike, with
diplomatic relations with Cuba broken and a U-2 plane shot down
over Russia. Yet he still left the office with the respect of his
countrymen. A respect which he will take with him to his grave.

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EISENHOWER TAKES FIRST OATH OF OFFICE
__ ... Administered by Chief Justice Fred Vinson on Jan. 20.1953

DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER
Ort 74, 7890 March 28, 7969

IN MEMO HI AM


Nations Leaders Mourn

By United Press International
General Eisenhower held a
unique place in Americas
history and its heart and in the
hearts of people the world
over. President Nixon.
A giant of our time is
gone. former President
Lyndon B. Johnson.
. . I cannot forget his
services to his country and to
western civilization. former
president Harry S. Truman.
The President led the nation
in mourning Dwight David
Eisenhower as tributes to the
fallen soldier-statesman came
from across the nation and
around the world.
Proclaiming Monday as a day
of national mourning, Nixon
issued a statement saying of the

man under whom he served eight
years as vice president:
For a quarter of a century he
spoke with a moral authority
seldom equalled in American
public life.
This was not only because he
held the nations highest military
rank and its highest civilian
office, but more importantly
because of the kind of a man he
was.
He was a man of great
strength, wisdom and
compassion. But it always
seemed to me that two qualities
stood out above all in both his
public and his private life: One
was an unwavering sense of
duty; the other was that
whatever he did, he did because
he believed it was right.



Statewide Regents Survey
Views Quarter System

Within the next week, the
Board of Regents will be asking
you what you think of the
quarter system.
As a part of the largest and
most comprehensive survey of
its kind in the state, all faculty
and students at Floridas seven
state universities will be asked to
rate and comment upon

Shepherd Announces
FROM PAGE ONE
Students Organizing Committee was not granted an official campus
charter.
Frankly, I am fearful for the future of our university, Shepherd
said. There is a need for positive action to deal with some very real
problems. I believe the student body has to exert leadership.
He said his attacks on the issues recently raised would be
two-pronged. One course of action under his administration, he said,
would be preventive measures to avoid future controversies.
The other action needed, he contended, it education of the state
legislature and the public about the true nature of this university and
the need for academic freedom. Student leadership in this endeavor is
indispensible.
Shepherd, an independent, was the founder and first chairman of
the Accent Symposium. He also is a charter member of UFs chapter
of Omicron Delta Kappa honorary. He served as administrative
assistant three years ago under Student Body President Buddy Jacobs.
Shepherd describes his political philosophy as moderate
progressive whatever that means.
Harris, the vice presidential candidate who had until recently been
prominently mentioned as a presidential aspirer himself, is a member
of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He is also a member of Florida Blue
Key honorary.
Shepherd said he asked Harris to be his running mate because
Harris is the one person, other than myself, who I believe could be
an outstanding president of the student body. He is knowledgeable
about Student Government and he has a deep concern for the student
body and the university.
First partys platform will be heavily oriented toward academic
problems, Shepherd said. Some other areas of particular concern will
be the internal operation of Student Government, student insurance,
dorm area problems and university-city relations.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone
of all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
' fa/A&t rife Aea/A 6# I
/ruvte a AUi&ei /

TWELVE WEEK SESSION
June 16 to Sept. 5
Three-week and six-week
Sessions. Regular Six-week
session July 7-Aug. 15 I
I

modations.
For information, write:
DIRECTOR OF SUMMER SESSIONS
University of Maine, Orono. Maine 04473

prospective changes in the
quarter system.
The survey is the result of the
recommendation of a
nine-member committee under
the auspices of the Board of
Regents. Arts and Sciences Dean
Harry Sisler and Ed Tolle, 4JM,
served on the committee.
The survey was originally

Earning degree credits in the cool, re refreshing
freshing refreshing Maine donate is like being on
vacation with recreational opportunities
at nearby lakes, mountains and seashore
while you take Grat date and Undergrad Undergraduate
uate Undergraduate courses at Orono or Portland.
Distinguished faculty and visiting lec lecturers,
turers, lecturers, conferences, workshops, summer
arts festival. Modern dormitory accom-

intended for release the first part
of Winter Quarter. However,
printing difficulties and changes
in the wording of the
questionnaire delayed its mailing
until this week.
75,000 four-page surveys are
being distributed around the
state. Opinions will be sought on
questions ranging from the
abolishment of final exams to
the upping of credit in all
courses to four or five hours.
The total results will be
included in a regents appraisal of
the quarter system. Individual
faculty governing councils in the
state universities will make the
final implementation of any
changes.
Goodrich Joins
Armed Forces
Student Government
Vice-President Gary Goodrich,
once considered a prime
contender for SG President, has
enlisted in the armed forces.
SG President Clyde Taylor
said he will not appoint a new
vice-president since only two
weeks remain before new
elections are held.
I am appointing several
special assistants to take over the
work Gary was involved in,
Taylor said. I do not feel there
is a need to appoint anyone with
such a short period of time
remaining.
Presidential First
Thomas Jefferson was the
first U.S. president who had
been governor of a state.

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TUESDAY COUPON SPECIAL

College

Fidelity Union Life Insurance Co. 1636 W. Univ. Ave.
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DEFERRED PERMIUM PAYMENTS
THE LEADER IN SALES TO COLLEGE MEN

Classes Beginning Tuesday, at the Ramada Inn.

The Institute of Applied
Hypnosis, Inc., is beginning
another of its courses in self
hypnosis for self improvement
Wednesday night. The first
hour of the course is free and
is open to the public.
Hypnosis will be demonstrated
and its application to various
forms of personal
development will be discussed.
Hyponosis has been proved to
be effective in improving
memory, ability to
concentrate, learning ability,
self confidence, self
motivation, sales performance,
creative thinking and many
other fields.
Using the techniques taught at
the institute, the student
learns to put his subconscious

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UF f s REPRESENTATIVES

Jim Bartlett
George Corl
Dan Sapp

mind to work for him rather
than allowing it to operate in a
completely random manner.
The training is simple and
almost univerally successful. It
is easily learned and
effortlessly used. Results are
readily seen
The Institute of Appplied
Hypnosis has been teaching
classes in the Suncoast area for
three years. There are Institute
schools throughout the U.S.
and Canada. Local classes are
taught by Mr. Ted C.
Van Antwerp.
The public is invited to attend
the free lecture and
demonstration on Wednesday,
April 2, at the Ramada Inn.

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372-3649

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Page 3



I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 31,1969

Page 4

DO YOU
WANT TO BE
A GUINEA PIG?
Ridiculous question? What about your answer? Its not so ridiculous
when you consider that a minority AAUP dominated bloc of Florida
faculty members is behind the candidacy of Neil Butler A letter to
the rest of the University of Florida faculty was circulated asking for
their vote and financial support. Part of this letter is reprinted below.

ft.,

We hope that you will support Mr. Butlers candidacy. It is time to elect an intelligent,
responsible Negro to the Gainesville City Commission. Gainesville can become a good
place for all citizens to live. This is what Neil Butler means when he asks to Believe in
Gainesville.

Paul L. Adams
Dawn Bentley
Seymour S, Block
David M. Chalmers
Kent E. Chernetski
Harold B. Clark
Arthur W. Combs
Stephen S. Conroy
Austin B. Creel
Robert L. Curran

WE SAY A MAN IS KNOWN BY THE COMPANY HE KEEPS

We ask, "Isn't Gainesville a good place to live NOW?"
We ask you, who represent the majority of the U of F and citizens of Gainesville, "Do
you want to let this minority group run your city government through their hand picked
candidate?"
We ask, if this quote regarding Neil Butler from his ad in the Gainesville Sun of March
24th is Valid?
"He is obligated to no person, group or company!"
Dont Let 13% of Gainesvilles Voters Start Telling You What To Do
WINDY WILKERSON

Represents the Majority, but the majority
~ must vote -Tuesday, April 1st
CITY COMMISSION

Raymond W. Fahien
Charles W. Fristoe
Irving J. Goffman
Jacquelin R. Goldman
Ira J. Gordon
Paul L. Hanna
Francis C. Hayes
Thomas A. Henderson
Joan Henry

Richard H. Hiers
Ernest M. Jones
Gladys M. Kammerer
Hal G. Lewis
John D. McCrone
Emily MacLachlan
0. Ruth McQuown
John K. Mahon
Ward D. Noyes, M. D.

William W. Purkey
George E. Ryschkewitsch
Delton L. Scudder
Robert R. Sherman
Emanuel Suter
W. Jape Taylor
Ralph B. Thompson
Eugene A. Todd
Joseph S. Vandiver
Stuart A. Wesbury, Jr.



135 Arrested In Church-
Detroit Policeman Killed

DETROIT (UPI) Police
shot their way into a black
nationalist meeting in a West
Side church Sunday and arrested
135 persons minutes after one
policeman was slain and another
wounded outside the building.
Four persons inside the
church were wounded. Police
said they faced riflemen kneeling
behind church pews when they
smashed into the New Bethel

UPI
NEWS
Kys Return Spurs
Peace Talk Hopes

PARIS (UPI) The return to
Paris this week of South
Vietnamese Vice President
Nguyen Cao Ky spurred hopes
Sunday that secret talks may
begin soon and break the logjam
in Vietnam peace negotiations.
Ky, coordinator of Saigons
delegation here, announced he
would fly to Paris after
attending the funeral for Dwight
D. Eisenhower in Washington.
Ky has been in Saigon for the
past month.
Western diplomats said Kys
move may indicate allied
expectations for progress toward
substantive talks outside the
limelight of the regular Thursday
sessions involving the United
States, South Vietnam, North
Vietnam and the Viet Congs
National Liberation Front
(NLF).
South Vietnamese President
Nguyen Van Thieu, in a major
policy shift, announced last
week he was ready to agree to
private talks with the NLF. Viet
Cong officials described the
move as a trick but did not
slam the door on the idea of
secret negotiations.
WATCH & JEWELRY REPAIR
G/UNESMIIf Shopping Center
1222 NORTH MAIN ST.
9:30 AM 9:OO PM Mon-Fri ~

Baptist Church, located about
three blocks west of the core
area of Detroits bloody 1967
riots.
The pastor of the New Bethel
Baptist Church is the Rev. C. L.
Franklin, father of singer Aretha
Franklin. The church apparently
had been loaned to the black
nationalist group and the Rev.
Franklin was not present during
the shooting.

President Nixon has also
declared he considers secret talks
necessary for progress in
bargaining.
Allied delegation officials
have remained hopeful the NLF
and North Vietnam will agree to
engage in the secret negotiations
that could open the door to a
peaceful settlement in Vietnam.

