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The Florida alligator

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Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

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University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 103

n b 1
| BB IB 4(g^jjj^^
RADICAL WALKOUT
SSOC members apparently didn't find D. Burke Kibler's speech
Thursday to their liking. The Board of Regents chairman was speaking
at Phi Kappa Phi's initiation when the left-wingers got up and left. See
related story page two.

Emergency Room Nurses Resign
In Dispute At Shands Hospital

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Emergency room nurses at Shands Teaching Hospital
resigned Wednesday after their request for a change of
supervisor was denied.
Administrators at the hospital say they are not concerned
over the mass resignation.
Over 20 years of emergency room experience is represented
by the six registered nurses, one licensed practical nurse and one
orderly who said they went through the proper channels before
quitting.
The issue centers around an emergency room supervisor who,
it is claimed, does not work in the emergency room and handles
mostly the paper work of the unit.
Nurses and staff through their spokesman claim the
supervisor interfered with their giving the best care they can to
patients in the emergency room.
Mrs. Judi Schwartz, group spokesman, had negotiated with
administrators for four months to try and avoid the mass
resignation.
Patients mean more to us than the administration could
ever know. They denied our request to prove we are
dispensible.
She said the group met a dead end every time they requested
a change of supervisors.

REGENTS VICE CHANCELLOR REPORTS
Ashler Assures Rathskeller Inquiry Not Inquisition

By DON YOKEL
Alligator Staff Writer
Vice Chancellor of the Board of
Regents, Phil Ashler, Thursday said he
doesnt think the Rathskeller inquiry is
worth getting excited over. This is not
an inquisition, he said.
This inquiry is for my own
information so I can properly inform

The
Florida Alligator

the governor as to where Rathskeller
profits go.
The inquiry into Rathskeller
operations
a budget meeting, when Gov. Claude
Kirk mentioned to Ashler that hemight
look at the operation to see if it is
hurting Gainesville tavern business.
Ashler said the Rathskeller topic
came up following discussion on the
hiring of a laundryman at one of the
universities.

University oj l'loriila Gainesville

IN SSOC DECISION
OConnell Supported

By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
UF President Stephen C
O'Connell has received
overwhelming support front
students for his decision not to
recognize SSOC, he told the
Alligator Thursday.
He has re ceived a
tremendous number of
telephone calls, letters and
telegrams from students this
week.
They are incensed at SSOC
and other groups claiming that
all the students are behind
them, OConnell added.
Some of the students who
called him said they were
speaking for others who also
support OConnells decision.
An informal telephone poll
conducted by the Alligator last
Thursday also showed a
preponderance of support for
OConnell.
There is also a petition
circulating around campus
supporting OConnell. Gary
LeAndre, 4ED, is circulating 600
copies around the UF.
When the petition has 5,000

If someone thought he or she would be involved in an
accident in the near future, she recommended wearing a sign
stating: Take me to Alachua General Hospital.
She described the situation as being critical at the
emergency room.
Shands Teaching Hospital Director, Stuart A. Wesbury,
Thursday said hospitals have a very high turnover in nurses and
this is generally normal in any hospital.
The mass resignations just happened to occur in one area
this time, he said.
Another hospital spokesman said the problem at the
emergency room is an internal one which has been resolved by
the resignations.
A Florida Alligator reporter Thursday checked the
emergency room and found it to be operating in what seemed to
be a normal manner.
Mrs. Schwartz said members of the emergency room staff
who quit Wednesday are not looking for employment as of yet
and have no plans for taking any further action to obtain their
demands.
The employees are receiving their vacation pay from the
hospital and claim there is no immediate hardship to them
caused by their action.
Miss Terry Reeves, registered nurse, quit her job in protest
after working in the emergency room 10 years.

He jokingly asked if we were
putting beer distributors out of
business. Ashler said at that time, he
didirt ihiiik so but wouldcheek into
this possibility.
Beer distributors in Gainesville, as far
as he knew, are not being hurt by the
Rathskeller competition. In fact,
theres a good possibility the
Rathskeller is operating in the red.
An aid to Kirk on Thursday said the
governor has received tremendous

.*
"They (the students) are incensed at SSOC and $

other groups claiming that all the students are behind :j
* them UF President Stephen C. O 'Connell :


signatures it will go to President
O'Connell, LeAndre said.
In an interview this Thursday,
OConnell repeated one of the
reasons for his decision; the fact
that, non-students may join.
Although membership rolls
submitted last fall did not list
any non-students, non-students
were cited in the official
transcript of the committee
hearings, OConnell said.
As to SSOC meeting on
campus, OConnell said
Campus buildings should be
used for the purpose for which
they were built.
But SSOC or anyone else
has a perfect right to speak out
on any issue pertaining to this
campus, by any means that are
legitimate.
The plan proposed by student
leaders for simply registering
organizations that cannot get

STEPHEN C. O'CONNELL
... gets backing
official recognition, needs
careful study and evaluation,
especially the question of where
such groups would meet,
OConnell said.
OConnell denied he was
subject to any pressure from the
Board of Regents.
This was my decision, he
said. People who disagree with
a decision always have to find
some motive for the reasons.
NIT-e Owls
Fly By Gators
By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
People who read the paper
and see that I got 26 points and
17 rebounds will think I did
good. But they dont know how
I did on defense or what really
happened, UF center Neal Walk
said late Thursday night.
I was tight in the beginning
and I kicked, dropped, and
threw the ball away. We wanted
to win real bad, but we just
werent really smooth. The
Gators were badly beaten by
Temple 82-66 in the
NATIONAL INVITATIONAL
BASKETBALL tournament.
I hope the pros still want
(SEE 'UF' PAGE 20)

amounts of mail concerning
Rathskeller operations at UF.
People dont beliece the state should
peddle alcoholic beverages,Tiesairi.
He added that if the Rathskeller
accomplishes its function as a forum for
faculty and students then the governor
is probably in favor of its operation.
If the governor thought the
operation of the Rathskeller was bad he
would have had it investigated a long
time ago.

America's
Number I
Coltege
Daily

Frida y, March 14. thoh



Page 2

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14,1969

Expanded Gator Gras Returns In Spring!

By ELLEN OUPUY
Alligator Staff Writer
UFs annual Gator Gras is returning
to campus next quarter in full swing.
Originally organized as a plan for
campus-wide student participation in
the spring, Gator Gras has continued to
grow in size.
This year the Gras will begin on April
8 and run through the 12th sponsoring a
beauty contest, ugly man competition,
battle of the bands, soap box derby, tug
of war and a folk festival.
The beauty contest is a first in the
traditionally scheduled events and will
provide the winning coed a chance to

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| Florida Players Plan |
iThree-Act'Walerooril
S $
jij The premier performances of Waleroon, a three-act play
written by UF graduate student Victor Cook, will be presented
|jj: March 31 and April 1 by the Florida Players at 8 p.m. in the ij:
iji: Constans Theatre.
With an explosive script, Waleroon is a story of personality :ji
$ conflict and a violent struggle for identity iji
jij: dominance. According to director Richard Oman, also aUF iji
jij: graduate student, the show will be given a highly theatrical iji
jij! treatment. iji
jij: He will work with an 18 member cast in three-a-day ij:
jij: rehearsals during the week between quarters. iji
jij: Cook, who will serve in an advisory capacity for the §
jij: production, has designed a unique and exciting set, Oman went iji
jij: on to say. Production crews, coordinated by grad student Duane :jjj
jij Ford, are working to fully realize its potential. iji
jij Oman is best remembered by UF audiences as the director of iji
jij the highly successful and well received The Successful Life of iji
jij Three, presented in the Laboratory Theatre series last quarter, iji
jij Playwright Cook will be on hand to serve Oman in a double iji
>: capacity, both as author and scene designer. :j:j
,v

AT PHI KAPPA PHI INITIATION
SSOC Walkout Interrupts Kiblers Talk

ByCAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
More than 40 SSOC members
and sympathizers walked out on
Chairman of the Board of
Regents D. Burke Kiblers
speech before the Phi Kappa Phi
initiation Thursday afternoon in
protest of the regents stand
against the recognition of the
group at UF.
The regents backed up UF
President Stephen C. OConnells
decision to deny charter to the
SSOC organization last week,
and added that neither group
nor the Students for a
Democratic Society would be
recognized at any Florida
university.
SSOC assembled on the Plaza
of the Americas at 2:30 p.m.
and walked to the Reitz Union
auditorium en masse to confront
Kibler.
OConnell, addressing himself
to the group of about 75 radicals
in the auditorium, told them
that he and Kibler had come to

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the-official opinions of their
.authors. Address correspondence to the Florida AJ|gator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn awav copy which-JL, consides consides_
_ consides_ objftfftiojinyMle.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

compete in Miami for the Miss Florida
Universe contest with possibilities of
heading for the Miss U.S.A. contest and
then to Miss Universe.
The competition will be combined
for Miss Gator Gras and Miss University
of Florida.
Judging will be based on personality,
intelligence, and modeling in bathing
suits, long gown, and personal selection
competition.
April 11 at the Plaza of the Americas
will be judging day for the Ugly Man
contest.
Competition will be based on
originality and ugliness with a $3 entry
fee required to buy trophies.

the plaza to talk to the
protestors, but they had gone v
He warned them to obey me
laws of the university and said
any disruption would be a
display of bad manners.
Two demonstrators left the
hall in the middle of OConnells
remarks.
Kibler was apparently
undisturbed by the students
walking out intermittently
during his speech.
He did interupt his remarks at
one point, however, to say that
the people who are leaving are
conspicuously absent from the
front rows, (where the honor
society initiates were seated) and
with that, approximately 15
students left the auditorium
while Phi Kappa Phi members
and guests applauded loudly.
Kibler, commenting after the
ceremony, said that if things
dont get any worse than they
were during his speech we have
nothing to worry about.
He said he had received a
copy of a letter from SSOC

CONTEST DEADLINE APRIL 4

JM Students To Get
Congressional Internships

UF journalism students are
being offered three-month staff
appointments under U.S.
senators and representatives.
The Congressional Internship
Program is designed to give
selected undergraduate
journalism students first-hand
knowledge of legislative
processes in Congress.
Internships will begin in
January and February of 1970.
The program is sponsored by
Sears, Roebuck and Co. in
cooperation with the American
Council on Education for
Journalism (ACEJ).
Arthur M. Wood, president of
Sears, and Frank R. Ahlgren,
president of the ACEJ and

inviting him to meet with
members of the group in an
open panel discussion at UF
during the first weeks of the new
quarter, and said he would not
meet with them as a group, but
would talk to a few
representatives.
He said meeting with the
whole group would be like

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That night a battle of the bands will
also be held in the Plaza of the Americas
with some of the state s
non-professional bands competing with
the winner to be sent to the state
contest by the Jaycees.
Saturday morning the highlight of
the Gator Gras activities will take place.
Its the annual Gator Gras 500 Soap
Box Derby. The race is open to
everyone . fraternities, sororities,
dorm areas, and campus organizations
are invited.
A $5 entry fee is required for
trophies and applicants must pick up
entry rules in Room 310 of the Reitz
Union.

former editor of the Memphis
Commercial Appeal, announced
the program and said its overall
objective is broader
understanding and
communication between the
people and their government.
Interns will be assigned to
offices of senators and
representatives who have agreed
to participate in the program.
As a supplement to the
interns Congressional
experience, the students will
participate in an eight-week
course in Washington entitled
Understanding and Reporting
Public Affairs, taught by
Samuel J. Archibald, executive

meeting with the North
Vietnamese... theyd probably
argue about the shape of the
table.
Fahrer called Kiblers speech
the same old garbage you can
expect from a regent. Fahrer,
however, had been one of the
first SSOC members to leave the
auditorium in protest.

Following the derby, a tug-of-war I
will be held in Broward field. This will I
be a pure strength competition hold I
between ten-man teams. Any male may I
enter. I
The final event of the Gras will be 1
the Folk Festival to be held at the 1
Rathskeller. I
The Festival will feature groups and 1
individuals such as Pete Altman, Rick I
and Kitty Oliver, Steve Robitalli and 1
Schef Wright, and the Puget Sounds. 1
This wrap-up of the Gras will begin I
at 8:30 p.m. and end at 2 a.m. 1
Deadline for the contests is April 4 I
and all entry forms and rules sheets may I
be picked up in Room 310 of the Union. 1

director of the Fair Campaign
Practices Committee, Inc., and
assistant professor at the
University of Missouri School of
Journalism.
A stipend of $1,250 will be
given to each intern to cover
transportation and living
expense^.
A maximum of 20 interns
will be selected from entries
submitted by accredited schools
or departments of journalism
and communications. Selection
will be based on academic
performance, writing ability,
interest in reporting government
and political affairs and
recommendations by
department heads.
UF College of Journalism will
submit two recommendations,
which will be forwarded by
April 18 to the selection
committee in Washington.
Members of the committee
include Ahlgren, Archibald and
Baskett Mosse, professor of
journalism at the Medill School
of Journalism, Northwestern
University, and executive
secretary of the ACEJ
accrediting committee.
Application forms may be
obtained from Dr. Glenn Butler,
room 322 in the stadium.



j=IN GATORADE FRACAS =^|
I HEW Shifts 1
TALLAHASSEE (UPI) Officials of the U.S. office of Health,
Education and Welfare agreed Thursday to re-examine their claim to
the rights to the formula for the thirst-quenching drink Gatorade as
hopes brightened for the state to get a share of the royalties.
State Board of Regents member Fred Parker said he hoped to have
a policy decision from HEW in time for the March 31 Regents
meetings, but HEW attorney Manual Hiller said it may take several
weeks.
HEW served notice about two years ago that it had the rights to the
Gatorade formula and it could not be patented. Hiller said a decision
on any change in that decision would have to come from the assistant
secretary for health and scientific affairs but the post has not yet
been filled by President Nixon. Cade told newsmen following the
closed-door negotiating session that he computed the cost of research
at a grand total of $42.70.
The only costs, he said, were for the use of the laboratory and
other incidental expenses while he worked one summer.
Parker and an attorney for Gatorade Trust, Claude Spilman of
Indianapolis, said they believed an out-of-court settlement for rights
to Gatorade with the state getting some of the benefits through
UF could be worked out if HEW relinquished its rights.
Attorneys for Stokely-Van Camp, which purchased the
manufacturing and marketing rights from Cade after the university
rejected his offer to patent it, sat in on the negotiating session but said
they had no position during the current phase of discussions with the
federal agency.
Gatorade is a lemon-lime drink used extensively by athletic teams
to quickly restore energy lost from exertion. It was named after UFs
Gator football team.
Project Surge
To Start Lobby

By KATHY MORSE
Alligator Staff Writer
Students will have a say in
the next legislative session on
changes in tuition, voting age
requirements and punishment
for student demonstrators if
Project Surge has its way.
Project Surge is the code
word for Students for
Responsible Government, a
newly created Student
Government organization
designed to improve
communications between
students and those in positions
of government and authority.
A registered lobbyist will be
sent to Tallahassee to represent
student opinions on all related
legislation.

