Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 102

_ __ TOM KENNEDY
GATOR SUPPORT

Look out New York City, here comes the
Gators. That's the way of things as the DU's noted in
Florida Gym Saturday night. The Gator hoopsters
open their NIT quest tonight at 6:55 p.m. against
Temple University from Philadelphia, Pa. The game
will be broadcast on WRUF radio. The Rathskeller

Kibler Sacks SSOC Meet

It appears that by mutual
consent, there will be no
confrontation between Board of
Regents Chairman D. Burke
Kibler and the SSOC.
Kibler wont see them, and
the SSOC no longer wants a
meeting anyway.
In an interview with the
Alligator Wednesday, Kibler said
he had no intentions of granting
audiences to the SSOC or any
other group.
I have been invited to
Gainesville to speak at the
initiation banquet of Phi Kappa
Phi, he said. This is not
regents business, and I dont
want it to be turned into such.
SSOC chairman Steve Fahrer,
said he plans to contact the
president of Phi Kappa Phi and
tell him SSOC no longer had

Senators Support
Present PE Setup
By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
a
A resolution calling for voluntary physical education failed to pass
the Student Senate Tuesday night because, as Senator Stewart
Hershey said: the resolution doesnt hold water.
The resolution followed the report of a special committee of the
Senate which studied the problem and last week recommended that
physical education remain compulsory. Because of opposition at that
time, however, this portion of the bill was dropped.
Minority Leader Scott Holloway defended the measure saying that
he was sure the student body did not favor continuation of
mandatory P.E. He said if the senators wanted to truly represent their
constituents, they would vote for the measure.
The resolution which requires a two-thirds majority, was defeated
"on a roll call vote: 29 yeas, 21 neas.
Unanimously passed was a resolution supporting the Council of
Student Body Presidents stand on removing the recognition
procedure from campus organizations.
The measure further urged UF President Stephen C. OConnell to
assign the power of organizational registration to the SG in accord
with Action Conference recommendations.
The Senate certified the results of the March 5 referendum on SG
(SEE 'SENATE' PAGE 2)

The
Florida Alligator

intentions to harass Kiblers
address.
Fahrer had said before that
SSOC would disrupt Kiblers
speech in order to make known
their demands to be granted a
charter.
Kibler said he was
periodically on campus, and
would gladly meet informally
with groups to discuss their
problems.
If SSOC has a complaint,
hue said, the best way is to take
it through legitimate channels
and have it put on the agenda of
the Board of Regents. In that
way, they will know once and
for all where they stand.
Kibler would not give any
views he held on chartering
organizations.
Mr. Mautz (University

will sponsor a listening party complete with UF
cheerleaders. For this event there will be no
admission price required. Donations will be
collected after the game to send a telegram to the
team.

University of Florida, Gainesville

Chancellor) is welcome to
express his views, Kibler said.
However, I will wait for the
report of a committee studying
proposals for the restructuring
of recognition procedures.
Im not saying that after
that time, I wont have my
views, but I would prefer to wait
for the report of the board, he
said.
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NOTHING TO HIDE
Kibler Hits Kjrk
On'Ratlnquiry
By DON YOKEL "
Alligator Staff Writer
Board of Regents Chairman D. Burke Kibler Wednesday said the
UF Rathskeller is a good and integral part of campus life.
The argument that the Rathskeller is putting local taverns out of
business is like saying cafeterias on campus are ruining restaurant
business in Gainesville, he said.
If we used that argument we couldn't have a book store on
campus.
Governor Claude Kirk, Tuesday at a Cabinet Budget Commission
meeting in Tallahassee, ordered an investigation of the Rathskeller to
determine where its profits are going and if it is hurting local tavern
business.
Dan Delaney, a Kirk aid, said the governor has not released
anything official on the pending investigation but appropriate

correspondence has been made.
He said he did not know what
prompted the Rathskeller
operations complaint.
Kibler said he thought the
investigation was instigated by
local business interests.
Rathskeller management has
denied Rathskeller profits are
used for anything other than
taxes, overhead, payroll and
entertainment.
Kibler said Kirk has the right
to make an inquiry into the
operation of the faculty-run
Rathskeller.
Approval was given by Kibler
for the Rathskeller several
months ago. I have faith and
confidence in the present
management of the club, he said.

I cant believe there is anything wrong with the operation of the
club.
He said the governors office has not contacted him concerning an
investigation and doesnt know how long it would take to hold an
investigation.
The governor could inquire through the president of the
university as to Rathskeller operations but it is more proper for him
to go through the Board of Regents.
Rae 0. Weimer, assistant to the president, doubted if the
Rathskeller is making a great profit. I doubt if local business has a
legitimate reason for being upset.
Wymer said he doesnt think the Rathskeller has anything to hide.
James T. Hennessey, assistant vice president for student affairs,
said he hasnt heard anything officially but an inquiry into the
financial aspects of the operation were mentioned at a Faculty Club
dinner Tuesday.

DUMPSTER ART
The dumpster trash
containers around campus are
rapidly becoming a natural asset
rather than an eyesore. Art
students, dabblers, and
undiscovered talents are
converting the receptacles into
patriotic (?) reminders, mail
trucks (unfinished at left) and
other "things".

PHOTOS BY RANDY BASSETT

America's
Number I
College
Daily

Thursday, March 13, 1969

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D. BURKE KIBLER
... backs Rathskeller

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!, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13,1969

Page 2

Murphree Ready
For Telephones
Centrex is about to invade the last area of campus not now
connected onto the telephone system.
Murphree Area residents last month approved by a vote of 2-1, a
proposal to install telephones in the oldest residence halls on campus.
However, UF Housing Director Harold Riker explained that not all
of the residence halls will be connected when the system opens in the
fall quarter.
We have instructed Southern Bell to connect only Fletcher and
Murphree Halls, Riker said. Buckman, Thomas and Sledd Halls are
to remain without telephones.
There have to be a few areas cm campus where a student on a
limited budget can afford to live, Riker said. We intend to set aside
these areas for such students.

Sen. Pastore Indicts TV,
For Competition In Sex

WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen.
John O. Pastore, D-R.1., Berated
the presidents of the three
television networks Wednesday
as men who were helping to
break down the morals of our
nation by emphasizing violence
and sex on television.
You men who know the
difference between right and
wrong should say, Lets get
together, fellows, and do
something about it, Pastore
said at a crowded hearing of his
Senate communications
subcommittee on television
violence. The senator said
Congress could do little except
pressure the networks.

YAF Supports Denial
Os SSOC Recognition
The Executive Board of the UF Chapter of Young Americans for
Freedom, a conservative political action organization, passed a
resolution Tuesday supporting UF President Stephen C. OConnells
denial of the SSOC charter.
The resolution listed the following points:
Whereas the SSOC is not a student organization, but is open to
persons not affiliated with the UF; and whereas certain policies
pursued by SSOC and its companion organization SDS call for
disruption of the normal, orderly function of the University and
possible violent confrontation with the administration; be it resolved
that we the executive board of the UF Chapter of Young Americans
for Freedom endorse and support the decision of President OConnell
to deny SSOC recognition as a campus organization.
Senate Supports PE
HOM PA6E OME jj
survival. Secretary of the Interior Bill Modlin said because of the low
turnout, it was not an invalid election, it just has no legal effect.
Jim Reinman and Ron Brown were approved as General and Vice
Chairman of SURGE, the student legislative lobby created by Floor
Leader Charles Harris.
A charter for the Reitz Union Board of Managers was passed which
gives SG more power in the running of the Union. The Board of
Managers does not recognize the power of the Senate over its charter
and the matter will go to President OConnell for consideration.
A proposed amendment to the Student Body Constitution
restructuring the Honor Court was passed unanimously and will be
voted on by students in the general election April 24.
THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June,
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holiday!
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of theij
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Budding, University of Ifiorida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator la
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601.
Subscription rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reServestheriebt to regulate Ibe typographical tone I
gjl advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertising Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.

The presidents of Columbia
Broadcasting System, National
Broadcasting Co., and the
American Broadcasting Co.
insisted they already were
regulating themselves. All three
said their schedules for next fall,
when the new television season
starts, had far fewer
action-adventure shows and
fewer scenes of violence in every
kind of program.
I think were doing a pretty
good job, CBS President Frank
Stanton told Pastore. Even news
cameramen had been warned not
to shoot bloody when
covering the Vietnam War and

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DR. HAROLD RIKER
... planned invasion

other violent events.
If the industry is properly
regulating itself, why are we
here? Pastore replied sharply.
Why are the American people
aroused?
What can we do about it?
Pastore asked, gesturing
helplessly. He said Congress was
forbidden by the Constitution to
get into this business of
censorship.
You men come before us
and say youre doing a good job,
and the violence goes on and
on, the senator told them.
He accused Stanton, NBC
President Julian Goodman and
ABC President Leonard H
Goldenson of waging a
competition in sex and
dodging any serious outside
review of programming which
might lessen televised violence.
I SSOC Rally |
I Scheduled
V J.J
jjj The Southern Students jjj;
jij Organizing Committee will jjj:
j:j sponsor a teach-in rally today j:j:
ft at 2:30 pjn. in the Plaza of jij:
jj: the Americas. jij
.jjj At the rally, a letter asking jjj;
jij for a meeting between ji<
jjj: Chairman of the Board of jjj
jjj: Regents D. Burke Kibler and $:
jjj SSOC will be presented, jjj
jjj: SSOC is also seeking a panel jjj:
jjj; discussion with the regents jjj:
jjj: chairman as a means of
jjj opening communications jij:
jjjj between the two groups. jjj

wpp. :
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Dedicated to Public Service

The Tigert Watch-
Determined, Quiet
By ANNE FREEDMAN
Alligator Staff Writer
More than 25 demonstrators line the benches and floors on the
second floor of Tigert Hall outside of the office of UF President
Stephen C. OConnell.
Four long-haired, bell-bottom clad girls sit on the stone bench at
the foot of the stairs.
There are the bearded students; the mustached; the pea-jacketed;
the one in army surplus fatigues; the one with dog; and the tall,
sandy-haired political science major in a yellow, monogrammed,
London Fog type parka.
They are all at the vigil... sitting.
Jan Keshen is a 2UC, an English major from North Miami. She
spent all Tuesday from nine to five, except for one hour spent
running off to a class, sitting outside the presidents office.
A sorority girl, she says that SSOCs purpose is not to get card
carrying members. We just want people to be politically aware.
Her parents are civil rights activists, she explained, so she has a
background of being politically aware.

SILENT VIGIL
... SSOC sits, waits

students and faculty have no real voice in student affairs.
I'm acting as a concerned student for students. Hopefully the
protest will exert some kind of pressure on the administration to
point out to them and other students that the students really have no
voice, she said.
I think the thing that frightens people about SSOC is the idea of
violence like black power. We dont want violence. I think we've
demonstrated that by sitting here.
Most kids dont have the S2OO bond to get out of jail. We don't
want to go to jail as most people think, Miss McCalman said, playing
unconsciously with her long, beaded necklace.
Paul Goodman, 2UC, was seated under a window against the wall,
studying for a biology final.
He said OConnells refusal to recognize SSOC struck him as
discrimination and thats why he would spend a couple hours each
day this week in Tigert.
You dont see them judging a new fraternity on what other
fraternities do, he said.
Would you please move over against the wall or sit on a bench?
Steve Fahrer, 4AS, chairman of SSOC asks a group that has formed
near the middle of the hall.
We dont want to disrupt anything, he said, as the group
shuffled.
People come and go.
Administrators, dressed in coats and ties walk past. Some of the
demonstrators wave. But they don't speak.
Most are studying something. A few are slumped over against the
wall, asleep.
And they wait, sitting quietly on the floor outside the office of the
president of their university.

March 18 Vote GROUP 1
Elect SIDNEY KNIGHT
to City Commission
WELL QUALIFIED
Graduate engineer with experience in
electric power utilities
Masters degree in Business Administration,
with Distinction, Harvard University
Law degree: University of Florida i.D. 1965
3 years studying Gainesville local
government
Management consultant, now retired

Citizens for Sidney Knight Campaign Fund (Paid Pol. ad)

The pert coed, friendly and
talkative, kept moving around
from place to place while she
spoke.
The benches get pretty hard,
after a while, Margaret, a
former 3ED, currently not
enrolled, explained.
The benches get pretty
annoying when the window sill
jabs into your back, Judye
McCalman, 4AS added.
A political science major with
long red hair, Miss McCalman is
anxious to explain why she was
spending four hours on the hard
benches outside O'Connells
office.
I think that this particular
issue the whole SSOC
recognition thing is really only
a manifestation of the fact that



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FRIENDLINESS PAYS OFF
The Friendly Gator award this week goes to Jean White, cashier at
the engineering counter at the Hub. Tom Warner, student government
representative, makes the presentation.

1

Clarion Trial
Definitely Set
The trial of accused
flag-burner John Claxton, twice
delayed and rescheduled, is
finally scheduled to begin next
Monday.
Claxton, a 2UC, was arrested
November 11 for allegedly
burning a US flag at a SDS-SSOC
A-political rally held the night
of national election returns.
Claxton was apprehended
while leaving an SDS-SSOC
meeting, and charged with city
ordinances against flag-burning.
The local ordinance carries a fine
of S4OO or 60 days in jail.
Claxton posted a SSOO bond,
and was released. Then, on Nov.
25, he was again arrested, and
placed in county jail.
City charges were dropped
against Claxton, and he was
charged with a similar state law.
The stricter law carries a SI,OOO
fine and/or one year in jail.
Trial dates were changed
from an original hearing date of
Nov. 17 to Dec. 3, and finally,
to Monday at 9:30 in county
court.
Sedans, Wagons, Sports
m Cars. Trucks, 4-wheH
drive.
I No. 1 in Japan I
ft Godding (r Clark ?
i Motor* I
I 1012 SOUTH Main St. |
I Open 8 A.M. 8 P.M. m
\ -Gotcr ||

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How about a touch of Americana, Florida style? This long sleeved
voile in red, white and blue invites a kiss of the sun and a
Marchlike breeze. You'll find it in our Junior Corner.