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MON TUES WED
MARCH 31 APRIL 1 APRIL 2
RIPS ONE HOUR DRY CLEANING
& MARTINIZING PLANTS
7 complet! PLANTS
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204 N.W. 13th Street
319 N.W. 13th Street
1603 S.W. 13th Street

1150 N.E. 16th Avenue

About half of those in
custody wore conventional
clothing. The other half were
dressed in African robes, or
Army-like fatigues, some with
the leopard shoulder and collar
insignia of the Republic of New
Africa.
Police Commissioner
Johannes F. Spreen said
arresting officers confiscated
seven rifles, three handguns and
a large quantity of
ammunition. Witnesses said
police gave paraffin tests in the
church in an effort to determine
who had been firing at them.
Some of those taken into
custody were held for
questioning on a preliminary
charge of conspiracy to commit
murder. Others were held as
witnesses.
Police released 25 of those in
custody within hours of the
gunbattle. A judge released 15
more on bond.
Killed was Patrolman Michael
J. Czapski, 22, a rookie on the
force for less than a year. His
partner, Patrolman Richard E.
Worobec, 28, was reported in
fair condition following
emergency surgery at Ford
Hospital. Czapski had been shot
several times, police said.
Worobec suffered three bullet
wounds.
Czapski, who was single, had
been a policeman only since last
May. Worobec, married and the
father of two children, joined
the force in October of 1966.

SHOP-SHOP
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IN GAINESVILLE
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ing clooking of ony of our plant*,
on your way fa work ..
and pick it up on your
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316 North Main Street
3444 West University Avenue

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f w/MEAT BALLS $1.35
j ft SALAD > ww
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j 14 S.W._lst STREET
Tradition Begins at
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Set up vibrations, make noise
Do your own thing in our spectacular
selection of flared pants for men and
women. Just arrived, 12 new patterns.
Its not our only bag, see our
other fashions. w |
lAtttittrgttg j&pp

Monday, March 31,1968, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

i, Tlm Florida Aigiiar, Monday, Man* 31, 1960

Fiscal Expert
And President
Agree On Tax
Support for a one-year
extension of the 10 per cent
income tax surcharge came last
Wednesday from UFs expert on
fiscal policy, Dr. Irving
Coffman.
Dr. Coffman, specialist in
federal government finance,
commented on President
Nixons request to Congress to
continue the surtax, scheduled
to expire June 30.
He called the new
economics the use of taxes
to influence economic activity
desirable to restrain the
overheated economy.
The UF tax authority not
only supports the surtax, but
warns it may not be enough to
combat inflation.
A curb on private investments
is necessary, and voluntary
wage-price guidelines desirable,
Coffman said.
The surtax may not be
enough of a policy to cool down
the economy, particularly
private investments, which are
expected to be much higher over
the next year than it has been in
the past two years, he said.
Dr. Coffman added: It very
well may be that the Council of
Economic Advisers will have to
give some consideration to more
selective fiscal and monetary
measures to restrain this private
investment.
Coffman said one measure
being watched is the higher rate
of interest which, it would hope,
might restrain private
investments.
As for wage-price guidelines,
Dr. Coffman commented:
Obviously, voluntary controls
would be preferable to formal
controls.
Another economy-related
problem was cited
employment.
Despite the fact that it is
desirable to restrain inflationary
pressures, it is at least as
important for Washington to
keep its eye on the
unemployment rate so that we
don't end up trading inflation
for recession.
SG Exchange
Opens Today
The SC-sponsored Student
Book Exchange resumes
operation today, continuing
through Friday under the
colonnade of the Reitz Union.
Books will be collected today
and tomorrow only, although
sales wOl be conducted all five
days this wed at prices
requested by the student.
The hours for the book
exchange are 25 pjn. each
afternoon.
I Miler-Brown I
M 3ME MU
I fe: THE to. VO W
I wojasEiy 1

DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST
I % T" f 'ttXJ SHCULPN'T HAVfe "THIS V 2%
(myIKhJ A| OVEREA-TtN LAST W6HT.J
\V / 1 poh'-t remember] v

Rare Book Acquired
By Research Library
A rare first edition of the nine volumes of The Life and Opinions
of Tristram Shandy, a Gentleman, is an exciting new acquisition of
UFs Research Library.
Announcement of the purchase of the volumes, published in the
years between 1759-67, was made by Miss Laura V. Monti, special
collections librarian at the University.
The works already are being used by Dr. Melvyn New, assistant
professor of English, who will edit selections to be published by the
University Press.
When the original volume was written by Laurence Sterne
(17131768) and published in 1760 by the famous publisher
Dodsley, it startled Londoners and brought fame to its author.
It was denounced on moral and literary grounds by Dr. Samuel
Johnson, Horace Walpole and Oliver Goldsmith, but defended by
other literary figures.
The Sterne manuscript was rejected on its first appearance before
Dodsley, but was accepted after a friend of Sterne published it in
York in 1759, in a two-volume issue of two or three hundred copies.
After the success of the 1760 publication, Dodsley commissioned
Sterne to write a volume of Tristram every year.

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Red Rockets Hit Saigon

SAIGON (UPl)Communist
gunners pumped at least three
rockets into parts of Saigon near
the downtown district Sunday
night, breaking a two-week hill
in raids on the South
Vietnamese capital. Allied
spokesmen said there were
apparently no casualties.
On another battlefront, US
commanders said troops firing
from North Vietnamese territory
for the first time since the
Communist offensive started
Feb. 23 tried to shoot down a
US spotter plane but were
silenced by American
counterbarrages.
The area near the
Demilitarized Zone DMZ
between the two Vietnams has
been the scene of heavy fighting
in recent days with at least 269
North Vietnamese regulars
killed, according to US count.
US spokesmen said the
American plane came under
50-caliber machine gun fire from
an area near the north bank of
the Ben Hai River, the boundary
between North and South
Vietnam.
Allied spokesmen said three
and possibly four rockets hit
Sajgon in the barrage that began
about 11:35 pm Sunday. Two
plunged into the Saigon River at
the edge of the downtown area.
A third struck a barren area on
the riverfront in the city's 9th
Precinct.
It appeared that the rockets
were fired from the same
location, probably south of the
city where most of the previous
barrages have been launched.
The shells landed at one minute
intervals in areas ranging from
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one half mDe to one mile of
downtown Saigon.
The United States takes the
position that shellings of South
Vietnamese population centers
and abuses of the DMZ violate
the terms of the understanding
with Hanoi under, which
American air raids on North
Vietnam were halted last Nov. 1.
American military spokesmen
said the rocket attack on Saigon
Sunday night followed about 20

Israeli Jets Bomb
Jordan Territory
By United Pm International
Israeli jet fighters raided Arab positions inside Jordan for the
second time in four days Sunday, retaliating for three Arab
commando assaults against Israeli border patrols.
The Israeli military communique announcing the raid described it
only as an accurate reprisal for the Arab attacks, in which five
Israeli soldiers were wounded.
A Jordanian military spokesman said two Israeli Mystere fighters
dropped napalm bombs in a 29-minute raid over the Tel Abou Naeir
area, four miles south of the King Hussein Bridge. There were no
Jordanian casualties, the spokesman said.
An Israeli bombing raid into Jordan last Wednesday sparked a
formal Jordanian complaint before the United Nations Security
Council, which is still debating the issue. Jordan claimed 18 civilians
were killed and 25 others woulded in the raid on a village. Israel
claimed the target actually was an Arab commando base.
The Israeli report on Sundays raid said the planes struck just east
of the Israeli border village of Kfar Ruppin, where two Israeli soldiers
were wounded in a gunfight with Arabs across the Jordan River.

£E DV~ & ( j /WN.thrttFl. tO.OOQn-9 : (io
CDdl 3RD AV/^jS^CS
tec Pants J%v_
OPEkJ J/VflMc'BftfvTS |"" O "kSJL |
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artillery barrages on allied
installations throughout South
Vietnam Saturday night and
early Sunday morning. Most
were directed against South
Vietnamese military bases.
The spotter plane fired upon
Saturday near the DMZ directed
artillery fire against the North
Vietnamese gun site six miles
northeast of the American
outpost at Gio Linh, officials
reported. They said the gun
position was destroyed and the
body of one North Vietnamese
soldier was sighted.

Miss Doris Kendrick
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Fashion co-ordinator of The Clothes
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Monday, March 31.1 M, Tlm Florida AMator.

Page 7



Page 8

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 31,1969

OF UF FOR QQP CAUCUS
Slade Refuses OConnells Offer

UF President Stephen C. OConnell last Monday
invited Republican legislative leaders to hold their
upcoming caucus on university unrest at UF only to
have the invitation rejected by State Sen. Tom
Slade, R-Jacksonville.
Slade, who touched off a furor with demands for
the ouster of Philosophy Professor Kenneth Megill,
said the GOP legislative caucus would bypass UF
for fear of creating a circus atmosphere.
It would serve no purpose to conduct a caucus
in such an atmosphere, Slade said.
In a letter to Slade released at a Miami news
conference, OConnell expressed his willingness to

Pregnancy Expert Named
To J. Wayne Reitz Biology Chair

Dr. Donald H. Barron, a
leading authority on pregnancy
physiology at Yale University,
has been named to fill the J.
Wayne Reitz Chair of
Reproductive Biology and
Medicine.
The appointment, announced
by UF President Stephen C.
OConnell, fills the first privately
endowed chair in the universitys
history. The chair was endowed
by Mrs. Cordelia Scaife May of
Ligonier, Pa., who has given
$950,000 to the Department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology in
the College of Medicine.

Ombudsman Concept
Pushed For Cities

The ombudsman
concept begun at UF last
quarter received a strong
recommendation for
establishment at all levels of
government in the United States.
The Southeastern Assembly,
sponsored by UF and Columbia
University, met in a three-day
session last weekend in Daytona
and was attended by 75
governmental representatives
from five southern states.
As part of a nationwide series
of non-partisan studies cm the
ombudsman approach to dealing
with citizen grievances, the

Camp Takajo
Naples Maine
Needs
Male Counselors
Qualified in :

Waterfront tennis
Baseball
Nature study

See Placement office for further information.
If interested Please fillout application and
make appointment for:
Thursday April 3rd

The three separate gifts of
money from Mrs. May will
support a program of research,
service and education in
reproductive biology.
Barron will take up his new
position on July 1.
OConnell and Emanuel Suter,
dean of the College of Medicine,
called Barrons appointment an
honor for the university.
It is recognition of the
strength and national respect
achieved by the Department of
Obstetrics and Gynecology, and
the ability of its chairman, Dr.
Harry Prystowsky, to attract the

conference issued a report
commending the idea as a check
on local officials.
A majority of governmental
officials carry out their
functions with efficiency,
honesty and courtesy. However,
cases of unsatisfactory
performance are sufficiently
numerous and serious to pose a
problem requiring attention,
the report noted.
The assembly recommended
that any grievance procedures
established on local, state or
national levels should cover all
administrative functions in that
governmental unit.