A Twig campus Twig mall
M 1131 W. Univ. Ave. 2552 N.W. 13th St.
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With its headquarters at UF,
Project Surge will eventually
have branches in all Florida state
universities, Jim Reinman,
project chairman, said Thursday.
Letters have been sent to five
other universities explaining the
organization to the student body
presidents and asking them to
set up similar groups.
Through cooperation and
joint funding, Project Surge will
represent all state university
students and will therefore have
more power and influence,
Reinman said.
A full-time paid lobbyist will
begin working in Tallahassee
when the next legislature goes in
session in April.

Sociologists View Death
Penalty Non-Effective

By GLENDA COHN
Alligator Staff Writer
The right of one man to
take another mans life, the
effectiveness of the current
penal code and the fairness
employed these are the
problems of capital
punishment as viewed by
professors in UFs sociology
department.
Department Chairman Gerald
R. Leslie sees no reason for
retaining capital punishment,
which is legal in some states but
has been abolished in others.
I object on moral and
humanitarian grounds. Capital
punishment has been shown to
be no effective deterrent to
crime, he said.
Dr. Richard Larson is
opposed to capital punishment
as ethically unjustifiable, but he
is disturbed by very long prison
terms as a substitute because
there is not much rehabilitation
going on. I think the main goal
should be rehabilitation, and for
prisoners that are beyond
rehabilitation, just keeping them
in prison is all that can be
done.
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1 don't think capital
punishment has any place in a
modern penal system, says Dr.
Joseph Vandiver. Since it is not
effective as a deterrent and the
act is irredeemable, I see no
social gain in using it.
Rejecting the sentimental sentimentalist
ist sentimentalist reasons for opposition, Dr.
Harold Hunter is against capital
punishment because there is
such a differential in
enforcement of the law.
People with money can get
off by hiring a better attorney.
I'm opposed to it because the
only guy who gets caught in it is
the poor guy who cant hire a
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Friday, March 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

lawyer. Why put the poor guy to
death when the rich one can get
off the hook? he said.
Dr. E. W. Bock sums up his
views in these words: I just
dont see any use in it the
only thing it does is keep the
government from having to build
new cells for inmates.
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Page 3



Page 4

>, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

Apollo 9 Scorches Safely Back To Earth

ABOARD USS GUADALCANAL
(UPI) Three Apollo 9 astronauts, who put
Americans within lour months of walking on the
moon, scorched safely back from space
Thursday, but got drenched during an
uncomfortable Atlantic recovery that took 48
minutes.
Wind, waves and the downdraft of a recovery
helicopters rotor completely dunked James A.
McDivitt and David R. Scott in the rolling swells
as they were hauled skyward in a basket for the
short helicopter ride to their prime recovery ship.
Rookie astronaut Russell L. Rusty
Schweickart, who called the l O-days of Apollo 9
the most successful flight weve ha H escaped a
dunking.
But just as his partners, lie had to ride out
more than three-quarters of an hour in the
bobbing Apollo in waves so rough two life rafts
overturned beside their scorched spaceship

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during the recovery
Like man' Americans, the mission
controllers watched the broadcast that showed
the tedious recovery operations that followed the
solashdown at 53 seconds after noon, HST.
v
McDivitt, Scott and Schweickart flew a
near-perfect mission which proved the U.S. moon
landing craft ready for lunar flight after its first
manned mission and set four spaceflight records.
Their success kept the U.S. program right on
schedule for a moon orbit flight in May and a
moon-landing in July.
Stepping out of the orange and white pickup
helicopter on the Guadalcanal deck, McDivitt
clearly swayed on his feet. Scott pulled off his
dripping socks on the steps leading from the
helicopter before he stepped onto a red carpet
rolled out for the astronauts.
Tile USS Guadalcanal beamed live television
of Apollo 9's gentle splashdown into the Atlantic

under its triple orange-and-whito parachutes.
It's certainly been a long time since we eft
land, said McDivitt, who grew the heaviest
heard during the 10-day flight. I obviously
don't have my sea legs or my land legs either. It
sure is good to get hack."
Scott called the mission a great flight and a
great recovery, despite the dunking.
As a rookie, said Schweickart, the
red-haired civilian who had just finished his first
space mission, 1 think it was the most successful
flight we've had. We accomplished a lot, hut the
prettiest of all was our recovery.
He referred to a switch in landing /ones that
sent the Guadalcanal steaming all night to reach
the new recovery /.one 480 miles to the south.
Stormy weather in the original /one forced the
change which added one 96-minute orbit to
Apoilo 9s 10-day flight.



Senate Approves Treaty To Stop Weaponsace

WASHINGTON (UPI) After an eight-month
political stalemate and a host of last-minute
reservations that were soundly defeated, the
Senate Thursday approved the proposed treaty
to halt the spread of nuclear weapons.
Amid a growing outcry in Congress and across
the nation against deployment of an Antiballistic
Missle System, the Senate approved the treaty by
a vote of 83 to 15. The treaty expressly urges
diplomatic efforts to negotiate an end to the
arms race.
1 cant believe that the President of the
United States, in the face of this vote, would go
ahead with the deployment of the ABM, Se n J.
William Fulbright, D-Ark., said shortly befo.* ~ie
treaty won final Senate approval.

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AF.cR EIGHT-MONTH BATTLE

The chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee said the treatys provision
committing the United States and other
countries to strategic arms negotiations doesnt
prohibit the ABM legally, but that deployment
would violate the spirit of the treaty.
The treaty was submitted to the Senate last
July by former President Lyndon B. Johnson but
it got caught up in last falls presidential election
campaign and was never acted on by the Senate.
President Nixon, then the Republican
nominee, urged against immediate Senate action
because of the Soviet-led invasion of
Czechoslavakia. After he took office, however,
Nixon called for prompt Senate approval of the
treaty in the interests of the United States.

Friday, March 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

The treaty, first major international arms
agreement since the l l )63 pact banning
atmospheric nuclear tests, would bar the United
States, Russia and Britain from sharing their
nuclear weapons with other countries. The 85
non-nuclear signatories renounce their right to
produce or acquire nuclear weapons.
Unlike the test ban treaty, which set off one
of the bitterest Senate struggles since Woodrow
Wilsons League of Nations proposal, the
nonproliferation treaty created scarcely a ripple
of dissent.
Conservatives blasted it as a halfway measure
with no real meaning. But some, like Sen. Karl
Mundt, R-S.D., who called it highly
disappointing and inadequate, ended up voting
for it.

Page 5



i, The Florida Alligator, Friday. March 14. 1969

Page 6

Yale Performers
ToSing InGraham
The Augmented Seven, a
singing group from Yale, will he
at UF Saturday for two
performances.
At 7:30 p.m., the group will
sing in the Graham Area
recreation hall. Admission is
free.
At 9:30 p.m., the Augmented
Seven will perform in McCarty
Auditorium. The concert will be
sponsored by Sigma Nu.
Admission is 35 cents.

HOSTED BY SCIENCE ACADEMY
Nobel Winner

Dr. Robert S. Mulliken, 1966
Nobel Prize winner, is the
principle speaker during the
Florida Academy of Sciences
annual meeting through
Saturday in the J. Wayne Reitz

Institutions Program
Condenses Course
Freshmen students enrolling in American Institutions in the fall
term of 1969 will have the option of completing the course in either
two or three quarters, according to Dr. H. J. Doherty, chairman of the
Social Sciences Department of University College.
Doherty recently announced that the University Curriculum
Committee has approved the request of his department that a number
of sections be offered on a five day per week basis, completing the
years work in two quarters.
The regular three quarter sequence will continue to be offered,
with class meetings three times a week, but future offerings will be
tailored to meet student demands, according to Doherty.
The planned change in scheduling the course is a result of
discussions with UC students during a meeting of the recently created
Student-Faculty Advisory Committee of the Social Sciences
Department.
At the same meeting the faculty approved Dohertys
recommendation that 50 per cent of the student grade be based on
the instructors evaluation, and 50 per cent on objective examinations.
This policy, scheduled to begin in September, replaces the present
policy of taking only one-third of the score from the instructors
evaluation.
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Union.
Mulliken will speak at a
luncheon today. He is a research
professor of chemistry and
physics at Florida State
University.

To Talk
Friday night Dr. Walton
Smith, 1969 Academy medalist,
will speak on Ocean Space, in
an after dinner address.
The tentative schedule lists
registration and a reception for
the first day. At 8:30 a.m.
March 14 sectional meetings on
various branches of
science biological, medical,
physical, and social will be
held.
These meetings will continue
in the afternoon and on
Saturday.
The American Statistical
Association and the American
Association of Physics Teachers
are holding meetings in
conjunction with the science
meet.
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Poor People Plan Easter March

MIAMI (UPI) Another poor peoples
march on Washington and a Black Easter
demonstration are planned to mark the
anniversary of the assassination of Dr.
Martin Luther King in Memphis, Tenn.
Rev. Ralph Abernathy, who stepped into
Kings shoes as head of the Southern
Christian Leadership Conference, told a
Miami civic club Wednesday he will lead the
march from Memphis on April 4, the date
the Nobel Peace Prize winner was felled by a
sniper at a motel.
Abernathy said that this time the
marchers will not build another
Resurrection City, the collection of huts
and muddy lanes in the heart of Washington

Ending School Segregation
Brings ProblemsForAlachua

Any time you start changing
social customs that have been
around a long time, nobody is
satisfied.
This is how Superintendent
of Public Instruction W.S.
Tiny Talbot explains why he
is being attacked from both right
and left about the new school
desegregation plan for Alachua
County.
The whites are wondering
what this is going to do to their
standards, and the Negroes are
wondering what is going to
happen to their teachers.
Under a court order that
declares all-Negro schools
unconstitutional, Alachua
County has until September,
1970, to either close or integrate
the eight schools which are now
totally black.
The current system is the
controversial freedom-of freedom-ofchoice
choice freedom-ofchoice plan, by which any
student can choose the school he
wishes to attend. Only 1500 of
Gainesvilles 7000 black students
are now attending
predominantly white schools.
The new plan calls for zoning
of the city; each student must go
to the school in his zone unless
he chooses to attend a school
outside his zone in which his
race is in the minority.
To implement the
desegregation plan, 11 new
schools will be built and two
all-Negro schools will be closed.
Lincoln High will be turned into
a vocational school for 600
students and two new high
schools are planned. The new
high schools will be in the far

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where they camped last year.
But we do intend to use our First
Amendment rights of orderly and peacefully
petitioning the president as well as the
Congress for a redress of our grievances, he
said.
Abernathy said a Black Easter
demonstration would be held to focus
attention on the assassinations of King, Sen.
Robert Kennedy, and other civil rights
leaders. He did not elaborate on the details
of the demonstration.
The SCLC head said the march next
month will go through Alabama, where King
first emerged as the voice of Negro rights,

east and far west sides of town,
leaving Gainesville High in the
central section. A. Quinn Jones
Elementary School will be
closed.
Controversy has arisen over
the closing of Lincoln High. But
Talbot says that three
agencies the State Department
of Education, the Bond Issue
Committee and the
Desegregation Committee of the
University of Miami have all
surveyed the city, and none
have recommended that Lincoln
stay open as a senior high
school.
Talbot describes the amount
of reshuffling of students under
the new plan as a tremendous
amount. The main problem is
the relocation of teachers.
About one-fourth of the
staff in Alachua County is
Negro, so about one of every
four teachers in each school will
be Negro, says Talbot; but he
says there can be no guarantee
of an exact balance in each
shcool.
Weve been having lots of
trouble recruiting Negro
teachers, says Talbot. Until
more Negroes start going to UF,
it will be a problem.
Alachua County recruits most
of its teachers from UF. Talbot
explains the reasons for this:
most teachers who come to
Alachua County are putting a
spouse through college or are
working for a higher degree at
UF, because of the relatively low
pay scale for teachers in the
county, few others apply for
jobs in the county.
Also, educaiton students
from UF serve their internships
in Alachua County schools. The

students are preferred to
applicants who have interned
elsewhere because their quality
is known before they start to
work.
Under the court order by
which the desegregation plan
was ordered, it will be possible
for all-white schools to exist.
The order only forbids all-black
schools. But the way the zoning
is arranged, all schools will be
integrated unless there is a great
amount of moving of families
from one zone to another.
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and to Atlanta, where King made his
headquarters in recent years.
Abernathy told members of Miamis
predominantly white Tiger Bay Political
Club:
If you really believe in what Dr. King
stood for- if you really believe injustice, in
brotherhood, in freedom, in peace and the
quest of these dreams through non-violent
means then I ask you and challenge you to
prove your belief by supporting the poor
people.
He added, I hope that many of you will
one day soon have the exhilirating and
life-giving experience of marching with us.

. UF REPRESENTATIVES I
- Mel Ward Jim Bartlett
Dan Sa PP Bill Worsham
Tom Stewart Arlie Watkinson
George Corl Harold DeVane
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DEFERRED PREMIUM PAYMENTS
Eugene McCarthy campaigned early
Richard Nixon campaigned early
The Kennedys campaigned early
JOHN MICA WILL NOT BE
STOPPED FROM CAMPAIGNING EARLY.
I wish to thank the students
of the U. of F. for their support and
concern during the past week.
Best of luck on finals!
(PAID POLITICAL ADV.)