, oV*V*V*V*s****s*|s**V*t*V"VViV*****"s*(
| Dean Hale I
| Unalarmed ]
| By Melvin
$ Lester L. Hale, vice $
, V
;j president for student affairs, >j
: was not alarmed by the latest $
> # o
: demand that students and >:

:: faculty members violating ::
:: rules and policies of state ::
:|i universities be expelled :j
:j: immediately. :|:
;: State Rep. J. G. Melvin
v (D-Ft. Walton Beach) is the :
;: newest legislator to advocate :
:: immediate expulsion of $
:: students and faculty members [:
:: who violate university ::
:j: regulations. ::
:: He felt the university ::
:|: couldnt suspend people for ::
:|: what they believe or think. :j
: Hale qualified his S
.: statements by saying he was v
: assuming Melvin was referring v
v to individuals who were v
* disrupting the university. j:|
, : ; , /. , a .v.v; , .v; ;v. ; , ; .'; i ;'. > ;-v*;.;v:.';
sales & services
(UdtM'Cluc)
% wig sale .1 m
|L 1013 w. university ave.
blocks from campus jl)
K^* t 372-B9 VIT

Conservatives Knock SSOC

In its second meeting Monday
night, the Students for American
Conservatism (SAC) issued the
following statement:
We the members of the
Students for American
Conservatism unanimously
support President OConnells
policy concerning SSOC.
BP
H|; % ;:\4o : ;V; v: ..
JIMMEY BAILEY
... SAC spokesman

Van Cliburn
Sunday
4:00p.m.

Thursday, March 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator, I

As students of the UF, we
do not recognize SSOC as an
official organization.
We do not believe that the
Student Government leaders
represent the will of the student
body in their recognition of
SSOC.
SAC was originated and
headed by Jimmey Bailey,
former George Wallace
Campaign Manager for the UF
campus. Bailey was not available
Miller-Brown
ONEMILE
NORTH OF
THE MALL
376-4552 AuThorized
DEALER

n. on />.nn *i
&. OUU. uO udlly ~~
Village Square
2401 southwest thirteenth street

Page 3



, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13, T 969

Page 4

? w GARY MULLER^^
Little Heart Patient Health Center Celebrity j

By DAVE OSIER
Alligator Staff Writer
For the past two weeks little six-year-old Gary
Muller has been pretty much of a celebrity on
the seventh floor childrens ward of the UFs J.
Hillis Miller Health Center.
And for a good reason.
Gary, who is a first grader at Orlandos Pine
Hills Elementary School, has been an open-heart
surgery patient at the centers Shands Teaching
Hospital.
But no ordinary patient Gary has been. Hes
had the concerned citizens of two cities and a lot
of a state pulling for him.
You see, before he underwent a heart
operation last Thursday by a team of medical
specialists, Gary couldnt do most of the things
other children his age do. Like playing cowboys
and Indians and riding a bike.
His heart was defective. It had a hard time
pumping blood to his lungs because an
obstruction blocked vital passageways. And, on
top of this, there was a hole between his hearts
two lower chambers. There simply wasnt enough
pressure to do the job right.
But now hes doing fine after the surgeons
reparied those deficiencies in a three hour
operation.
Through all his long trial, his mother and
stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Potaracke, plus

Nurses 1 Conference To Discuss
Pediatric Heart Diagnosis Today

The UFs College of Nursing,
the Shands Teaching Hospital
and Clinics, and the Division of
Continuing Education are
sponsoring a conference entitled,
The Heart of the Matter, for
registered nurses today.
The conference, which will
define the nursing process
associated with pediatric
cardiovascular diagnostic
measures, will begin at 8:30 a.m.
in the J. Wayne Reitz Union.

SG Book Exchange
Open This Afternoon

The SG Book Exchange,
operated by the office of the
Secretary of the Interior, opens
the collection of books up for
sale.
The book exchange will be
placed on the colonnade of the
Reitz Union by the duck pond.
The hours are 2-6 p.m. today
and Friday and 2-4 p.m. Monday
through Wednesday of next
week.
Books will only be collected
at this time.
The book exchange will
reopen for buying and selling
March 27.
The book exchange is an
opportunity to sell books for
better prices than the bookstores
will give him because we
eliminate the middleman, said
Siw TtfT
Hawaiian JET
Village s||
Now leasing for Sept,
3461 S.W. Second Ave.
PHONE 378-5905
Next to Westgate
Shopping Center
Townhouse & Flats
Swimming Pool
Recreation Hall
yyaii to waii Carpet
Air Conditioned
Dishwashers & Disposals
Private Patios
Master TV Antenna
Laundry Facilities
1 & 2 BR., 1, lVz, 2 Baths
MODELS OPEN DAILY 10-5
Hotpoint Appliances

Emphasis will be on the
nurse-patient relationship during
the diagnostic phase, the nurses
supportive function and her role
in providing for continuity of
care.
Conference speakers include
Dr. Gerold L. Schiebler,
professor and chairman,
Department of Pediatrics in the
Universitys College of Medicine;
Dr. Carol E. Bradshaw, assistant
dean for nursing practice,
College of Nursing; Mrs. JoAnne

Kevin Davey, director of the
book exchange.
For those who participated
in the program last time and
werent satisfied with the way
things were handled, weve made
some crucial changes and made
things a little simpler.

STRAWBERRY PE
gtiCfAL!
NOW THRU SUNDAY
FRESH STRAWBERRIES IN
a velvety glaze heaped
,N A tender flaky
CRUST AND TOPPED
WITH A CREAMY
| WHIPPED TOPPING
REG. 45c VALUE
2310 S. W. 13th Street 1505 N. W. 13th Street

a score of distressed citizens in Gainesville,
Orlando and throughout the state who donated
their blood and offered their aid, have been
behind him all the way.
After a plea for blood donors was made in an
Orlando Sentinel story two weeks ago, 67 area
residents there rallied to local blood banks to
roll up their sleeves. Many more have sent cards,
letters and gifts expressing their concern.
Doctors said there was plenty of blood from
Orlando on hand when the operation rolled
around. Even so, donors in Gainesville showed up
at the hospital ready and willing when Gary was
admitted.
Garys parents brought him here after Orlando
physicians suggested the operation when he
collapsed from fatigue two weeks ago Tuesday.
He sometimes turned blue from a lack of oxygen
in his blood.
Potaracke, an independent truck driver who
has been working two days a week hauling fruit,
had worked full time for an Orlando moving van
company but quit when Garys condition grew
more serious every day.
Since last Thursday Garys mother and
stepfather have been standing-by diligently.
Following the first four critical days after the
operation they have been commuting each day to
and from Orlando.
They have seven other children at home.
Garys 13-year-old sister, Kay, has been caring

H. Patray, assistant professor of
nursing in the College; and Mrs.
Ann S. Syfrett, nurse 111, Shands
Teaching Hospital and Clinics
among others. Mrs. Grace N.
Lanning, associate director,
Florida Heart Association, St.
Petersburg, will be an
introductory speaker.
The seminar is being
sponsored in cooperation with
the Florida Heart, Florida
Hospital, and Florida Nurses
Associations.

Dick Holme/
Jeweler/
CLOCK. WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
TROPHIES ENGRAVING
1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
1/2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

j GATOR 1 ) j
y ADS
9 1 II
IpEOPIE W'T
nV
ml \jhiv. ex-._2532 U J w
I

"LET'S BELIEVE
IN GAINESVILLE"
VOTE FOR
Neil A. Butler
CITY COMMISSIONER o, p .ii
Qualifications
Lifelong resident of Gainesville
Steward Mt. Olive Methodist Church
World War II Navy Combat Veteran
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
Elks American Legion
B.S. Degree University of Florida
Admitted to Graduate School U of F
Registered Professional Nurse
Member American Nurses Association
Fl m u ed A U Nursin9 for Operation Concern"
W~rVri Nurse Pediatrics UofF Teaching Hospital
Served as Chairman of Gainesvilles
Human Relations Advisory Board
Chairman Board of Directors, Bell Nursery
Member Board of Directors, Seagle Foundation
(Paid Political Advertisement

ior his six brothers and sisters in their parents
absence.
Gary perked up Monday when a Sentinel
photographer came to take his picture. But, Mrs.
Potaracke said, Hes getting restless and wants
to go home. Hes tired of having shots.
Gary has much waiting for him when he does
get home which should be this weekend if all
goes well.
His stepfather bought him a bicycle and
wheeled it into his room Sunday. Everytime he
tried to ride one before, he would quickly tire
and fall off, his mother said.
She had many thanks for the citizens of
Orlando, Gainesville and all over Florida. There
just arent words enough to tell you all how
much we appreciate your blood donations,
money, cards, calls and prayers, she said.
The news of people behind Gary has inspired
him a whole lot.
Gary has been getting cards and letters at an
ever increasing rate. Many have had money gifts
in them from $1 to SSO, she said.
She said Gary is putting the money in the
bank for his future.
They are putting together a scrapbook of
news clippings about Garys plight, she said. The
Sentinel has had a story or picture of Gary
almost every day since they learned of his
predicament a few weeks ago.

Oood Strvict Starts'
at
CRANE IMPORTS

SAL ES-tER VICE VICEREPAIRS
REPAIRS VICEREPAIRS
CRANE IMPORTS
SO6 E. Unit. An. nuim



fApollo Astronauts!
I To Orbit Longer I

SPACE CENTER, Houston (UPI) Apollo 9s astronauts received
orders Wednesday to add one orbit to their flight and splash down
Thursday in the Atlantic in gentle tradewind swells rather than in the
storm-tossed original landing area.
Lets go there, lets go there, James A. McDivitt agreed when
flight controllers made the change that extended the 10-day flight by
96 minutes.
Earlier, told that the original landing zone 200 miles southwest of
Bermuda still was experiencing 12-foot swells, McDivitt said: I dont
think anybody up here is good enough sailer for that.
McDivitt and David R. Scott are Air Force colonels and Russell L.
Schweickart is a civilian scientist who formerly was an Air Force pilot.
The landing zone switch, only the second one in 19 American
manned spaceflights, sent the prime recovery carrier USS Guadalcanal
steaming at top speed to the new recovery area 480 miles to the
South. A Navy spokesman said it should arrive with time to spare for
the splashdown ending mans third longest spaceflight at onb minute
past noon, EST.
Have it bring all the good weather it can with it, McDivitt said to
flight controllers when they told him the carrier was moving. Earlier
Scott had asked to land in a nice, soft piece of water with no wind
and no waves ... and lots of sunshine.
Heroin Ring Broken
NEW YORK (UPI) The largest heroin smuggling ring in
American history has been broken and the case will involve at least
five nations, the U.S. Customs Department announced Wednesday.
The second 62-pound shipment of heroin this week was uncovered
by federal narcotics agents and a third shipment was reported en route
to New York aboard an unidentified ship. A spokesman said this
shipment is under surveillance and will be seized when it arrives here
Friday or Saturday.
Lester B. Johnson, U.S. commissioner of customs, said his
department had been working on the case since last July when 64
pounds of heroin were seized at airports in New York and
Washington. He described it as the most important case of its kind in
U.S. history.

Arby's
N.I.T. CELEBRATION
V
Jamocha Shakes
10<
with purchase of one or more Arby's
W ed. March 12 & Thur. March 13
Congratulations Gators & Best of Luck
H Arby's ft
1405 S. W. 13th St.
Just South of the Underpass
J ~r ' ~

FOR STUDENT DISCOUNTS
House Defeats Travel Bill

A bill which would
substantially cut the costs of
travel on Floridas turnpikes for
UF students, has been
tentatively defeated by House of
Representatives committees, but
it may not be completely dead.
Prefiled last month, and sent
to the House Committees on
Transportation and Finance &

Student Architects
Face Jury Friday

Architectural students at the
UF go before the jury Friday.
The jurors, however, are
specialists in architecture and
health care.
Whats on trial? The students
designs for a small hospital for a
city with a population of about
12,000.
Jurors will be interested
especially in knowing if the
defendents kept within the
limitations of a given number of
square feet and designed a fully
equipped hospital.
Among out-of-state jury
members will be Dr. H.
McDonald Rimple. deputy
director of the Health Services
and Mental Health
Administrations Division of
Hospital and Medical Facilities,
which administers the
Hill-Burton program for federal
funding of hospital construction.
Another will be Wilbur

Taxation, the bill would allow
any full-time student to
purchase a toll pass for not more
than $lO which would allow him
to use state turnpikes for six
months at no extra cost.
But Lynwood Arnold,
chairman of the transportation
committee said because it
would not be in compliance

Taylor, director of the Office of
Architecture and Engineering,
Health Facilities Planning and
Construction Service, U.S.
Public Health Service, Silver
Spring, Md.

Gator PAWN SHOP
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
DIAMONDS
\Jj-OANSj GUNS
BUY SELL TRADE
. c
"We specialize in Gator-Aid
1334 E. UNIVERSITY 378-5575

Thursday, March 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

with the bonding provisions of
the Florida Turnpike, the bill
was tentatively defeated at an
informal committee meeting on
Feb. 18.
Arnold, in a letter to UF
student Jay Scheck Jr.,
explained consideration of bills
by House Committees are not
binding at this time.
Though the above action of
our Committee is an indication
of the feelings of Committee
members at present, such action
could possibly be reversed,
Arnold said.
The toll on the Florida
Turnpike, running from
Wildwood to Miami, is $4.80
one way. Any student who
makes the round-trip more than
once would save money.

Page 5



Page 6

, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13^1969

5: Public Relations;:
- .
s Career Day Set ;j

v >.
£ A Public Relations Career :
£ Conference is scheduled for :
£ Friday from 5-6:30 p.m. in :
room 236 Stadium. :
* i
Speakers from the Central v
and North Florida Chapter of :
the Public Relations Society :
v of America will address all
v UF students interested in £
public relations careers. £

YOUNG RASCALS SCHEDULED
SG Talent Search Fruitful

A host of pop groups, plays
and entertainers will be headed
for UF next year as a result of a
recent student governments
talent hunt to New York.
Lee Terry, program
coordinator for SG said last
week that three groups and one
play have made definite
commitments to UF for next
year, although none have as yet
signed contracts.
At least four more have
expressed interest in coming to
UF, but their appearance will
depend on tour schedules.
Those with commitments
include the Sandpipers for
Summer Frolics, The Young
Rascals, being handled by IFC,
and Glenn Yarborough, to
appear-next spring.
More tentative groups include
the Lettermert, Donovan, The
New Christy Minstrels and Paul
Anka. i
Earlier reports that SG was
bidding for a spot on the
Beatles-Rolling Stones tour of
the United States were axed
when the U.S. tour was
cancelled.
In addition to these, SG is
looking for at least one name
show group, similar to the
Mideast Crisis
Debate Tonight
The Mideast Crisis will be
debated between two Arabs and
two Israelis tonight at 10 on
WUFT.
The hour-long show, first in a
new College Comment series,
will be hosted by WUFT
Program Director Mark Damen.
Arye Ephrath, 4EG, and
Shimshon Yehoshua, Agriculture
professor, will represent the
Israeli viewpoint.
Mohammed Hallej,
Jacksonville University Political
Science professor, and
Youhanna Fares, UF professor
of Nuclear Chemistry will
represent the Arab viewpoint.
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DROPOUTS BY HOWARD POST
FERMENTEP COCO\\uT JUICE... ABOUT FERMENTED ON THIS ISLAND/ /
V- / COCOHUT JUICE?/ I 7/ J
1960 by Lln.lyd Fr.lurf Sy'(ftOtr, !f>c

Jack Jones Show which
appeared last year.
We contacted Tony Bennett
and Andy Williams, Terry said,
but these people will not give a
commitment this early.
However, they know were
interested, and there will be
correspondence between us.
Hopefully by June, he said,
we will know one way or
another if we can land these
people.