Basketball
Outdoor camping
Music (Piano)

help and offered the legislators use of all university
facilities.
We will make available to you any information
which you might wish to consider either as to our
existing operation or as to our needs, OConnell s
letter stated.
Everyone is, of course, entitled to his views as to
what a university should be, as well as what is wrong
with this institution, but I would suggest that before
any judgments are made, those who make them
ought to make every effort to get first hand, as
many facts as possible.
The offer I make is designed to give this

renowned physiologist to its
faculty, OConnell said.
He will be extremely
valuable to our department and
to the entire College of Medicine
because, in addition to being an
outstanding teacher and
researcher, his interests extend
beyond physiology and
reproductive biology.
Barrons research has resulted
in about 150 original works on
subjects ranging from new
knowledge in plant physiology
to the development of the spinal
cord and diversified studies in
prenatal life.
Among his works are studies
on factors influencing the
oxygen supply to the brain at
birth, respiratory rhythms,
development of the central
nervous system, and, more
recently, a series of papers on
placental physiology, vascular
mechanisms and uterine blood
flow.

I 1 1'!
. /'** '- ;v ''fTnhi
.wssvAVA'.svrtv.v' .v.v'.yMCXv
; _ I
- 1
cMwNfl : >- / IF :

If you let nature
take its course
you may fail yours.

You were supposed to cram for
calculus tonight, but somehow 35-24-35
looked more appealing than the
derivative of x 3.
And now its 1 a.m. And nature can
play some pretty mean tricks on a guy
at 1 a.m.
Relax, take a couple of NoDoz"

opportunity to you and any others who might wish
to avail themselves of it, he said.
OConnell said he made the offer to Slade to clear
up many popular misconceptions about UF.
There is a great lack of facts and a
misconception in the minds of the public, he said.
Many people hear about disturbances on other
campuses and translate that to our campus.
Slade said, however, that even if there were no
other factors involved, the pressure of legislative
business in Tallahassee would probably prevent a
Gainesville meeting.

MONDAY
u FRIDAY
LARGE AMOUNT DELLS GRADE A
FRIED on
CHICKEN
PORTIONS LARGE ENOUGH TO
SATISFY MOST HUNGRY STUDENTS!
313 West
University Ave.
Downtown
Gainesville

and stop relaxing.
NoDoz has the strongest stimulant
you can buy without a prescription.
And its not habit forming.
NoDoz will help you resist
nature, at least until the next 411;'-
time a cold hard fact loses :
out to a soft warm one.



Clark Kerr Speaks
At Religion-In-Life

Clark Kerr the man in the
middle when student unrest
erupted at Berkeley speaks at
the UF April 22.
President of the University of
California for 11 years prior to
his resignation in 1967, Dr. Ken
is noted as this countrys most
articulate spokesman on the
modern-day university.
He will address a
Religion-In-Life convocation on
the subject of the university in a
time of turmoil.
Dr. Kerr is chairman of the
Carnegie Commission on Higher
Education. His present position
at the University of California is
professor of economics and
industrial relations. He also
serves as research economist for
the Institute of Industrial
Relations and on the boards of a
number of educational and
philanthropic foundations.
Last year he received an
award for extraordinary and
distinguished contributions to
the advancement of higher
education from the academic
senate, Berkeley Division,
University of California. In 1964

WHATS
HAPPENING
CIRCLE K CLUB Wilbur Jackson, 3AS, has been elected Lt.
Governor of the Suwanee Division of Circle K International. Jackson,
a transfer from Santa Fe JC, will be coordinating all Circle K business
for the division which includes five junior colleges and UF.
FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM A new womens service
organization is being formed at the Florida State Museum, according
to Dr. J.C. Dickinson, museum director. An organizational meeting
for potential museum volunteers is scheduled for 10 a.m. today in
room 361 Reitz Union.
MORTAR BOARD Initiation will be held Tuesday for 19 coeds
tapped into the UF Trianon Chapter of Mortar Board. The following
were tapped: Lynn Barger, Dianne Baron, Catherine Bennett, Joan
Bradbury, Jane Cohen, Jan Dickens, Marsha Distiller, Joan Dowd,
Roslyn Gould, Janelle Heck, Barbara Lindley, Eileen McDargh, Vicki
Mandell, Judy Matthews, Eloise Oliver, Helene Rutansky, Monica
Shagrin, Mellisa Shepard and Suzanna Veldhuis.
SAVANT Jan Dickens has been elected president of Savant for
the 1968-69 term. Barbara Linden is vice president, Linda Satlof is
secretary, Susan Johnson is treasurer, Karen Kay is historian and Marti
Cochrane is publicity extension director.
student producer-
Pro lect WE FOR> THE FLORIQA

he won the Alexander
Meiklejohn Award for
contributions to academic
freedom from the American
Association of University
Professors.
Dr. Kerr has a long and
distinguished record in
education, government and
public service. He is a
contributor to 17 major
publications and a prolific
author whose 1964 book on the
uses of the university is widely
quoted. His most recent book,
The University and Utopia, is
slated for publication this year.
A member of President
Eisenhowers Commission on
National Goals from 1959-60,
Dr. Kerr also served on labor
management advisory
committees for both Presidents
Kennedy and Johnson. He is on
the Rockefeller Foundation
board of trustees, the advisory
committee on endowment
management of the Ford
Foundation and chairman of the
Armour automation fund
committee.

DR. CLARK KERR
... former Berkeley president

MALONES
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U of F JEWELRY BOOK ENDS
U of F "T SHIRTS CHECKS CASHED
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Dear Citizen and Voter:
I have conducted my campaign for the City Commis Commission
sion Commission the same way I will conduct myself as your City
Commiasioner-with dignity and honor. NO ONE has a
right to lower the standards demanded for such a respon responsible
sible responsible office.
I have been honest and fair and made no pie-in-the-sky
promises that I could not keep. I sincerely want to repre represent
sent represent all the people of Gainesville but I WILL NOT lower
the high ideals and standards which I hold so dear in order
to win such an office.
I believe my election to the commission will signal a
new day and new hope for ALL of Gainesville. We are a
mature, honorable, progressive city. I don't believe we
will settle for anything less than the most qualified person
to fill that office.
I ask that every voter evaluate the qualifications of
both candidates and vote their convictions. To decide this
on anything else would undermine the entire
Democratic structure for which we have fought and died.
Please go to the polls tomorrow and let the world know
that Gainesville is healthy and mature. Vote for Progress
in Gainesville.
"LET'S BELIEVE IN GAINESVILLE ... Neil Butler
dossil!"

Married Five Children
Lifelong resident of Gainesville
Steward Mt. Olive Methodist Church
World War II Navy Combat Veteran
Omaga Psi Phi Fratarnity
Elks American Legion
B.S. degree University of Florida
Admittad to Graduate School U. of F.
Registered Professional Nurse

ON APRIL X, VOTE FOR
NEIL BUTLER
City Commissioner
l>dl>OlAd "Lets Bejieve In Gainesville"

"Lets Believe in Gainesville
VOTE FOR
THE QUALIFIED CANDIDATE

QUALIFICATIONS

DANSKIN
LEOTARDS
and
TIGHTS
AVAILABLE AT:
UCHTERS
N THE MAU
HEADQUARTERS IN GAINESVILLE FOR DANCEWEAR

Member American Nuraas Association
Coordinated all Nursing for "ppsTation Concern"
Former Head Nurse Pediatrics U. of F.
Teaching Hospital
Served as Chairman of Gainesville's Human Relations
Advisory Board
Chairman Board of Directors, 801 l Nurssry
Member Board of Directors, Ssogle Foundation
Member Steering Committee of Coordinating
Council of Concern

Monday, March 31,1909, Tha Florida Alligator,

Also
U. off F. Glasses & Mugs
U. off F. Sweatshirts
Briefcases
Pens
Art Supplies
Desk Lamps

i... ; i'J.

Page 9



EDITOR'S NOTE: The Alligator
today relinquishes its editorial pages so
that the complete texts of official
statements from UF President Stephen
C. O'Connell concerning the
SladeMegill and SSOC charter
controversies of last quarter may be
published.
The letters and documents referred to

OConnell:'SSOC Isnt
A Student Organization

TO: Lester L. Hale, Vice President for Student Affairs
FROM: Stephen C. O'Connell, President
RE: Recognition of students for New Party and Southern
Student Organizing Committee
Your memorandum on the above matter, together with
the recommendation of the majority of the Committee on
Student Organizations and Social Affairs, the views of the
minority of the Committee, and the file developed by the
Committee have all been carefully considered.
Recognition of a student organization by the University,
as sought here, gives the organization, among others, the
privilege of (1) using University facilities as available, (2)
inviting speakers to this campus, (3) seeking and receiving
an award of that part of registration fees entrusted to
Student Government for student activities, and (4)
representing to the students on this campus and to the
public generally that it and its purposes and objectives are
properly related to and enjoy the approval of this
institution.
Denial of recognition does not deny an organization
existence, prevent students from joining it, nor prevent its
members from exercising any rights of expression or
assembly protected by Constitution or law. I am sure that
many organizations exist on this campus, and other off
campus, with membership comprised in part of University
students, which organizations have never sought and might
not be entitled to recognition and the benefits it offers. Yet
they continue to operate. Such is the case with SDS and
SSOC.
The file in this case indicates that an SSOC chapter has
existed in Gainesville for more than two years and SDS has
existed off campus, with student members, since 1965.
Denial of recognition will not mark the end of these groups,
or their activities. But this does not mean that the
University should be or is obligated to recognize them and
extend the benefits of recognition.
Each of the above-cited benefits of recognition is of
importance, both to the organization and to this
institution. The use of facilities furnished by the people of
this state must be consistent with the purposes for which
they are requested and furnished; the privilege of using this
campus as a forum for invited speakers imposes significant
responsibilities on the organization and its officers to
shoulder the obligations prescribed in the policy recently
adopted by the University Senate; the right to request and
receive funds allocated to student activities from
registration fees, paid by students under force of law and
Board of Regents policy, is of major importance and a
misdirection of such funds to uses not consistent with
activities properly related to the academic function of this
institution could have grave consequences; and perhaps
most important, recognition, whether it be so in fact or
not, is taken and is utilized to indicate that the objectives,
purposes and operation of the organization enjoy the
approval of this University. This effect of recognition is to
elevate the organization to a status of acceptability that
should be accorded only if its purposes and activities, past
and promised, deserve it. If it doesn't then the organization
should be left to travel on its own name, not that of the
University.
We come then to the two applications in issue. As is
noted below, the vote of the Committee, 5 to 4, on the
applications can hardly be 'said to be an overwhelming
endorsement ot uiutor
A. APPLICATION OF STUDENTS FOR NEW PARTY
By 54 vote the Committee recommended this
organization be given recognition as an approved student
organization. You recommend that the Committee
recommendation be approved. Your recommendation and
that of the Committee, subject to the conditions prescribed
in the letter from the Committee, and that added below, is
accepted.
The recognition of this group seems dictated by
precedent of the University's having recognized student
organizations which exist to support other political parties
on the state and national scene.
As I read the file and your memorandum, membership in
this group is limited to full-time University students and its
purpose is to support, through the existing political
mechanism, the precepts and platform of the New Party.
The existence of this student group seems consistent
with the educational mission of this institution which in
part at least encourages students to exercise their influence
as citizens through the established political process.
However, because the organization's purpose is political.
neither it nor any other student organizations, whose
function is to promite the interest of political parties,
should be allocated any portion of registration fees
entrusted to Student Government for student activities.
B. SOUTHERN STUDENT ORGANIZING COMMITTEE
While the Committee voted 54 to recommend
recognition of this organization, you have recommended,
for die reasons stated in your memorandum, that it not be
given official recognition. Again your recommendation is
accepted and the SSOC is denied recognition by this
institution. % t

in O'Connell's letter to State Sen. Tom
Slade are too voluminous for
reproduction here. For those interested
in reading the complete file, however,
the president has made copies available
in the College Library, at the Student
Activities Desk and Information Desk in
the Reitz Union and in the offices of all
deans.

