Citation
The Florida alligator

Material Information

Title:
The Florida alligator
Alternate title:
Summer school news
Alternate title:
University of Florida summer gator
Alternate title:
Summer gator
Alternate Title:
Daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue daily bulletin
Alternate Title:
Orange and blue bulletin
Alternate Title:
Page of record
Place of Publication:
Gainesville Fla
Publisher:
the students of the University of Florida
Publication Date:
Frequency:
Daily except Saturday and Sunday (Sept.-May); semiweekly (June-Aug.)[<1964>-1973]
Weekly[ FORMER 1912-]
Weekly (semiweekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1915-1917>]
Biweekly (weekly June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1918>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1919-1924>]
Weekly (daily except Sunday and Monday June-Aug.)[ FORMER <1928>]
Semiweekly[ FORMER <1962>]
Weekly[ FORMER <1963>]
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ; 32-59 cm.

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Gainesville (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Alachua County (Fla.) ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Alachua -- Gainesville
Coordinates:
29.665245 x -82.336097

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Vol. 1, no. 1 (Sept. 24, 1912)-v. 65, no. 74 (Jan. 31, 1973).
General Note:
Summer issues also called: Summer school ed., <1915>-1920 and again in 1923; summer issues also called: Summer ed., <1921>.
General Note:
Has occasional supplements.
Funding:
Funded by Van Dyke Endowment for the Libraries in support of teaching, research, acquisitions, preservation and programs in the Libraries

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
Copyright The Independent Florida Alligator. Permission granted to University of Florida to digitize and display this item for non-profit research and educational purposes. Any reuse of this item in excess of fair use or other copyright exemptions requires permission of the copyright holder.
Resource Identifier:
000972808 ( ALEPH )
01410246 ( OCLC )
AEU8328 ( NOTIS )
sn 96027439 ( LCCN )

Related Items

Preceded by:
Orange and blue
Succeeded by:
Independent Florida alligator

Full Text
Law Students Dont Like SSOC Objectives

By KAREN ENG
Alligator Staff Writer
The majority of UF law students
voiced disagreement with the objectives
of the Southern Students Organizing
Committee (SSOC) in a poll taken by
the John Marshall Bar Association
(JMBA) Monday.
Seventy per cent (401) of the 572
law students voted in the poll, held to
offer something a little more
concrete. .. and less emotional that
what heretofore has been called the
students opinion, according to
spokesmen.
Os the students voting, 84 per cent

PRESS
Pacemaker
All-American

Vol 61, No. 100

s Si
s,':' v 'B§{- ;-;
II r H
'blondes have more fun?
Blondes not only have more fun but now they dominate UF
beauty contests. Ronna Goldstein (above), 3 Ed, has been selected
Miss Seminole for 1969. An AEPhi, Miss Goldstein was selected by
contest judge Omar Sharif, who is currently in Puerto Rico, where he
is cast in the title role of Che Guevara. Forty coeds entered and only
one of the five finalists was a brunette. See more pictures on page
3.

pi

PRESSURE APPLIED
Pools Hit Legislative Snag

By NEAL SANDERS
Alligator Staff Writer
Despite approval from the Board of Regents, a
pair of pool complexes for UFs residence halls may
he. .stalled-hy 1 e pislat i ve_ nressu re
According to UF Housing-Director Harold Riker,
the progranWor the recreational facilities is stalled
in the UF Business Affairs office.
Right now, William Elmore (vice president for
business affairs) is trying to determine whether
legislative approval is needed to build the pools,
Riker said. Once that barrier is cleared, an
architect can be appointed so the project can get
started.

IN STATEMENT MONDAY
O'Connell Rules Megill Safe

said they did not agree with the
objectives of SSOC as they understood
them. Copies of the SSOC charter,
petition for charter, Vice President of
Student Affairs Lester Hales
recommendation and UF President
Stephen C. OConnells final opinion
were posted around the law school
before the poll.
Although the majority of students
voting didnt agree with SSOCs
objectives, 49 per cent of the students
felt OConnell should have approved the
charter with the understanding that if
SSOC should violate university
standards, it would be treated like any
other student organization.

The
Florida Alligator

The need to seek an opinion on whether the state
legislature must approve the release of funds for the
pools has been due to outside legislative pressures
according to Mike Davidson, SG secretary of
recreation.
Elmore is -caught in fr-btnd-between ignoring the
actions of someone in Tallahassee or going through
the whole process of legislative approval, Davidson
said.
These things always take time, said Riker. We
have a list of specifications drawn, and approval
from the Board of Regents. There still remains the
naming of an architect, the drawing of plans,
approvals, contract letting, and finally, construction
time.