Friday, March 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

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Page 7



I, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14. 1969

Page 8

The
Florida
Alligator
"The price of freedom is the
exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-in-Chief
Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
Raul Ramirez
Executive Editor
Glenn Fake
News Editor
PmumjJt*

Editors Viewpoint
SHEPHERD GOODRICH HARRIS CALLAHAN MICA HOLLIS BAILEY
Play By Play Politics, Candidates Line Up
By Harold Aldrich

With the invalid referendum
on the future of Student
Government now only a
better-off-forgotten memory of
deeply ingrained student apathy,
the politics behind the scenes is
beginning to pick up steam.
Many students criticized this
editor for his editorials
supporting SG while political
deals were being made for the
upcoming student elections. I
defend the editorials on the
grounds that for all its wrongs,
SG still offers many tangible and
necessary benefits to the
students, attributes often
overlooked by cynical people.
For the good it does, SG
deserved to remain. Also,
dealism as manifested in SG is a
microcosm of American politics.
Democracy works because
divergent interest groups can
arrive at reasonable
compromises. This includes
division of the pie to a
winners supporters.
Where dealism often fails is in
its absence of idealism. The
winner should be allowed to
repay his supporters, but the
positions should go only to those
qualified to carry out the
responsibilities.
Dealism is not, by itself, evil.
It becomes evil when it lays the
groundwork for corruption and
non-service. So Im not
particularly psyched out when
someone tellsme -so-and-so 4s
out making deals.
At the same time, I believe
deals should be honest and
above-board. The public has a
right to know before it elects a

Tens Company, 30sACrowd

The editorial board of the Alligator has voted to change
the position presented in an editorial in Tuesday's edition.
The editorial, entitled Lost Innocence. was written by
a subordinate editor who is not a member of the editorial
board. It was published without the approval of a majority
of the top four editors.
Criticizing President Stephen C. OConneii for
threatening to invoke UFs demonstration policy, which
prohibits disruption, the editorial contended that the
students sitting in the hallway in front of the president's
office Monday were peaceful and not disruptive.
As pointed out in a letter published Thursday, OConnell
himself did not issue the warning to the demonstrators,
although he authored a written statement distributed to,
them Monday morning.
Executive Vice President L. E. Grinter, acting under
OConnells instructions, agreed early in the morning that
the protest could continue if the protestors were quiet."
SSOC leader Ed Freeman agreed that the number of people
participating would be limited to about ten.
When the number grew to about 30, Grinter asked them
to conform to their agreement or leave the building. He
apparently believed that the growing number threatened to
become a repeat of large demonstrations last week. He
wisely tried to avoid an unnecessary confrontation.

candidate what kind of workers
he will be bringing into office
with him, in general terms.
Hence, your editor has tried
to stay as close as possible to the
political arena so he can report
what is happening inside.
As tentative alignments stand
now, there are a number of
candidates planning to seek the
student bodys highest office.
The field may narrow by the end
of qualifying time April 4, but as
of now there are three or four
major candidates and possibly
that many minor ones.
Perhaps heading the list are
Charles Shepherd and Gary
Goodrich, although neither has
formally announced yet.
Shepherd, a former student
body president and founder of
the Accent program, is best
remembered for his public
defense of Pamme Brewers right
to pose nude and the subsequent
revamping of the Code of
Student Conduct to end in loco
parentis.
Goodrich is currently vice
president under Clyde Taylor.
He has played a major role in
shaping many of the very
successful programs
accomplished by the Taylor
administration.
Other candidates include
Charles Harris, Student Senate
majority leader; Mick Callahan,
chairman of the Tntereoufse
John Mica, a former
secretary of academic affairs;
Jim Hollis, a vocal former
president of the Veterans Club,
and Jimmey Bailey, former

chairman of UF Students for
Wallace.
For the moment, Shepherd
appears to have garnered the
most support among the
fraternities. But Goodrichs
supporters, namely Greg
Johnson and Tom Thoman,
claim to be gaining ground in the
fraternity shuffle.
The lines will be more
clearly drawn during the break
because qualifying opens the
first day of classes next term.
Harris and Callahan, both
strong candidates in the early
going of the campaign, have
slipped considerably since
Goodrich and Shepherd entered
the race.
Goodrich drained off some of
Harris support from organized
independents. Shepherd took up
most of Harris fraternity
support.
Shepherd also cut deeply into
Callahan when Florida Blue Key
President Manny James left
Callahan and went to Shepherds
camp. The reason for his switch
was rather simple: he believes
Shepherd is the best candidate
and will win the election.
Callahan dropped out of the
forefront for a while, apparently
undecided about running. He has
decided, however, to run
without a strong fraternity bloc,
or with none at all, if necessary.
He apparently wants to be
-president -vefy-maehr -He toW a
crowd of radicals last week that
he would lie, lie and lie for
three weeks to get elected and
then would set the
administration on its ears. His

EDITORIAL

After O'Connell deckled last week to deny official
recognition to SSOC. up to 200 demonstrators lined the
hallway outside his office Thursday and Friday. The very
presence of that many warm bodies in a narrow hallway is
potentially disruptive of the normal operations of the
offices in the building. In this case, the potential was
effect ively rea I ized.
OConnell was clearly within the bounds of fairness when
he warned the demonstrators, in the statement distributed
by Grinter. that additional such demonstrations would be
ruled disruptive and that participants would be asked to
leave the premises or be suspended and/or arrested.
This is not to say that disgruntled SSOC' supporters could
not express their disdain for OConnells recognition denial.
They may, as the president repeatedly emphasized,
demonstrate to their hearts content outside the building,
where they would be much less likely to disrupt Tigert's
offices.
Although we disagreed with OConnell's decision to deny
SSOC a charter, we recognize him as a usually fair and
always patient man. He showed both attributes, as did other
administrators, in dealing with uptight demonstrators.
Unfortunately, it cannot be said that SSOC' was mature
enough to return fairness for fairness.

biggest supporter is UF alumnus
Ernie (Apathy Still Cares) Litz,
who also doubles as
administrative assistant for Rep.
Ralph Turlington of Gainesville.
Harris is currently undergoing
some loyalty pains. He doesn't
want himself and his remaining
supporters to take ? backseat
during the campaign with some
other candidate. At the same
time, he is personally committed
to sincere and dedicated service
and wants to be part of SG.
He cant be involved in policy
decisions unless hes on the
winning side, and he quite
probably does not have enough
backing to win himself. He may
try to do so anyway though.
Many of his advisors have
suggested that he link up with
Shepherd, probably as vice
president. He has also been
offered vice president under
Goodrich, but he is still smarting
from the manner in which the
Goodrich supporters dropped
him when Goodrich got into an
inactive reserve unit and decided
to run.
If Harris should decide not to

The Florida Alligator
Published by student, of the University of FlorUi under the
UPtoee of the Booed of Student PuMicrtom.
* <*> a,
*e writer of the article ad not thoee of tIM UafrenHv of Florida.

run for the top spot, he very
likely would accept Shepherds
offer to be number two on the
ticket.
Shepherd, incidentally,
decided to run when Goodrich
entered the race for sure.
Although he had already
publicly repudiated a few days
before the rumors that he might
run again, Shepherd changed his
mind because he believes that
Goodrich is too rash and abrupt
to be an effective president.
Mica officially entered the
race with a full-page
advertisement in the Alligator
last week, despite recently
approved election law revisions
prohibiting distribution of
campaign literature or ads prior
to the close of qualifying. He has
claimed ignorance of the law as
his defense.
Many of the current
alignments could change over
the break between quarters.
So we shall watch with
interest the impact of dealism,
and hope, for the students sake,
that a generous amount of
idealism is blended in.



Accent 7O: Wedge
In The Political Pie
MR. EDITOR:
ACCENT MAKES AN IMPRESSION! You bet it did. But it
didn't happen over night. It took 12 months of planning and
preparation to present a program that would be considered an
achievement of lasting value to the students of University of Florida.
That is twelve-months of hard and dedicated work by a group of
people called the Executive Committee.
It was the effort of this group to see that a failure of great
potential (ACCENT 6B) could become a realistic and meaningful
educational experience for the University of Florida. It was only
through this concentrated team effort of each member of the
Executive Committee, that ACCENT was able to produce what it did.
ACCENT 70 is underway with the recen* ection of the new
general chairman and vice-chairman. And this brings into view another
phase of campus politics. Considered in the selection of the new
chairman and vice-chairman were three immediate past members of
the Executive Committee: Qualified? YES! Experienced? YES!
Successful? YES! Desire to continue work in something they believe
in? YES!
ELECTED to ACCENT 7O? NO! AND WHY NOT?
Because these students were more interested in presenting a good
program, than being involved in the campus politics that makes it
necessary to do anything on this campus. It seems proper to give an
example of such doings:
Manny James, president of Florida Blue Key and influential voting
member of the Public Functions Authority, which elected the new
chairmen, approached Frazier Solsberry and assured him the
chairmanship, if his fraternity would support his new candidate for
president of the student body next .month. The answer was no, and
the results are quite evident. No former ACCENT member was elected
to anything. And we know why!
The Thursday afternoon meeting of the Public Functions
Authority was a modem day form of a kangaroo court for all
concerned. The deal had been made and the motions were being made
to look official.
The applicants were given a quick interview in Tront of the room
and immediately thereafter, the selections were made.
There was no call for a report or recommendation by the ACCENT
69 Executive Committee, who ii seems proper could serve as the best
possible authority to give at least an outline of what is required of the
jobs and who might fit in best, for this important team-effort. The
vote was not even close for either position.
It could be possible for history to repeat itself, when concerned
with ACCENT 7O. Charles Shepherd used the ACCENT
chairmanship to pay off a political debt and the 1968 results of
ACCENT are not easy to be forgotten. Perhaps this is what made
ACCENT 69 work. The people working in it did not want to see
politics min the program again, for it would be the last and we all
knew it.
Even with the 69 committee, the present administration screamed
a closed political system of the executive committee electing the new
chairman. They tried to destroy the program, because they were not
in the in crowd.
Tremendous efforts were made by the editor of the Alligator to
save the program and appease the dissidents. He was successful, but
only on the assumption that ACCENT would once against become
apolitical, as contended in its original inception. Thus the Public
Functions Authority would elect the new chairmen, since it was made
up of a diversified group of campus leaders. It was thought.
In an Alligator editorial, March 21,1966, praising the formation of
ACCENT, it read, What should be pointed out, however, is that
ACCENT is definitely not tied to campus politics and the bureaucratic
red tape that naturally follows. Steps are being taken, too, to insure
that the symposium remains apolitical in nature. This will include the
formation of a permanent executive committee made up of faculty
members and students. Well, history can speak for itself and the
present situation certainly stinks of petty politics.
We are not yelling sour grapes over the decision of the
Authority. But we do resent and deplore the methods of determining
the selection of new chairmen. They are certainly acting like the only
authority on campus programs.
If ACCENT 69 was really a success than the people who made it
so should have been given deeper consideration based on their desire
and experience, rather than their political aspirations. It is hoped that
more people will become aware of the important decisions that affect
their university and that they as students should demand that their
interests be protected.
We are all realists and must realize that politics will in some ways
be the basis of decisions and outcomes, but we are idealists in the
sense that ACCENT represents to us, the fulfillment of a much needed
program on the college campuses and should not be sacrificed for
small political pay-offs. Good luck ACCENT 7O, cause youll need
it
THE ACCENT 69 EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
LARRY BERRIN
FRAZIER SOLSBERRY
JEFF WEIL
JOE HAIR ~
TOM DEMARCO
NANCY REGISTER
JEFF FENSTER
TOM BLACKMON
BARRY MALTER
RONNIE BLOOM

mi
} lo p e f nr t f lp
No Seizure Intended

V
(E DITOR S NOTE: Following is an
interchange between State Representative David
$: Lindsey and Florida Blue Key President Manny
I
8 DEAR SIR:
%
:|:j Receipt is hereby acknowledged of the
February 19, 1969, official Bray of the
§j: Florida Blue Key.
g Your confusion of facts is understandable in
£: view of the hastily printed report. Namely in
paragraph No. 1, reflecting external threats of
|:j: intimidations, which is reality and fact should
$ read Internal.
Conception of the unpopular and unlawful,
seizure by force if necessary theory,
manifested within your very own coveted Ivory
Towers, and certainly not with any unqualified,
or uninformed legislators.
By permissiveness, or laxity, administrators
not only invited, but prompted legislative
intervention into your zealously protected
domain.
The Universities unquenchable thirst for
additional taxpayers monies naturally captivates
S public attention. It becomes paramounted with
the advent of extra curricular subjects contrary
and alien to their basic hallowed beliefs.
If your organization is well intentioned, as
you would have us believe, you should be
constructively introducing an oath of allegence
(sic) to the State and Country of which,
£ sanctions your freedom and mine.
I
S
S DAVID L. LINDSEY

\ \
\ rsf" \
\ si
M 11 m if
Klit W) wf
a < j
Expert
m a a ~ _ _______ _ __ m m

Friday, March 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

James. Lindsey is the legislator who recently
threatened to vote down UF appropriations if
Megill were not fired.)
DEAR REPRESENTATIVE:
Received your latter of February 28 and feel
that a reply in behalf of Florida Blue Key must
be made.
I believe that you are guilty of your own
charge of confusing the facts. My letter asked
that due process and judicial fairness be applied
in all affairs concerning the University. 1 believe
that each man, student or professor, is entitled to
the guarantees of our constitution, even if I
personally do not agree with his ideas. This was
the intent of my letter of February 19th, which
was readily apparent to most members of the
Legislature.
If I misjudged your motives, then I stand
corrected but in the words, of our own Governor
Kirk, When something walks and talks like a
duck, I generally call it a duck.
Florida Blue Key is certainly not advocating
seizure by force or any overthrow of the
University. While the power of the purse strings
which you have threatened is ve.y formidable, I
believe it is our duty to resist such thinly veiled
threats if we are to be true to ourselves.
I would hope this letter clarified some of the
earlier points in the official Bray of Florida
Blue Key since I obviously over-estimated your
tbility to comprehend.
MANNY JAMES
FBK PRESIDENT

Page 9



(, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

Page 10

Oranere .->,,,1

ADDRESS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices

WORK-STUDY PROGRAM
~TOBS: UF students qualified for
the College Work-Study program
are needed. If your parents'
income is less than $7,000 a year
you may apply. Many jobs are
available on campus. Please
contact Student Employment,
Room 23, Tigert Hall.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.