Basic to my concurrence in your recommendation is the
fact that SSOC is not a student organization. As I
understand the file, anyone may attend and participate in
their meetings, although in some way the spokesman
indicated that voting would be limited to members. In a
move consistent with this, the SSOC chapter involved here
has apparently formed an alliance with JOMO (Junta of
Military Organizations, which has as its motto "In Guns We
T rust.")
At a January 1969 meeting of another University
committee, a leader in JOMO was introduced as the St.
Petersburg, Florida, correspondent of SSOC' In a recent
issue of the "Phoenix," which apparently is one of the
official organs of the SSOC national organization, it is
reported that the Gainesville SSOC chapter and JOMO have
in fact formed an alliance and are cooperating in
conducting self-education courses in "fire arms usage,
hand-to-hand combat, and survival techniques."
This coupled with the elements of connection with SDS
which are suggested by the file, including use of the name
SDS on the original application, and at least some sharing
of agreement with the purposes and course of action
espoused by SDS leaders, leads to the conclusion that
approval of SSOC offers SDS and JOMO direct, if
unofficial, entree to this campus. Neither of the latter
groups would, in my opinion, be entitled to recognition
themselves.
There are those, on and off this campus, that argue with
logic that since SSOC agrees to abide by University
regulations, they should be recognized. Then if they violate
the rules recognition should be removed.
This view, it seems to me, ignores the basic question of
whether the purposes, objectives, and methods of the
organization, as stated by the applicants and revealed by its
origin, alliances and actions, are and are likely to be
consistent with the education purpose for which the people
of this state have erected and maintain this institution.
Further it ignores the issue of whether the actions of the
organization are likely to contribute to or detract from the
scholarly atmosphere that ought to prevail here. Wisdom
dictates that we exercise foresight, not merely hindsight, in
the decisions we are required to make.
There me those who argue that denial of recognition will
give SSOC a cause around which they can rally for
disruptive activities a large segment of the students on this
campus. I have more confidence in the mature judgement
of our students than those who so feel. Nevertheless,
logically extended, this view would result in this institution
approving every request of such groups to avoid trouble on
this campus. This we will not do.
No student, no group, is entitled to approval of every
request or demand made. All that is required is a fair
consideration of legitimate requests and approval of those
that are found to be consistent with the best interests of
this institution. If SSOC uses this denial of recognition as a
cause for disruption, it will have demonstrated this decision
to be a correct one.
In my opinion, SSOC's request for recognition has been
given fair and deliberate consideration. Again, in my
opinion, it has been found not consistent with the best
interests of this institution, its educational mission, and its
continued operation and progress.
My conclusion then is the same as yours, that SSOC is
not a student organization which is entitled to recognition
by this institution. It will of course have the right to
continue, but without the assistance and benefits of
recognition by this University.
r P Tw m
H.jr -: N qmmr?
PRESIDENT STEPHEN O'CONNELL
...'charges not justified' \
The Honorable Tom Slade
Florida State Senator
Jacksonville, Florida
Dear Senator:
As I promised in my letter of February 15, we have
treated your letter of February 10 as a complaint against
Dr. Kenneth Megill and have followed the requirements of
By-Law Number 1 of the University Senate.
The issues you have presented by your complaint and
those considered by me i the inquiry which followed are
two fold: (1) Did Dr. Megill make the statements referred
to in your letter, and (2) if so, do they warrant his
dismissal as requested by you?
The resolution of these issues requires, first, a
determination of the facts and second, measurement of
these facts against existing standards, professional and
legal, to determine Dr. Megill's right to make the
statements and the propriety of his having done so.
Although it is difficult to disassociate personal views of
agreement or disagreement with the statements attributed
to Dr. Megill, whether I or anyone else agrees with what
he said is not the issue only whether he had the right to
make them and it was proper to do so as a member of the
faculty of this institution. Although I disagree with the
statements made by Dr. Megill, and that which he
advocates, this should not, and has not, colored my
determination of this matter.
A. FACTS
The facts are these. Dr. Megill made the statements set
forth in your letter in substance, if not in the exact
words. In his letter dated February 24, of which a copy is
attached. Dr. Megill explains his views on each of the
statements attributed to him and states specifically that in
his statement regarding takeover of the University by
students and faculty, he did not and does not now
advocate doing this by force or violence.
In the letter from Dr. Thomas Hanna to Dean Hairy
Sisler, dated February 18, Dr. Hanna makes the following
explanation of what was urged by Dr. Megill:
"Dr. Megill, in his remarks concerning the institutional
importance of greatly increased faculty-student advice
and active participation in universities, did not refer to
a faculty labor "union" doing this, nor did he refer to
a "take-over" df the University in the sense of
violence, physical force or coercion. To the contrary,
it is the practical concern of dedicated faculty,
students and administrators of the University of
Florida as well as Dr. Megill that ALL faculty (not
a "union"), that ALL students (not "radical'*
students) and ALL local administrators join together
(not "take over" through coercion) to achieve a far
more efficient and practical use of state education
appropriations for the effective operation of our
universities.'
Dr. Hanna states that Dr. Megill has read his letter and
agrees with the contents of it, including Dr. Hanna's
explanation of what he meant by take-over of the
University by faculty and students.
In the attached pamphlet "Toward a Free University,"
written by Dr. Megill some months ago, and in his
statement dated February 23rd, also attached, Dr. Megill's
views are further illuminated.
B. APPLICABLE STANDARDS
BOARD OF REGENTS POLICY: The Board of
Regents have adopted a policy relating to academic
freedom which states in part the obligations and rights of
faculty members, which policy has been adopted by this
university as Section 5.10 of the University Policy
Manual. A copy is attached. Three points in this
statement are pertinent here. One is the statement that
the student must have the opportunity to study a full
spectrum of ideas, opinions and beliefs, so that he may
acquire maturity for analysis and judgement. A second is
the requirement that the teacher be objective and skillful
in the exposition of matters presented in the classroom. A
third is that "The University teacher is a citizen, a
member of a learned profession, and an academic officer
of an educational institution. He should be constantly
mindful that these roles may be inseparable in the public
view and he should therefore at all times exercise
appropriate restraint and good judgment."
LEGAL DECISIONS: In the attached brief prepared by
Mr. Henry Barber, Gainesville, Florida,
to whom the University is permitted to turn for legal
advice on specific issues, he advises that under existing
decisions of the Supreme Court of the United States:
1. A faculty member cannot be dismissed for any
cause without strict procedural due process;
2. That expression of an idea, opinion, or course of
action without exhortation to implementation by
force, violence or coercion would probably not be
grounds for disciplinary action or dismissal by the
institution; and
3. That the trend is to guarantee to the public
,nc,ud| ng th teacher, all the constitutional
rights of free speech accorded other citron.
SWEMENTS OF PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES:
cILh h memorandum on the applicable professional
standards. Henry A. Fenn, Dean Emeritus, College of
Law, University of Florida, reaches these conclusions:
P statements * both the Board of Regents
a he Un,vers |ty preclude any "immediate" action
such as contemplated by Senator Slade.
(to'iaL?? doubtful H an V disciplinary action against
Dr. Megill is justified at this time because:

'Unwise SU

a Whil I
statements conftiti
discretion" and| a p
judgement"
University
conclusion.
J- The Ameriln
Professors almoslee
th at any discipilar
aca dernic freedol."
c. It is very doublful
any disciplinary atio
in his excellent nlm
basis and reasoning to
recommends that a pjcv
subject be prepared aid
Based upon the inquly
Chairman of the Departlei
Megill teaches, and Deal S
Arts and Sciences in whlh
is located, both deternliei
letter would not warralt
Dr, Megill. This means
ground for dismissal of . I
It is noteworthy, toJ tl
February 18, and Dr. Hlgi
the Department of Philsc
say that in their professim
only the right, but theAy
about the operation of lu
can be equated with thJdi
accepted history on nevly
of the chemist to annolnc
outmodes existing oneslo
announce a theory thl
cancer despite damage t Jth
Taking the four statelei
reverse order, they are I
idea in this century is lie
that only radicals are tlk
(3) that the students In
oppressed class living if a
that he advocated "their
union to join at the Ire
movement and take overlh
The first three statele
Megill seem to be opinfcr
person, student, facultl,
entitled to make such date
society. I see no valid re|s<
not make such statement v
The fourth statement |r
as I see it, the critical onl I
words take over the Unlre
me and others on this am
and a great number of til i
his letter of February 2l
and the pamphlet "Towl<
that he does not advoegt
violence. Although Dr. le
existing method of seleli
University so as to makwf
faculty, nowhere does A
of action by which he wli
The internal operatiol;
is a' complicated one. I
University
promulgated pursuant*
adopted by the Board#
legislative acts. The stic
action of the various bo^e
Dr. Megill states thij!
paragraph quoted fromlC
what he meant by talc#<
faculty and local adminjt
more efficient and pj<
appropriations for thl
universities.
If this is what he mey
he proposes to do it by jf
right to urge such sew
I A
PROFESSOF
...hears goo



itement Not Cause For Dismissal

Iced that Dr. Megill's alleged
;e a lack of "scholarly
ropriate restraint and good
by Board of Regents and
,there may differ with this
Association of University
tainly will take the position
action violates Dr. Megill's
that the courts would sustain
taken.
randum Dean Fenn gives the
his conclusion. He also
statement dealing with this
bmitted to the University
JSSION
iade by them. Dr. Hanna as
of Philosophy in which Dr.
iler. Dean of the College of
ie Department of Philosophy
that the complaint in your
targes being brought against
in their opinion there is no
egill.
it Dr. Hanna, in his letter of
s fellow faculty members in
hy (see attached statement)
judgment Dr. Megill had not
as a scholar to state his views
versify. This, it seems to me,
inaury of a historian to challenge
nly discovered evidence; the duty
I 1 a new-found discovery that
the duty of the scientist to
iks cigarette smoking with
industry.
> referred to in your letter in
lows: (1) that the only new
oncept of black power; (2)
I about it in a relevant way;
t realize that they are an
oppressed country; and (4)
nization of a strong teacher
ir time the radical student
Jnivereity."
s or ideas expressed by Dr.
that advocate nothing. Any
ass, citizen or legislator is
ents about any matter in our
why he or anyone else could
:h impunity.
ea attributed to Dr. Megill is,
cause of his use of the action
ity," this statement has given
s grave concern, as it has you
izens of Florida. However, in
e statement of February 23,
i Free University," it is clear
such take-over by force and
II urges major changes in the
i of all administrators at the
n responsible to students and
vocate or explain the course
accomplish the changes.
d structure of this university
determined in part by the
i the rules and regulations
to, in large part by policies
agents and in other part by
cture can be changed only by
as which have erected it.
hr he has read and approves the
m Dr. Hanna's letter, interpreting
ak over, that is, that all students,
in trators join together to achieve a
p ctical use of state education
th effective operation of our
it and means by take-over and if
gitimate means, he had a perfect
n and to set it as a goal to be
Ji*' v. WV
a...vv-rwy
OR ken megill
joodnews