FINAL DEADLINE
for 69
SEMINOLE
ORDERS i-4sbk
APRIL 18 tHjql
MAIL EARLY
3| Please reserve copies of the 1969 Seminole jfcj
J I have enclosed $ ($5.00 per copy) Bp.
l9| You will be notified in the Alligator when the
yearbooks have arrived. Mail to 1969 Seminole, K|
. MAIL TO: 1969 SEMINOLE
ROOM 330
J. WAYNE REITZ UNION
mmmm -

The one play definitely
committed to UF for next year
is Your Own Thing, an
off-Broadway production
currently running in New York.
Cost of the groups varies.
Most expensive of the
committed groups is The Young
Rascals, which will cost IFC
about $15,000. Least expensive
is the summer presentation of
the Sandpipers, costing $3,500.

Van Cliburn
Sunday
4:00p.m.



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SOLID GOLD SOUL
Diana Ross and the Supremes, famous for their "Motown" sound,
will be apprearing in the Florida Gym April 2.
Tickets for the concert, sponsored by Student Government
Productions, will go on sale the afternoon of March 31, the first day
of classes after spring break.
The Supremes, composed of Cindy Birdsong, Mary Wilson and lead
singer Diana Ross, have traveled all over the world and have appeared
on such television shows as The Ed Sullivan Show and the Dean
Martin Show.
They have several gold records, each symbolizing the sale of one
million records. Among their more popular songs have been "Where
Did Our Love Go?," "Baby Love," and "Stop in the Name of Love."
Tickets will be $6, $5 and $3 a couple.

Greeks Plan Strong Week

An expanded Greek Week
featuring an evaluation of the
System, a beauty contest, Greek
games and Frolics is planned this
year as a result of a campaign
pledge of Inter-Fraternity
President Steve Zack.
A Greek Week of any kind
has been non-existent at the UF
for several years.
Zack says that since the
system here is the best in the
South, and one of the best in the
nation, Greeks should set a
pattern for a really effective
week.
Greek Week will begin
Monday, May 19, with Jersey
Day and run through May 24.
On this day all fraternity and
sorority members will wear their
jerseys.
Bonfire speeches by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
and Steve Zack will be part of
the opening ceremonies
Tuesday through Thursday
evaluation seminars concerning
leadership, rush, financing, and
academics will be held.
National officers have been
invited to help evaluate the
system as a whole and determine
how to interest more
independent in the Greek way of
life.
Sororities have been invited
to participate in many phases of
Greek Week and they will be
holding evaluations of their own.
Thursday afternoon a
barbeque with a country band
will i>e held in the Plaza of the
Americans.
A banquet sor national
visitors, IFC officials, and the
Greek Week staff will be held
Friday night followed by the
Miss Greek Week contest Finals.
Greek theme parties will be
given at each house later that
night. Costumes will be worn by
those attending. A special prize

and a trophy will be awarded to
the best-decorated house.
Saturday afternoon fraternity
men will compete in donkey and
chariot races and a greased pig
contest as part of Greek games.
Spring Frolics will climax the
week Saturday night.
Negotiations for several
entertainers are still going on
and an announcement will be
made later as to the
performer. John Cosgrove is
IFC director for Greek Week.

Piano Virtuoso Performs
Van Cliburn, who became famous overnight when he won the
Tchaikowsky Competition in Moscow in 1958, will appear in concert
at the UF gymnasium Sunday at 4 p.m.
After winning first place in the Tchaikowsky competition, Cliburn
played for Krushchev and returned to New York City to face the First
ticker-tape parade ever given a classical musician.
Ross Parmenter of the New York Times, said Cliburn had lived up
to expectations, something that hardly seemed possible after so great
a build-up.
Cliburns First recording, the Tchaikowsky B-flat Minor Concerto,
immediately became a best-seller.
After receiving a scholarship to the Joulliard School of Music in
New York, Cliburn received the Levintritt Award in 1954.
Prior to Clibums winning the award, the judges had found no one
worthy for five years.
New York Times critic Harold Schonberg wrote, Cliburn stands
revealed as a pianist whose potentialities have fused into a
combination of uncommon virtuosity and musicianship.
This past summer Cliburn played in Saratoga, Hollywood Bowl,
Meadowbrook, Tanglewood, Ravinia and other U.S. summer festivals.
In September, he played in Europe, returning for his current
transcontinental tour of fifty North American cities.

i; Yale Singers
To Perform
*
|: The Augmented Seven, ::
;bilk'd Tas~YaieViest Singing^
: Group, will perform;:;
: Saturday night at 9:30.
: Sponsored by Sigma Nu, :
: the group will sing in v
;j; McCarty Auditorium. £
:'.; Admission is 35 cents. The

concert is open to all.

Profs Awarded
Study Grants
In Humanities
Two UF professors have been
awarded fellowships from the
National Endowment for the
Humanities, a newly established
counterpart to the National
Science Foundation.
Dr. Henry E. Allison,
associate professor of
philosophy, and Dr. Claude K.
Abraham, associate professor of
French, were announced as
winners of the awards last week
by Dr. Thomas Hanna, chairman
of UFs philosophy department.
Allison, awarded a S9OOO
fellowship for research during
the 1969-70 academic year,
plans to write a book on 18th
century German philosopher
Immanuel Kant.
Abraham plans to use his
SISOO summer fellowship to
conclude two years of previous
research on The Influence of
Malherde on 17th Century
French Poetry.
In 1967 Dr. Kenneth Megill,
professor of philosophy at UF,
was awarded an NEH full-year
grant, giving UF award-winning
professors for two out of the
three years the fellowship
, program has been in existence.
A- v^je
gK' ''.:.]>!; :$m
wrafc: dm : ''^^B
gib J^BBk
'
IBSXBKiB : iV :
tngfc '..
DR. THOMAS HANNA
... announces fellowships

Gator Gras
Derby 500 +
Tug oWar
April 12

* X

Gator Gras Entries Due
: v
x
.*
: The deadline for entering the Miss University of Florida and
Miss Gator Gras combo contest is today at 4 p.m. £
: Groups entering* a contestant in the beauty contest this $
: year a combination feature must submit their entries by this x
afternoon in order to get special fee rates.
: A group sponsoring a contestant can enter one girl for both
contests or one girl in each all for a flat fee of $25. :j:
If groups dont meet the deadline for the special fee, they :j:
x must have entries in by April 4 and pay the regular rate. :|:
:j: This is the first year that Miss Gator Gras will go to Miami
x for the Miss Florida Universe Contest, the winner from which
*
will go the later Miss U.S.A. contest and possibly into Miss
Universe competition. $
Gator Gras begins April 10 and lasts for three days until
April 12. The springtime festivity is heralded as the third
v quarter Gator Growl and is sponsored by SG and the Reitz X
Union Program Council.

*'
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Thursday, March 13, 1969, The Florida Allipatoft

Page 7



Page 8

> Th# Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13,1969

Staff Writings

A column in Mondays Alligator took the
members of SSOC to task for their childish and
immature actions during the past week. The
author of the column could be no blinder.
The author attended part of a meeting of SSOC
members and student leaders Thursday night in
which the radicals appeared not satisfied with the
offers made by the leaders. Many of the SSOC
members felt the leaders had sold them down the
river.
And I can see why they felt that way. All day
long they had heard rumors about all the groups
calling for a student strike, or at least some sign of
support.
Thursday night the leaders told them there
would be no such backing.
As a matter of fact, Manny James, president of
Blue Key, told them take the union, take Tigert,
but damnit, take it by yourself.
Later that night, in a meeting to decide tactics,
nr/Minc root triiA r>rl r\rc u/orp chrm/n Tirpit

(Editors Note: The following are exerts from a
letter from Rae O. Weimer, Special Assistant to
President OConnell, to Dr. Glenn Butler, chairman
of the Board of Student Publications)
Dear Dr. Butler:
Your attention is called to the editorial in the
Florida Alligator Tuesday, March 11, titled Lost
Innocence. The purpose of my letter is to point up
what I consider poor journalistic practices and
failure to conform to the General Policies of the
Board of Student Publications.
Let me review the facts as I see them:
Statements in the editorial are untrue, inaccurate
and give a completely false impression.
President OConnell was not on campus Monday,
March 10.
He did not threaten a group of peaceful
demonstrators after they had spent the day quietly
outside his office.
He did not call in uniformed police and deliver
an ultimatum of suspension and arrest.
The facts, much more accurately handled by the
Alligator reporter than the editorial writer, are
these:
Executive Vice President L. E. Grinter was in
charge Monday during the absence of President
OConnell. When the SSOC group arrived Monday
morning they were handed copies of a statement by
President OConnell reviewing the disruption of
operations in Tigert Hall by SSOC members on

Staff Writings-

SSOC : More Than Irresponsible Kiddies

Blind people with open eyes.
There are far too many of
them running around running
into walls and then screaming at
people they can barely see much
less understand.
If SSOC has done nothing
else, which I debate, they have
brought these walking blind out
of the woodwork.
Without any effort you can
hear them squaking in hidden
comers all over campus and in
the Alligator.
SSOC kiddies" they call the
radicals. Irresponsible, militant
dangerous... all of the rash
lables have been pinned on them
by people who would table any
-walking creature long hair
a hippie, commie militant.
But SSOC has shown their
true colors this week and never
could anyone looking at both

Radical Desires But Careful Responses

Lost Innocence Unfortunate Error

sides of the story call them
irresponsible.
They know what they want
and they are trying to find out
how to get it. Arent we all?
And they have bent over and
around and under not to step on
anybodys rights to get it.
A peaceful study-in in Tigert
Hall can hardly be called
disrupting the normal process
of the university," unless the
university finds studying in a
state building, paid for by the
taxpayers, disruptive.
Its a sorry philosophy for a
university.
And it is also sorry when
SSOC, sitting on stone benches
in the hail outside rtre
presidents office, has to fear
suspension and arrest while
Jimmey Bailey the radical of
another color, apparently more
appealing to the administration
can sit on the plush sofa inside

hungry and apparently without backing, a majority
of SSOC members refused to listen to a minoritys
cries to take control of the administration building.
This was pointed out when UF professor Bob
Canney, one of the few pushing for immediate
action shouted, My God. I thought you people
were radicals!
They are radicals, but not the kind Canney was
screaming about. They are radical in their desires.
They want the university controlled by students and
faculty, not by administrators who spend all day
shuffling papers.
I once called Steve Fahrer a moderate radical.
He shuddered at the sound, but when I explained
what I meant he agreed, at least partially, with me.
He was afraid of the term moderate, he said,
because it implied that he would sacrifice his
principles for his own betterment. He said he would
never do this. And I believe him.
He is moderate though, because he realizes
injurious force often does more damage than good.
Thats why he and Ed Freeman urged the students
to leave Tigert Hall Friday before there was
vinlpnro

Friday, March 7, and spelling out what steps would
be taken to prevent a repetition of those events.
Ed Freeman, former president of SSOC, asked
for a conference with Dr. Grinter and conferred in
the latters office. When Dr. Grinter suggested the
number of demonstrators be limited to six at any
one time, Mr. Freeman asked that the number be
10, and they agreed on this number.
Where the editorial gives the impression the
President threatened a peaceful group, a more
correct interpretation would be found in this part of
the Presidents statement:
In event any group or individual shall gather-in
so as to disrupt the normal operation of the
university conducted in such building as did SSOC
on Friday, March 7th, the following action will be
taken:
1. The representative of the president, whether he
be administration, faculty member, staff or
student body official, who is in authority in the
building or portion of building in which the
disruption occurs shall request that those
creating the disturbance cease, desist and remove
themselves from the building.
2. If the disrupters do not cease, desist and remove
themselves, an administrative or academic official
representing the president shall advise them that
any student who has refused to obey the request
is then and there suspended from the University,
subject to a hearing on charges of disruption
which shall be filed forthwith. Upon

OConnelTs office. Like a
vulture waiting for the chance to
see blood.
What more right does this
right-wing reactionary have to sit
in Tigert and disrupt the
normal process of the
university than left-wing
radicals studying in the open
hallway and watching the
shadows of the campus cops as
they pose on the stariway
waiting for someone to sneeze or
get up to go to the bathroom.
I've watched all of this for the
past week.
SSUC has just as much right rightas
as rightas anyone else to work for what
they believe. Especially when
they are about as militant as
Wayne Morse in their actions, if
not in their sometimes angry
words and statements.