RELAX
before finals
at the
FREE
UNION DANCE
Friday March Nth
9:00p.m. to 1:00a.m.
on she
. ... ...
Music By
"THE BELOVED"
formerly "THE KIDZ"
SPONSORED BY THE UNION PROGRAMS r~' 'CIL

NEXT CAR LOAN...
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERALCREDIT UNION I
slh Avenue_otjhe jomer of 12th Street Hours:8:00o.m. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday |

NOTICE TO STUDENTS:
The Student Accounts sections
is now accepting Short-term
Loan applications for payment
of Spring Quarter Registration
Fees.
NATIONAL DEFENSE
LOAN BORROWERS: If you
have been approved for a release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan Program for the
Spring Quarter, and have
pre-registered for that quarter,
your fee payment can be
deducted from your loan. As
soon as you have finished
pre-registering come to the
Student Accounts Office.

BLUE BULLETIN

POETRY READING: Prof.
Bill Robinson will give a reading,
"Poets I Have Known,"
Thursday, March 14, from 4:40
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Reitz
Union, Lounges 122 and 123.
SUMMER STUDENT
EMPLOYMENT: The Florida
State Br--d of Health will have a
few training positions for college
students this summer. For
information and applications,
please contact iudent
Employment, Room 23, Tigert
Hall.
STATE TEACHERS:
General Loan Scholarship
money has arrived. You may
receive it in the Student
Depository from Mrs. Robinson
or Miss Nabers.
STUDENT JOBS: UF
students available to start work
now are wanted by the Student
Employment. Jobs are available
for typists, library clerks, key
punch operators and draftsmen.
Please contact Student
Employment, Room 23, Tigert
Hall, for further details.
~~ GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit, or release of transcr.pt
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
-C TO n.wc,ON O p INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

Friday, March 14
Text Book Exchange, C-48
Union, 2:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
Movie, "Casablanca", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Movie, Murphree Area Council,
"Iprcress File", West Wing
Main Cafeteria, 7:00 & 9:00
p.m.
Movie, Tolbert Area Council,
7:00, "Laurel & Hardy",
9:00, "Arabesque", 12:00
p.m., "The Lost World",
South Hall Movie Room.
Audubon Wildlife Films,
Audubon Lecturer: Roger
Tory Peterson,
"Galapagoes Wild Eden",
Union Ballroom, 8:00 p.m.
Dance, "The Beloved" (formerly
"The Kidz"), Reitz Union
Terrace, free, 9:00 p.m.
Saturday, March 15
Movie, "The Chase", Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Murphree Area Movie, "Ipcress
File", West Wing Main
Cafeteria, 7:00 & 9:00 p.m.
Tolbert Area Movie, 7:00 p.m.,
"Laurel & Hardy", 9:00 p.m.
"Arabesque", 12:00
midnight, "The Lost World."
St. Patrick's Day Dinner Dance,
Arredondo Room 7:00 p.m.

Sunday, March 16 j
|l
Dulicate Bridge, 150 C Union, J
1:00 p.m.
SGP: "VAN CLIBURN",
Florida Gym, 4:00 p.m.
University Film Series Movie,
"Last Command, Short:
"The Great Train Robbery',
Union Aud., 7:00 A 9:15
p.m.
a
Monday, March 17
Book Exchange, C-43 Union.!
2:00-4:00 p.m.
Dancing Lessons, 254 Union, j
6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, March 18
Text Book Exchange, C-48
Union, 2:00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. 1
UNION BOX OFFICE- Tickets
are now on sale for: 1
UNIVERSITY FI LM
SERIES, 10 films, General
Public, Faculty & Staff,
$5.00; Univ. of Fla. Students,
$2.50; Univ. of Fla. Students,
5 films, $1.50. SGP: "VAN
CLIBURN", General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $3.00, $2.25
6 $1.50; Univ of Fla.
Student, $2.50, $1.75 &
SI.OO. Fine Arts:
"BHASKAR & SHALA
General Public 31.50
Faculty & Staff, $1.00; Univ
of Fla. Student, $.75.



w koMM m
B*
i > j : S. >wilHl .- H ';i| >:s?
jfW. jkk MH g BK
Now Leasing forSeptember
i
The exquisite /e bonne vie apartinents. S, W, 16th Avenue and Msm Street (next to
Gator Town) has everything: two Swimming Pools, Tennis Courts, 1, 2 & 3 bedroom
Townhouse and Garden Apartment s, garbage disposal, full carpeted and airconditioned.

Appliances by
-f+atruoinl
GENERAL I ELECTRIC COMPANY

Friday, March 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator

For Information Contact
Steve Halpert
111 1 ~ l "~ T'T~ 1 I ffVW 1111
378-3457
Gator Town Apartments

Page 11



Page 12

, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

THETA CHI The fraternity has announced the
addition of sixteen new members into their
brotherhood. The initiation ceremony this term
climaxed a strenuous and fulfilling pledgeship.
Recent house elections placed these men in
positions of leadership for the coming year: Phillip
Hohnson, president; Charlie Ruse, vice president;
Jim Wilkerson, secretary; Tom Richardson, assistant
treasurer; Jeff Lovem, historian; Les Meierhenry,
librarian; Jerry Grimm, house manager; Bill Hale,
lawn manager; and Ric Weilgorecki, chaplin.
PHI SIGMA SIGMA Ten newly initiated sisters
are proudly wearing the Sphinx of Phi Sigma Sigma.
The Phi Sigs had a dessert social with new
sorority Pi Beta Phi and parents were honored
recently at their annual Parents Weekend.
Maxine Kasselman is secretary of Panhellenic.
Jackie Jedel and Debbie Lederman received keys for
outstanding service to Panhellenic.
Bobbie Laden is a new Sig Ep Little Sister.
Margie Wise was chosen DU Darling. Diane Mazur is
a Delta Chi Little Sister, and Sharon Friedman was
initiated into Kappa Sigma Little Sisters.
Congratulations to Marsha Distiller and Helene
Rutansky for being tapped into Mortar Board.
TAU BETA PI The Florida Alpha Chapter of
Tau Beta Pi Association, National Engineering
Honor Society, recently tapped 19 new members
into its organization, along with 4 distinguished
Alumni and 4 eminent Engineers.
To qualify for Tau Beta Pi a student must have at
least a 3.30 upper division average.
The new student members are Bertrum S.
Barbay, Peter C. Belford, Robert L. Cusumano,
John D. Edwards, Arye Eprath, William A.
Ferguson, Don Fraser, J George Hayden, Donald F.
Hayden, Cecil L Kirksey, Charles D. Knudsen,
.Arthur J. Koblasz, Blake W. Masters, Ronald W.
Meyer, Perry B. Petersen, James R. Rennak, Robert
Rogers, Lyman A. Scribner, Jr., and Richard
Weddington.
ALPHA TAU OMEGA The brothers under the
leadership of Steve (Goofy) Sykes, donated over
$750 to the Johnnie Lee Samuels Fund. $733 came
from their presentation of Gator Olympics, headed
by Brother Sykes. The remainder was provided by
donations obtained by the pledges. They intend to
make Gator Olympics an annual event to bolster
needed funds and to increase track participation at
theUF.
Placing second in scholarship among social
fraternities on campus, the Taus received one of the

B- vsHsjamm*- inii n jiiiihuibhh \m wwtm
+ w
VERSITY
VROLET
tudents Friend
D DISCOUNT
R ENTIRE REPAIR BILL
T BODY SHOP REPAIRS)
ites on Any Repairs
Card To Our Service Manager
SITY CHEVROLET
n St. Phone 376 75 81

Greek News
,;.v.v.v.v.;.;.;.v.y. By MIKE SIMMONS .v/.v.v.v.
Alligator Staff Writer

five top scholarship awards presented at Winter
Frolics.
Thanks go to Tom (Owl) Blackmon, program
director and Joe Hair, financial chairman, for their
efforts in presenting this years dynamic Accent
program. Charlie Murphy has been appointed
chairman of the Miss UF Contest. Steve Metz is in
charge of the field day for Greek Week and Lon
Lane will be keeping the campus informed about
the gala affair as public relations chairman.
ALPHA CHI OMEGA-The Alpha Chis
recently completed their National Altruistic Project
which was aiding the Easter Seal campaign.
March sth, Janie Cohen, Joanie Dowd, and
Eileen McDargh were tapped by Mortar Board for
their outstanding achievement while at the UF.
Jan Kuhn was chosen as the first runner-up in the
Miss Seminole Contest.
PHI KAPPA TAU The brothers held their
annual Founders Day last weekend in the Reitz
Union. Among several outstanding alumni present
from Tallahassee were Broward Williams, State
Treasurer, and Richard Ervin, Florida Supreme
Court Chief Justice.
Gutherie Babcock, a prominent Miami banker
received the Outstanding Alumnus Award and was
elected Alumni president.
Several brothers also received awards at the
banquet: Ted Remley, outstanding brother; Paul
Register, outstanding pledge; Judy Panning,
outstanding little sister; John Cosgrove, Randy
Williams Spirit and Leadership Award; Frank Riggle,
Bill Fleming Memorial Scholarship; Paul Register,
Pledge Athletic Award; Jerry Currington, pledge
scholarship award; Dave Hoffman, brother
scholarship award.
After defeating the Chi Phis for the basketball
championship and the AGRs for the handball
championship, the Phi Taus are ready to make a
clean sweep of next quarters intramural sports and
take the Presidents Cup.
SIGMA KAPPA White Pearl Weekend
became the highlight of a Sigma Kappas year last
Friday and Saturday night. Tally Lauter, Beta Theta
Pi, was selected sweetheart for 1969.
Recently selected as fraternity little sisters were:
Terrye Hodkin, Phi Kappa Tau, Kitty Harris, Delta
Chi, Mary Anne LaPointe and Vana Christian, Delta
Upsilon, and Julia Hixson, Lambda Chi Alpha.
Winter quarter initiates included: Donna French,
Best Pledge; Susan Meyer, Linda Mogge, Wendy
Seipp, Best Scholarship; Susan Sheffner, Linda
Wilson and Liz Wurst.

Pre-Graduate Grant
For Negroes Issued
A pre-graduate school preparatory program for Negro students has
been made possible by a grant in excess ot 5250,000 trom the
Rockefeller Foundation.
The three-year program to help Negro students quality tor graduate
work in agriculture and related Helds will be financed through a
5261,750 grant. Dr. E. T. York, UF provost for agriculture announced
Thursday.
York said excellent employment opportunities exist for black
Americans, but many potentially good students are unable to satisfy
the high entrance requirements for graduate studies and thus qualify
themselves to take advantage of these opportunities.
Dr. Marvin A. Brooker, presently Dean of Resident Instruction
with the UF Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, will head the
program.
SALESSERVICERENTALS
8881 \ Smith Corina
~ Dealer"
ADD OFFICE EQUIPMENT
formerly Hancock Office Equipment
"LEI'S BELIEVE
IN GAINESVILLE"
VOTE FOR
Neil A. Butler
CITY COMMISSIONER cm
Qualifications
Lifelong resident of Gainesville
Steward Mt. Olive Methodist Church
World War II Navy Combat Veteran
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
Elks American Legion
B.S. Degree University of Florida
Admitted to Graduate School U of F
Registered Professional Nurse
Member American Nurses Association
Coordinated all Nursing for "Operation Concern"
q T? **s2* rrarse Pediatrics -Uof F Teaching Hospital
Served as Chairman of Gainesvilles
Human Relations Advisory Board
Chairman Board of Directors, Bell Nursery
Member Board of Directors, Seagle Foundation
(Paid Political Advertisement



GA T '^^iwniuwMfMimMwiuiMihw.L, ~
ator Classifieds

FOR SALE |
Used Aluminum Swival Cha.rs in
excellent condition. Refinished to
suit your taste. Save over 75% off
new cost. One Week Only $8 50 j r
Office Furniture Co., 620 S. Main
D hone 376-1146. (A-lt-103-p)
Drafted must sell VM record changer
stereo cartridge sl2, 8 Coaxial
speaker cabinet $5, 10" Midrange
speaker $3, Concord 4 track Stereo
tape recorder S7O. Call John
372-9661, 5-12 PM. (A-lt-103-p)
G unsOunsGunsInventory over
450 Buy Sell Trade Repair
Reloading supplies, Custom,
reloading Harry Beckwith, Gun
Dealer, Micanopy 466-3340
(A-ts-69-p)
Tampico mobile home 10x50 Front
kitchen 2 br good condition. Call
Jerry Hollingsworth 454-1973 If no
answer call 454-1035. (Alt io3-p)
Classical Gu i tar Beautifu I
workmanship only 6 mos
01d575.00 w/case. AlsoSony tape
deck model 350, 2 yrs old SIIO.OO
Call 376-7047. (A-4MOI-P)
HONDA 305 Dream 2 helmets 1967
5000 miles excellent cond. SSOO call
Craig at 3928125. (A-3t-101-P)

nCTVRES fmny I m-W 1 i Afl
wnu MUBMJ-L-JLi. i 11 1
Runco :
z 2sf uj Romeo I
i
! No 7 J ;
love story....