University of Florida, Gainesville

Slade Attack
Said Invalid
By JANIE GOULD
Alligator Staff Writer
Philosophy professor
Kenneth Megill is home
free the complaint issued
against him by State Sen. Tom
Slade was ruled invalid by UF
President Stephen C. OConnell
in a statement released to the
press Monday.
Megill was the target in
February of an attack by Slade,
who demanded his dismissal
because of statements Megill
made in an Accent 69 speech.
Megill called black power
the only new idea in this
century; he said only radicals
talk in a relevant way; students
must realize they are an
oppressed class in an oppressed
country; and he called for a
radical student movement and
strong teachers union to take
over the UF.
Slade urged OConnell to
dismiss Megill immediately
and said statements like the
above have got to make the
blood of every taxpayer in the
state boil.
OConnell based his decision
not to bring charges against
Megill on an inquiry conducted
within Megills college (Arts and

Fifty-one per cent agreed with
OConnells decision to deny the
charter.
The students were asked their
opinion on a resolution drawn up by
former student body president Charles
Shepherd and Howell Ferguson, son of
former Board of Regents Chairman
Chester Ferguson.
The resolution calls for the
establishment of two categories of
student organizations registered and
recognized. A recognized organization
would be eligible for funding by
Student Government and have the
approving sanction of the UF.
Any student-related organization

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STUDY TIME IN TIGERT
Steve Fahrer and Jan Kesher found Monday's SSOC study-in an
opportunity for term-paper typing. See related story on page 2.

Sciences) and department
(philosophy). Dr. Harry Sisler,
dean of the college, and Dr.
Thomas Hanna, chairman of the
department, agreed the
complaint lacked substance.
Megills statement regarding a
student takeover apparently is
what struck Slades nerves.
According to OConnell, Megill
has since made it clear that he
does not advocate such a
takeover by force and violence
As part of the inquiry, Megill
interpreted what he meant by a
t ake-evc-f-.Aeco rding
OConnell, Megill used the term
to mean all students, faculty
and local administration uniting
to work for a more efficient and
practical use of state education
appropriations for the
University.
(SEE 'SSOC' PAGE 3)

would automatically qualify as a
registered organization and be eligible to
use university facilities. It would not be
eligible for funding by Student
Government or carry the UFs approval.
Forty-five percent of the law
students were in favor of the resolution,
while 31 per cent favored the present
system and 24 per cent preferred some
third alternative.
The results from the poll have been
made available to OConnell, Student
Body President Clyde Taylor and other
decision-makers who feel they might
benefit from knowing how a
representative cross section of UF
students feel.

Tuesday, March 11, 1969

Gator Sendoff
Set For 7:45
Students are asked to attend
the Gator basketball rally in
front of Florida Gym
Wednesday morning at 7:45 to
send off the National
Invitational Tournament-bound
UF basketball team.
Cheerleaders and the Florida
band will participate as the
iTafor team, coaches and press
representatives board a bus for
Jacksonville where they will
catch a commercial flight to
New York.
They will square off against
Temple in the opening round
action of the NIT Thursday
night at Madison Square Garden.

America's
Number I
Collage
Daily



The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 11, 1969

Page 2

Administration Avoids Confrontation

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PASSING THE HOURS
... Ed Freeman reads Alligator editorial page
HEW Threatens
Federal Aid Cut

WASHINGTON
(UPI) HEW Secretary Robert
H. Finch said Monday he is
reminding college administrators
of laws requiring federal aid to
be cut off to students convicted
of rioting on campus. He said he
hopes this provides them with
the backbone to act.
Finch said the office of
education in his Health,
Education and Welfare
Department is preparing letters
to be sent to colleges citing two
sections of federal law.
One says a court conviction
of rioting on campus requires
federal scholarship or loan aid to
be cut off. The other requires a
university hearing and finding of
guilt following a court
conviction before the aid can be
terminated.
The faculty and the
administration have to stand
up, Finch told the House
Education and Labor
Committee. In most cases they
have the power at hand to deal
with the disorders. Were only
going to remind them of this and
for some of them maybe
strengthen their backbone.
Rep. Paul Rodgers, D-Fla.,
meanwhile, said HEW was
not enforcing the present
law. He told Finch in a letter
that he plans legislative moves to
force the department to cut off
federal aid to convicted student