During the past week, Fahrer and Freeman have
provided unexcelled leadership. They have stood up
for their ideals. They have stood up to President
OConnell; they have stood up to dissenting
students; and they have stood up to 10 uniformed
campus police officers. (Have you ever faced the
possibility of suspension from school and arrest for
an ideal?)
They did Monday afternoon.
Through all this, there have been no arrests, no
bloodshed, and no disruption of the normal
processes of the university.
All that happened was that a few Tigert
secretaries got upset because they thought the
unkept hippies might accost them as they walked
down the halls of Tigert.
As Jan Keshen, one of the demonstrators, who
stands 4-foot-l 1-3/4 said: Im not an accoster.
As a matter of fact, the most disruptive thing
that happened Monday was when a dozen campus
police officers marched into Tigert Hall. Every
secretary on the second floor stopped what they
were doing and took a walk to the ladies room to
opt a Innlr at thp artinn

And isnt it actions we are
told to judge people on?
This is President OConnells
blindness. He is too hung up on
the name and the newspaper
stories about what is happening
on other campuses to see our
radicals for what they really
are: sincere students who are
willing to stand up for what they

The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
£ditonf, Busr**, Adwtwmg offices in Room 330, Reft* Union. Phone
392-1681, 392 1682 or 392-1683.
F orid *% <<~ ** wu or th auck aid not thoa of Ik. UoimrOtY of FfcaMo.*

By Dave Reddick

announcement of the order of suspension the
administrative or academic official in charge shall
request those students suspended to identify
themselves by presenting appropriate documents
such as ID cards.
3. After lapse of a reasonable time following the
request to cease, desist and remove themselves
from the building, the representative of the
president shall request a campus policeman to
inform any disruptors remaining on the premises
that they are in violation of law, and that if they
fail to cease, desist and remove themselves from
the building, they will be arrested. Any persons
failing to heed this warning shall be forthwith
arrested and charged in the proper court for
appropriate violation of law.
There is no threat or implied action here in event
peaceful and quiet demonstrations do not disrupt
normal operations of the university.
Cordially,
Rae O. Weimer
Special Assistant to the President
The editorial Board of the Alligator agrees that
the editorial, entitled Lost Innocence, contained
certain statements which were not factually correct.
Through an unfortunate error, the editorial was
printed without the approval of all the top editors.
We apologize for the error and hope it did not
create unnecessary ill-will.
THE EDITORS

By Carol Sanaer-

believe and take the slaps in the
face from the administration and
their pretty threats of
suspension and arrest and still
striye against injustice.
SSOC may be kiddies in one
respect... they are idealists,
and idealists get hurt no matters
what. But thank God they at
least try to make a difference.



reeling Rising
Against Revolt

By ROSCOE DRUMMOND
reprinted from the
Christian Science Monitor
Despite more violence at some
universities, favorable omens appear
on the campus horizon.
But we must avoid the wishful
assumption that the worst is over and
that we need only wait for the
destructionists to fade away.
They wont. They dont operate
that way. They war to the end. The
destructionists will give up only
when they lose their student and
faculty allies.
That, right there, is the favorable
omen they are beginning to lose
their student and faculty allies and
this finally will destroy the
destructionists.
The revolt against the revolters is
on in full swing. This is the
heartening verdict of columnist Max
Lemer, an ardent reformer who
ardently believes in the democratic
process as the best means of
achieving reform.
Perhaps in full swing is a little
too strong, but here is the evidence
behind Mr. Lemers judgment:
Many universities Columbia,
UCLA, Chicago, Wisconsin, and
others are putting into effect long
over-due academic reforms and are
providing legitimate student
participation.
The leaders of the groups which
want violence for its own sake and
who only talk a reform as an excuse
for violence they are finding their
appeal to other students on the
decline.
The antiviolence students those
who believe that universities are for
learning, not for burning are
beginning to organize to resist
violence. They are making visible
progress.
These are all favorable
developments. But it needs to be
understood that the campus
destructionists, led primarily by the
so-called Students for a Democratic
Society, are prepared to engage in
continued violence, not because they
see themselves gaining strength, but
because they are losing strength. As
they find the ranks of the
antiviolence students growing and
their own ranks thinning, their
response to this plight is to turn to
more violence out of desperation.
I have talked with some of the
knowledgeable antiviolence leaders
and this is the way they see it:
They have learned the hard way
that the Students for a Democratic

Violence Is Ugly But Change Must Quicken

MR. EDITOR:
Members of SSOC are not
going through the accepted
channels for change. They dont
want an administration accepted
change. They want real change,
and they want it now.
is Hre dc-s ire fe-r
--unprecedented fe-r---unprecedented red tape-cutting
change immature? Many
administrators, faculty members
and students seem to think so.
But if you look at SSOC from
another angle, it serves a very
useful purpose. It scares,

Society do not believe in democracy
any more than the leaders of the
Student Nonviolent Coordinating
Committee believe in nonviolence.
They openly proclaim that their
purpose is to destroy. During the
worst vandalism at Columbia, SDS
declared: As much as we would like
to, we are not strong enough yet to
destroy the United States. But we are
strong enough to destroy Columbia.
Their tactic is to seize upon
arguable student grivances, and then,
instead of peacefully seeking to
resolve them, they inflame them.
And when the SDS cannot find any
real grievances, it invents them.
But the new ingredient in the
decline of SDS influence is that more
and more university students are
coming to see that the way to reform
is through reason, dialogue, and
democratic percepts and that
violence is the enemy of reform.
These students are the core of the
revolt againt the revolters.
The first of the student-faculty
prodemocracy Thomas Jefferson
Clubs was organized at Berkeley and
partly as a result of its crusading
activity, the SDS can now rarely get
more than a few hundred to join
their acts of violence, while earlier a
militant protest would enlist several
thousand students.
Among some there is a tendency
to describe the newly aroused
antiviolence student movement as
the revolt of the moderates. That
is imprecise. Many, if not most, of
these students are liberal bordering
on the radical; they are passionate
reformers; they want more student
power.
But they totally reject every form
of totalitarianism (Communist or
Fascist), and they totally support the
proposition that human progress can
only be secured by respect for
democratic principles.
One of the most active of the
antiviolence student leaders is
Charles T. Stephens, the president of
the National Association of Thomas
Jefferson Clubs. He is now setting
out to organize a united student
alliance to give leadership and help to
the antiviolence movement on the
campuses.
It is the students themselves who
can do most to generate the revolt
against the revolters, and they
deserve wide support because this
campus violence is aiming to destroy,
not just the university, but
democracy itself.

pressures and sometimes forces
the administration to take
positive action it might not have
otherwise taken.
The positive action seems to
be implemented with this logic:
Why give SSOC something else
to yell about? So the
administration bends, just a
little,Jxx.Qxdffr to keen SSOC and
student radicals from creating
an uproar. The recent decision
concerning Prof. Kenneth Megill
is an example of positive action
forced on the administration.
SSOC was happy to see
OConnell deny them due

OPEN FORUM:^
Aim. mi ViMuHt
r *>
hove for thp

process, equal protection of the
laws, freedom of speech and
various other things guaranteed
by the constitution. It, of
course, gave them another issue
to work with in order to get
student support for the larger,
more important issues. Is this
wrong?
Non-violent protests, the
threat of violence and the
minute social conscience of
white America helped increase
the rights of black people. But
not enough, and not fast
enough.
Look at it this way. Violence,

Radical Youth:
Bred By Ideas

By MICHAEL HARRINGTON
reprinted from the
Providence Journal
With the battle reports coming in
from the University of Wisconsin,
San Francisco State, Duke and the
other campuses, a good many adults
must be puzzled at the ability of
what seems to be a tiny radical
minority to disrupt higher education.
This view of student unrest as the
work of a petulant, ungrateful few
overlooks a massive, crucial
development among the young and
ignores the irony that it is the
American business system which has
been, and will continue, creating the
preconditions of youthful revolt.
A personal experience might make
the point clearer. This month I spoke
at the University of Florida at
Gainesville. It is a solid, established
institution which has supplied a
significant portion of the states
political elite, but it has no left-wing
history like Berkeley or Madison.
I talked briefly with some of the
SDS leaders there and they felt that
their hard core was about 1 per cent
of the student body, with perhaps
another 9 per cent concerned with
social issues and ready to join larger
demonstrations.
The key people who organized the
symposium-which featured Wayne
Morse, Julian Bond and the militant
atheist, Madalyn Murray, as well as
Senator Strom Thurmondbelonged
to fraternities, not leftist groups.
And yet, when I finished a speech
highly critical of the domestic
policies of the Johnson
administration, and of President
Nixons plans in that area, and calling
for social investments in the billions
of dollars, there was a standing
ovation from several thousand
students. Why?
Part of the answer lies in the fact
that Americas sophisticated
technology requires a vast increase in
the quantity and quality of higher
education. So more and more
sophisticated businessmen realize
that university schooling is not a gift
to the pampered young but an
economic necessity of the
automating society.
In California, the strikes and
demonstrations have made headlines
but, paradoxically, that very
educational system which has
undergone so much unrest has also
been an important asset for the
states modem industry.
So at Gainesville, Florida, and in

any form of violence, is
Is the desire to end the war in
Vietnam, racism and poverty
wrong? But you might say the
SSOC doesnt go about ending
these things through the proper
channels. But sometimes the
proper channels are clogged.
Do you really think Negroes
would even be able to sit in the
front of the bus, in Alabama, if
they had gone through the
proper channels?
disgusting. The violence of
starvation in a rat-infested,
worm-ridden ghetto is
disgusting. George C. Wallace

Thursday, March 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

college towns throughout the nation,
there is now the desire, and the
money, to confront students with
the latest ideas. But in the America
of today, the best known and most
articulate speakers on a social policy
almost invariably range from the
Center to the Left.
In short, the increase in the
quality of American higher education
tends to have a liberalizing, or even
radicalizing, effect on the students
and it is not confined to a tiny
minority or to a few famous
campuses. Last month, Fortune
Magazine measured this
extraordinary phenomenon in> a
special issue, American Youth; Its
Outlook Is Changing the World. The
figures were startling.
There are 23 million Americans
between 18 and 24 years of age, and
about 8 million of themor better
than a third of the generationare
now in college or have already been
there.
In this group, two thirds were in
favor of draft resistance and two
thirds also thought it appropriate to
engage in civil disobedience. That
means that over two million young
Americans in college look favorably
on radical forms of protest. And that
is hardly a small disgruntled group; it
is a major social phenomenon.
But these figures actually
underestimate thd role which the
committed youth will play in the
American future. For these young
people are precisely the ones who are
concerned and activist. They have
already supplied the cadres for the
McCarthy and Kennedy movements
of 1968 which had a major impact
upon the nations politics. And that,
I suspect, is only a beginning.
The real irony in all of this is that
the status quo has to go on increasing
the numbers of its own bitter,
youthful critics and giving aid and
comfort to them. For all that a
Ronald Reagan might want to let
Berkeley or San Francisco State
collapse on the heads of the
demonstrators, he cannot do it
without working serious economic
harm on the very conservative,
monied interests which support him.
There will be battles and reprisals
from the Right (sometimes provoked
by exuberant nihilism on the Left.)
But in the long run, the affluent
society cannot run its complicated
hardware unless it subsidizes more
and more youth in the pursuit of
learning and thereby helps expose
them to radical ideas.

and SSOC members who
advocate violence are disgusting.
As long as people like George
Wallace can gain the support of
millions of Americans,
organizations like SSOC are
necessary.
When we have no
institutionalized violence;
when we have, no racists hiding
under the states rights slogan;
when this country is as great as
it can be, then organizations like
SSOC will not be necessary.
JOHN HOAG, 3JM

Page 9



I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13,1969

Page 10

tofellftll/You Can Save
WWW All Week.
PILLSBURY PLAIN & SR. ...limit 1 w/SS.OQ Os more purchase excluding cigarettes 20 -oz.
FLOUR 5 49* J 11)
ASTOR COFFEE 39* DIIKHM
PRESERVES 39*
mam hh mm h mt m M am
KETCHUP 5/sl. medium eggs lU.
CHARCOAL 99* 2 s l. |*o
3* lb. ROCKINGHAM WHOLE
fillfllEll AftC 12. Pt. DIXIE DARLING BROWN N' SERVE
vHKKIN tV Fig Bars 39* Din. Rolls2/29*
22 oz. DEEP SOUTH SWEET 4-Plt. 40-60-75-100 WATT G.E. FROST W *
# | ?n-oz. DIXIE DARLING PRESTIGE 8-Pt. DIXIE DARLING PECAN
Relish 39* Bulbs 89* Bread 29- Cinn.Rolls 29
Limit I Shortening of Ycur Choice With $5.00 or More Purchase Excluding Cigarettes
48 oz. THRIFTY MAID ALL FLAVORS FRUIT DRINKS OR ___
FRUIT PUNCH 4/Sl. B mlv food _iTN
F|UIT cocktail s/si. 1V
SLICED PINEAPPLE... 3/$l lH E *.lO
TUNA 5/sl. PEAS 4/sl. JMLC -!^! STICKS
No. 303 Con THRIFTY MAID CS OR WK GOUJEN No. I Can PARD DOG
CORN6/sl. FOOD 8/sl. detergent BB
Quantity Rights Reserved-Prices Good Wednesday Noon Thru Wednesday Noon, 19, 1969
HEATH and BEAUTY AIDS |f ill B|
Right Guard 58* LlRIy I DWP^
Spray....39* Shampoo 88* UlftlV I
extra large toothpaste mouthwash
Crest 57* Scope $ 1 44 w m BLUE i
Razor.... 98* Shampoo 88* Rw deteroeht
FAMILY TUBE HEAD 4 SHOULDER Exlro Large TOOTHPASTE K T
Shampoo $ 139l 39 Gleem... 73* -,* JB mF
Mi *";
8i Wp VALUE "amps : m TOP VALUE STAMPS ; M 4,4 or NABISCO POTATO
N 5 roo-eT son do. = noznr. rv,o, jL OtOtO SflOCk ChipS K? ffl DIET RITE Os
&V Handi Wrao l Liquid Cleaner 200-CT. F/WNBIh IVI 1 C r
I ~ !w.-aZ-r.T----" H Scottie Tissues .. 33 W 4 R pT. 4 .S O^
I^7|V^X.TRA :|7|WeXTR/% : regular scott /fiSsUf^WiSl'l _ es
:*l 1 M TOP VALUE STAMPS !I* I'M TOP VALUE STAMPS T ! -1-. r I #%
:Rs ; i" Toilet Tissue ... 2/33= ITTiI 7/xQ^
1-- --T. - i LzUIII I ISSUc ... H-Q'