' ~ '"* ~~ .---1,
" 'WUh
In the tradition of
I : I w*% t i p u j
ITI Bo %|P Im 9 | J
-/;\\. '*' v -""-'-- ,-****. ...J^^
BBiiINCLEIoMSIDABIN Ilf
IHiflMaf

FOR SALE I
m'fes r^ h \ t 350 c only 2400
tuniUble Z*"*'' G*"
378 n ', a 7% J^t.700.'pT ke i s2o '
Honrt.'^n 11 **' L kS "<' 65
JJs?*JS?.r sir sr*a jrx
fAT^: O) 378 8905 ---
Mfcycj 3 Aacing
'vitcycl. $325 cash. Stereo and 50
albums sno, AM-FM radio and
OO *ZZ LL 3780570 Boro
o clock on weekdays
weekends-anytime.(A-4t-10l P) y
$llOO JS UM 650 400 m 'es
$llOO Fisher amp am-fm radio $220
Benjamin Miracord changer SBO doth
SURFBOARD 7 6" Maqic
Speedline shape and rails, 12 lbs 4
week old sllO call 372-9421 after 3
pm. (A-3MOI-P) J
Suzuk. 80cc SIOO. Must sell. Call
oill. Room 97 372-9352.
(A-4t-100-p)

Friday. March 14. 1969. The Florida Alligator,

| FOR SALE |
Mobile home, 1963 Richardson
10x50. Ft ir and ck, 2 br $2400. Call
r n ~ ? 7 6 5 for information.
(A-2M02-P)
Mires Max. completely customized
with 64 Volkswagen engine
completely rebuilt with many extras.
All fibre glass body with canvas
flowered top. SI2OO. Call 392-7987
(A-2M02-P)
16 gauge J.P. Sauer & Son double
barrel shotgun, hand made by
German craftsmen. Exquisite gun for
collectoi or hunter. $l5O. Call
39 2-7987 before it's too late'
(A-21-102-P)
BABV FLYING SQUIRRELS back
in stock $5 or $9/pair. 327 NW 16th
St. (5-7 p.m.) 376-0968. (A-2t-10?-P)
FOR RENT I
-^X*X*X*J*X<"X*X*X*:V-SSSSNS W*J*W->XX.;iS
Luxurious 1-bdrm apt to sublease.
Furnished Carpeted central heat
air dishwasher disposal pool
' avai,a ble March
- 20 378-7618. (B- 3t-99-p)
will f rf|e 7 $ 100 de p s -^- Landmark
2 bdr sublease for spring qtr. Call
after 5 p.m. 378-7611. (B-4MOO-P)

Downtown GniraivM* j
tip *|f JR
2JJ W. Unhtrtlfy Ay*.
NOT FRIDAY i
AN UNFORGETTABLE DRAMA.
A FILM THAT SHOULD BE SEEN!
In its approach to lesbianism,
it exploits to the hilt one of the S
frankest and most genuinely
erotic scenes to have come to J
film. Nothing is left to the
imagination!"
Judith Crist,
New York Magazine J
still
NO ONE UNDER w
I BE ADMITTED
Vlwirv POSITIVE PROOF*
Metrocotof OF AGE
......... REQUIRED

Page 13

FOR RENT |
"'y-n*x x x-x*x*x*x*x*x*vx*x x-x*x*x*xS"!
One female roommate needed 3rd
qtr. Landmark 104. Cail 378-9041
(B-lt- 103-p)

SundayMarchl6tiT^|
"LAST COMMAND I
THE GREAT I
TRAIN ROBBERYI
7:00 PM S 9:00 PM I
UNIV. FILM SERIES 50< I

I "ONE OF THE
: YEAR S TEN BEST. £§flk
: HAILJOANNA. T i
m a it a

Use our handy
mail in order
form.

FOR RENT |
>>X NXiSW
Sublet College Terrace Apl. for Spr.
Qtr. $l2O mcl. util. Pool JW AC. C.i
372-7705. (B-jt 101-P)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS*

BCDO ii SWOT'S 1B 8 MWgWWj
| FOR RENT I
Efficiency apt. Air, Close to campus.
$75 per month $2lO for Spring
quarter. Call 376-3990. (B-lt-103-p)
2 bedroom apt. in Landmark. Pool
bym & sauna Facilities. Preferably
April through August. Lease. Phone
378-4899. (B-lt-103-p)
To sublet: 1-bedroom apt.
Landmark, poolside, dishwasher,
A.C., Apt. 161. Call 378-9767.
(B-lt-193-p)
2 br apt. townhouse AC, lVz bath,
pool, carpeted, dishwasher, keep our
damage deposit. Williamsburg Apts.
$2lO mo. Call 376-0838.
(B-2M02-P)
Must sublease 3 bedrm 2bath fur furnished
nished furnished apt. at Williamsburg, large
living rm. dining rm. dishwasher cen central
tral central air heat pool $260. Call
3780756. (B-st-99-P)
Best location in town. 1 blk from
Tigert Hall. 1 br. AC apts. Rents
sllO-$l2O Colonial Manor Apts.
1216 S.W. 2nd Ave. Apt 1 9-6 p.m.
daily, 2-5 p.m. Sunday 372-7111.
(B-98-6t-p)
FOR RENT: Concrete block
cottages, individual living units, 6
minutes from campus, decor may be
changed to suit taste, no lease, S7O
monthly. Call: 372-4407 after 8:00
pm. Ask for Steve. (B-3t-101-P)
2 rm efficiency. Central heat and air
conditioning all utilities (except gas)
paid for. 1604 NW 3rd PI. Apt. 3 or
call 378-3291. (B-4MOO-P)
Sublet 2 br Camelot apt 202 for
summer. Convenient Westgate Shop.
Pool, laundry, sauna, clubhouse with
col TV included. Unfurn or furn
376-0354. (B-101-3t-P)
2 bedroom furnished Lakeside trailer
to sublease for 3rd quarter (available
March 20) sllO/month. Bar & rugs
included will save on utilities
3760891. (B-3MOI-P)
Perfect pad, 2 bdr. trailer-house.
Private hideaway only 5 min from
campus SBS monthly includes lot.
Call any time. 378-3938 or
378-7085. (B-3MOI-P)
Must sublet 1 bedroom furnished
University Gardens Apartment,
carpeted, AC, pool slls per month.
Call Lee 372-5921. (B-st-99-p)
5 coeds need to sublease unusual
2-bedrm Univ. Gardens Apt. with
bar, wall murals, gourd, and last Mo.
paid for. Sum or sp-sum. qtr.
376-0737. (B-lt-103-p)
3 to sublet apt. Very close to campus
2 bedroom, Air-Heat. Call 378-faso7.
(B-lt-103-p)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
C t. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
Couple or girl to share house near
Mall SSO mo. or child care for 7 mo.
6 20 mo. old. 378-7609.
(C-2M02-P)
Roommate wanted spring &/or
summer $42.50/mo. + util. Air &
heat. Call Phil or Dave 4-7 p.m.
372-3801. (C-2M02-P)
Male roommate for third quarter.
Three bedroom house wood
interior, fireplace, TV, and bar. Call
378-1112 or come to 627 NE 8 Ave.
after 6 p.m. (C-2t-102-P)
NEAR CAMPUS! Need female
roommate for very nice 2 bedroom
duplex: $45 a mo. plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 372-2048 after 6:00 p.m.
(C-2M02-P)
1 male roommate needed for spring
qtr. No lease to sign. 2-bedroom, AC,
pool, 3 blocks from campus. $42 per
month plus 1/3 utilities. Call
376-9540. (C-3t-102-P)
FEMALE roommate wanted for
spring quarter. Two bedroom
Gatortown Apt. $42.50 mo. Call
372-0784. (C-2M02-P)
Male roommate wanted to share
fantastic two bedroom apt. Color
TV, stereo, AC. The works. Call
378-5673 for additional information.
>/£-2t-102-P)
3rd quarter, one bedroom apt.
Colonial Manor, carpeted & pool. Vz
block from campus, $l2O Call
immediately 378-8470. (C-2t-102-P)
ONLY 1 bl. from campus coed
roommate to share 2 bdr. apt. with 2
hlrls. $122. for spring quarter. Call
378-8074. Very quiet. (C-2M02-P)
CHEAP! Need 1 or 2 male
roommates. Pool, TV and others
included. Frederick Gardens No. 20.
Call 378-6551 nor for special deal.
(C-2t-102-P)
Roommate wanted 4th person in
sharp 2-bedroom house. $32. 50/mo.
No lease, south Gainesville in
excellent location. 376-2344.
(C-2t-102-P)

n ffgaawwii w i qe i wk.vwww
I WANTED ]
Panic! Need one cellmate for spring
and summer. Landmark Call Sherry
or Judy Ann 378-5554. (C-4t-100-p)
LIVE OFF CAMPUS C.L.O.
$60.00/M. Room & board. Frosh &
sophs, may break. Contracts total
indepen. Call 376-9420. Come by
117 NW 15 St. (C-7t-97-P)
Need 1 roommate for Frederick Gar Gardens
dens Gardens 2 bedroom apartment spring
quarter. AC, pool. March rent paid.
No deposit needed. Call 378-1978.
(C-st-99-P)
Female to share small house behind
NRM starting sprint ntr $45 mo call
3785275 now, th o i finals and the
break late at night preferable.
(C-st-99-P)

Hi \ SPECIAL
FRIDAY ||
I fried 1
I SHRIMP 1
If WITH FRENCH FRIES, HOT If
H SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES ||
1 $ lO9 1
I MORRISON'S i
I CAFETERIAS I
pL OAjNESyiUJE MALI J||
Box Office Opens 6:30
Show Starts 7:00
ACTION
r/oaT HftlTVZr
KaJJIAHXATK Itossi rfIJVIIIIJT'A'OXr
I MAT OADUAUO*I r~ -
HniA.i-ifitri'Ams
Q** l iiiliniiriiiiiMiifmmntwiiniimiiiiwuiin
.>!
(o strung JAY C. FUPPEN BRUCE CABOT MiIaKS
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE TECHNICOLOR* PANAVISION* a [c]
I !
pr *** ni
bodyguard / Kirk Douglas
f OO . IHStwaKoscina
J/.JH I J^MEuWallach
bod, WMI
A UNIVCRSAt WTWf TECHNICOLOR
\w\ COMING SOON
fffsLV \ IN THE ATTIC
A-/ CONQUERER WORM
fsn ISBa l(BMiNf^Ys^ TTHEY raided
AND PEPPER
' ON-Y (Opens March 271
>,;*l,it * r v r

Page 14

i, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

....... v,v..V..V00V.*.
WANTED |
: :sv.v.s .sccw x*x.xsv.:.v; ;-x x*xx*x.:-x- x'
Female roommate needed for spring
and/or summer quarters. French
Quarter Apt. 65. Phone 372-5554.
(C-4t-100-p)
Quiet studious male for 2br apt.
Available 3rd qtr. $41.25 and share
apt with 3 additional roommates.
Call 376-6672 after 6 pm. (C-st-99-P)
ARRI-BL with motor,magazines,&
tripod. Also compatable 35mm
soundrecording system.
Edwards,Apt.3o2 1225 SW First Ave.
Top price!!! (C-st-101-P)
Wanted one male roommate to rent 2
bedrm apt. Total rent for month is
$165.00. Phn 376-9575. 88 Vill. Park
Apts. Urgent occupancy needed.
(C-4t-100-p)

frx*ra:ii!hmhwoeeaisarewwxmj:
WANTED ||
One male roommate for 2-bedroom,
Fredrick Garden apartment, pool,
air-conditioned, call 378-5642.
TC-3MOI-P)

THIS IS THE FLICK
TO CHECK WITH YOUR
CHICK!!!
CA*V CIKE LE£J i-r JACK
IDO^O^^MME^OBB^LANCES*
I The scene was I
wfR % the w^est I
% \ l n t iiii I
* IASKGIS-J
B RESTRICTED-PERSONS UNDER l NOT ADMITTED]
UNLESS ACCOMPANO BT PARENT OR ADULT GUARDIAN] |
JESS. GARVARENTZ
iss NAT WACHSBERGER ANTONIO ISASI technicolor* techniscope*
FEATURE AT ... 1:50 4:20 6:50 9:20
1 PUBLIC ACCLAIM PROMPTS
OUR HOLDING "CHARLY"
Telephone 378-2434
EnpVJ v Ia
X
SELMUR PICTURES in collaboration with ROBERTSON ASSOCIATES presents
CLIFF ROBERTSON. CLAIRE BLOOM
i£Sw/'Ralph / ram /asr/ffla // Eg?
/NE^.N ijmJSm^Lsw
-EgATURE AT , 2:00 0., c __

WANTED I
Fourth coed rommate wanted to
spring or spring/summer quarters,
Landmark Apts. Call 378-8731
anytime. (C-3t-101-P)



Friday, March 14,1969, The Florida Alligator,

I WANTED {
Female roommate needed for large
Camelot Apt. Fireplace, on the pool.
Reduced rent. Call 378-9694.
(C-4t-100-p)
Need 2 roommates for large 2 bdrm.
house. Near Sin City, Univ., and
sororities. Inexpensive and nice. Call
Steve at 376-9592. (C-4t-100-p)
Have your own room and bath and
live with congenial male in luxury
apt. SBS a month, utilities included.
Williamsburg 66, 376-7854 anytime
(C-3MOI-P)
Landmark no.lll Need female
roommate for spring quarter $45 on
the pool AC. Really Nice. Call
372-1664. (C-3t-103-p)
Live for SIOO.OO Nest quarter
Need 1 female romate for spring. Air,
pool, heat, Univ. Gardens. Call Linda
378-4219. (C-lt-103-p)
Male roommate for spring quarter.
Share a convenient A.C. apt. Nicely
furnished, one blk. from campus. SSO
a month. Call after 5 pm 376-4768
(C-lt-103-p)
Needed roommate for spr. qtr. in a
beautiful, furnished, 2 bdr. Fr. Qtr.
apt. Very inexpensive at only $l3O
per mo. Call 376-0008. (C-lt-103-p)
1 female roommate to share 2
bedroom apt. with 1 other (own
room), very close to campus,
air-cond-heat. Call 378-6507
(C-lt-103-p)
Need 1 or 2 female roommates for
spring quarter, poolside French
Quarter 3784507. (C-lt-103-p)
MALE ROOMMATE needed to share
2 bedr. 2bath Landmark apt. with
two others for the spring qtr.
S4O/mo. Call 376-2349. (C-3MOI-P)
Need 2 MALE roommates to share
luxurious Landmark Apt. with a dish
washer warm neighbors and a
generally quiet atmosphere. Call
372-9609. (C-101-3t-P)
Coed to share 2-bedroom townhouse
in Tanglewood. AC, dishwasher,
upstairs entrance, doorstep parking,
pool, and more! Call 376-1015.
(C-3MOI-P)
Roommate wanted to share 3
bedroom lVi bath house. Central heat
and air conditioning. SSO/month +
1/3 utilities. Call 378-7041.
(C-3MOI-P)
3 girls need roommate for spring
and/or summer term. Dishwasher,
pool, gym and sauna. Landmark apt.
21. Ph. 378-8467. Ask for Elaine.
$45. (C-3t-96-p)
One female roommate for one
bedroom Village Park apt. on pool
Call 378-3903 after 5 weekdays,
any-time weekends. (C-4t-100-p)
SMC
THRU SAT. 3:00. 5:00 7:05,9:15
ROD STEIGER
THE PAWNBROKER
r MAR 16-18
Filmed In Massachusetts'
Bridgewater Mental Hospital
'Tiriair rotu
MAR 19-22
RITA TUSHINGHAM
Gilt WM Tlm
Grw Eyes
PLUS
ANTHONY QUINN
'MoM A Pale
Horse'
MAR 23-25
DEAR JOHN! I
1 I.. i
MAR 26-28
'MOHIDEY POP I
FESTIVAL
PLUS
/Road Runner Rtyut*
MAR 30-APR 1
TINY TIM & OTHERS
YOU ARE WHAT
YOU EAr
PLUS I
ALEC GUINESS I
THE 1
WORSE'S jjOjjjjl
KAPPY EXAMS