THE FLORIDA ALLIGATOR is the official student newspaper of the
University of Florida and is published five times weekly except during June.
July and August when it is published semi-weekly, and during student holidays
and exam periods. Editorials represent only the official opinions of their
authors. Address correspondence to the Florida Alligator, Reitz Union
Building, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601. The Alligator is
entered as second class matter at the United States Post Office at Gainesville,
Florida 32601. J
rate is SIO.OO per year or $3.50 per quarter.
The Florida Alligator reserves the right to regulate the typographical tone of
all advertisements and to revise or turn away copy which it considers
objectionable.
The Florida Alligator will not consider adjustments of payment for any
advertisement involving typographical errors or erroneous insertion unless
notice is given to the Advertisin Manager within (1) one day after the
advertisement appears. The Florida Alligator will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement scheduled to run several
times. Notices for correction must be given before next insertion.
1

WITH SSOC DEMONSTRATORS

rioters.
Rogers said that of 549
students arrested at disorders at
San Francisco State College, 122
were receiving federal financial
assistance, but there was no
indication this aid had been cut
off to any of them.

Most Southern Presidents Lack Veto

By RICHARD GLENN
Alligator Staff Writer
Os six major southern
universities polled Monday, only
at UF and the University of
Mississippi do the presidents
have the power to approve or
disapprove student
organizations.
At UF an organization has to
submit a petition to the
Committee on Student
Organizations, then the
recommendations of this
committee are passed on to the
Presidents office for final
approval.
Tom Hines, associate dean
and director of student activities
at Ole Miss outlined the
procedure set up for student
groups to follow in seeking
official recognition.
A petition is presented to the
Student-Faculty Committee on

By CAROL SANGER
Alligator Assignments Editor
The administration apparently backed down
from a face-to-face confrontation with SSOC in
Tigert Hall Monday, after UF President Stephen C.
OConnell issued an ultimatum threatening the
demonstrators with suspension from the university
and arrest.
Executive Vice President L. E. Grinter acting in
OConnells absence told a group of seven SSOC
members who were sitting on the benches in the
hallway in front of OConnells office that they
could stay if they remained orderly. He apparently
changed his mind about 3 p.m.
He told the group, that had grown to about 20,
they would have to leave the building because there
were too many in the hall.
The protesters left and congregated on the steps
outside the building deciding 10 minutes later to
return en masse and force Grinter to read the
statement that they had five minutes to leave to be
suspended. However, no statement was issued from
OConnells office then as more than 30 students
crowded the benches in the hall. SSOC members,
who up until that time had numbered no more than
12 to 15, had spent the day studying, eating, and
talking quietly.
In 20 minutes, as the crowd of protesters and
press grew, 10 uniformed University Policemen
began their own vigil on each end of the second
floor hallway.
University Police Chief A. I. Shuler entered
OConnells office for a brief conference with
university administrators and left, taking his officers
with him. Plainclothesmen remained in Tigert until
the demonstrators left when the offices closed at 5
p.m.
SSOC was forewarned of OConnells ultimatum
and said they had no intention of taking over the
administration building, nor OConnells office, nor
accosting any occupant of the building.
The presidents position stated, if the disruptors
do not cease, desist and remove themselves (from
Tigert), an administrative or academic official
representing the president shall advise them that any
student who has refused to obey the request is then
and there suspended from the University, subject to
a hearing on the charges of disruption.
After a lapse of a reasonable time campus
police were to have been called in to remove the
suspended students and place them under arrest for
trespassing.
The study-in protest was called by SSOC Sunday

OVER STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

Organizations and Recreation.
The committee reviews the
petition and makes a
recommendation for approval or
disapproval by the university
chancellor, who has the final
authority.
Hines said that he could not
recall the chancellor ever
reversing a decision of the
committee.
The University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill has the
most lenient procedure of the
six universities polled.
A student group has to
submit to the Dean of Student
Affairs a copy of its constitution
or by-laws, a list of officers, the
nature of any off campus

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connections and the name of the
faculty adviser.
Once this has been done the
group is automatically
recognized according to C. O. f
Cathey, dean of student affairs
atUNC.
Dean Cathey said that an
officially recognized group was
entitled to the use of any
university facilities necessary for
its meetings.
University of Georgia student
groups go through the student
senate, a faculty committee on
student affairs and the
University Council (composed of
faculty members) for official
recognition.
Louisiana State Universitv