sought. A university cannot achieve its gras ten potential
without manifestation of the deepest interest and the
maximum concerted effort by all who are a part of and
contribute to its operation staff, students, faculty, and
administrators. \ have encouraged and will continue to
encourage this attitude on this campus.
It seems to me, however, that Dr. Megill's idea of a free
university advocates something fundamentally different
than the present system under which the responsibility
for the administration of the university is delegated from
the legislature through the various agencies to the
president, and, in turn, in large part to the other
administrators and faculty on the campus, and to lesser
extant, to student government and other student
organizations.
This concept is not a new one. it seems to be as old as
organized education itself, and presently is in use in
varying degrees in some universities, particularly in
Europe and South and Latin America. But the literature
on the subject and American experience seem to indicate
that his concept has little place in a public institution
consisting of many widely differing disciplines and
dedicated to education of the greatest possible number of
capable students.
Nevertheless to the extent that Dr. Megill can by
legitimate means, consistent with a scholarly atmosphere
and without disruption of the operation of this
institution, urge this change, he has the right to do so and
the people, the legislature, the Board of Education and
the Regents have the right to make the changes should
they be persuaded to do so.
D. CONCLUSION
Considering all of the facts as reflected in the attached
documents and after considering the explanations given
by Dr. Megill and Dr. Hanna, the recommendation of
Dean Harry Sisler, and considering further the applicable
legal standards, I have concluded that Dr. Megill had a
right to make the statements that he did and that, unless
and until he advocates bringing about such changes by
force, violence or activities disruptive of the orderly
operation of this institution, he has committed no wrong.
Further, as revealed by the evaluation made of him and
his teaching in his classroom by students in the two
classes taught by him in the fall quarter of 1968 he is
objective in his teaching and has not abused his position
as teacher to advocate his own views in the classroom.
Copies of these evaluation summaries are attached. In
fact, one of the criticisms of him by his students is that he
is overly objective.
I have also determined that Dr. Megill did not advocate
and has not advocated the take-over of the university
administration by force, violence or disruptive activities.
If he does so, he then would subject himself to suspension
pending trial as provided for in the University
Constitution.
I regard the issue presented by your complaint and
your inquiry as being of far greater importance than the
simple issue of whether Dr. Megill did or did not commit
acts which subject him to dismissal' in this case. Therefore,
f out of this matter can come a better understanding of
the nature of a university's operation, the rights and
obligations of faculty members, there will have been a
worthwhile incident despite the damage which may have
been done to this institution in the process. This is one
reason that I have gone so deeply into the matter.
Another is that I feel that if we are to have, as we must,
the authority to deal with our own affairs, we must
demonstrate that we deserve it.
Because I regard this report as being made not only to
you but to the legislature and the people of Florida as
well, you have kindly consented to accept it in person at a
conference at which Dean Sisler, Dr. Hanna and Dr. Megill
are to be present along with the President of the Senate,
the Honorable Jack Mathews; Speaker of the House, the
Honorable Fred Schultz; and the chairmen of the
Education Committees of both houses of the State
Legislature.
At this presentation we invite you and others to utilize
to the fullest the opportunity to ask questions of the
University personnel present in order that you gain a full
understanding of the facts in this matter, as well as a full
discussion of the rights and obligations of faculty
members in such cases.
Hopefully out of this incident and our discussions will
come a better understanding of the part of all the
public, their elected officials and University personnel
of the purpose, function, and operation of our
universities, and of the rights and obligations of those
who teach in them.
There are many statements on what a university should
be and do. It has been said that it ought to be a place
where people think, and encourage others to do so, on all
of the issues that do and can affect our world. In a guest
editorial written for a daily newspaper last year. Dr. Harry
Sisler said:
'The most important needs of society which
institutions of higher education fulfill are those of
transmitting and critically evaluating the culture, the
thought, and theknowleflie accumulated by^the
providing a continuing source of new ideas and
concepts. The University ideally should serve as a
gadfly to society to prevent society from becoming
complacent and shallow in its thought.
Indeed, the university should act as an important
element of the moral, social, and aesthetic conscience
of the community. The university should be a place
where new ideas (most of which admittedly do not
, measure up and should be discarded) can be tasted; it

should provide a mirror in which society can look at
itself and subject itself to honest and sineers criticism.
I
The university must be an institution in which truth
can be sought without fear and without pressure from
those whose vested interests may be disturbed or from
those who are content with the half-true, the partly
good, and the almost best, and thus don't wish the
"boat to be rocked" by those who are afflicted by
what I like to call divine discontent It should, of
course, be recognized that many of the now concepts
and new ideas born in the halls and laboratories of the
university will not stand the tost of critical
examination.
Nevertheless, this will never be determined until these
ideas are critically and honestly examined. Such
examination is a major function off the university."
In my opinion this is a classic statement that could well
be remembered by all on and off campus.
Everyone is entitled to his own idea as to what a
university should be and do in serving its traditional
functions of transmission of knowledge by teaching,
discovery of new knowledge through research, and
assisting in the implementation of new and old knowledge
through service. But basic to all of these functions, and to
the reason for existence of such an institution, is the
freedom to expose, examine, dissect, evaluate, test and
accept or reject a full spectrum of ideas, opinions or
beliefs so that, as stated in the Board of Regents Policy,
the student "may acquire maturity for analysis and
judgment."
If this process isto be meaningful, the exposition and
examination of ideas must not be limited to the existing
forms or to the popular only, but the proposed and
unpopular as well.
This, of course, relates primarily to the activities in-the
classroom, but it as a practical matter must extend to all
aspects of university life as well. It is impossible to so
neatly separate the classroom from the remainder of the
campus. Likewise, if university teachers are permitted the
freedom of exposition and examination of ideas, popular
and unpopular, in the classroom, as guaranteed by the
Board policy and by law, it must follow that they have
the same freedom to do so outside the classroom.
.. J
As stated in the Board policy it is essential that the
student and the faculty member "be free to cultivate a
spirit of inquiry and scholarly criticism and to examine
ideas in an atmosphere of freedom and confidence." This
atmosphere cannot exist if on each occasion a student or
professor announces an unpopular thought there is
demand that he be dismissed or an investigation is
merited. Society and higher education will be the loser if
this isto be the course.
Because of destructive disturbances on many campuses
the public today has an understandable fear of the actions
of students and faculty, and a growing doubt of the value
and course of higher education. I am convinced that the
doubt of the value of higher education is not warranted;
that we have no cause to suffer lack of confidence in our
young people, or to believe that they will be
indoctrinated by the exposure and examination of new
ideas, good or bad.
The basis for fear results from the actions of a few. It is
real, but it must not be permitted to cause us to destroy
the freedom of inquiry, exposition, and examination of
ideas that are the basic ingredients of a university
community. What must be done, and will be done, is to
prevent the forced adoption of the ideas and demands of
the few by disruption, coercion, force and violence.
It must be understood, too, that the professor end the
whole of the academic community, is also beset by a fear
when demand is made for his dismissal because of
statements he makes. If a better method of treatment off
such a matter is not found, this fear can debilitate the
spirit of inquiry and consideration of the new that has
characterized the American scene since the birth of this
nation.
While the right of the professor to express new ideas
and to urge their adoption through acceptable means is,
***§|
IpL |
W' ; JflHjggi **. f
W;
* JiL
VICE PRESIDENT LES HALE
.V 1 urges 'no charter' for SSOC

and ought to ba secure, it is equally important that he
cannot and should not be permitted to force his views on
anyone or bring about changes through advocacy or
exhortation to violence, force or coercion through
disniption.
There remains one further matter apart from the
freedom and right of the professor to speak. It is the
propriety to speak in the place and at the time he doas
so. This is both a difficult and an important matter.
The Board policy on the subject of academic freedom
Suites mm.
"The University teacher is a citizen, a member of a
learned profession and an academic officer of an
educational institution. He should be constantly
mindful that these roles may be inseparable in the
public view, and he should therefore at all times
exercise appropriate restraint and good judgment."
In the 1940 Statement of Principles of Academic
Freedom and Tenure, issued by the American Association
of University Professors, it is said, among other things,
that:
"When he (the teacher) speaks or writes as a citizen, he
should be free from institutional censorship or
discipline, but his special position in the community
imposes special obligations. As a man of learning and
an educational officer, he should remember that the
public may judge his profession and his institution by
his utterances. Hence he should at all times be
accurate, should exercise appropriate restraint, show
respect for the opinions of others, and should make
every effort to indicate that he is not an institutional
spokesman."
In substance these quoted statements say the same
thing. Both are admonitions, and expectations, not legally
enforcible proscriptions of conduct. These are
professional standards which are higher than the
minimums prescribed by law and rules.
What is proper restraint and good judgment is
impossible of exact definition. It is best determined in
q>ecific instances.
In the present instance in the face of the take-over
by students of buildings and other disturbances on
campuses across this nation it was, in my opinion,
unwise for Dr. Megill to use the term "take-over" of this
university in his public statements. Even if he had made it
crystal clear that he did not advocate use of force,
violence or coercion to accomplish the faculty-student
control which he advocates as the best system, it would
have been difficult to disassociate the "take-over" by
legitimate means from that which is not. The results of
the use of these words best illustrate that it was unwise to
use them.
There can be no doubt that a member of the faculty,
both as citizen and scholar, has a right to speak out on
unpopular and popular issues. Yet when he does so he
must consider carefully the manner in which he does it
For, if by lack of good judgment and proper restraint, we
do inject ourselves into the political arena, then we ought
to know that we must be suited out and ready to play the
political game.
But an unwise statement in an isolated instance is not
cause for administrative action. In this present
controversy I, too, made an error of judgment and
restraint in a statement which was taken to allude to you,
for which I apologized. You may well conclude that the
manner in which you made your complaint with the
attendant publicity was an error in judgment in view of
what has been furnished to you in the report. Yet, I am
sure you will agree that neither of us should be fired.
It is my hope that you and the others to whom this
report is made will concur in my finding that Dr. Megill's
statements urging changes in the structure and operation
of the University through means not accompanied by
force, violence and coercion, are permissible, end not
grounds for bringing charges against him, and that he has
maintained required objectivity in his daesroom
instruction.
It is also my hope all will agree that it is imperative the
University, and the people of this state, permit and
encourage, study and discussion of "a full qwetrum of
ideas, opinions and beliefs," both popular and unpopular,
in an atmosphere of freedom, confident that in doing so
no throat of low of rights or status will be suffered by
student of faculty. We should all know that far leas
damage can be done by exposition of ideas, bad as they
might be, than by creating a condition under which men
will fear to express them.
It is also my hope that we can agree that in futuro
cases, where complaint is to be made against a state
employee, it can be made in away that will achieve the
purpose intended without attendant publicity and damage
to the institution and others who are inevitably affected.
It is also my hope that this incident will have
demonstrated the necessity for all on our campus to
exercise proper restraint and good judgment in their
; public writings and statements lest in the nmcaat ye
become more a political and less an academic institution.
Somehow, utilizing the best judgment he can muster, each
must accomodate his rights as a citizen with his
obligations ee a mponsible academic officer.
With my kindest regards, lam /
Sincerely yours,
, STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
.President



!, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 31,196$

Page 12

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

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suspension, interior etc. Also XK 150
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(G-3M02-P)
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Call $72-1664 (Co3t-103-P)
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guns and ammo. Bring this I
lad and your student I.D. card I
I offer expires April 5 I
lHarry Beckwith Gun Dealer!
|Micanopy,Fla Ph 466-3340 J

:w^s%v. .wwxx*x-x-x*x-:-:*X'X-XX-;.:
l LOST A FOUND I
LOST REWARD for return
NorelcoAape from recorder stolen
from Union last month. Need tape;
keep recorder, no questions asked.
Call 378-0966. (L-IMO4-P)
REAL ESTATE |
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WOODED LOT across from
University Golf Course, $4500. R. T.
Poole, Rt. No 1, Sox 1027, Apopka,
Florida 32703 (A-st-104-P)
j HELP WANTED |
LEGAL SECRETARY wanted.
Previous experience not necessary.
Will train If qualified. Must be
proficient in shorthand and typing.
Salary commensurate with ability.
My secretary Is resigning last of April.
Call Parks M. Carmichael, Scruggs,
Carmichael & Tomlinson, 376-5242,
for Interview beginning Monday
March 31. (E-4M04-P)
WAITRESS Cashier Hostess
attractive coeds for part or full time
work. Employee discounts, beautiful
surroundings. Apply In personnel
office 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Maas
Brothers. (E-3t-104-C)

| PERSONAL 1
i£wx*x-x.w.sxx-x->>:xxx.Nwsyrtv*x*i*'-
Dear Bonax" sure did miss you
during the quarter break. Welcome
back. May this be our best quarter
yet in many ways. Pollnlces"
(J-IMO4-P-)
Female senior wants traveling
companion to hitchike through
Bavarian Alps and up through
Scandinavia. Flexible itinerary. Sleep
in hostels. Approximately June
23-August 25. Call 392-6015.
(J-lt-104-P)
Dial 378-5600 and hear a taped
message any time day or night.
Message changes each Wednesday.
Let Freedom Ring, 16 NW 7th Ave.
(J-st-104-P)
FRESHMEN & SOPH: NEED to
EARN MONEY this summer? The
Southwestern Co. will interview
college men this Thursday & Friday,
April 3 & 4. See Placement Office
JWRU Room G-22 for sign-up sheets.
(E-st-104-P)
My office is small. My business is
new. Parking Is terrible but youll be
glad you came. Buy your next
eye-glasses at University Opticians,
526 SW 4th Ave. Next to Greyhound
Bus Station. 378-4480. (M-lt-104-C)
These two Allied agents
World
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Does a dime store replica
American flag constitute a legal
standard? Can an American flag
be identified in a court as such if
nobody has counted the number
of stars and stripes? Can a
banner of the United States be
symbolically sullied as well as
physically soiled?
These issues were hashed out
at the March 18-19 mis-trial
of John Robert Claxton, a
former UF student and one-time
member of the Southern
Student Organizing Committee
(SSOC) charged with burning a
small replica of Old Glory with
the intent to insult it on the
night of the Presidential
elections, Nov. 5,1968.
I burned it out of respect for
what it was supposed to stand
for, the clean cut youth gold a
six-man jury. "The state cannot
prove and has not proved intent
to insult," Claxtons
court-appointed attorney
Benjamin Tench claimed in his
closing statement.
Three and a half hours later
the jury announced they were
hopelessly stalemated. Eighth
Judicial Circuit Court Judge A.
H. Murphree declared a mistrial.
A new trial date will be set in
April.
I burned the flag because it
had been insulted by social
injustices, the defendant said
on the witness stand, referring
specifically to racial prejudices
and the electoral college. I
bowed my head when I lit it to
show respect.
I dont object to saluting the
flag, said Claxton. I learned in
elementary school that the
proper way to dispose of a
sullied flag was to bum it.
The alleged incident came
during an election night protest
rally of SSOC in front of Tigert
Hall.

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Accused Flag Burner Gets Mistrial

State Prosecuting Attorney
Mack Futch charged the jurors
that they would probably have
no greater responsibility in your
lives than to judge whether any
man has the arbitrary right to
decide for himself whether a flag
is no longer the standard of
these United States.
Claxton never once denied
burning an American flag despite
his counsels persistent efforts to
prove that since none of the
witnesses had counted the exact
number of stars and stripes, it
could not, therefore, be shown
that it was an American flag that
was burned.
Tench asserted that three
state witnesses all members of
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity
across the street from Tigert Hall
where the incident took
place were out for blood.
All three testified that the
incident was personally
sickening to them and they had
considered physical retribution
but later discarded the idea.
Some of the fraternity men
had been drinking, maintained
Claxton. They had been
chanting war now to drown out
our cries for peace now.
Tench compared his
defendants actions to those of
the men at the Boston Tea
Party, claiming both represented
symbolic dissent. He insisted
that intent to insult had not
been shown.
John neither tore, spit on,
blew his nose on, stomped upon
nor cursed the flag, Tench said.
Poppycock. . hbgwash,
Futch retorted to the
Staff Meets
There will be a short, but
important, meeting of the
editorial staff of the Alligator
tonight in the editorial office.
The meeting is mandatory
for all editors and staff
members.

iIX-MAN JURY HUNG

defendants claim that he had
burned the flag out of respect.
Futch suggested to the jurors
that Claxton had deliberately
cut his once shoulder length hair
to obscure his identity in the
courtroom. Claxton denied it,
saying he cut it to get a job.
Asked if several photographs
of the alleged incident were
pictures of him, he replied ,1
cant say its my picture. I cant
deny its my picture.
Among the states dozen
witnesses were several free lance
and student photographers and
newsmen who were present. City
UF Student
Car Victim
James Hubert Sanders,
3EE, was killed March 24, in
a head-on collision on 1-75
north of Tampa.
A resident of Fletcher Hall
and native of Fayette, Ala.,
Sanders graduated from
Bradon High School in June,
1966.
Funeral services were
March 28, in Fayette.

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policeman Andrew Chamblin
also testified that he had been
assigned to observe and take
names at the rally under the
guise of casual, typical college
clothes.
Chamblin stated he did not
see the actual lighting but that

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Monday, March 31,1969, The Florida Alligator,

nobody was close enough to
Gaxton to light the flag.
The 20-year old defendant sat
quietly throughout the
testimony. His father, a retired
Navy duty officer and his
mother were in the courtroom
for the entire case.

Page 13



FSU OR GOVERNOR?
Adams Mulls Future

By ELLEN DUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
Secretary of State Tom
Adams seems to have his finger
in two pies and which does he
want, the apple or the cherry?
With his hand firmly caught in
the wheels of the 1970
gubernatorial race, Adams may
have to decide between the
thrills and chills of campaign
riding or the tamer job of serving
as president over rebellious
students on the FSU campus,
replacing the recently resigned
John Champion.
Tallahassee insiders say
former Gov. Lcoy Collins and
acting FSU President Stanley
Marshall arc out of the
running leaving Adams as the
front man in line for the job.
Whether he will run or not is
still only speculation.

WWII Eyesores
To Be Razed

A set of campus
landmarks eyesores, if you
will are about to make their
exit from the campus.
A complex of five frame
temporaries and an airplane
hangar have been contracted for
demolition, according to Calvin
Greene, director of physical
plant facilities.
The temporaries lie
immediately east of the Hub,
and north of McCarty Hall. The
hangar is located west of the
Military Science Building.
The buildings have had a
variety of tenants, and have gone
under sundry names while their
'' ,r ship has shifted from
depart. -~r t t to department.
The first set of buildings,
most commonly known as
Dorm D, began as temporary
mens housing immediately after
World War 11. They served in
that capacity for nearly a decade
before coming into academic

CAMPUS INTERVIEWS
For Civilian Positions with the
U.S. Air Force Systems Command
APRIL 15,1969
The Systems Command utilizes the skills of
SCIENTISTS, ENGINEERS, and TECHNICALLY
ORIENTED ADMINISTRATORS to meet its mission as
the Air Forces single overall manager for the steps
involved in the acquisition of aerospace systems.
These openings exist throughout the country and offer
exceptional first-job involvement in professional work.
Most positions are in the Career Civil Service.
Contact-your campus Piarerfleht Officer to arrange
an interview, or write to:
Headquarters Air Force Systems Command (SCPCB-CN)
Andrews Air Force Base
Washington, D.C. 20331
Ar. Equal Opportunity Employer

He did say the presidency is
not something that could be
brushed lightly aside.
Though sources are confident
Adams will be offered the job,
he is not so sure himself.
To be considered for the
presidency of FSU would be a
great honor, Adams said in an
interview. Whether it could be
entertained at this point in time
for me would require a
re-evaluation.
Dr. Louis C. Murray,
chairman of the regents
presidential selection committee,
said there is a long list of
candidates to be screened and
that only eight, mostly from out
of the state, have been
interviewed.
Adams said it seemed
preposterous that the position
would be offered to him in view

usage by the College of Arts and
Sciences.
The Anthropology Lab
shingle, which still hangs over
some of the buildings, attests to
the occupancy by that
department.
Most recently, the College of
Agriculture used the buildings as
a research area, but moved out
with the completion of additions
to McCarty Hall.
UFs hangar has sat in
disuse for nearly a year since the
Department of Chemical
Engineering, the last known
occupant, moved out to new
facilities.
No new buildings are slated
for either area. Dorm D lies
within the line of development
of a pedestrian mall between the
Reitz Union and the Plaza of the
Americas. The area will be
landscaped after the buildings
are demolished.

of all the political ifs. He
noted his frequent feuds with
Gov. Claude Kirk, who would
either appoint him or has the ear
of the majority of the Board of
Regents.
He did not deny the
possibility that the idea of being
able to name a Republican to
the present all-Deniocratic State
Cabinet might appeal enough to
Kirk to overcome any personal
antipathy to Adams. Sources
close to the governor reported
his chief reservation was that
Adams might use his campus
office as an alleged
non-political springboard to
further his bid for governor.
A commitment from Adams
that he would stick to his
campus responsibilities, it was
learned, might nail down the job
for him.
However, word from some of
the Secretary of States closest
political backers was that he has
his eye on the 1970 governors
race and plans to qualify i. the
Democratic primary.