Page 15

| | HELP WANTED j!;
WANTE'D Fxpericneed bookkeep
Sr, B-'KKWPT"."te
secretarvl, J." bookkeeping and
rs a mu ai b %^ nc ii":
ssnrv wi, h . ss
Carmichael &
(E-10i- S 3t.P) e f r in ter view.
cock ta|l waitresses
Part-t.ms or full-time Will train.
376 Q 176 f* 1 Dui) s steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)

REITZ UNIOM THEATRE
7
Casa blanca
Starring: Humphrey Bogart
Ingrid Bergman
Peter Lorre
FRIDAY MARCH 14 6:00, 8:30,11:00 PM

FINAL DEADLINE
for 69 m,
SEMINOLE
ORDERS ir-^^v
APRIL 18
MAIL EARLY S
JdH Please reserve copies of the 1969 Seminole
M You will be notified in the Alligator when the
yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole, MS
MAIL TO: 1969 SEMINOLE
ROOM 330
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

| HELP WANTED
If you are interested in making extra
money, have transportation, neat
appearance and can work 5 to 8 P.M.
Mon thru Fri and 9 to 12 Sat. A.M., I
can show you how. Please contact
Mr. McGinness, Ramada Inn,
Monday, March 17, 9 A.M. to 6 P.M.
(E-lt-103-p)
Opportunity for college men to work
as part time life insurance salesmen
while in college as campus agents for
Pacific Mutual Life. 378-6390.
(E-st-99-P)

I HELP WANTED 1
SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS:
Exciting work at boys camp, June
22 to Aug. 21. Mature staff from all
parts of the country (foreign
students). In rich cultural area of
Berkshires, Mass. High degree of staff
fellowship. Grad students, upper
classmen preferred. Attractive
salar'es. 41st year. Openings include;
waterfront; swimming, sailing,
water-skiing, canoeing. Land sports;
tennis, baseball, soccer, golf, archery,
r fiery, campcraft and tripping;
choral director, song leader, folk
music, guitarist, photography.

1 ADMISSION 40<
MARLON V
f BRANDO 7i (ij l
1 SAMSP/EGEES J&J 1
PRODUCTION
IJANI ROBlfl C ANGK JANIC W &
fllllfllfillfllfl If
IB'HIIWIIHaiIHIIMI.iIII JP
Screenplay by IIIIIAN HfIIMAN Si\.;r. JOHN BARRY Produced by SAM Ml Directed by ARIHUR P(NN jf
Based on a novel and play by HORION 111 A HORIZON PICIURI Filmed in PMMVISIIN' TECHNICOLOR' j|
SATURDAY MARCH 15 6, 8:30,11:00 PM

HELP WANTED
yearbook, ceramics, pianist,
electronics, nature, astronomy, ham
radio. Give skills, references, phone
number, (immediate phone
,*esponce), to camp Mah-Kee-Nac,
137 Thacher Lane, South Orange,
N.J. 07079. (E-2M02-P)
* rvirtpiTt*7**ifi7i* cooooow:.:^
AUTOS 1
---.. n n g c t c p or
Vietnam bound must sell 62 V-8
Mercury 4-door call 372-5934
(G-lt-103-p)



GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| AUTOS
X X*X # X*XX*X # X** # X*X # X*X*X # M !SSS?W # W*S I, C 0 8 |
62 Corvette conv. hard top. 327-340
H.P. Hurst, posi, Mags, 55 Chevy 2
dr. V nyl hard top, Air, 327-300 H.P.
Call 378-6346. (G-lt-103-p)
VW Manx buggy 1300 53hp red
metal flake full top side curtains roll
bar 1900 or best offer see at sport car
specialties 1010 s main 3789086.
(G-4t-100-P)
Running gear to 162 E type rear end,
suspension, interior etc. also XK 150
wre wheels; some XK 120; Mkli
parts. Pat day 3 76-2998.
(G-3t-102-P)
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Falcon
Futura 2 door hardtop 6 cyl radio
automatic new wsw. Must sell. A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 372-5703.
(G-3t-101-P)
1960 Gold Jag. Has everything plus
sunroof, radio, purple dashlight,
leather seats, velvet floor mat. SI2OO.
Call Sally 376-0737. (G-lt-103-p)
Happy 22nd, Kathy, Ill love You
Forever, Sam. (J-lt-103-p)
This break think about the summer
spend it n Europe, Middle East or
Japan for credit or on your own. Call
392-1655, Rm 310 Reitz Union.
(J-2M02-P)
WHERES HOME NEXT
QUARTER? Try Georgia Seagle Hall,
mens cooperative. Rom & board
$220/quarter. 1002 W. University.
372-9410. (J-3MOI-P)
THANKS AMERICA for your
response! So far, 4 out of 6 pups
have been saved from the pound.
Dont you want to make it 6/6? Call
3 76-9969 by 10 p.m. tonitht.
(J-lt-103-p)
WELCOME, JAKE! Were proud to
have you at the SPANISH MAIN
every night from 6 til 9. All those
people who have been asking us to
stay open nights will welcome you,
too! 105 W. University Ave. Phone:
372-0667. (J-4t-100-p)
Fishy Phi was fun!!!
But finals are here. Put away your
bottles and study! Good Luck! Open
House in Titusville Spring break.
Everyone is invited! All my love,
Dupy. (J-lt-103-p)
Female senior wants traveling
companion to hitchike through
Bavarian alps and up through
Scandinavia. Flexible itinerary. Sleep
in hostels. Approximately June 23
August 25. Call 392 = 6015.
(J-lt-103-p)
I PERSONAL
Dear Fijis
Best of luck on finals. We love you
all. Us. (J-lt-103-p)

Rainbow Springs
is at its
bloomingest
111
JapF* I
c ... §ll IPL £k
Everything is new at ,/rr-
Rainbow Springs and ifr. jpmtjfm
now is the best time to C. sQjs
see it all. Last year, in ;rOk
preparation for this ilr I* mT' '£ '*
Spring, we planted JP|k\o ft § J
50,000 azaleas and
more than 200,000 §J| M
day liiies, as well as /M 1
countless other fllr £ 111
plants, trees and p|
welcome you to Rain- 'll
bow Springs, Floridas
most beautiful attraction. S-. Jpgii, Igf *PPj|lil
There are even new arrivals Jm j||L ||P
in the animal area, born just y^pP^
a few days ago. Enjoy
Floridas only Underwater Cruise.
Ride the Forest Flite monorail.
Cruise aboard the Rainbow
Queen paddleboat. And if you dont
have a camera, well lend you
one^we.
Rainbow Springs
U.S. 41 at Dunnellon, 20 minutes west of l-75-at-Ocala.
j

Page 16

'* The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, l9bJ

PERSONAL
A >
Dummy For a fantasticanv happy
six mos. Remember I. L. Y. M. T.
Y. B. L. T. T. ALWAYS love ya,
Big Creep. (J-li-103-p)
LOST DOG: Golden chow-long
ha red breed; female; .14 yrs.
"Princess vie nity NW 39th Ave &
NW 34th St; gentle; sent mental
value; Reward. (L-3MOI-P)
HELP' I've lost keys on key ring. !t
found, call 392-7870. (L-2t 102-P)
Stinkledink, HAPPY 21st. I still love
you even if you are now older than I!
Wait 3 nomths and we will both be
legal!! Dum-Dum 1- j-lt-103-p)
Take a finals break--Come to the
dance in the Broward Rec Room Sat,
March 15, 9:001:00 pm.
(J-3MOI-P)
Happy Birthday, Barbara Nunn!!
From your many Mallory and
Rawlings fans. (J-lt-103-p)
Friday Afternoon Club will swing
again next quarter. No more cocktail
parties for this quarter at
Lamplighter. (J-2M02-P)
Modine: its getting warm, were still
waiting for our rind. Please dont let
our skates rust. Arise in drool
Clyde, z, & Gunch Bunch!
(J-lt-103-p)
If you cant go to .the ISLE OF
WOMEN, come see us. We went
and returned with tortoise shell
jewelry its famous for. Mantilla
combs, earings (wow!), watch bands,
hair clips, etc. From $2.50 to $6.95.
WHTRE? You guessed it THE
SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open every night till 9:00.
(J-4t-100-p)
LOST & FOUND |
LOST: Phi Delta Theta pin. If found,
call 376-1701. $lO reward. Ask for
Bruce. (L-st-99-P)
LOST blue contacts in a flat, white
case. PESPERATE! Call 376-0968,
please. (L-2t-102-P)
Lost Reward for return of the tape
from recorder stolen from Union last
month. Need tape; Keep recorder. No
questions asked. Call 392-6015.
(L-lt-103-p)
LOST: Wallet somewhere on campus.
If found please call Myron Hauben
between 8 and 4 or after 11 P.M.
376-8140. (L-lt-103-p)
SERVICES |
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(st-99-M-P)

SERVICES
** *
Any paper, English or Get man, typed
by experienced secretary. Prompt
service reasonable rates. Piease call:
372-5221. (M-lt-103-P)
INCOME TAX $4.00 up. Expe.t
service in two locations to serve you:
1227 w. Univ. Ave. (across from
Ramada inn) & 107 N. Main St
378-9006. (M-ts-95-P)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST
Quality Voiks. repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Mam St.
(M-7t-95-P)
Tennis racket restringing, satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489
(M-18t-59-p)

I pi pl I 4 jp y W- 1
I 1 ilv mfTm 4 4H
t JanL m*wm Wm 19 -HIM II __ t I- I
II llrUnH Jiff ii// KfliP 1m B'fllili iliAviliHMl
IS 1 VII A W tm IHI HHXEm H I
-1 r llt aIS mM fll. Xu 11k /ll I \ InKXXSI v|
ON SALE AT BOOK STORES

|6Uns-6uns-guns
I -Students only only-10%
-10% only-10% DISCOUNT on
I guns and ammo.
I Bring this ad and
lyour student I.D.card-
I offer expires April 5
I 1969
IHarry Beckwith-Gun Dealer
Micanopy, Fla
I Phone 466-33 tO
l^ Ti;,^ GATOR AP\/ERTISERSj



ATOR GRABBERS GOVERNORSGAME^^^
Hickel s Poacher Patrol
Roughest On r Legionaires

EVERGLADES PARK (UPI) Interior
Secretary Walter J. Hickel struck out for the
wilds of the Florida Everglades Thursday to
personally track down alligator
poachers presumably the deaf ones, since
about everyone else had heard he was coming.
Accompanied by park rangers and enough
certified newsmen and photographers to terrify
birds and beasts for miles around, Hickel planned
a nighttime poacher patrol at Lostmans River, a
Park Service outpost 40 miles from civilization
where the southwest borders of the great park
emerge with the Gulf of Mexico.
In this wild country of sawgrass praries,
mangrove swamps, jungle-like hammock islands
and infinitely meandering highways, Everglades
Park Supt. John Raferty hoped to convince
Hickel of the problems rangers face.
Hickel picked a gray, windy day for his
Florida visit, and a cold night* for his boat
adventure. The temperature headed into the low
40s as the secretarys party set out from
Flamingo at the southern tip of the park, where
telephone and electrical wires end.
The expedition was strictly a roughing-it
affair. Newsmen were told to bring mosquito
repellant, rain gear, bedrolls and their own food.
But catching a poacher is the game of a
seasoned outdoorsman any time, and nobody
really expected to find, on a chill night preceded

Draft Collins Campaign
Beginning To Snowball

TALLAHASSEE
(UPI) Students boosting
ex-Gov. Leoy Collins for
president of Florida State
University picked up some
valuable faculty support
Thursday.
Gary Pajcic, former FSU
football star and leader of the
movement, reported letters
endorsing Collins have been
received from a number of
professors, including Nobel
Laureate Robert S. Mulliken,
opera composer Carlisle Floyd,
former astronaut and chemistry
instructor Anthony Llwelyn and
Dr. Michael Kasha, director of
the Institute of Molecular
Biophysics.
Kasha said in a letter to the
selection committee that Collins
would provide campus unity at
a critical time and provide a
more attractive basis for
selection of a vice president for
academic affairs, which is also
vacant.

mummr
wmsx?ytt/s&?s%& -ts£ weSSKUi^m
U % w X I iIH
R f l|w|
\i rfPw
Wv _-JUr m.
R wg# *.; ssA^Uz&mmw
IHK MmKk
I A f #
JKIMr f ;
I J&^^sgssil
H h .; £&£&£&
wa?SgiM:wlMip
r 'JBflHMM|Mpr*pp
r* *s. Up A-%
I iMMgy
I Dedicated to Public Service

Dr. Mulliken wrote the Board
of Regents that it would be
impossible to find anyone
better qualified than Collins.
Pajcic, declaring it was time
the moderate students start

THIS BREAK
think about a Summer in:
l /AJ-MiyriL
6 or 10 weeks
alone, touring or for credit
get info before you go
#3lO UNION Call 392-1655

March 18 Vata GROUP 1
Elect SIDNEY KNIGHT
to City Commission
WELL QUALIFIED
Graduate engineer with experience in
electric power utilities
Masters degree in Business Administration,
with Distinction, Harvard University
law dogree: University of Florida J.D. 1965
3 years studying Gainesville local
government
Management consultant, now retired

Citizens for Sidney Knight Campaign Fund (Paid Poi. ad)

with such publicity, any of the boatsmen and
airboaters who know the maze of the Glades like
their own bedrooms.
Hickels purpose was to kick off a campaign
against the poachers who have cut the alligator
population of the vast nation preserve from
nearly one million to an estimated 20,000.
Poachers take only the soft belly hide because
the scaly back is of no use in making handbags
and shoes.
They get from $4 to $6 a foot on the illegal
market for gator skins. A large reptile can
produce a six or seven-foot hide and a pair of
poachers working together can make up to S4OO
a night.
Hickel has ordered 10 rangers added to the
present park staff of 21, and assigned them
specifically to the poacher patrol.
Hickel flew into Homestead Air Force Base
accompanied by Rep. William C. Cramer, R-Fla.,
and was met by Gov. Claude Kirk, who promptly
schooled the secretary in what Kirk professed to
be a gator call.
Making a noise that sounded something
between a grunt and clearing his throat, Kirk told
Hickel: If you can do that out at Lostmans
River, stand back. The last time Kirk tried his
call in the presence of a gator, however, the
reptile headed the other way.

speaking for FSU rather than
campus radicals on either end
of the political spectrum, said
2,000 students have already
written letters and signed
petitions backing Collins.