in protest of the presidents denial of charter to the
group and demanding:
§ the support of an effective Student
Government that would have ultimate say over all
areas of student activities;
no internal or external investigations ot
students or faculty because of their political views
that OConnell publically apologize to Dr.
Kenneth Megill;
no city, state or county police be allowed on
the Florida campus; and
§ campus police be disarmed.
SSOC spokesman Ed Freeman talked to Grinter
in the presidents office at 9 a.m. before the small
band of protesters entered the building. He said
Grinter at that time had given the group permission
to sit quietly on the benches outside OConnells
office as long as they didn t disturb the normal
processes of the university.
Grinter then told the group of student leaders
gathered in the presidents office he would use his
own discretion in the matter and would not read
the statement from the president unless it became
necessary later on. He distributed copies of the
ultimatum to SSOC leaders and the press.
The only thing thats really disruptive about
this whole thing is that the administration is so
up-tight about it, Steve Fahrer, SSOC chairman
said.
Gary Goodrich, vice president of the student
body, explained to Fahrer that secretaries were
frightened by the groups presence and several
refused to work, holding up university record
processing.
Fahrer and Freeman then drew up the statement
saying it was not their intention to take-over the
building or threaten any of its occupants.
As the building closed, the group again assembled
on the outside steps, saying they would return to
take up the vigil at 9 a.m. this morning.
The student ACLU said they will have observers
at the vigils to see that no illegal or
unconstitutional acts are committed by the
administration.
OConnell, who was in Jacksonville Monday, will
be in his office today and Wednesday.
Fahrer said the members of SSOC had no
intention of getting arrested yet. He said the vigil
was not worth it.
SSOC, who declared themselves officially
recognized by the students Sunday, plans a rally at
2:15 p.m. Thursday in the Plaza of the Americas in
protest of Board of Regents Head D. Burke Kiblers
appearance on the UF campus Thursday night.

has a faculty committee on
student organizations that
handles all applications for
recognition from student groups.
Arden French, LSU dean of
men, said the faculty committee
has complete authority over
student organizations.
Student groups at the
University of Alabama apply to
the Student Government
Association Legislature for
recognition. If passed by the
legislature the application is
referred to the Student Life
Committee for final approval.
The Student Life Committee is
composed of ''faculty and
students.



OConnell Rules Megill Home Free

f FROM PA6t ONt
If this is what he meant and
means by takeover and if he
proposes to do it by legitimate
means, OConnell said, He had
a perfect right to urge such
action and to set it as a goal to
be sought.
However, OConnell felt the
use of the word takeover was
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'PRETTY' TALL ORDER
Rangy blondes had a head start in running for Seminole royalty, or
so it would seem. Miss Seminole 1969 is 5-foot-9 Ronna Goldstein
and the first runner (upper left) Janine Kuhn, 2UC, is a 5-10 golden
tressed lass representing Alpha Chi Omega. DG's Joan Spiegel (upper
right) was the only brunette finalist. Third runnerup was AEPhi
Kathi Horne (lower left) and fourth runnerup was Phi Gams Marti
Cox, also a Seminole beauty last year. All girls will get a color spread
in the UF yearbook.
/Sk Whats NEW at the
BOOKSTORE*?
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( NEW YORK TIME & PUBLISHERS WEEKLY:)
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unwise, because of instances of
actual physical takeovers of
buildings by students on other
campuses.
But an unwise statement in
an isolated instance is not cause
for administrative action,
OConnell said.
The inquiry showed Megill to
be objective in his classroom
teaching. In fact, one of the
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AFTER CONDUCTING INQUIRY

criticisms of him by his students
is that he is overly objective,
OConnell said.
Another administrator, Henry
A. Fenn, dean emeritus of the
law school, said any disciplinary
action conducted against Megill
probably would be interpreted
by the American Association of
University Professors (AAUP) as
a violation of his academic
freedom; and the courts most
likely would not sustain any
such action.
OConnell presented the
conclusions of the inquiry to
Slade Monday morning in
Jacksonville. Present at the

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gOLOMOCN or AMERICA, INC.
} v v vr
Pick up a good second car from Volkswagen.

Somebody traded in a Rolls-Royce for a Volks Volkswagen?
wagen? Volkswagen?
Yes, somebody traded in a Rolls-Royce for a
Volkswagen.
It happened in Texas, of course.
But even in average states some pretty fancy
cars show up on a VW dealer's used car lot.
And some not so fancy cars. And some quite
practical cars. Like Volkswagens.
But no car, Rolls or VW, gets that guarantee on
the windshield automatically.
First it goes through a rigorous 16-point in-

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conference were Florida Senate
President John E. Mathews,
Speaker of the -House Fred
Schultz, and other legislators,.as
well as Slade, Hanna and Sisler.
OConnell, noting Board of
Regents policy which calls for an
atmosphere of freedom and
confidence on campus, said,
This atmosphere cannot exist if
on each occasion a student or

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Tuesday, March 11,1969, The Florida Alligator,

spection.
If anything needs fixing, it gets fixed.
Only then does the dealer guarantee the free
repair or replacement of every major working
part* for thirty days or a thousand miles.
Whichever comes first.
So when a Volkswagen dealer says that a used
car is as good cn the inside as it
looks on the outside, you don't have
to trust him.
He'll put it all down in writing for I
you.

professor announces an
unpopular thought there is a
demand that he be dismissed or
an investigation is merited.
He also expressed a hope that
future complaints would be
handled without so much press
play. (Slades letter to OConnell
demanding Megills dismissal
reached the press before
OConnell received it.)