on These Specials jj\
Prices Good thru Wed.noon,Mar.
FROZEN VALUES golden ripe
ORANGE JUICE3/sl. f| ||lll WW
Bernes 3/89' Turnips 3/sl I/1 |U fllUj
Potatoes 89* Cakes 85 < W"V
TOFFEE /. ESKIMO ICE CttAM YOUNG TENDER POLE U S. No I RUSSET BAKING (S ib. Bog 490
Rwh 4/sl# S wiches2/$l Beans 2 es 49* Potatoes 10- 79*
Boz. All FLAVORS MORTON MEAT 2 Lb. THUNDERBOLT BREADED CHUNKEES AP MW M MW MMWMMW MW 0W UMW v WH W
BBS a M /OOt CwMIMAM 1 AA Cello Bag YOUNG TENDER HEADS FRESH FIRM
rics o/oo snrimpsi.vv a lB an rltk#.tt o/oo<
Mb,O.D|OUraAmE LAC..Y W,CI* VailOlSX BAG XJ VOOOOO6 ...U/ Om
vODDIvI ## maCarOnl O# U.S. No. IGA. REOSWEET IYEllOW<3lb.
Mb. MRS. FILBERT'S (Qlrs.) GOLDEN I Lb. CHIFFON SOFT IRC OhIBHC C LB
Margarine4/$l Margarine... 45* rOIOtOeSO S OV UniOIIS...* -JV
pTASTEO SEA LENTEN IDEAS-, fam 5 49* Apples... 4 69*
a TASTE -* EA PERC:H I Lb. BASKET SALAD WASHINGTON STATE EXTRA FANCY GOLDEN DELICIOUS
3EHI Dinners...39* Tomatoes 29* Apples 29*
TASTE O' SEA 16 oz FISH FRESH, DELICIOUS
Sticks.... .69* CtrAwkpttipc 3
Quantity Rights Reserved-Prices Good Wednesday Noon Thru Wednesday Noon, March 19, 1969 bB B B
WINN-DIXIE
3*oi. TARNOW SMOKED SLICED BEEF. TURKEY OR # 9*oz BORDENS BIG TEN FRESH QUARTER PORK LOINS SLICED INTO
CORNED BEEF 3/sl. CANNED BISCUITS 2/41 PORK CHOPS 69*
COPELAND ALL MEAT __ 10 CounITBALLARD OR PILLSBURY EXTRA LIGHT TENDER PORK TENDERLOINS. BONELESS
SLICED BOLOGNA 59* CANNED BISCUITS 4/41* ROAST or STEAKS 99*
Mb. Bog SUNNYLAND FRESH 12 oz. SUPERBRAND SLICED INDIVIDUALLY WRAPPED AMERICAN FRESH BOSTON BUTT
PORK SAUSAGE 49* CHEESE FOOD 59* PORK ROAST 59
TASTE OSEA FRESH FLOUNDER SUPERBRAND 2-Lb. 808 WHITE THICK SAVE I7C
FISH FILLETS 49* COTTAGE CHEESE 2 *s9* SLICED BACON sl.l
12 oz. TASTE O' SEA OLD FASHION WISCONSIN 1%-Lb. Avg. SWIFT PREMIUM CORNISH
FISHCAKES 3/sl. DAISY CHEESE 79* GAME HENS 2/$1.39
JJL -D BRAND FRESH LEAN
Mm tm gr oud 1147
is, |
\ USDA CHOICE WB BRAND CORN FED BONELESS NY STRIP USDA CHOICE W D BRAND CORN FED BONELESS ROUND
\ __ STEAKS S F STEAK 99
su PA STEAK s l STEAK *1
11 Ml# 1 "" kill RIBS 59* STEAK S P
Bin INI \ JTf STEAKETTEST 9 ROAST 69*
IlnlTlw B 9 STEW s r ROAST 89*
PcroerTowels 37< Whole'Kernel Corn 27j||j|jl* {jMjk** l ||B* 3 *|
Vwl TWO PATIO MEXICAN V % J PKGS TROPHY AOA9TEO 5-LB W O BRAND LEAN
(( nrr caxaii y AOCt 2/29* i 800. 12 02 GREEN giant RB&i&r Dinners WHftSiF Peanuts HUsSF Ground Bee#
SCOTT FAM^ILT .0 L. J i i 0 good thru march IP SS good thpu march ip '£9jO good thru march i
Paper Napkins 41 Mexicorn ....
Spanish Rice . 25 e Spears of
* 1 (-Home nrcr 1 M-oz p.lmktto r*WM F.t/fM. tvmz T
i iprrii 12-oz lESUEUR . * JPS/5 vj3* Srcakettesr Pim. Cheese RPtWhole Frvers \
303 LAKSt >i Ii 7 lyA \A /L f .fj YpQ /\|| 4. vj Y Y .>. T 1 ~IV v v l 1 l j. .. rz". 1 ?.. .. j ijuii i i ..rr.'in 1 1 i i.iii
lIIri|IIIIIJIIII I JB t|, I | I I £ I j \ 9

Thursday, March 13,1969, Tha Florida Alligator,

Page 11



* GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

| FOR SALE |
1968 Yamaha Jsocc, only 2500
miles, $775. Stereo component
Monarch amplifier, tuner, Garrard
turntable, athena speakers, S2OO.
378-7773. (A-4t-100-p)
Runs like new! Looks like new! 65
Honda 150 with 2 helmets and many
other extras. Great for getting to
campus. 378-8905 after 6.
(A-4t-100-p)
Suzuki 80cc SIOO. Must sell. Call
Bill. Room 97 372-9352.
(A-4t-lUO-p)
1966 Suzuki TlO 2500 cc $225.
372-9317. Ask for Mike or Skip.
(A-3t-100-p)
GOING ABROADMust sell Racing
Mtcycl. $325 cash, Stereo and 50
albums sllO, AM-FM radio, and
more goodies. CALL 3780570 Before
5:00 o'clock on weekdays,
weekendsanytime. (A-4t-101-P)
1969 TRIUMPH 650 400 miles
$llOO Fisher amp am-fm radio $220
Benjamin Miracord changer SBO both
1 year old call 376-0285 after six.
(A-3t-101-P)
SURFBOARD 76" Magic"
Speedline shape and rails, 12 lbs. 4
week old sllO call 372-9421 after 3
pm. (A-3MOI-P)
1968 Benelli 125 cc Scrambler road
and trail sprockets, Must Sacrifice
$l6O. Call 378-2878. (A-2MOI-P)
Classical G u itarBeautiful
workmanship only 6 mos
01d575.00 w/ case. AlsoSony tape
deck model 350, 2 yrs old SIIO.OO.
Call 376-7047. (A-4MOI-P)
1965 Yamaha YDS-3 250 5-speed
5700 miles only. New tire,
mechanically, perfect $375 or best
offer. Allen Corbin 378-5851 after 6.
(A-2MOI-P)
HONDA 305 Dream 2 helmets 1967
5000 miles excellent cond. SSOO call
Craig at 3928125. (A-3MOI-P)
Mobile home, 1963 Richardson
10x50. Fr Ir and ck, 2 br $2400. Call
376-0765 for information.
(A-2M02-P)
Mires Max. completely customized
with 64 Volkswagen engine
completely rebuilt with many extras.
All fibre glass body with canvas
flowered top. SI2OO. Call 392-7987.
(A-2t-102-P)
16 gauge J.P. Sauer & Son double
barrel shotgun, hand made by
German craftsmen. Exquisite gun for
collector or hunter. $l5O. Call
392-7987 before its too late!
(A-2M02-P)
BABY FLYING SQUIRRELS back
in stock $5 or $9/pair. 327 NW 16th
St. (5-7 p.m.) 376-0968. (A-2t-102-P)
Win 22 cal mod 52 deluxe, colt navy
cap and ball 9 mm auto pistol. Win
mod 62 22 cal 16 ga-22 high power
over and under German made. High
quality 6 power redfield scope 2 V7,
22 cal scope 3V9 and 4x scope
25/308 po Ackley rifle 357 and 270
dies new RCBS press, etc 372-7912
after 6. (A-lt-102-P)
.-osg
| FOR RENT
Will forfiet SIOO deposit. Landmark
2 bdr sublease for spring qtr. Call
after 5 p.m. 378-7611. (B-4MOO-P)
2 br apt. townhouse AC, IV2 bath,
pool, carpeted, dishwasher, keep our
damage deposit. Williamsburg Apts.
$2lO mo. Cal! 376-0838.
(B-2M02-P)
Must sublease 3 bedrm 2bath fur furnished
nished furnished apt. at Williamsburg, large
living rm. dining rm. dishwasher cen central
tral central air heat pool $260. Call
3780756. (B-st-99-P)
SUBLET 2 br apt. at Landmark
Phase II or 2 roommates wanted to
share same. Pool, health club, etc.
Reasonable rent. Call 378-8982 after
6. Apt. 113. (B-st-98-P)
VILLAGE 34 Sublet spacious 1
bdrm. apt. private patio, quiet
surroundings. Call Lynn 372-6077.
(B-st-98-P)
Best location in town. 1 blk from
Tigert Hall. 1 br. AC apts. Rents
sllO-$ 120 Colonial Manor Apts.
1216 S.W. 2nd Ave. Apt 1 9-6 p.m.
daily, 2-5 p.m. Sunday 372-7111.
(B-98-6t-p)
1 Bedroom Landmark apartment.
Sublet for spring and summer. Call
376-9986. (B-3t-100-p)
Married? Going to be? Nice,
furnished Apt. 1 block from UF
Pinewood paneling 87.50/mo.
Available Mar. 25. Call 378-5883.
(B-3t-100-p)
3
FOR RENT: Concrete block
cottages, individual living units, 6
minutes from campus, decor may be
changed to suit taste, no lease, S7O
monthly. Call: 372-4407 after 8:00
pm. Ask for Steve. (B-3MOI-P)

FOR RENT |
2 rm efficiency. Central heat and air
conditioning all utilities (except gas)
paid for. 1604 NW 3rd PI. Apt. 3 or
call 378-3291. (B-4MOO-P)
Sublet 2 br Camelot apt 202 for
summer. Convenient Westgate Shop.
Pool, laundry, sauna, clubhouse with
col TV included. Unfurn or furn
376-0354. (B-101-3t-P)
2 bedroom furnished Lakeside trailer
to sublease for 3rd quarter (available
March 20) sllO/month. Bar & rugs
included will save on utilities
3760891. (B-3MOI-P)
Perfect pad, 2 bdr. trailer-house.
Private hideaway only 5 min from
campus SBS monthly includes lot.
Call any time. 378-3938 or
378-7085. (B-3MOI-P)
Sublet College Terrace Apt. for Spr.
Qtr. $l2O incl. util. Pool & AC. Call
372-7708. (B-3MOI-P)
jjT* WANTH) |
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
Panic! Need one cellmate for spring
and summer. Landmark Call Sherry
or Judy Ann 378-5554. (C-4t-100-p)
Couple or girl to share house near
Mall SSO mo. or child care for 7 mo.
& 20 mo. old. 378-7609.
(C-2t-102-P)
Roommate wanted spring &/or
summer $42.50/mo. + util. Air &
heat. Call Phil or Dave 4-7 p.m.
372-3801. (C-2M02-P)

[GUNS-GUNS-GUNSI
I -Students only- I
10% DISCOUNT on
I guns and ammo. I
I Bring this ad and I
lyour student I.D.card-
I offer expires April 5
1969
IHarry Beckwith-Gun Dealer
iMicanopy, Fla
|^Phone466jj334o
rairn*TSTs!ll\ BOX OFFICE OPENS 6:30
WUHIKIMh! SHOW STARTS 7:00
ItUllfiHttlHl 2 GREAT MOTION PICTURES
The Toughest Hellfighter of All!
umsmimm
panavision
KIRK DOUGLAS W LOUELV
sviuii Koscinn \T V Ulrv
Eli uiRiiRCH ;4 AA to Die only
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE V TECHNICOLOR
- COMING ATTRACTIONS
"Three in the Attic" And "Conqueror Worm" Opens March 20
"The Night They Raided Minsky's"
And "s* Opens March 27

:, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13, 1969

Page 12

f 11 WANTED
Maie roommate for third quarter.
Three bedroom house wood
interior, fireplace, TV, and bar. Call
378-1112 or come to 627 NE 8 Ave.
after 6 p.m. (C-2t-102-P)
NEAR CAMPUS! Need female
roommate for very nice 2 bedroom
duplex: $45 a mo. plus 1/3 utilities.
Call 372-2048 after 6:00 p.m.
(C-2M02-P)
1 male roommate needed for spring
qtr. No lease to sign. 2-bedroom, AC,
pool, 3 blocks from campus. $42 per
month plus 1/3 utilities. Call
376-9540. (C-3M02-P)
FEMALE roommate wanted for
spring quarter. Two bedroom
Gatortown Apt. $42.50 mo. Call
372-0784. (C-2t-102-P)
Male roommate wanted to share
fantastic two bedroom apt. Color
TV, stereo, AC. The works. Call
378-5673 for additional Information.
(C-2t-102-P)
3rd quarter, one bedroom apt.
Colonial Manor, carpeted & pool. Vz
block from campus, $l2O Call
Immediately 378-8470. (C-2t-102-P)
ONLY 1 bl. from campus coed
roommate to share 2 bdr. apt. with 2
blrls. $122. for spring quarter. Call
378-8074. Very quiet. (C-2M02-P)
CHE API Need 1 or 2 male
roommates. Pool, TV and others
included. Frederick Gardens No. 20.
Call 378-6551 nor for special deal.
(C-2t-102-P)
Roommate wanted 4th person in
sharp 2-bedroom house. $32.50/mo.
No lease, south Gainesville in
excellent location. 376-2344.
(C-2t-102-P)

WANTED I
LIVE OFF CA MPUS C.L.O.
$60.00/M. Room & board. Frosh &
sophs, may break. Contracts total
indepen. Ciill 376-9420. Come by
117 NW 15 St. (C-7t-97-P)
Female to share small house behind
NRM starting spring qtr $45 mo call
3785275 now, through finals and the
break late at night preferable.
(C-st-99-P)
Need 2 coeds for spacious, poolside
Camelot apartment. 2 bedrooms, 2
baths. s6l month. 378-8458.
(C-4t-99-P)
Quiet studious male for 2br apt.
Available 3rd qtr. $41.25 and share
apt with 3 additional roommates.
Call 376-6672 after 6 pm. (C-st-99-P)
Need 1 roommate for Frederick Gar Gardens
dens Gardens 2 bedroom apartment spring
quarter. AC, pool. March rent paid.
No deposit needed. Call 378-1978.
(C-st-99-P)
ARRI-BL with motor,magazines,&
tripod. Also compatable 35mm
s o u n d r e c o rd ing system.
Edwards,Apt.3o2 1225 SW First Ave.
Top price!!! (C-SMOI-P)
Need ride to Huntsville Ala. Friday
March 21. Pay half gas. Call Morgan
at 392-9901 after 9:00 pm.
(C-2MOI-P)
One female roommate for Landmark
$ 110 for Spring quarter over
pool. Willing to make a deal! Call
378-9604 or 376-7129 TODAY!
(C-st-98-P)
2 female roomates for spring and/or
summer quarters. Rent only $40.25.
Call 378-4565 or come by Apt. 69
French Quarter after 5. (C-st-98-P)
Female roommate needed for spring
and/or summer quarters. French
Quarter Apt. 65. Phone 372-5554.
(C-4t-100-p)
Female roommate needed for large
Camelot Apt. Fireplace, on the pool.
Reduced rent. Call 378-9694.
(C-4t-100-p)
Need 2 roommates for large 2 bdrm.
house. Near Sin City, Univ., and
sororities. Inexpensive and nice. Call
Steve at 376-9592. (C-4t-100-p)

v .*:
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1 WANTED
y v
One male roommate for 2-bedroom,
Fredrick Garden apartment, pool,
air-conditioned, call 378-5642.
(C-3MOI-P)
Fourth coed rommate wanted for
spring or spring/summer quarters,
Landmark Apts. Call 378-8731
anytime. (C-3t-101-P)
MALE ROOMMATE needed to share
2 bedr. 2bath Landmark apt. with
two others for the spring qtr.
S4O/mo. Call 376-2349. (C-3MOI-P)
Need 2 MALE roommates to share
luxurious Landmark Apt. with a dish
washer warm neighbors and a
generally quiet atmosphere. Call
372-9609. (C-101-3t-P)
Coed to share apt. near campus air
conditioned, own room, $45 per
month 909 SW 6 Ave. Call
378-1837. (C-2MOI-P)
Coed to share 2-bedroom townhouse
in Tanglewood. AC, dishwasher,
upstairs entrance, doorstep parking,
pool, and more! Call 376-1015.
(C-3MOI-P)
Roommate wanted to share 3
bedroom IV2 bath house. Central heat
and air conditioning. SSO/month +
1/3 utilities. Call 378-7041.
(C-3MOI-P)
Wanted One female roommate for
Spring Quarter in French Quarter
Apt. Call 376-7706. (C-2MOI-P)
3 girls need roommate for spring
and/or summer term. Dishwasher,
pool, gym and sauna. Landmark apt.
21. Ph. 378-8467. Ask for Elaine.
$45. (C-3t-96-p)
Wanted one male roommate to rent 2
bedrm apt. Total rent for month is
$165.00. Phn 376-9575. 88 Vill. Park
Apts. Urgent occupancy needed.
(C-4t-100-p)
Doc savage paperbacks, new or used
numbers 1,3, 4,7, 8, 10, and 19.
Will pay up to $2- each. Send a note
to P.O. Box 12934 U. Sta. Will
pick up. (C-3t-100-p)
Female roommate wanted for spring
quarter. 1 block behind Norman
s4l/m & 1/3 Util. A.C. Call
378-0769. (C-4t-100-p)
One female roommate for one
bedroom Village Park apt. on pool
Call 378-3903 after 5 weekdays,
any-time weekends. (C-4t-100-p)