John D. Here Sunday
Philanthropist John D. Rockefeller 111 will be on campus for three
days next week, according to UF President Stephen C. O'Connell.
He will be visiting the College of Medicine's department of
obstetrics and gynecology.
He has a special interest in world population control, O'Connell
said.
Arriving Sunday night and departing Wednesday, Rockefeller will
be guest of honor at a press conference Tuesday at 3 p.m. in rooms
122-123 of the Reitz Union.
I ROBBIE'S I
Best In
Meal QWSandwichea
fCOLOR TV & BILLIARDS^
11718 W. University Ave.
I *On The Gold Coast 1
Tradition Begins at
the U Shop
45*
Set ep vfcratioHS, Make eoise
Do your own thing in our spectacular
selection of flared pants for men and
women. Just arrived, 12 new patterns.
Its not our only bag. ir je
other fashions.
Pnitrerstin Jsfynji
1620 W. Univ. Univ. Plaza

Friday, March 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 17



Page 18

The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

Skin In 'Joanna
Without Pretense
By MIKE SIMMONS
Alligator Reviewer
Like life, the movies of today no longer kid us with the idea that
we have to be grabbed, swept along toward a definite conclusion,
climaxed and faded out.
Existence might just be a collection of arbitrarily collected
moments belonging to any one person, and films representing life
and people are now becoming a definite art form by presenting all
this dramatically yet without the contrived melodrama theyve always
clung to.
Joanna, now unfolding at Center 1, is quite simply a glimpse at a
stage and cluster of experiences felt by a unique-yet-familiar young
girl. Now, this wouldnt be much (like if a month of just anybodys
life were suddenly flashed upon the screen) expect that a lot more
happens to her life than to most.
Shes an 18-year-old Britisher who hops from bed to bed in search
of purpose, sojourns to Moroco and Ireland for an outting, and falls in
love with a black hoodlum for the time being.
Joanna is controversial as advertised but not nearly so much
as it is refreshing. Part of its total joy is no doubt due to Genevieve
Waite, the precocious young actress holding down the title role.
Its hard to imagine her being any different than the sweet,
wide-eyed, and somewhat disillusioned child-woman she reveals in the
film. Its also hard to say that she acts, but one is easily delighted by
her re-actinns
The film is appealing, as well, because its makers have also served as
innovators, employing many recently established elements of cinema
magic and coming up with enough of their own brand of stuff to
surprise even the jaded with its color and techniques.
The skin in the film is applied without pretense and nothing is
made of it its simply part of the whole situation. The ending,
however, is well worth waiting for- its one of the most inventive
yet, and it would be a challenge to come up with any better.
The best feature, though, would have to be the films musical
score. Thats an unusual statement to make, but then not every film is
graced with the talents of Rod Mckuen. It sparks the mood of almost
every sequence especially the setting-sun scene and
philosophy and gives the whole thing a depth and sense of
continuity.
Some of Mckuens older favorites have been given new life and fit
this films story line as surprisingly as Paul Simons did The
Graduate. Mckuen even found time amidst his recent popularity to
compose some new ones especially for the film.
It is hoped that well hear more from him in the cinema and that
therell be more films to come like Joanna. She said shed be back
and she just might.
WANTED?
A live f
RAY BROWN
can ba found at
SPORTSMANS BARBER
SHOP '
University Plaza
1620 W. University Ave. 372-9129

>, ; : v f
jan nates HSUS next quarter

Tenor Jan Peerce will sin# at the UF Gym Sun.,
April 13. Throughout Ma/th and April, Peerce has
been heard in concerts and recitals in Florida,
including performances in Miami Beach, Tampa and

RAKE IN THE Sjfkt a
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FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
March 16-21
GUEST SPEAKER
DR. ROBERT DENNY
Associate Secretary, Baptist World Alliance,
Washington, D.C.
Sunday services 8:30 & 11:00 A.M.
£ 7:30 P.M.
Monday through Friday 7:30 P.M.

St. Petersburg; he also presided at the traditional
Passover festival at the Hotel Deauville in Miami
Beach.



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GATOR GRAS SOAPBOX DERBY

This speeding Phi Tau-Delta Gamma soapbox ran
a fast race in last year's derby. This is an annual
affair which will take place on the Med Center hill

Phenomenol Van Cliburn
Outstanding US Pianist

Eleven years ago on April
14, 1958 a tall, blonde youth
from Texas stood in the Great
Hall of the State Conservatory
of Music in Moscow
asknowledging the cheers of a
huge audience.
The young artist was Van
Cliburn and he had just won first
place in the First Intemation
Tchaikovsky Piano Competition.
Overnight, Van Cliburn
became an international sensation
and his return to the United
States was that of a national
hero.
He was greeted by President
Eisenhower. New York City
accorded him the first ticker
tape parade for a classical
musician. His RCA recording of
the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto
No. 1 in B-Flat Minor, the same
composition he played to win
the contest, quickly became the
first classical recording to sell a
million copies.
The general public did not
realize that Van Cliburn,
appearing at Fla. Gym, Sunday
at 4 p.m., was firmly established
concert artist who had received
the recognition of the American
musical public and press before
Draft Delay
Now In Effect
Florida males who live from
day to day sweating the draft are
getting a break from the Army.
A reliable source Thursday
said that starting this month a
man who receives his induction
orders can still qualify for the
120-day delay program if he
rushes down to the service
branch of his choice.
Quick action on his part can
get him off call and let him
finish a quarter and maybe two.
The £ Alligator Wednesday
published maximum and
minimum heights for men and
women. It was incorrectly
reported that a 5-foot-6 man
couldnt be drafted. The minimum
is 5-foot. It was also reported
that the maximum height is
6-foot-10, the correct maximum I
is 6-foot-6. I

he entered the Russian
competition.
He had played with most of
this countrys major orchestras
and had received outstanding
reviews from Americas leading
critics.
He had played in many piano
competitions in the United
States and never came in second
to another pianist. He had won
the 1947 Texas State Prize; the
1948 National Musical Festival
Award in Carnegie Hall; the
1952 G.B. Dealey Award in
Dallas and the 1952 Kosciuszko
Foundation Chopin Award. He
won the Juilliard Concerto
Contest in 1953 and upon
graduation from Juilliard, with
highest honors, he was given the
Carl M. Roeder Memorial
Award.
It was in 1954 that he won
the Edgar M. Leventritt
Foundation Internation

HI nH ih
W 1 l V ^f^MJr W*

Saturday morning, April 12. Fraternities and
sororities usually use the same soapbox in different
division races.

Competition. Although it is held
each year, the judges had not
given an award for five years
until Van Cliburn was
unanimously voted first by a
panel of eminent judges.
Even before leaving for
Moscow, he had a contract for a
return engagement as soloist
with Leonard Bernstein and the
New York Philharmonic.
Van Cliburn returned to the
\ United States to find himself a
living legend and in the past ten
years has managed the incredibly
difficult task of living up to his
own legend.
He is offered more
engagements than time permits
him to accept. The gracious and
modest charm of his personality
has won him a host of friends in
every city of the country.
He has become an artist of
which his country can be
exceedingly proud.

I IN LIBRARY 1
Service Info
Book Reviews

(EDITORS NOTE: This is
the second in a series of reviews
of the books in the Selective
Service Information Bureau
found on the first floor of the
University Library.)
By KAREN KAWALER
Alligator Correspondent
This brochure gave an
abbreviated account of the
history, purposes, and methods of
classification of the Selective
Service System.
The registrants rights and
responsibilities were also
included. Designated especially
for the layman, it was very
interesting and informative.
Dating back to the time of
Moses, the history of military
training was traced through
modern times.
The purposes of the selective
service are to produce military
manpower in sufficient numbers,
and to preserve a national interest
in all civilian respects.
The classification system and
various aspects of deferment
were presented. The reader is
informed how to appearl his
classification and how to get
additional help if necessary.
By JANE COHEN
Alligator Correspondent
This brochure dealt with the
Mission of the 1967 Task Force.
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Friday, March 14, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

It also told some interesting
facts about the Selective Service
System of the past, present, and
what revisions the Task Force
has come up with for the
Selective Service System of the
future.
Another interesting section
compared the present Federal,
State and local Selective Service
Systems as improved with the
fully Federal System proposed
by the National Advisory
Commission.
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An Equal Opportunity Employer

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florid* Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

owe
me. But I guess Ive got to get
stronger and be tougher on
myself so Ill improve.
Walk was understandably
depressed and dejected after his
last collegiate game as a Gator.
Coach Tommy Bartletts
Gators took their second worst
beating of the season.
Other than an 88-67 loss to
Kentucky, this year, the worst
Gator defeat had been by seven
points.
UF didnt jell as a team as
they were outclassed by a hot
Temple squad on the floor and
on the boards. The Owls shot
56% from the floor, 12 full
percentage points better than
their season average.
Temple was paced by
6-foot-9 Eddie Mast, who
poured in 20 points nine more
than his seasons average.
For the Gators, it was
All-America Walk trying vainly
to rally his teammates. He
scored 26 points and grabbed 17
rebounds.
After an even First half with
the UF leading 37-35 the Owls
took charge.
We changed our 2-3 zone
defense to a 3-2 defense in the
second half, Temple Head
Coach Harrv Litwack said after

WhitworthLeads St. Pete Gals

ST. PETERSBURG (UPI) Long-hitting
Kathy Whitworth, leading money winner on the
Ladies Professional Golf Association tour last year,
will open defense of her Orange Blossom Classic
title Friday.
She is one of three women pros in the field of 50
who will be trying to become the first to win the
event three times. Miss Whitworth won the classic in
1965 and repeated last year enroute to winning 10
tourneys and $59,097.
Other two-time winners back for a crack at
number three are veteran Louise Suggs, winner in
1959 and 1962, and Mickey Wright, winner in 1961
and 1963.
The field in the $12,500 tourney will include

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UF Trounced By Owls, 82-66

The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor
the encounter.
This stopped up their
scoring from the middle.
Led by the hot hand of Mast,
the Owls scored 19 points to the
Gators eight in the first five and
a half minutes of the second
half, Mast contributing eight of
them in the streak.
The Owls led 5447.
UF continued to lose ground
as Temple built up a 10-point
lead at 65-55, with 6:48
remaining.
From then on, the Owls
slowed the game down.
Despite the apparent pace of
the game, the Gators managed
what normally would have been
their average (40%) from the
floor.

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eight of the 10 top money winners of last year,
including Miss Whitworth, second place finisher
Carol Mann and Sandra Hayne, who finished third.
Miss Mann and Miss Haynie have always been
strong contenders in the Orange Blossom Classic but
neither has been able to capture the big prize.
Missing from the field will be two of the touring
pros. Marilynn Smith, the only player to win
back-to-back Orange Blossom titles in 1966 and
1967, is on a golfing tour of the world.
Clifford Ann Creed was married earlier this week
and is honeymooning in Mexico.
The tourney is the second of the year for the
women pros. They opened with the $35,000
Burdine Open in Miami. That was won by amateur
Joanne Gunderson Camer.

Off the boards, the Gators
grabbed 33 rebounds, far below
the average of 50 which set the
SEC pace during most of the
season. The Owls grabbed down
38.
Walk played the second half
with three fouls, collecting his
fourth midway through and
finally fouling out with 55
seconds remaining. At this point.
Bartlett put in the reserves.
Though there was some stir
when Owl Bill Strunk flattened
forward Boyd Welsch out on the
floor with an arm in the face,
referees ruled it was not down
intentionally and the players
shook hands after the incident.
At that stage, UF was playing
with Richard Vasqucz, Mike
Leatherwood, Mike McGinnis,
Ed Lukco and Walk.
UF trailed or was even except
for the opening and closing
seconds of the first half. The
Gators, using their 1-3-1 zone
defense outshot the Owls in the
first half 4846%.
Walk made the only free
throws for the Gators in the
opening half. He hit one of five.
It was that kind of night. On
the other hand, Temple hit five
for eight on the line that half.
The Gators got the lead by
freezing the ball with the score

tied 35-35 with 50 seconds
remaining in the half.
Leatherwood passed to
Welsch who missed the ball but
recoveredand sunk a 20-foot shot
as the buzzer went off.
We changed our game plan
in the second half when we were
trailing by 10 points, but we still
couldn't get the ball in the
basket, said Bartlett afterwards.
Attendance for the opening
game was around 10,000.
Tentatively, travel plans
home arc set for Saturday so the
team members will be back in
time for final examinations.
Welsch had 15 points for the
night; Owens 10, Lukco 6,

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NEW YORK (UPI) Bob
Cousys farewell to the game he
made an art is expected to be
the highlight of the 32nd annual
National Invitation Tournament,
which opened an eight-day run
Thursday night.
Boston College, hoping to
give Cousy an NIT sendoff to
match the one St. Johns gave
Joe Lapchick in 1965, will meet
Kansas in a nationally televised
contest. Fordham meets
Louisville in the second game.
The quarter-finals will be held
Monday night and Tuesday night
with the semi-finals Thursday
and the nationally televised
finals on Saturday afternoon.
In 1965 when Lapchick
retired as St. Johns coach, the
redmen beat Villanova in the
NIT finals to give him an
emotional goodbye to the game.
Cousy, an All-America star at
Holy Cross in his collegian days
and whose artistry with the
Boston Celtics became
legendary, is retiring at the end
of this season as Boston College
coach and the Eagles want to
give him a winning sendoff.
Cousy calls his present team

Pistol PeteOf 69
Out-Guns Pete 6B
Junior Pete Maravich, Louisiana State 1969 despite a steady
seige of aches, pains and injuries, outscored sophomore Pete
Maravich LSU 1968,1,148 to 1,138.
Needing 48 points in the final game of 69, against Georgia in
Athens, to match his 6B total, Pete made 58. He made a break for
himself by scoring 13 straight points for LSU to tie Georgia, sending
the game into overtime, tying it again for the double-overtime, and
racking up his ten extra points in the overtimes to win for LSU,
90-80.
Maravichs 1,148 points in 26 games comprises a new NCAA record
for seasonal average, 44.2, breaking his own 6B record of 43.8. His
two-year total of 2,286 points is an NCAA record, 191 points past the
mark of 2,095 by Elvin Hayes of Houston in 1967 and 6B.
Petes two-year average of 44.0, precisely 43.96, is another NCAA
record, almost 8 points per game beyond the 36.1 mark established by
Furmans Frank Selvy in 1953 and 54. He can break the all-time
NCAA career record of 2,973 points, by Oscar Robertson of
Cincinnati in 1958-59-60, next year by scoring 688. On a 26-game
schedule that will require only an average of 26.5 ppg.
The Southeastern Conference has four other players scoring solidly
20 points per game to rank with the national leaders. They are Dan
Issel of Kentucky 26.4, Neal Walk of Florida 24.0, Bob Lienhard of
Georgia 23.8, and Tom Hagen of Vanderbilt 23.4.