Page 3



Page 4

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 11, 1969

Ray Pleads Guilty In King Murder Trial

j MEMPHIS, Tcnn. (UPI) James Earl Ray
: pleaded guilty to the murder of Dr. Martin Luther
; King Jr. in exchange for his life Monday but he and
; the judge kept alive the possibility of a conspiracy.
> A 12-man jury heard an hour and 55 minutes of
jj token testimony and then, by prearrangement,
convicted Ray and sentenced him to 99 years in
prison.
jjj Judge W. Preston Battle slapped at critics of
Memphis and its handling of the case. We have not
done too badly here for a decadent river town, he
said.
Judge Battle noted that although it has not
been established at this time that there was any

Recognition Resolution To Come
Before Student Senate Tonight

By DEAN BUNCH
Alligator Staff Writer
The Student Senates last
meeting of the quarter will be
held tonight in Room 349, Reitz
Union, at 7:30.
Another resolution on the
problem of recognition of
student organizations will be
introduced. The Senate
Thursday approved a measure
disapproving of President
Stephen C. OConnells denial of
use of university facilities to
ssoc.
The newest measure on the
subject, introduced by majority
floor leader Charles Harris and
law senator Clyde Ellis, urges the
Board of Regents to approve the
proposal of the Council of
Student Body Presidents that
state universities get out of the
business of recognizing student
organizations.
Student Body President
Clyde Taylor, along with leaders
from Florida State University
and the University of South
Florida urged that universities

Media Show Tonight

A mixed media program will
be presented by the Religion
365 class tonight at 8 in the
Union Auditorium.
First on the programs agenda
is an off-Broadway one-act play
3-Act Play
Opens At 7
Tryouts for Waleroon, a
three-act play written, produced
and directed by UF students will
be held tonight in Constans
Theatre at 7 p.m.
An explosive script, the play
is a story of personality conflict
and a violent struggle for
identity dominance. Tumblers,
jugglers, tractor drivers, ballet
dancers, and anyone who can
act, sing or drive a nail is
invited to try out tonight.

ALLIED PERSONNEL OF GAINESVILLE
This area's largest & most progressive
Personnel Placement Service
Is pleased to announce
Another
SALES and ADMINISTRATIVE
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Friday and Saturday, March 28th & 29th.
TWENTY-FIVE NAT'L COMPANIES PARTICIPATING!
Near grads and recent grads desired
No Obligations! No Registration-Fees-!
Fee Paid Openings Only!
Seminar Registration Starts Friday, March 7th.
Running through Wednesday, March 26th at
1800 North Main St. 376-4611

get out of the business of
recognition and merely register
any group of students wishing to
use university facilities.
The Senate resolution
requests OConnell to place the
responsibility for registration in
the hands of SG in accord with
recommendations of the Action
Conference.
Other items on the Senate
agenda include: a proposal that
pysical education be made
voluntary; and the second
reading of a new charter for the
Reitz Union Board of Managers.
Both of these resolutions are
expected to raise discussion
since the committee reporting
the original resolution on P.E.
suggested that it remain
compulsory, and because the
Union Board of Managers does
not recognize the authority of
the Senate to change its charter.
The Senate will canvas
Wednesdays special referendum
and certify the results. It will
-also consider approval of ofrecommendations

directed by Melissa Leifer.
Following the play will be a
light-show dialogue with some
experimental religious music
directed by Cathy Blackwell.
The highlight of the program
will be student-produced films,
slides, music and dancing,
directed by Bob ~ Glazer and
Steve Newman.
Miller-Brown
NORTH OF jfQV
THE MALL RU
376-4552
authorized
DEALER