* G ATO R CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED
A male graduate student needs a
friendly and neat roommate to share
a 2-bedroom house at 819 N.W. 19
Ave. $45. Call Sai at 378-3365 or
392-1885. (C-3t-100-p)
Have your own room and bath and
live with congenial male in luxury
apt. SBS a month, utilities included.
Williamsburg 66, 376-7854 anytime.
(C-3t-101-P)
I'
SUMMER CAMP POSITIONS:
Exciting work at boy's camp, June
22 to Aug. 21. Mature staff from all
parts of the country (foreign
students). In rich cultural area of
Berkshires, Mass. High degree of staff
fellowship. Grad students, upper
classmen preferred. Attractive
salaries. 41st year. Openings include;
waterfront; swimming, sailing,
water-skiing, canoeing. Land sports;
tennis, baseball, soccer, golf, archery,
riflery, campcraft and tripping;
choral director, song leader, folk
music, guitarist, photography,
yearbook, ceramics, pianist,
electronics, nature, astronomy, ham
radio. Give skills, references, phone
number, (immediate phone
responce), to camp Mah-Kee-Nac,
137 Thacher Lane, South Orange,
N.J. 07079. (E-2M02-P)
WANTEDExperienced bookkeeper
and secretary. Bookkeeper must be
experienced in bookkeeping and
secretary must be experienced in
shorthand and typing. Salary
commensurate with ability. Call
Parks M. Carmichael, Scruggs,
Carmichael & Tomlinson, 376-5242,
Gainesville, for interview.
(E-101-3t-P)
Experienced cashiers, full and part
time. Apply at Florida Book Store,
16 14 West University Avenue.
(E-st-98-P)
EXCITING CAREER secretary to
executive. Plush office nice associates
and excellent pay. Call ALLIED
PERSONNEL of Gainesville 1800 N.
Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)
GENERAL OFFICE girls who type
well or handle bookkeeping know
office machines. Great future. Call
ALLIED PERSONNEL of Gainesville
1800 N. Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-time or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Duo's Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
Opportunity for college men to work
as part time life insurance salesmen
while in college as campus agents for
Pacific Mutual Life. 378-6390.
(E-st-99-P)
INHALATION THERAPY
TECHNICIAN TRAINEE On the job
training for mature person. Hospital
experience and some mechanical
aptitude helpful. Salary
commensurate with experience and
education. Paid vacation, holidays,
sick leave, and other benefits. Inquire
personnel director, Alachua General
Hospital, 372-4321. (E-6t-98-P)

Hi \ specials HI
Lunch and Dinner |j|||
||| Thursday Special 111
m BROILED CALVES LIVER m
§§ & ONIONS §1
1 59 t I
f§ fried" SHRIMP WITH H
§§ FRENCH FRIES, HOT §1
m SLAW & HUSH PUPPIES W
"I $1.09 I
1 MORRISON'S I
I CAFETERIAS I

1 AUTOS
>i jS
LIKE NEW Beautiful 65 Falcon
Futura 2 door hardtop 6 cyl radio
automatic new wsw. Must sell. A real
bargain. Call 392-1473 or 372-5703.
(G-3MOI-P)
Running gear to 162 E type rear end,
suspension, interior etc. also XK 150
wire wheels; some XK 120; Mkll
parts. Pat day 376-2998.
(G-3M02-P)
VW Manx buggy 1300 53hp red
metal flake full top side curtains roll
bar 1900 or best offer see at sport car
specialties 1010 s main 3789086.
(G-4t-100-P)
57 VW Excellent condition; never
missed a servicing. $390. Call
372-9875. Also must sell one-room
air conditioner. Guarantee. SBO.
(G-2t-101-P)
PERSONAL
Friday Afternoon Club will swing
again next quarter. No more cocktail
parties for this quarter at
Lamplighter. (J-2t-102-P)
Dear J.A.M., It's the thirteenth again!
Happy third month anniversary!
Your dumb blonde. (J-lt-102-P)
To the brothers of AXA Hope final
grades prove better than 86% proof.
Love, Little Sisters of the Crescent.
(J-lt-102-P)
Take a finals break Come to the
dance in the Broward Rec Room Sat,
March 15, 9:001:00 pm.
(J-3MOI-P)
WHERES HOME NEXT
QUARTER? Try Georgia Seagle Hall,
mens cooperative. Rom & board
$220/quarter. 1002 W. University.
372-9410. (J-3t-101-P)
GIRL WATCHER! YOU PICKED A
GOOD TOWN TO! THE
PHOTOGRAPHER" (J-2MOI-P)
SSCC CHILDREN SHOULD GO
FAR! The sooner they leave, the
better! MR. CLEAN" (J-2t-101-P)
CONGRATULATIONS, DONNA! Ill
buy you a steak if you win the mini
contest Thurs. -MR. CLEAN
TJ-2t-101-P)
E~ sitVt'E
I wcueenl
I AS I
leuluttl
B ucaMcwr i -mb mi J
gSThtes The OtherShrthJ

Thursday, March 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

§ PERSONAL g
forxvrawDocwoj::
This break think about the summer
spend it in Europe, Middle East or
Japan for credit or on your own. Call
392-1655, Rm. 310 Reitz Union.
(J-2M02-P)
'"WELCOME, JAKE! Were proud to
have you at the SPANISH MAIN
every night from 6 til 9. All those
people who' have been asking us to
stay open nights will welcome you,
too! 105 W. University Ave. Phone:
372-0667. (J-4t-100-p)
If you cant go to the ISLE OF
WOMEN, come see us. We went
and returned with tortoise shell
jewelry its famous for. Mantilla
combs, earings (wow!), watch bands,
hair clips, etc. From $2.50 to $6.95.
WHERE? You guessed it THE
SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open every night till 9:00.
(J-4t-100-p)
1 LOST & FOUND I
LOST DOG: Golden chow-long
haired breed; female; 14 yrs.
"F>rincess vicinity NW 39th Ave &
NW 34th St; gentle; sentimental
value; Reward. (L-3t-101-P)
HELP! Ive lost keys on key ring. If
found, call 392-7870. (L-2M02-P)
LOST blue contacts in a flat, white
case. DESPERATE! Call 376-0968,
please. (L-2t-102-P)

SAT.
llnN SIBIH.II NUNHMKEII
\ 3:00 5:00 7:05 9:15 \

I tPPP i> faott /JBu f mk
jfl. \ I f )I Mf^k
*******
VIE BOOK THAT
LAUNCHED THE WAR
is now an explosive, new motion picture presented in
the full breathtaking splendor of wide screen and color.
Here is the conflict, the fire and passion of Uncle
Toms Cabin.. only time can dim its legend of those
who lived and died during the epic struggle of slavery.
KROGER BABB presents HARRIET BEECHER STOWE'S
fe. CLASSIC OF THE OLD SOUTH
\ UNCLE TOMS
fjg, CABIN
iheEJC

Page 13

.WXWWNWVtV.v.v.v.v.'.v.v.'.wvwtw....
I LOST & FOUND I
v
':^vav.v.v.v.av.v.v.v.v.v.-.v>>;qv-wwl
FOUND: German shepherd puppy on
campus. Call 378-0937. (L-3t-NC-99)
LOST: Phi Delta Theta pin. If found,
call 376-1701. $lO reward. Ask for
Bruce. (L-st-99-P)
SERVICES
v
INCOME TAX $4.00 up. Expert
service in two locations to serve you:
1227 W. Univ. Ave. (across from
Ramada Inn) & 107 N. Main St.
378-9666. (M-ts-95-P)
A LTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systems
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
(Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(st-99-M-P)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-95-P)
Experienced typist reasonable rates
prompt service. 376-0406.
(M-st-98-P)
Tennis racket restringing, satisfaction
guaranteed. Free pickup and delivery
on and near campus. Call M and R
Tennis Services. 378-2489.
(M-18t-59-P)

NOW!
the shock that
shook Vegas to its
foundations!
THEY
CHIME
TO ROB
LAS
VEGAS


LOCKWOOD SOMMER
CO6B FRANCE.-,
wmmmmmmmmmmm
r""_
K#j HURRY!..
( % A I * \> , > ! M
I YOU MUST SEE
JL ACADEMY AWARD
S NOMINEE...
Hi CUFF ROBERTSON
4c%y



Page 14

i. The Florid* Alligator, Thursday, March 13,1969

EXTRA
WITH TMII COUfUN AMO PUICMAtI Os Miaiidii
iGleem Tooth Paste 1
6% ox. size |
1* (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) £
EXTRA
IListerine Antiseptic |
20 ox. hot. |
6. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) £
EXTRA |P-'^
WltM TMII COUPON AMO PUICMAtI Os IbaiiM
I Miss Breck Hair Spray |
| Unscented, reg. super |
13 ox. size |
jg 11. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA p--^|
MITM TMII COUfOH AMO fUICHAII Os
I Woodbury Shampoo |
| 8 oz. hot. |
f (Expires Wed., March 19. 1969) j 1
EXTRA
WITH IMIS COUPON AND PUICMAtI Os
| Arrid Extra-Dry |
% Deodorant
A % 2
4.3 oz. size
\> 2
> e 2
(Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA IF"*!
| Sominex Tablets 1
jt
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)> f
j. i
| 26. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA BP-Sf
WITH TMII COUPON AMO PUICHAII Os
| Vick's Formula 44"
| Cough Syrup
| 6 oz. or 3V2 oz. bot.
i ;
j! 31. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA
> Dristan Decongestant |
|; Tablets j
j; 24 or 50 ct. size j
)> 32. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) j
EXTRA
|Sj|
2
j! Any 3 Pkgs. of
j! Bit Dye 1
!>
)> 36. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) £
EXTRA
i So-Fresh Mattress Fresh
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1 1 41. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) Jj
EXTRA IF IFWITH
WITH THIS COUPON ANO PtfBCNAtl OP KhM
0 2 1
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1
! J
|
|; 46. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
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j; Terry Dish Towel |
j! 51. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
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WITH THIS COUPON AMO PUICHAII Os Bttaiatf
!! Squibb Liquid Swjeto
j! 24 cc Bot.
! **
ji 56. (Expires Wed., March 19,1969)
diiipa
, t
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> |
61. (Expires Wed.. March 19, 1969) j

111 11 reenSta mps fpj
iEfferdent Tablets
40 ct. bot. |]
%2. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) |
EXTRA
WITH TMII COUPON AND PUICHAII Os MaiiM
| Jergen's Lotion |
I 9Va oz. or 14Va oz. bot. |i
jp 7. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) 3
EXTRA
|g|
| Breck Basic |
S 2
| Conditioner |
j|> 12. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) |
EXTRA
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WITH TMII COUPON AND PUICMAtI Os
| l
Gillette Techmatic Razor
Is
I f j
|> 17. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA ¥***%
\% Tampax Tampons |i
i)> regular or super
! li
;S > AA 2 |
(Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) I
EXTRA
WITH TMII COUPON ANB PUBCMAII Os fctiiifldH
j! Saccharin Tablets < J
| 500 or 1000 ct. j[S
3>
§ |j
27. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) J ll

I >5750 extra I
I I
WHEW YOU CLIP AND REDEEM THE COUPONS ON THIS PAGE

EXTRA IF*!
$ Any 2 pkgs. Gerber
j|> j
jj! Baby Pants
1 ;
|> 37. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA
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Jet-Dry jj;
; Solid or Liquid | |
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[ 42. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) \ 9
M\to G reenSta m ps Pi
UmAml WITH THIS COUPON AN# Os Ifeiitfi
$
:
; Meat Thermometer 1 |
!: 47. Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) X
PI
I Metal Ice Cube Tray |
52. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) Jj
I' I FI EXTRA
|fll|^GreenStampsP K j
with this AMO
*% Alko Seltzer
25 ct. Bot. I
jljf 57. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) Jj
i% Quart or Pint I
1 1 Freezer Container 3
|g 52. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)

EXTRA PV
| Fasteeth Denture Powder |
2 oz. or 4Vi oz. size |
3. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA
WITH TMII COUPON AMO PUBCMAII Os HKluitfl
| Head A Shoulders ! |
|i| Shampoo
| 8. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
dWGreenStampspy
Dippity-Do Setting Gel
*> reg. or extra-hold
I |
g 13. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) £
EXTRA
| Personna Stainless Steel
l! Blades Double Edge 5 ct. |
| or Iniector 7 ct.
j > w
|j> 18. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
EXTRA
WITH TMII COUPON ANB PUBCMAII Os
[Norwich Aspirin |
v 250 ct. bot. |
23. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) $
EXTRA
| Contac Capsules 1
% <8
| 10 ct. bot.
j > 28. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) |

EXTRA IF 55
iKGreenStampsfM
| #950-2 Flashlight Battery
i#H2-S Flashlight with Batteries |
#935-2C Flashlight Battery i
38. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) j
EXTRA IF s **
Q
Swift's Vigoro
! 50 lb. bag
> <
* 1 o
; *3. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) j
mps p*]
j; Egg Beater
48. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
mps
|; SI.OO or More Os |
|; Any Candies |
jj| 53. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) J
p]
Listerine Lozenges |
I; regular or lemon 4
| 18 ct. pkg. 1
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jj | 58. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) J
IJTJB o EXTRA IFFi
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I HbdflLndflil with tail coufom ot tibawddS
|| Cutex Polish Remover |
It 4 Oz. size |
|f 54. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) |