Baseball Date
UFs bat(tling) baseball
Gators travel to Winter Park to
improve their seasons record of
2-2 against Rollins College this
Friday and Saturday.
The Gator batsmen are lead
by first baseman Skip Lujack
and leftfielder Bill Harmon who
Coach Dave Fuller hopes will
come through in the clutch this
weekend.

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Tulsa Rates Pre-NIT Favorite Role

the best Ive had in my six
seasons at BC.
Boston College, which has a
21-3 mark Rutgers has an
identical 21-3 and is the only
other team in the tournament
which has won more than
20 must be given a good
chance to give Cousy a winning
farewell. BC was 5-3 when
Cousy announced his retirement
and the Eagles have rattled off
16 straight victories since then.
The Eagles rank as a
cofavorite in the tournament
along with FrJ*k McGuires
sophomore-stewed South
Carolina team, which posted a
20-6 mark and was the runnerup
to North Carolina in the Atlantic
Coast Conference during the
regular season. Defense-minded
Tennessee, which is 18-6, also
must be given a good chance to
win the tourney.
Louisville, which finished at
20-5 and lost a playoff to Drake
in the Missouri Valley
Conference, is a threat but the
Cardinals have been erratic at
times. Kansas, the runnerup in
the NIT to Dayton last year, has
a 20-6 mark but since the club

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lost Jo Jo White at midyear it
will have to be rated as an
underdog to Boston College in
its opener.
The UF will be making its
first appearance ever in the NIT
Thursday night and will be
displaying 6-10 center Neal
Walk, a third team All-America
choice. Walk is averaging 24
points a game and paced the
Gators to an 18-8 mark in the
Southeastern Conference
including a victory over
Kentucky.
Temple, which has an
identical 18-8 record, is a
veteran of NIT competition. The
team will be making its eighth
appearance in the first and coach
Harry Litwack piloted the team
to the championship of the first
NIT in 1938.
Temple's center, Eddie Mast,
is averaging only nine points a
game and UF has a key
advantage with Walk at this
slot although Temples overall
team strength is probably a little
better. It should be a close game.
St. Peters of Jersey City, N.J.
is a school almost unknown

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outside of the east but it made
the semi-finals of the NIT last
season. The team is loaded with
city players who grew up on
the sidewalks of the
metropolitan area. St. Peters
strength is one star, Elnardo
Webster, a fine coach in Don
Kennedy and a torrid fast break.
The club ran Duke off the floor
in last years NIT and blitzed

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Friday, March 14, 1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Utah State just 10 days ago.
Tulsa, which has a 19-7 mark
compared to St. Peter's 20-6
record, is paced by Bobby
Smith. He just missed making
third team All-America and is
averaging 24.6 points a game.
The club also has recruited two
starters from New York, Rob
Washington and Larry
Cheatham.

Page 21



Page 22

!, The Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

BatgirlsWouldMakeabeufh Shudder

By BILL DUNN
Alligator Assistant Sports Editor
The Gator Batgirls come from
all walks of campus life. They
range in academic classification
from lUC to 7ED. Some are
from sororities but a good
number are independents. They
seem to have two things in
common: love of baseball, to
some degree, and appreciation
of athletes.
Ihe composite Batgirl,
compiled from figures listed
by the 50 coeds who have been
selected to help the team, give
the average Batgirl a shapely
36-24-36 figure. They average
5-foot-5, 115 pounds. The
composite Batgirl is 1914 years
old. No individual girl on the
squad, however, has these
average composite specifications.
An almost equal number of
freshman, sophomore and junior
coeds make up the squad along
with a handful of seniors and a
single seventh year student.
But lets dont get bogged
down with these dry baseball
statistics. Why did individual
coeds want this mans job in the
first place?

Yocum Wins Dorm Bowl

Yocum section won the dorm
all-campus bowling tournament
defeating Sledd G in the finals.
Yocum had won the Hume
championship by defeating
Cockrell 1548-1458. Rex Wallin
for Cockrell was high man for
both teams with a 199-375.
Mike Levin bowled a 197-352
forYocum.
Sledd G beat Murphree H
1542-1463 for the Murphree
Championship. Keith Oiler of
Sledd bowled a 202-371 for high
honors in that match.
In Tolbert area, Tolbert 2
edged North 3, 1540-1517 for
the Tolbert title. Fred Erdman
of North was high for the day
with a 185-365. Henderson
dominated Graham area as they
Netters Go
Against FSU
The UF tennis team will
travel to Tallahassee Saturday to
face their arch rival, Florida
State. The Gators go into the
crucial matches with a 4ol
record, the tie coming against
talented Miami last week in a
match cancelled before
completion because of darkness
and poor weather.
Armi Neely will be back in
the top slot after he missed last
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Presbyterian because of a
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FUNGO BAT: A DISEASED PIECE OF WOOD?

KBs*
PICKUP
... a Batgirl?
I think it will be great to
help keep me in shape, says
35-25-36 Camilla Connally, a
public relations major from
Daytona Beach.
Ive always loved baseball
because Ive had brothers and
cousins playing at LSU, Tampa
and Dad, saysjournalism major
Cathy ODonnell, a 19-year-old
sophomore from Miami.
Another Batgirl, Rose Nealis,
a blue eyed nursing major from
St. Petersburg, claims her reason
goes further than team spirit.
1 need to find a new team to
follow since Micky Mantle

walked away with an easy
1578-1357 win over Newins.
Jody Bell led Henderson with a
201-362.
In Blue League handball Phi
Tau rolled over AGR 2-0 and
significantly closed the gap on
league leading Chi Phi. Phi Tau
now only trails by 89 points
after picking up 60 in handball.
Peter Swan won two games
over Van Connoley, 21-18-17
and Gil Pastorizz and Ken Fowle
defeated David Beardsley and
Dave Cobb in doubles. Dave
Kirchner never had the
opportunity to finish his match
with Mike Warren.
In Orange League action,
league leading Tau Epsilon Phi
had its championship match
with Pi Lam interrupted by rain.
At rainfall, the TEPs led the
match 2-1 on the strength of
singles wins by Mike Schneider
and Dennis Young.
Both teams were very strong
and the match seemed to hinge
on the draw for position. Both
teams dropped their singles
matches but the TEPs had the
stronger drop players.
When time was called, the
TEPs had lost one doubles
match, were tied in another,

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retired, she says,
matter-of-factly.
It will be a great
opportunity to meet more
people, contends Becky
Tikkanen, a brown-haired
business education major from
Cocoa.
Many girls boasted that they
wanted to be Batgirls because
baseball was the sport they knew
the most about. So organizers
gave the coeds a quiz on baseball
jargon.
A fungo bat, according to
Freshman Leslie Jones, a Batgirl
majoring in psychology of
abnormal children, is a bat with
fungus on it or a sweaty, dirty
bat.
Captain Mike Owea explained
to Leslie that a fungo bat was a
longer, thinner bat than that
used in games, one used to hit
fly balls to outfielders during
practice.
Oh, replied Leslie.
Camilla Connally says the
second sacker is the second
player to fall asleep after the

1-1, and led the third, 1-0. The
TEPs seemed to get the better
end of the draw and should win
the tournament. The 1-1 tie
match features TEPs number
one doubles team of Mike
Gordon and Alan Trumpkin and
Pi Lams number one player and
possibly the best player on
campus, Ken Burdick.
Should the TEPs win the
match they will take a 135 point
lead into the next quarter and
should virtually walk into the
Orange League Presidents Cup.
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first dozes off after getting
beanballed. Second baseman
Leon Bloodworth told Camilla
that he was the second sacker.
Beth Fagin, a Miami Beach
sophomore, says a squeeze play
is simply a real tense
situation. Linda Nugent, 7ED
from New York, calculates that
a base on balls is when the
sudolv of baseballs runs out.
Batgirl Cheryl Mays (Im no
relation to Willie) has an even
better definition for the
squeeze play. Says Cheryl:
Its when a Batgirl picks the bat
up out of the mud and squeezes
the mud off the bat.
Janie Cohen, a 5-foot-5,
green-eyed brunette from Miami,
reveals that a full count is
when the bases are loaded with
two outs.

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Cheryl Raskin had the most
creative way of determining just
who the second sacker was.
It depends what your bag
is, she says.
Babe Ruth would quiver in
his grave to hear the Gator
Batgirls talk baseball. But if he
could see them in action, he
would know they were good
vibrations.
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
fl Cars, Trucks, 4-wheel H
S drive.
j No. lin Japan I
1 Codding £r Clark I
Motors
1 1012 SOUTH Main S. I
1 Open 8 A.M. 8 P.M. I



A PHOTO ESSAY
Womans Gymnastics: Poetry In Motion

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MARY BATES FELTHAM
... balance beam

Netters Match Cat Guts
With Arch Rival FSU

TALLAHASSEE Florida
States tennis team will get its
first big test of the young season
Saturday when the Seminoles
host the powerful UF Gators at
11:00 A.M.
Both the Gators and the
Seminoles boast veteran teams.
Neither side lost a man from last
year, although the UF has added
freshman Charlie Owens to its
top six of Armistead Neely,
Steve Beeland, Jamie Pressly,
Greg Hilley and Paul Lunetta.
The UF has a very fine

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LYNN LEIBOWITZ
... floor exercises
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LAURINDA HARRIS
... on the beam

team, said Tribe mentor Lex
Wood. One of the best we will
face this year. They were very
strong last year, and their new
freshman has bumped one of the
older boys out of the top six.
Wood will counter with a top
six of Dave Danielson, Bob
Marcher, Randy Johnson, A1
Procopio, Herb Rapp and John
DeZeeuw all were regulars last
season.
I think we must be in a
slump, said Wood. Some of
the boys have been sick, and

others just havent been playing
well. Our last week of practice
has been the worst of the year.
The Seminoles had a
successful preseason trip in
February when they split five
matches.
They blanked perennial SEC
powerhouse Mississippi State,
9o, and downed LSU, 72,
while losing to Houston, 45,
and Rice, I6, and tying Tulane
in an abreviated match.

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KHRIS KJEROFF
... graceful arch
JML STEAK HOUSE
FEATURING CHUCK WAGON STEAKS FROM 99c
OPEN 11:00 AM to 9:00 PM 7 Days Weekly
Westgale Shopping Center PHONE 378-3320
3321 W. University Ave. Gainesville, Florida
Gainesville Dragway will
not be taking a quarter
break. Enjoy yours with us.
1&.
W FINALS
9U GOT YOU
DOWN?
UNLAX
This Sunday at
Gainesville Dragway
SEE four skydivers free fall for 2 miles
''-v
SEE Gene Owen match race in Satan Shaker
SEE Super Stock, Street & Competition Elim.
RACE You can win trophies or cash
Time trials 10 AM Eliminations 2 PM
''
V -(|[lMlEEDi>#
3Va miles north of the airport
on State Rd. 225
378-0046

Friday, March 14,1969, The Florida Alligator.

23



Page 24

l Th Florida Alligator, Friday, March 14, 1969

h ijr^n
iliiilSH
H'ijXl
4
1405 S.W. 13th Street
Just South of the Underpass
OrcUr Your
'69
Seminole
NOW

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ApHni^JyJ||Q9l^Qy9i9oQy^PsMH
in my name. |PJ
I haveanctaaadf ($6.00 par aapyt H
jggjg WWW fggi
f|l Student Number 9
cW CitV You wW be notified in the Alligator when the K
yemlinnlri have arrived. Mai to 1960 Seminole, K

had
yours
today ?

jPLAYER of the WEEK
J|nfL
% s . s>* . -
1 &
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'V"
Ron Coleman
Florida track star Ron Coleman is the Outstanding
Player of the Week. Last week in the Southeastern
Conference Track Meet in Montgomery, Ala., Ron
placed second in the triple jump breaking the old SEC
record of 48' W, by jumping 49' 3%" only to have the
record broken again. Coleman, only a freshman also
won the long jump, with a leap of 24' %"., thus
compiling a total of 10 points for the Gators.
Coach Carnes said, "Ron is doing a fantastic job this
year. He is an outatanding performer on and off the
track."
Other Gators to be mentioned this week are Steve
Melnyk for shooting 66 in a golf match against FSU,
Mike Ovca for his outstanding performances in baseball,
and swimmer Barry Russo.

"You do; know what the
: i - "
FLORIDA QUARTERLY IS ?
Said the Caterpiller.

CwKfUWOWf* J
'BOOKSTORE I
BRANCH STORES-MEDICAL CENTER, BROWARD!
TRI SHOP. JENNINGS. TOWERS A The UNION I

It's coming
I he said.
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