CONSPIRACY NOT RULED OUT

conspiracy by Ray and others to kill King, this is
not conclusive evidence that there was no
conspiracy.
If there was, he said, the conspirators could never
lie down to pleasant dreams.
For murder, though it hath no tongue, will
speak with most miraculous organ, concluded the
judge in a quote from Hamlet.
Both Kings widow and his successor, Rev. Ralph
Abernathy, insisted others were involved in the
murder and said the government should continue to
investigate. Negroes throughout the south called the
sudden, two-hour trial a cover-up.
After the trial, prosecutor Phil Canale said when

recommendations ofrecommendations by Taylor to
fill vacancies on university
committees.
SURGE, the student lobby
organized under the direction of
Harris will have its general and
assistant chairmen approved.
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asked if a conspiracy might ever come to light that
I learned a long time ago not to rule out
anything.
In Washington, the Justice Department said the
investigation into the original allegations of a
conspiracy is still open.
The original allegation was an FBI warrant
which said Ray, alias Eric Stavro Galt, and a man
whom he alleged to be his brother conspired to
kill King.
The brother Ray actually has two- quickly
evaporated from the investigation and then-Atty.
Gen. Ramsay Clark insisted only one man was
involved.

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Second SEDER Thurs. April 3rd.
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$4.50 non-members
Weekday Yom Tov dinners
April 4th through April 9th
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Reservations must be made before quarter ends.
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USE GATOR ADS



Cliburn Concert
Time Changed
Van Cliburn, originally
scheduled to appear at 8:15 p.m.
in the Florida Gymnasium,
Sunday, will appear at 4 p.m. on
this date. All ticket and
promotional materials carry the
incorrect 8:15 p.m. starting
time.

Dissent To Be Studied

A psychological investigation
of The Seeds, Roots and
Flowers of Student Discontent
is on the program for the
Southern College Health
Associations 1969 convention
at UF, March 21-22.
Representatives of about 150
college and university student
health services in seven states are
expected for the conference at
Reitz Union Auditorium.
William M. Scruggs Jr.,
program coordinator for UFs
sponsoring Division of
Continuing Education and
Student Health Services, said the
conference opens March 21 with
registration and a welcome from
UF President Stephen C.
OConnell.
* All speakers are on the UF
staff except Dr. Maurice M.
Osborne Jr., president of the
American College Health
Association and director of

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the 12:15 p.m. luncheon March
21 on Long Rang Goals of
College Health.
A panel discussion of student
discontent is set for 9:15 a.m.,
featuring Dr. E. Arthur Larson,
chief of the mental health
program; Dr. Ben Barger, clinical
psychologist in mental health,
and Thaxton Springfield,
coordinator of religious
activities.
Dr. Robert H. Waldman,
assistant professor of medicine
and microbiology, will present
Influenza Prevention l lmmunization
mmunization lmmunization by Aersol at 10:45
a.m.
Unusual Diseases in College
Students will be the 2 p.m.
topic for Dr. W. J. Coggins,
director of student health
services at Florida.

Urinary Tract Infection in
College Co-eds will be discussed
at 2:45 p.m. when Dr. Michael
L. Pickering, special fallow in
Microbiology, addresses the
convention.
Sex Education in
College A Physicians View
will be presented at 4 p.m. by
Dr. Nell W. Potter.
Student Health Services as a
Prepaid Medical Group will be
Dr. Samuel P. Martins topic at
the 7:30 banquet. Dr. Martin is
provost of the University of
Floridas J. Hillis Miller Health
Center.

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Tuesday, March 11,1969, The Florida Alligator,

Page 5



Page 6

. The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 11, 1969

The Florida Alligator
"Th price of freedom
* th< exercise of responsibility."
Harold Aldrich
Editor-In-Chief
P$U/kokth Dave Doucette
Managing Editor
* Raul Ramirez Glenn Fake
Executive Editor News Editor
. it is necessary and proper to announce that
any gather-in such as conducted in Tigert Hall on
Friday, March 7, study-in, vigil, or any other activity
disruptive of the orderly operation of the University
by SSOC or any other group of individuals either in
Tigert Hall or other University buildings will be and are
hereby declared to be disruptive of the normal
operation of the University.
. . Stephen C. O'Connell
mSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^^SSSSSSmSSmmmSSSSm^SSSSmSSSSSSSSmSSSk
EDITORIAL
Lost Innocence
UF President Stephen C. OConnell lost his innocence
yesterday.
Prior to 3 p.m., March 10, his complicity .in the SSOC
charter denial was, to some extent, excusable since it merely
reflected the intolerance of his superiors in Tallahassee.
Then he did it.
He sacrificed his position of leadership to a few moments
of blind panic.
He foolishly threatened a group of peaceful
demonstrators who had spent the day quietly outside his
office.
He called in uniformed police and delivered an
ultimatum of suspension and arrest.
And from that time on, Stephen OConnell took on a
new image.
A disappointing image.
We never thought of Stephen OConnell as a strong-arm
tactician. We never thought of him as another Hayakawa.
We thought of him as a peaceful man. A quiet man.
A man embarrassed by the position of having to serve
two masters: a sometimes inflexible Board of Regents and a
university hungry for constructive change.
His university.
OConnells application of the Demonstration Policy to
the quiet handful who sat near his office door studying and
talking among themselves was poorly taken.
They were guilty or neither disruption of mass protest.
They specifically declared that they intended neither to
take over the administration building nor to accost any
occupant thereof.
And it is to his diminishing credit that he finally saw the
error of his ill-considered ultimatum, that he saw the
inevitable result of stifling student voices would be to
precipitate the exact type of conflict and disunity that he
ostensibly wants to avoid.
Still damage has been done.
Damage to the faith of those who have trusted him,
those who want to believe that the Hi-Im-Steve OConnell
who walked through the Plaza of the Americas not so long
ago really wants to bring meaning, relevancy, and progress
to this university.
We want the old Stephen OConnell back again.
We want him back to roll away the threatening clouds of
dissention.
To tell us that we are all together once again.
The Florida Alligator
Published by students of the University of Florida under the
auspices of the Board of Student Publications.
Editorial, Business, Advertising offices in Room 330, Reitz Union. Phone
Opinions expressed in the Florida Alligator are those of the editors or of
Use writes of the article and not those of the Univerritv of Floridte.