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lUiyV Pl/ \i Take sides with the leader. MARK V double-breasted
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' Meals served from 11:OOAM to 1 A
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Bernie Sher at the Organ if
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Oysters & clams on the half shell
Michelob on draft \
Steaks & Seafoods our Specialty
Visit our Package Store competitive area 31
prices Try our Special package deal f
for Student Organizations. 1 \ 1
At the sign of the beacon light. v ;
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Cocktail Lounge til 2 AM s
jl (TXXir* [ | Harry Lawton, Manager
520 S.W. 2nd Ave.

I, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 31, 1969

Page 14



The Gator baseballers take on
a talented Tennessee team in a
doubleheader today at Perry
Field. The first game is slated for
1 pjn.
The Gators, with a 9-5 mark
going into the spring quarter
have two conference wins under
their belts in as many games.
The first big test,
conference-wise, comes today
against UT.
UT returns three of its top
four pitchers. Mound strength is
also the Gator forte. It should be
a duel of the hurlers.

UFACWork Needed!
ii sJBL I

Now that student effort in the
UF Activities Center is being
coordinated by Order of
Omegas Project SCAT it is time
for student organizations to do
their part in making the
Activities Center a reality.
It has been reported
previously that the UFAC
planning will involve five stages:
(1) Tour of other facilities,
(2) UF feasibility,
(3) UF-Gainesville/Alachua
County feasibility,
(4) Production building
schematics, and (5) Production
working drawings.
SCAT General Chairman Jim
Devaney and Assistant General
Chairman Steve Rohan have
planned a series of projects to
raise money for the schematic
drawing phase.
Without a strong united
student effort the center may go
by the wayside, Devaney said.
The cost of this fourth phase
will be approximately SIOO,OOO.
It is scheduled to begin in
October of 1969 and be
completed in June, 1970.
Devaney expressed some
doubts concerning the UFAC
being completed without any
snags, unless the push is given
from everyone in the university.
Present plans call for the
Athletic Department to use the
UFAC facilities only 8-10 per
cent of the time. Nevertheless it
is of vital importance to the
basketball team, the track team,
if it is to include an indoor
track, and swimmers, the
natatorium part of it.
Athletic Director Ray Graves
has had an Activity Center at the

PHOTO HDQTRS
so ART & JOURNALISM
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Gator, Vo I Glovemen Play Two

The
Florida
Volunteers hottest batsmen is
Sam Ewing, sophomore from
Nashville, who led last years
team with a .333.

top of the building priority for
three years. The natatorium
plans were ready to go two years
ago but the Athletic Department
was stopped at the Board of
Regents level.
The Regents said that the
natatorium was included in a
soon to be started Activities
Center at the UF.
We need an Activities Center
at the University of Florida,
Graves said. If we are to
compete successfully in the state
and conference we must have
the capital outlay within the
next two or three years.
Graves added:
We will cooperate and work
with any group to assist in the
completion of the Activities
Center.
It is time for all good
students, alumni and friends of
UF to come to the aid of their
institution.
Positions are available in
Omegas SCAT to help in the
Students
Artists Q ra ft smen
A store full of Office Supplies
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Such As:
25 6 Pencils in Color 5 b
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$2.35 Paper box card files
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AJF ON SEC TRAIL

Another familiar face will be
UT basketballer Rudy Kinard,
one of the top prep baseballers
in the South, who nearly signed
a pro contract before deciding
on a cage career at UT.
The Vols won 20 and lost 12
last year overall; in the SEC they
were 8-5.
The Gators are fresh from
splitting a two-game series with
touring Western Michigan
Saturday, 7-1, 4-6. In the
opener, hurler Mike Jacobs went
two for three, including a bases
loaded triple, collecting five

fund raising. Many projects are
waiting to be started and
completed.
For the first time the UFAC is
a very real thing, but not
without good communication,
between all the factions.

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Monday, March 31,1968, The Florida Alligator,

4 will handle the chores during
the twin bill.

Page 15



Trs^Wfe,'
L|^' il *dfcc
jSJT ,. * ' yJwKW ;y*!j|gffi ;#," A
fm v ~ .*. H
3fe^ r -* Jp _j&'-*&' Mg?
- g y :
||g§| JHltti' x *£
-A v ew! : *'ffiP^KMH^^Mi.. |s \~typlSP

Clean minds. Clean bodies. Take your pick?
These jovial Gators go sloshing about the Graham
area yard on a rainy day before final exams last

Golfers Charge To Victory
At Miami Invitational Tourney

By CHUCK PARTUSCH
Alligator Sports Writer
UFs All-American Steve
Melnyk birdied the first hole in a
sudden-death playoff with FSITs
Mike Cheek to win the
individual title in the 13th
Annual University of Miami
Invitational Golf Tournament at
the Biltmore Golf and Country
Club Saturday.
Paced by Melnyk and Richard
Spears, the Gators also won the
team title in the pressure-packed
tournament by two strokes over
second place FSU.
In the come-from- behind
victory over the Seminoles the
Gators had to come from nine
strokes back after the first round
to finally catch FSU after 16
holes of play on the final round.
Melnyks final round
35-34-69 Saturday was good
enough to catch FSITs Mike
Cheek in regulation play at 280.
Cheeks final round 68 score
purshed him ahead of the UFs
Richard Spears, the third round
leader.
Melnyks birdie on the fust
hole of the playoff was almost
an eagle. He chipped within
Gators Get
JC Tackle
The UF has signed junior
college tackle Mike Olgy of
Ventura, California to a football
scholarship, Gator Head Coach
Ray Graves announced this past
week.
Olgy, 64 and 235 pounds,
played for El Camino JC in
California. He is primarily an
offensive tackle, although he
played both ways in junior
college. He graduates from
junior College this month, will
enroll at the UF for the spring
quarter and take part in spring
drills as an offensive lineman.
Mike will get a good, close
look as an offensive lineman and
we think he can help us, said
Graves.

three inches of the hole, then
settled for his birdie while Cheek
paired the hole.
Melnyks 280 and Spears 281
total for 72 holes led fellow
Gator golfers John Darr-295,
Mike Estridge 295, David
Barnes 297, and Ron

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quarter. The new sport: a mud slide, of course. The
goal: bend your brain a little to shape up for finals.

Mahoods 299 to the team title.
The Gators will be playing in
the Cape Coral Invitational Golf
Tournament this Thursday,
Friday and Saturday at Cape
Coral, Fla. The next home
match will be April 12 against
Tennessee at the UF course.

Chiang Pong Champ
The campus-wide Table Tennis Tournament ended last quarter with
Chi Yu Chiang taking the singles title, and teaming with Andy
Beckenbach to capture the mens doubles.
Chiang defeated Don Story for the championship.
In the womens division, Francis Cammack beat Nancy Smith for
the singles title. Miss Cammack is one-half of the famous
Cammack-Cammack doubles champions.
Catherine Cammack teamed with sister Francis to win the doubles.
In mixed action Robert Beach and Kathy ODonnell downed Miss
Smith and Bill White.
Winners and runner-ups may pick up their trophies in the
Intramurals Office, room 229 Florida Gym.
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Page 16

i, The Florida Alligator, Monday, March 31,1969



Grid Positions Wide Open For Spring

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The UF Gators open spring
football drills Monday afternoon
with 90 players vying for 22
wide open spots.
Already headlining the drills
are some key personnel changes
and a pair of noteworthy missing
faces.
Baseball shortstop Guy
McTheny has performed so well
on the diamond his first dozen
games that he has been excused
from spring football drills.

RON HONORED AS MVP
l i i
Jourdan, Bachelor Pace Relays

Gators Ron Jourdan and Jack
Bacheler both broke their own
previous records Saturday at the
26th Annual Florida Relays as
six university and five high
school records fell during the
three day meet.
Jourdans 18th 7-foot high
jump performance led the record
breaking and earned him the
22nd Keamey-Raybun trophy
for the outstanding collegiate
performance. Jourdan broke his
own record of 6-8, set last year.
Bacheler, running for the UF
Track Club, won the
3,000-meter Steeplechase in
8:55.8 to snap his old record of
9:01.2 last year.
Tennessee set a new track
record in the Shuttle Hurdle
Relay with a 1:57.3. UF was
Bunky Henry
Early Leader
MIAMI (UPI) Football
kicking specialist Bunky Henry
birdied five of his first six holes
Sunday to gain a one-stroke lead
as he rounded the turn in the
final round of the $200,000
National Airlines Open golf
tournament.
The 25-year-old native of
Valdosta, Ga., who kicked 50
consecutive extra points to set a
record which has since
fallen at Georgia Tech was 12
under at the end of 63 holes,
with chubby Bob Murphy, the
third round leader, at 11 under.
Dan Sikes of Jacksonville,
Fla., who has a law degree but
has never practiced the
profession, fired a hole-in-one on
the 15 th hole Sunday to win a
new car. The 205-yard blast put
him in contention at 10 under as
he reached the 70th hole.
A heavy downpour
temporarily suspended play after
Murphy, the 1968 rookie
sensation, bogeyed seven and
double-bogeyed nine to drop to
11 -under.
Hava
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McTheny was a starting flanker
last year with the Gators.
Flanker Paul Maliska, of Winter
Park, will also miss spring drills
while he hurdles for the Gator
track team.
Both are key seniors who saw
considerable action on last years
6-3-1 squad.
Defensive halfback Steve
Tannen will work out both on
defense and offense (as a split
end). Head Coach Ray Graves
says that if Tannen is up to it, he
will play both in the fell.

Bill |P[
JOURDAN ACCEPTS
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second with a 1:58.3.
Amos Machanic of Miami
Jackson won the outstanding
high school athletic award at the
meet. He ran a 1:52.7 half-mile
leg on Jackson's winning
two-mile relay team and also
captured the 440 in 47.8.
Good Sorvico Starts
at
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Skip Amelung has been
moved from offensive tackle to
tight end in a bid to replace
graduated Jim Yarbrough.
There has been no official
word on the quarterback
situation where off-on veteran
southpaw Jackie Eckdahl returns
for his senior year. Eckdahl, who
played both behind and ahead of
graduated Larry Rentz last year,
was quoted last winter as saying
he wouldn't mind playing
flanker if the coaches wished to
groom promising freshman John
Reaves of Tampa for the job.

Many other changes are
expected to be made rapidly in
the first eight days of practice.
Graves original plans call for
fundamental drills this week and
next with a full-scale scrimmage
not likely until April 12.
Two spring games are slated,
one for April 26; the other on
May 3.
The Gators will work out
Monday, Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday each week. And all

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Monday, March 31,1069, The Florida Alligator,

practices will be opened to the
public.
For the first time, Fred
Pancoast will formulate the
entire offensive attack. He
replaced Ed Kensler as offensive
chief. Kensler will coach the
offensive line.
Former Heisman Trophy
winner Steve Spurrier is back to
coach the punters and backs. He
is the starting punter for the San
Francisco 49ers.