IffiTiW G reenSta mps K 3
W ITM THIS COUPON AMO rUICHASI Or
<*
Colgate Tooth Brush
| adult size |
4. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) $
ItirtiWWWWWWWWMWWWWWWW^ftAAAAAAAAftAAaAAAAX
it Ml jsj
|| Prell Concentrate |
Shampoo |
|l 5 oz. size £
9. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
* SSWWWWWWWWWWWWMWWW4fewWWWMWWWWAaAAAAA*
BiTil^GreenStampsH
|| Brylcreem Hair Dressing |j
|$ 3 oz. size |j
Jp 14. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
[fiTil^WGreenStampsK
WITH THIS COUPON
|| Gillette Techmatic Bands |
1 5 ct. or 10 ct. |j
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11> 19. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
* XaiWWWWiftAaAAAaAaAAI'AAAftftAAAAaA&aftAAAX;
Iff ?1, EXTRA W**m
[iTlWWGreenStampsM
WITH TMII COUtON AMO AhwidH
**> *k
Bufferin Tablets
1 1 100 ct. bot.
I jt> 24. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
| Coricidin Tablets |
S ss*
I 25 ct. |j
29. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) <|^

l[llll^Gre x e T n K StampsPj
SI.OO or more Ij
j|: Any Empire Brush 39. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) ||
Kflll^GreenStampspPj
Ladies Garden Gloves
i <
>. <
<
> 44. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) <
EXTRA PBSjB
j; Brix Self Lite Charcoal lj
$!
22 oz. can Jj
N 4|
I 49. (Expires Wed., March 19. 1969) 2)
§i|
I SI.OO or more Os |
Any Glassware I
35. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) £
Hll^Green?tamps|pJ
; Vaseline
Petroleum Jelly |
! 4 oz. or 1 2 oz.
> 2
[ 9. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)

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p Scope Mouthwash |
24 oz. bot. I
l 5. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
It SftOftAAAAAAAAAAAAAAteAAftAAAAAftftAAAAAAH
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|| 13 oz. Size I
tO. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969] A
EXTRA F !! Si
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| Palmolive Rapid Shave |
I Reg., Menthol, Lime <>
j|j| 15. (Expires Wed., March 19. 1969)
PI
|| Dial Spray Deodorant |
|| 4 oz. size |
*£> 20. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
IfiTil^GreenStampsH
UULJ WITH THIS COUPON AMP
| Chocks Vitamins & Iron |
| or Multiple Vitamins |
60 ct. bot. |
jjy 25. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969)
tSaaaftaaa&aaaaaaaaafcftaAAaaAftaaAftAAaAX
EXTRA |P l JJ -f|
WITN TNII COUPON AND tVICNAII Os
| Lysol Spray Disinfectant
| | 7 oz. can <[
2

;) 30 (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) <|

EXTRA
|| Johnson Baby Powder
II 9 oz. or 14 oz. can
|| 33. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) < §
Ifr.T.lo EXTRA IF-41
pQ
|: Gator Wild Bird Seed ;j
I 15 lb. bag ;j
; 34. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) XSHWWWWWWfcftAAft&AaftAPAAAAAAftAaAaAAAAAAX
mps H|
It " Woo I i te* Powder |
j| Half Pound.. !|
(j! Woolite Liquid !|
ij I OZ. 16 oz. 32 oz. J |
|j | 40. (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) ] j
irm- extra
[p]
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; or 3-Tube Sprinkler Hose 50 ft. ;!
50 ft. Floridian Hose %" or Vi" ; j
; (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) j|
p|
<
Clothes Pin Bags
I > (
!> !i
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<
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For Children
1> 36 ct.
1>
2 vC C <
J) (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) J
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F3
J & J Cotton Buds
I 54 ct. or 88 ct. !|
1 i
>
J
I (Expires Wed., March 19, 1969) <|



Thursday, March 13,1969, The Florida Alligator,

:^|^ te
WSIKTORTHESAVINy '^>l
| Shoe Peg Corn 4.99*
f \ Nibiets Corn s 99*
Golden Corn 5 x 99*
Green Giant Franch Style or Kitchen Sliced
Green Beans ... 5 ~ 99'
A Asparagus Spears 59 c
, Z., H.W... TH.w
hm ua njm had wp. AR l9 JJ 69 '* jv*" \( W Cling Peaches . 4 99*
Pictsweat Frozen Florida Orange Cmk. ADDED CUSTOMER BONUS* / A I'l
Th. Cold Flo Fighter l X Del Monte Tangy, Pineapple-Grapefruit
Orange Juice # o o # 2 79* Cmiii4 4 46-ei.OG^
Haddock or rTaPI I
Watchers Dinners O-oi
Frozen Dinners rkg 1 79* or color*
cooT whip 49* rQ Scot Towels x l 39*
Frozen Hm^^l
/ n_ IV2 lb JCAc *rsPW F S White or Assorted Colors, Bathroom Tissue
Srz::;: n S o#t weve. a ? 99*
Perch FilMsT X 89' §¥§ Kp3£s@%j
Fried Fish Fillets 69' Ms KjGR *[ <3fr
QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED i
Cll i lhb uj| or Colors
METE s t£>" Scotties 4=99'
h/M Coca Cola
c l !..*, Lady Scott 4x99*
AtjC . ~ MI Printed Bathroom Tissue
ti on Marshmallows ,9 Lady Scott 4x99*
plus Deposit Marshmallows 23* d.i Met.
._ . . oioTs-pSn,. = Chunk Tuna 3 :; 89'
* Dole Low-Cal Fruit
B- . - Sunshine (Sugar-Coated Cookies) _ _
Marmalade *tT 39 Lemon Coolers 49 Cocktail . 4 X 99*
F.F.V. Lemon Thins, Orange Thine or
I-"" 'AASVe-oi AAc Brown Edge Wafers .. Assortod Flavors 12 ox. cans
r'.hroo. a^ry m .. Publix Canned Drinks-49<
BaadpAMSBMM A 1 ~
UZZT , lb To^ el Ho,ders 49 Sandwiches e.... x 49*
PQnCQkG mix phg. French Dressing **' 29* White er Asserted Celers, Scett
Ihiij with Beans '= * SiiS. v- ss Family Napkins 2 :.: 29'

Page 15



Page 16

' The FlorMi Alligator, Thunday. March 13,1969

I tfk )B| km fc
hwgdHw m (RPV

Publix New Dairi-Fresh
Cottage Cheese cup 33
With Pork Serve
Cortland Sauerkraut X 33 c
Armour's Star Mira Cure
Sliced Bacon 65 c
Swift's Premium Flavorful
Braunschweiger 49 c
Swift's Premium Delicious
Cooked Salami X s 55 c
Tarnow's Cooked or Baked
Sliced Ham X: 69 c
Famous Orange-Band Label
Herman Wieners e e e e pkg. 59 c
Famous Oscar Mayer Brand
Smokies Links X 69 c
Copeland's Tasty SHced 5-oz. 10-or. 16.0 z.
Bologna 25 c 45 c 59 c
Tasty Seafood Treatl
Small White Shrimp.. 79 c
Tasty Seafood Treatl
Kingfish Steaks Z 69 c
[WtiPWum Lane
Fight Colds and Flwl
Large Bag, Fresh Florida
GRAPEFRUIT 8 X 49 c
Hi-Hat Brand Firm
TOMATOES 4 JSL 99 c
Crisp and Juicy
JONATHAN APPLES. 3 £ 49 c
New Florida Red-Bliss
POTATOES 10 X. 69 c

- .**s*3ifc-upp.l'nil--'- *a|J£ / Ty

CORNED BED AND CABBAGE
You don't hove to be Irish to enjoy corned
beef and cabbage! As a flavor combination,
it's a natural and everybody's favorite. Wipe a
4 to 5-lb. corned-beef brisket with damp paper
towel, place in large kettle, cover with cold
water. Add a medium clove of garlic, a medium
yellow onion (halved), 2 whole cloves, 10 whole
black peppers, 2 bay leaves, 14 teasp. mustard
seed. Bring to boil, reduce heat, simmer 5 min minutes,
utes, minutes, then skim. Cover and simmer 3 to 4 hours
until fork-tender. During last 15 minutes, add a
medium head of cabbage cut into wedges.. To
make it a one-dish meal, add during last 25
minutes 6 medium potatoes (pared and quar quartered).
tered). quartered). And you can turn it into a "New England
Boiled Dinner" by adding 6 medium carrots
and 6 medium white turnips or parsnips (pared
and quartered) when you add the potatoes. To
serve, remove corned beef and vegetables
from liquid. Slice beef, arrange on large plat platter,
ter, platter, surround by vegetables. Serves six to eight.
For the eating o' the green, make an Emer Emerald
ald Emerald Fruit Mold, using lime gelatin dessert) add adding
ing adding grapefruit sections (cut into small chunks)
and diced apple. Individual molds on curly en endive
dive endive or surrounded by watercress are attrac attractive.
tive. attractive. Dilute mayonnaise with a little orange
juice, add a drop or two of green food coloring, ~
and spoon over molds just before serving. For
this meal, you don't need the luck of the Irish to
have everything turn out delicious!

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it: 39*
Sliced Cooked Salami or
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From, Ota Dam Pept)
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Longhorn Cheese T 89 e
Armour's Miss Wisconsin Pimento
i
Cheese Spread 49 c
Kraft's Cracker Barrel
Sharp Cheddar ... 77 c
Breakfast Club Begular
Margarine Y.; 15 e
Imperial Brand Regular
Margarine \]'X: 43 c
Pillsbury's Crescent
Dinner Rolls 39 c
Clearfield Delicious Breakfast Treatl
Corn Meal Mush... VX: 29 c

PI
WITH THIf AND OF Kiilfll
I Armour's Star Magic Slice
Turkey Roast |
All Whit* or Light A Dark Mix ]
2-lb., 6-ox. pkg. <
63. [Expires Wed., March 19, 1969] J
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bHHM WITH TNII COUPON AND PUICNASI Os
I Morrell's Pride
Boneless Canned Hams
three pound can
64. [Expires Wed., March 19, 1969] <
Stamps
with this coupon and purcmasi or
Rath's Black Hawk J[
Honey-Cured Celebrity Ham Sj
2
> 2
[ 65. [Expires Wed., March 19. 1969] |
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Freezer Queen Veal |
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two pound pkg. |
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bdHH WITH COUPON PURCMASI OF Kiwfli
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WITH THIS COUPON AND fUICHASI OF
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|> or White Vinegar |
I quart bottle |
I 69. [Expires Wed., March 19, 1969]
mps PI
HwAbdH WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCMASI OF
I Any Spice Islands I
Spices <
reg. jar J
70. [Expires Wed., March 19, 1969] |
B tXTRA
WITH THIS COUPON AND PURCMASI OF
I Swift's Premium Tasty <
Pork Bag Sausage
1-lb. bag
[Expires Wed., March 19, 1969| I



Sports Letters
Dear Mr. Editor:
Motor racing, like any other sport, must be understood to be
appreciated. Marc Dunn and Bill Dunn obviously do not understand
it, and we believe it is both unfair and ignorant on their part to
criticise racing in general and the management of Daytona
International Speedway in particular.
The Daytona 500 is to stock car racing what the Super Bowl is to
football, and we would like to know where one can secure 50-yard
line tickets to that event for $6? Granted, one can watch college
games for that and high school games for even less, but one can see
amateur motor racing for much less also. At the 500, the spectator
cajn watch professionals in the biggest stock car race in the world, and
to see professional football in its prime, the spectator pays prices
equal to those at the 500 if not more.
For the information of the Alligator staff, the passes that were
given to the reporters WERE press passes. No tickets that are sold to
the public permit anyone to get even near the pits before, during, or
after the race at any NASCAR sanctioned event, and the passes that
do allow one to enter the pits before and after the race are given only
to public relations and news people.
In order for anyone to be in the actual pits during a race, he must
be a member of one of the crews of one of the cars entered in that
particular race. This rule is enforced because it keeps the pits less
crowded and confused and makes it easier for the crews. We know
what it is like to reach for a tool box during a pit stop only to find a
gawking reporter using it as a vantage point, and having no idea what
is taking place around him, he feels insulted when you ask him to
please get the heD out of the way. Races are often won or lost by a
few precious seconds in the pits and by keeping them clear it makes it
fair for everyone.
We cannot say for sure why the reporters were not allowed to use
the press box, but one reason is probably because of the very limited
space. The speedway is under the operation of building a new press
box, and it is likely that is was not finished for the 500. This is
possibly why only large newspapers and magazines were allowed to
use what accommodations were available, and we see no reason to feel
slighted because Sports Illustrated was given prominence over the
Alligator. Actually, we think that the reporters were lucky to get
treated aS well as they did, for at sports events as large as the 500,
college newspaper reporters are often forgotten about altogether. Has
the Alligator staff ever tried to secure seats in the press box for the
Super Bowl?
Marc Dunn mentioned in his article that the only thing that
brought the crowds to their feet were the wrecks. Besides this being
an out-and-out lie, (the crowds stood for most of the race) we see no
reason to hide the fact that it is only human to stand when there is a
wreck. After all, inside every car is a human being, and just about
everyone there, even the beer drinkers, cares about him.
Marc Dunn also called the $39,000 prize for first place an outrage
and pointed out the fact that it is more than some athletes make in an
entire season. For Mr. Dunns information, it is more than most
drivers make in an entire season also. On the average, professional
racing drivers are paid no more than professional football players or
major league baseball players, and as for his comment on the winners
four hours work, Mr. Dunn must not consider practice and testing
as part of the race. Not to mention the fact that every time he goes
out onto the track he is taking a calculated risk that could cost him
his life.
And then, driving can be considered only half the sport. It costs an
owner about $50,000 to build a car for a race like the 500, and if he is
lucky, he will go through only three engines during practice,
qualifying, and the race at the cost of $12,000 apiece. Counting tires,
entry fee, motel and transportation costs, and a trained crew of
mechanics, the Daytona 500 is an easy SIOO,OOO investment for each
entry. Os course, most of this is paid for by sponsors, but when you
compare the initial investment with the prize that only the winner
gets, and consider the risk involved for the driver, $39,000 is by no
means anywhere as near as outragous as Mr. Dunn would have us
believe.
Perhaps for some, driving an automobile at 200 mph on the
ultimate limit of tire adhesion does not seem like it would be a
challenge. Perhaps some would claim that racing involves no real skill,
but this is just as ridiculous as saying that being a quarterback or
second baseman requires no skill.
That is what racing is all about. Some people like it and some do
not. We sincerely hope that in the future the Alligator will get a
reporter who appreciates and understands the sport to cover races,
and will refrain from attempting to criticise subjects it obviously
knows nothing about.
ROBERT R. THOMAS
TIM CHITWOOD
JOHN S. GLEASON

(EDITOR'S NOTE: Our
passes were not press passes.
NASCAR officials have since
admitted they were not. We do
not question that racing is a
sport but only think it's a shame
such a popular sport at least at
Daytona has such poor press
relations. Your attitude of
belittling the campus press is the
very attitude we criticize of the
Daytona 500 management.)