Bitchin

Newlood For SG

Its the same reason you dont marry your
cousin. Besides all the social taboos, there are
medical and genetic reasons against incest. Families
that breed within themselves intensify deficiencies,
cause mental retardation. You can inbreed
hemophilia, as Queen Victorias family did, or
blindness.
Well, Student Government isnt exactly
incestuous, but it is running into some of the same
problems. It takes it workers and leaders from its
own ranks and its own preferred groups, and it is
exhibiting signs of malfunction already.
SG isnt exactly blind, but it tends to be
nearsighted in some matters, and downright
crosseyed in others. And Im not saying its a bunch
of bleeders, either, but SG could use a transfusion:
Greek blood isnt enough to run it.
Im not saying toss out the Greeks. There is
plenty to do that couldnt be accomplished without
them. And they have done much already. Im saying
they cant do it by themselves.
Im saying that SG is using up all its own life and
vitality and that of the fraternities by constantly
drawing on them for leadership. SG has simply
become more and more of the same people, each
bringing in their own kind, few bringing in anything
new. Inbreeding is a bad term for it, but they are
intensifying their deficiencies, causing malfunctions,
turning SG into a deformity in that same manner.
SG needs new blood. Why not get it from new
people who are willing and able to donate
themselves?
There are six thousand women at the UF. How
many do you see in office? On steering committees?
In cabinet posts? Not many.

Speaking Out

Whats New In Revolt?

Once there were some people who were governed
by men in a far-away town. They had to pay these
rulers for the privilege of being their subjects. But
they had little or no voice in their government.
These people were fiercely individualistic. They
wore long hair, and crude but colorful clothing.
They lived simply, and believed in love and peace
and brotherhood.
They also believed in law and order, and tried
very hard to obey they unjust rulers. But they
didnt think it right that they could not really have
a voice in their government. So they tried for a long
time, through due process, to change the balance of
power in an orderly fashion.
Unfortunately, this unfair system of government
served to maintain certain military and economic
(and educational) interests that were important to
the far-away rulers. So the rulers were not very

"Dont Point That Thing At Us! :

LBy Caron Balkany

Now, how many do you see typing? Filing?
Running errands?
Almost the entire typing crew at SG is women,
and women run most of the errands, answer most
of the phones, do most of the filing.
I ought to know -1 hired a lot of them. When I
was working in this personnel capacity, I found more
sorority girls, and independent women too, eager,
able, competent to work, yet stuck at typewriters
and filing cabinets.
Maybe these girls think theyll move up in the
world from their typewriter. If they do think so,
theyre new at the job; after reams of letters and the
runaround from their boss, the only thing most girls
will move up to is a new typewriter. If they dont
get disgusted first and quit.
Oh, yes there are women in SG just like there
are waitresses at the Fountainbleu and maids at the
Union. Why not make use of the competent women,
all over campus, who run sororities, dormitories,
womens organizations and honoraries? They are
good for more than typing. I have talked to many of
them. They are willing. Why arent they working?
Perhaps because they want to be utilized, not just
used; perhaps because they are too competent to
settle for a typing job, and too smart to believe
theyll get anything else.
SG ought to open up and let some qualified
women have a hand in running student government,
as well as in typing its letters. There are plenty of
qualified women around.
Families that inbreed for too long kill themselves
off.
Well, Student Government?