Page 17



Color Gators Cage Outlook
For 70 A Lean Green Scene

Although the UF dropped its
opening game in the National
Invitation Tournament to rugged
Temple, a new era in Gator
basketball began.
Gator head coach Tommy
Bartlett took the team to its first
post-season tournament in
history and already the little
Gator General is looking
ahead to next season.
It was a great honor being
selected to the NIT and I told
the boys in the dressing room
after the Temple game, we will
be back, says Bartlett: When
we were invited to the
tournament a new era in UF
basketball began.
The Gators will lose
all-American center Neal Walk
off the 1968-69 team. With his
departure goes the finest scorer
and rebounder in the history of
UF basketball.
Graduation will take both
point guards. Dependable Mike
Leatherwood and Richard
Vasquez will leave the UF
without an experienced

Walk Rushes By West,
MVP In All-Star Tilt
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. Six-foot-10 Neal Walk of the UF led the
East to a 104-80 victory over the West yesterday in the seventh annual
College All-Star Game sponsored by the National Association of
Basketball Coaches.
The East, coached by Tony Hinkle of Butler, never trailed in the
game, which gave it a 4-3 lead in the series.
The East had a 48-40 lead at the half.
Walk, voted outstanding player in the game, hit nine of 11 shots
from the field and four of eight free throws for 22 points.
The game was a helterskelter affair, with lots of individual heroics
but little finesse. The squads had only one practice session apiece.
It was a tight ball game up to the point where Willie McCarter of
Darke, firing for the West, hit a basket that tied the score at 54-all.
John Warren of St. Johns and Lee Lafayette of Michigan State hit a
couple of quick baskets and the East was ahead to stay.
UF Duo To Head Os Class

BIRMINGHAM-Two of the
UF's five starters, Mike
Leatherwood and Andy Owens,
rate the 1969 Academic
All-Southeastern Conference
basketball team, along with
Tommy Suitts of Alabama, Tom
Perry of Auburn and Chuck
Wade of Miss. State. Courtwise,
all five are starting members of
their respective teams, and all
have met the rugged requirement
of maintaining a B average or
better for the past full school
year in the class room.
These players would form a
pretty fair team in the following
lineup Owens at center, with
Wade and Perry at forward and
Suitts and Leatherwood at
guard. Owens, who averaged
16.1 points per game for the
Gators, and Leatherwood, who
was the SECs No. 3 man in
assists, are both majoring in
Business and, averaging B+.
Wade, whose scoring average fell
from 18 ppg to 12 after a severe
knee injury, is a B+ Education
major. Perry, a 2-year starter and
the league's No. 6 assists man, is
a B student in Physical
Education while Suitts, No. 2
scorer for Alabama, rates A
as a mathematics major.
Four other SEC players met
the academic requirements and
are listed as honorable mention.
They are Cort Nagle, an
alternate starter at Georgia,
Ralph Mayes, late-season starter
at Vanderbilt, and substitutes
Greg Main of Georgia and

playmaker.
Starter Boyd Welsch, Mike
McGinnis, the Gators sixth man,
and reserve Kurt Feazel will
leave via graduation.
Whats in store for the
1969-70 campaign?
We will be green, young and
very inexperienced, says
Bartlett. We have some
outstanding youngsters coming
up but it will take time to mold
them into our system.
Returning starters Andy
Owens (6-5) and Ed Lukco (6-1)
will form the base for Bartlett to
mold his 1969-70 squad. Owens
was the Gators second leading
scorer in 1968-69 with a 16.1
average. He was a member of the
third team all-SEC squad.
Two freshman stars, Gary
Waddell (6-10) and Dan Boe
(6-9) will be vying for Walks
position at the low post. Waddell
averaged 20.9 points a game for
the freshman and led in
rebounding with 9.5 average.
Transfer Tom Purvis (6-7) and
freshman Cliff Cox (6-6) and Hal
Kelley (6-2) will be battling for

Tommy Williams of Ole Miss.
Nagle rates a B+ and Main a
B in Business, while Mayes has
B in Mathematics and
Williams B in Business.
A half-dozen fine players
averaged B and just missed
qualifying for the academic
team. They include Bill Justus
(Bus. Adm.) of Tennessee, Perry
Wallace (Medical Electrical
Engineering) of Vanderbilt,
Jerry Brawner (Education) and
Ron Coleman (Education) of
Ole Miss., and Ralph Jukkola
(Mathematics) and Rich Lupcho
(Business) of L.S.U.

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wing positions. Cox averaged
13.4 points and Kelley 11.5 for
the Baby Gators.
Although there are several
matters of concern to Bartlett,
foremost on his mind now is
coming up with a point player
for next season.
In the case of Bartletts
terminology, point doesnt
necessarily mean putting points
on the scoreboard. The point
guard is the man who runs the
show on the court for Bartlett,
who guided this years team into
the National Invitation
Tournament in New York.
Both point players, Mike
Leatherwood and Richard
Vasquez, graduate and there are
no experienced hands available
to become an automatic
replacement at this spot.
This year the Gators finished
18-9, giving Bartlett a three-year
chart of 55-23. How well he
fares next year will be closely
tied to whether or not he gets
the point in the 1969-70
season.

UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
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Page 18



t CLIPBOARD >xw:^:M x^^
Loose Ends Left Hangin
Kl# nil I fiiinvi
wmi u/prp a wav T 111 1/ Will 1.:.y.:.:.>V

While you were away ...
Larry Smith broke an ankle
getting off an airplane from Los
Angeles, where he had been
attending a training camp for the
Rams.
The American Broadcasting
Co. announced that it would be
telecasting the UF-Georgia game
from Jacksonville again next
year on Nov. 8.
Several state newspapers
printed accounts of rumors that
Gator basketballer Todd Lalich
was considering leaving the UF
for Miami (of Ohio) University
shortly before he was dismissed
from the squad at the end of the
season for conduct unbecoming
an athlete.
The UF baseball team won
its third straight home game
March 24 against Georgia, the
first SEC win, 5-3, when Will
Harmon smashed an 11th inning
homer. Winning pitcher was
lefty Jim Courier, now 3-1 for
the season.
Temple University won the
National Invitational Basketball
Tournament over Boston College
taking away some of the sting
from the Gators opening round
NIT loss to the eventual
champs..
The nations No. 1 college
gridder, O.J. Simpson expressed
interest in joining the
Continental Football League
(CFL) if he could not come to
terms with Buffalo in the AFL!
As a promotion stunt for orange
juice (OJ), the Florida Citrus
Commission conceived the idea
which would have given the
super star at least $525,000 in
his first year with the Orlando
Panthers chib, current CFL
champions.
However, the commission had
just signed singing star Anita
Bryant, one time Miss America
to a sizable extending contract
to advertise citrus juices for the
coming year, and for the time
being, it looks like a beauty has
won out over a beast, of sorts.
Owens Named
Team Captain
Forward Andy Owens has
been chosen captain of next
years basketball squad.
The announcement was made
Saturday at a meeting of the
Gainesville Tipoff Club.
He will follow All-American
Neal Walk as cage captain. Coach
Bartlett lauded the selection,
saying that Owens was needed to
continue to solidify the status of
basketball, the foundation of
which was set this past season by
the Gators trip to the National
Invitational Tournament.
Gators Boyd Welsch" for the
most improved player; Mike
McGinnis, best attitude; Mike
Leatherwood, team leader; and
Kurt Feazle, best foul shooter.
Neal Walk was given the most
valuable player award for the
second consecutive year.

Hal Dyer, one-time freshman
football coach at Florida State
for three years, accepted an
assistant coaching post at Xavier.
University. Dyer had more
recently been coach at Pratt
Junior College in Kansas.
A joint meeting of the
National and American Football
League owners voted to fine
exuberant players who throw
footballs away into the stands
after touchdown romps. Though
the pigskins cost about $29 a
piece, the association voted to
fine players SIOO for tossing a
ball away. Some owners claimed
the clubs could get involved in
law suits if fans got hurt in the
mad scrambles that resulted.
There was no mention,

. LOOK OUT HOSS./
Pes. a,n& s r e&ts I SCCA
a Motor Racingnow second
l i\ v |fl> largest spectator sport, just
behind horse racing!
The largest foreign auto
manufacturer supporting the
sport of auto racing in this country \
is Datsun. Unlike Ford, Chrysler and
American Motors, Datsun gave its primary \
support to SCCA club racing instead of professionals. v
racing because that is where they could compete with
their marketing rivals and show the public what their car >v
could do. x. s
In 1967, Datsun began entering its factory supported cars in
races organized by the largest sports car organization in the world, the
Sports Car Club of America. X
So Datsun went where the action was in 1968 and proved their efforts were not in vain by winning 43 first \
places, 42 second places and 25 thirds in national SCCA competition. \
Datsun's position in entering SCCA club events was recently explained by Y. Katayama, president of Datsun, USA, in a \
breakfast speech before more than 400 officers of the SCCA at their national convention on Feb. 15 in Denver, Colo. \
Katayama said, Winning is not the only reason we go racing. We are in competition because we feel strongly about the
value of participating in this very exciting sport Many of our customers were so excited about their Datsuns that they wanted \
to compete in them. The best way we could acknowledge their enthusiasm was to provide, not only technical support, but
also financial support.. One word sums up our whole approach to competition. That word is PARTICIPATION,"
Katayama concluded.
By competing in auto races, Datsun, like other auto manufacturers, benefits technically from this experience. Such items as
disc brakes, independent rear suspension, overhead camshaft engines, are but a few of the performance features that are now
standard equipment on sedans and sports cars.
As long as auto racing has the support of auto manufacturers such as Datsun, Ford, Chrysler, American Motors and the
many other auto makers around the world, it will surely remain the second largest spectator sport in the United States.
Look out horse racing!
V
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Godding & Clark Motors

378-2311

however, of fining place kickers
who kick balls into the end zone
stands.
Billy Rhodes, the 230-pound
offensive tackle for FSU signed a
three year bonus contract with
the Montreal Alouettes of the
Continental Football League. He
was a fourth round draft choice
of the NFL St. Louis Cardinals.
Brevard Junior College, with
whom the Gator frosh split a
pair of games this year, lost in
the opening semi-final round of
the National Junior College
Basketball Tournament in
Hutchinson, Kansas. BJC earned
the berth by proving itself the
best in the South. They lost

Open 8 to 8 Mon.-Sat.

97-83 to Vincennes (Ind.) Junior
College.

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Monday, March 31,1969, The Florida Alligator,

1012 South Main

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Page 19



" and bookstore
SERVICE THE OFFIC,AL UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BOOKSTORE
OFFICIAL UNIVERSITY ADJOINING THE HUB
TEXTBOOKS & SUPPLIES BRANCH STORES MEDICAL CENTER, BROWARD, TRI SHOP, JENNINGS,
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M
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GET YOUR BOOKS AND SUPPLIES ON CAMPUS AND SAVE

20. Tha Florida Alligator, Monday, March 31,1969

Page 20