HOT ROAST BEEF
V 5.... 97$

UF Tracksters Shooting
For NCAA Indoor Laurels

UFs sensational high jumper
Ron Jourdan will travel to
Detroit this weekend in hopes of
capturing first place honors in
the NCAA and perhaps a new
American indoor mark.
The junior from Pensacola has
cleared the magic height of seven
feet 13 out of 15 attempts this
winter. At one point he had
cleared seven feet a record nine
consecutive times.
Jourdan has won first place
honors 14 times and has not lost
to a collegiate performer this
season. The lanky, 6-1,
150-pounder will be aiming at
the 7-3 American record held by
Bostons John Thomas.
NL Fuss
Still On
TAMPA (UPI) Baseball
Commissioner Bowie Kuhn
scheduled a closed meeting for
late Wednesday to discuss the
hassle created by the announced
retirement of Donn Clendenon.
Scheduled to meet with Kuhn
were National League President
Warren Giles, and representatives
of the Houston and Montreal
teams.
There was no indication
whether Clendenon would be at
the meeting.
Clendenon had been picked
up by Montreal in the baseball
expansion draft and then he and
Jesus Alou were traded to
Houston for outfielder Rusty
Staub.
But then Clendenon
announced his retirement to go
into business in Atlanta.
Houston has indicated it
wants to keep Alou and
Montreal has said it wants Staub.
The problem is in agreeing upon
another player to fill out the
trade.
What To Do
Without Refs?
One of the nuttiest stories
heard all winter was at
Middlebury College in Vermont.
Middlebury was playing
Brandeis, coached by K.C.
Jones, the one-time great Boston
Celtic guard.
In the stands scouting are the
Vermont coach, Art Loche, and
Doug Holmquist, his assistant.
The referees didnt show up.
So Loche and Holmquist
officiated the whole game. They
think its the first time in NCAA
history that two coaches
refereed a game.
Loche said he was so tired
Holmquist had to drive him
home.

Jourdans main competition
will come from Olympic winner
Dick Fosbury from Oregon State
University. Jourdan defeated
Fosbury during the indoor
season this year.
Ron has had a great winter
and he sure would like to have a
good showing in Detroit, says
Gator Track Coach Jimmy
Carnes. He has worked very
hard and is hoping for a record
performance.
Along with Jourdan a host of
Gators qualified for the meet
and will make the trip with
Carnes.
Jerry Fannin a sophomore
from Lakeland will challenge the
best in the country in the 440.
Eagles Sign
Missourian
PHILADELPHIA The
Philadelphia Eagles announced
this week the signing of their
fifth choice in the pro football
draft, Jim Anderson, a 6-foot-4
tackle from Missouri.

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Near grads and recent grads desired
No Obligations! No Registration Fees!
Fee Paid Openings Only!
Seminar Registration Starts Friday, March 7th.
Running through Wednesday, March 26th at
1800 North Main St. 376-4611

Thursday, March 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

He has recorded a 48.9 indoors
and last weekend was voted the
outstanding performer in the
Jesuit Invitationl with a 47.8
clocking.
Bill Ballinger is entered in the
600, John Parker in the mile,
Ron Coleman and Grover
Howard in the long jump and
triple jump, Bob Lang in the
1000 and Eammon OKeeffe in
the 880 for the Gators.
The mile relay team of
Fannin, OKeeffe, Ballinger and
Jake Schickel will participate in
the mile realy.
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Page 17



Page 18

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13,1969

r l

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
NEW YORK -An air of
casualness and a spirit of victory
looms in the Gator camp in New
York on the eve of the National
Invitational Tournament.
For some, this is their first
trip to the big city. Mike
McGinnis and his wife Pat were
in awe as they got their first
look at the Manhattan skyline.
Its something, the native
Zephyrhills, Fla., said. I only
know New York by what Ive
seen on TV. Mike also
remarked that compared with
Zephyrhills (a town of 4,000
during the winter and 2,500
during the summer) New York is
too big to believe.
The team sparkplug, Tony
Duva, of Fort Lauderdale, got
things going as the team
travelled to Jacksonville
Wednesday morning. Although
he is from the north he had
never visited New York.
Tony was quizzing UFs All
America center Neal Walk who is
originally from the big city:
Hey Neal, is there a lot of
open space in New York? Duva
asked.
Yeah, Tony about this
much, Walk gestured the
amount with the thumb and
forefinger of one hand.
Neal is the answer man for all
inquiries concerning the city,
since he was born here and
spends his summers here. He
informed the other Gators what
to expect, what to see and what
to watch out for.
A New York sports
columnist, Gene Roswell, wrote
. about the NIT Wednesday. He
said that the NIT has something
the NCAA doesnt it has
soul.
In basketball, soul is
do wn-to- the- school-yard school-yardconcrete-quality
concrete-quality school-yardconcrete-quality that frees the
game and the players from the
bind of establiaimie ntarianism,
Roswell wrote in the New York
Post.
With tongue in cheek,
Roswell noted that Neal is
six-foot-twelve when he sticks
his nose up in the air, and that
he has a beek so noble his best
friends call him hawk.
Roswell also commented that
Neal passed up the Olympics so
he could continue in school and
eventually help the Gators have
season good enough to be
invited to the NIT and that Neal
is the second biggest pro
prospect in the country,
SAVE MONEY I
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£ Its NIT-Time For The Gators

Mood Is Casual Bui Ready ... After Cold Reception

Alcindor of UCLA being the
first.
It seems that UF basketball is
becoming well known even in
the North, where they pride
themselves at being the best at
everything. This tournment is
just the start for Coach Tommy
Bartletts cagers, it is the first of
many.
No matter what the outcome
Thursday night, the UF has
made a name for itself in
basketball circles and there will
be many more Neal Walks
playing ball in Gator country.

V r i s*'
'jS oSJUSUhigL Jm' : Z
HKk I-a ? r
H| ll lur UA EL fl /MBpBIHjM
m, If
C'MON NEAL, SHAKE A LEG
... he'll need extra kick tonight
Graves To See NIT
NEW YORK UF Athletic Director Ray Graves and members of
the Gator Tipoff Club of Gainesville will fly to New Yo rk today to
watch the UFs opening round NIT game against Temple.
Graves wife was already in New York Wednesday along with the
families of cage Coach Tommy Bartlett, assistant basketball coach
Dick Davis and the wife of player Mike McGinnis.
Send A Telegram
Student organizations and individual basketball fans are asked to
show their presence at the NIT game tonight by sending the Gators a
telegram wishing them luck against the Temple Owls.
Address: Coach Tommy Bartlett, Room 2109, New Yorker Hotel,
New York, New York.
Local Western Union telephone number: 376-5311.
I ROBBIES
Mealu.&gi OlySandwiches
fCOLOR TV & BILLIARD? 5
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I On The Gold Coast 1

TIPOFF: 7 P.M. TONIGHT

The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Sports Editor

NEW YORK-The Gator basketball team left Gainesville
Wednesday morning and arrived in New York City around 12:30 p.m.
It was cold (25 degrees) and windy.
They toured the Madison Square Garden complex where they will
play Temple tonight in the opening round of the National Invitational
Basketball Tournament.
The massive complex seats 19,000 and most of the seats are
expected to be filled for the NIT matches.
There is little speculation as to pre-tourney favorites. Most writers
here consider the matter up for grabs.
The UF Gators have the only concensus All-Amercan in the field,
center Neal Walk selected to third team this year, second team
All-America honors last season.
Playing in the Gators bracket of the NIT are Temple (then (thenopponent
opponent (thenopponent Thursday night), Tulsa, St. Peters, Ohio University, West
Texas State, Tennessee and Rutgers.
In the other bracket are Wyoming, Fordham, Army, South
Carolina, Southern Illinois, Boston College, Kansas and Louisville.
The Gators practiced Wednesday night at New York Xavier High
School gym. They ran through drills preparing for Temples
anticipated slow deliberate attack.

Air Time
On WRUF
* it
Radio Station WRUF will
broadcast the Florida-Temple
NIT basketball game Thursday
night starting at 6:55 p.m.

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Intramurals -A Talent Gold Mine

Last Os A Two-Part Series
By DEE DEE HORN
Alligator Feature Writer
Time a void of space
between what can be and what is
was cited as the main reason
for not participating in varsity
sports by top intramural
athletes.
Im in mechanical
engineering, and thats hard
enough as it is without worrying
about taking time out to play
varsity sports that is, assuming
Im good enough to play, Mike
Hartman, Sigma Chi, said.
When I first came to the UF
from New York, Steve
Kaufmann, Chi Phi, said, I was
more interested in studying than
anything else. After your
freshman year if you dont go
out for varsity, youve more or
less blown your chance, because
this is the time you learn the
techniques.
Ted Bellhorn, AGR, is a
pre-veterinarian student and
needs all his time to study, but
likes the intramural program
because it gives students other
things to do besides academics
and provides competition in
something else besides grades.
The opinion of the
questioned athletes was that the
UFs intramural program is of
the highest caliber. It provides
all the essentials enjoyment,
recognition, competition, and
fraternal feelings all the things
athletes require.
When I first came to UF I
was on the freshman swimming
team. Intramurals offers more of
a chance for a diversified
program instead of devoting all
your time to one sport. I find
my leisure time can now be used
more valuably, said Bellhorn.
Varsity sports take an awful
lot of time. The time taken out
UF Nefters
Win Fourih
The UF tennis team, playing
without No. 1 man Armi Neely,
racked up its fourth win of the
season 7-2 over Presbyterian
here Wednesday.
Neely was forced to miss the
match because of a make up test
he had to take.
Freshman Charlie Owens
moved up to fill Armis shoes
and did so rather effectively
disposing of both his singles and
doubles opposition.
The Gators are 4-0-1 on the
season. Their next opponent is
arch-rival Florida State Saturday
in Tallahassee.
Results:
Owens (F) def. J. Amayaa (P) 6-1,
6-0; G. Amayaa (P) def. Beeland (F)
4-6, 6-4, 6-4; Pressly (F) def. Gregg
6-1, 6-0; Lunetta def. McKenzie (P)
6-1, 6-2; Hilley (F) def. Cobb (P) 6-1,
6-0; Cox (F) def. Pierce (P) 6-1, 6-1;
Doubles: Owens-Hilley (F) def.
Amayaa-Amayaa (P) 8-6, 6-4;
Lunetta-B. Bartlett (F) def.
Gregg-McKenzie (P) 6-4, 6-4;
Cobb-Pierce (P) def. Cox-J. Powell
(F) 6-1, 6-4.

| |

:j NEED ZIPPY RESULTS?
go AIUGAK* j
i CLASSIFIED^
*< V
* )
~ *'

SOME REGRET NOT GOING VARSITY

L O
mt m
TED BELLHORN
.. needs study time
for practicing is extremely
rigorous and cuts deeply into an
individuals personal plans. The
intramural program develops
self-skill and gives everyone a
fair chance for recognition. The
players have the opportunity to
do what they know best without
the heavier pressures of playing
on a varsity team.
But each of the athletes
explains his own personal reason
for not playing on a varsity
team, when, according to Ray
Rollyson of the Intramural
Department, they are good
enough to make a varsity team.
I had decided to try out for
football. I practiced kicking all
week. The day of tryouts came
and my leg was so sore I
couldnt kick at all.
I know Im better than a lot
of the guys playing on the Gator
team, and I regret to a certain
extent not being on the varsity;
but I love Sigma Nus and love
playing for them.
Culbertson was offered a

I m ak
I want economy and easy
parking of course but
Dafsun bas fbe feel of ab 9 car on ibe road. m q maimi
Ifs steady and comfortab le. AH my friends like it.

position on the track team by
Coach James Carnes after Carnes
saw him throw a javelin 193 feet
on the first try. The best javelin
thrower on the team at the time
was only throwing 202 feet. But
Culbertson doesnt like to
practice.
Im very much a naturalist. I
just wasnt inspired that much.
All I want to do is play sports
for the rest of my life or be an
actor. Thats why they call me
hot dogger on the field,
Culbertson said.
Kaufmann said he no longer
has any regrets about not being
on varsity team.
By my sophomore year I
became interested in fraternity
sports and enjoyed it so much
that I never thought about
trying for varsity after that. I
feel by playing for the fraternity
I am contributing something to
it. The UF offers one of the best
intramural programs to
fraternities and independents
Ive ever seen. Everyone gets an
equal chance to play.
Although Hames said he
prefers volleyball, for which
there is no varsity equal, his
present swimming times match
those of the varsity team.
However, he said that
fraternity teams have a tighter
bond between them than do the
intercollegiate teams. Id give up
that chance to play before
60,000 fans if I could help my
fraternity out by playing for
them instead.
Rick Perillo, TEP, said that
when he got out of high school
he had offers to play football for
small colleges but he didnt,
thinking that the educational
facilities would be as good at a
small college. Problems occurred
at home and Perillo attended
Miami-Dade Jr. College for two
years. They dont have a football
team.

According to NCAA rules a
varsity athlete must play three
out of four years and is
red-shirted for a year after
transferring. Therefore, he was
ineligible by the time he came to
the UF.
I regret it every day, but its
in the past. Now I play for TEP
(weve won football for the past
four years) and play in the Law
League. Any spare time I have I
play some type of sport.
The intramural program is
your own little league. It may be
all you can aspire to. Os course
theres not any comparison
between intramurals and varsity,
but its all you have, he said.
Bellhorn said he played
football his first two years at
Florence State College.
Then I injured my knee, and
I cant play football anymore.
Mike Smith, Sigma Phi
Epsilon, said the decision
whether to play varsity or
intramural sports stems from
high school.
Everything depends on the
amount of recognition you
receive in high school and if the
right scouts want to recruit you.
If you only attract the smaller
colleges and dont want to
accept them, then you come to a
big school like UF and play
intramurals...
My only regret is that I wish
I had gone out for freshman

Van Cliburn
Sunday
4:00p.m.

Thursday, March 13, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

l-Efig
TOM CULBERTON
... timing counts
football. Its terrible not
knowing if I could have made it
or not.
Recognition. Another
important word in the life of an
athlete.
I never got any real
recognition in high school, said
Tim Culbertson, Sigma Nu. Our
team never made a big name for
itself, so individuals couldnt.
Unless youre on a scholarship
you have to bust your brains out
and have a real desire in order to
make a varsity team.

Page 19



Page 20

I, The Florida Alligator, Thursday, March 13,1969

The store that
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