By Mike Robinson

interested in changing the balance of power, and
kept a large army to ensure that this would never
happen.
Naturally their unwilling sugjects failed to change
their government in an orderly manner.
They finally resorted to civil disobedience. They
burned and pillaged, and destroyed government
buildings and property, and they killed a great many
government soldiers and mercenary soldiers and
quite a few policemen.
Os course, the far-away rulers despised them as
being uncivilized savages, because they used force to
gain their objectives and because they finally
won.
But today their 200 million descendants honor
them as patriots. They were the colonists who
fought in the Revolutionary War, and in 1776
founded the United States of America.



MR. EDITOR:
As students of the UF we support freedom of
speech and assembly on the university campus
We support the right of all UF students to use
university facilities for any lawful purposes
We also support the right of UF students to
invite off-campus guests and speakers to the
university, as many students groups have
traditionally done in the past. We recognize that
such persons are subject to prosecution for any
violation of the law.
We therefore support the president of the UF
Stephen C. O Connell, in his decision to deny the
SSOC a university charter in as much as this
decision in no way abridges the freedom of this

OPEN FORUM:^
jAiL/iti mi 'DiMMit
hope for the mmpla

OConnell Move
Defies Precedent
MR. EDITOR:
Jfb
The refusal of SSOC s charter is simply the last straw. Deeply
disturbed, I can no longer believe by any stretch of the imagination
that O Connell is on the side of students or of progress. He is for not
making waves, even at the cost of freedom.
SSOC js an admirable organization, not only for its ideas but for its
nonviolent methods to achieve racial equality in the South. On this
campus, SSOC has lived up to its ideal of nonviolence. SSOC had the
integrity to go through channels, and Hale has cited going through
channels as an effective method. There is no rationality behind Hales
refusal to accept the charter. The administration has been typically
irrational and irrelevant to the needs of students and society.
What I finally realized in the aftermath of Chicago is proving true
all over again on campus. We cant expect the University of Florida to
ever step above the increasingly fascist tendencies of our Great sick
society. Marshall Jones was unfortunately right, but this campus will
probably stagnate under the burden of apathy.
ANNE LAMPERT 2UC

The Silent Observer

Almost As Cool As Columbia, Really

We made it!
What a glorious feeling to know that
now we too are with it . were hip,
cool, involved, dedicated, etc. ...just
about everything but violent.
Some members of SSOC are working
on that. I can almost see them
calculating in their minds how best to
arouse the pigs and make themselves
the Gandhis of UF.
The latest demand is that the pigs
on campus be disarmed. Oh come on
now! Even the Margaret Xs can see the
stupidity behind that.
And the screams ... Lets take
Tigert! Isnt anybody coming? Doesnt
anybody care?
If you could have closed your eayes
so you couldnt have seen the almost
bored look on the faces of the radicals
and the not-so-radicals in the
crowd ... and shut your ears so you
wouldn't hear the almost carnival
atmosphere of people who supposedly
are suffering the oppressions of
society ... if there werent these little
n age ine contradictions you might
believe it was not Florida but Bcrkelv or
Columbia. Almost.

SSOC Hasnt Lost Any Os Its Rights

Except its not real here, as much as
some of the screamers and
foot-stompers wish it would be.
Looking at them, listening to them,
listening to both sides all
sides refuse to listen, its almost a
farce.
The ideas are there, the injustice of
one mans decision is there, the narrow
mindedness of an apthetic student body
is there, and at the same time the
concern and concrete action of student
leaders is there . and it is real.
Clyde Taylor and Manny James
didnt trek to Tampa in the middle of
the night Thursday for their health.
They went to talk to the right
people .. people who can make a
difference no matter how much SSOC
tries to believe they cant.
They tried to make a difference and
they may have. They didnt deserve the
boos and hisses from the obstinate
radicals who apparently dont want
anything . not even reason or
support, to stand in their noble way.

group to hold meetings and use university facilities,
or prevent students from joining it; nor does it
prevent its members from exercising any rights of
expression or assembly protected by the
Constitution or law.
In addition, in as much as a university charter
may be granted only to purely students groups and
the SSOC, by its own admission, accepts
non-student members, we do not see how a charter
can be granted.
If in fact other non-student groups are chartered
by the university, we feel that the situations should
be investigated and the obvious contradiction
corrected. This would be done by changing the rules
or by removing the charters of these groups.

Not too long ago The
Gainesville Sun and other
deluded sources tried to portray
Stephen C. OConnell and D.
Burke Kibler as the heroes of
the mess initiated by Tom Slade
and his band of merry Pork
Choppers. At the time most UF
students and teachers located
anywhere on the left cynically
sneered at this naive attempt to
canonize individuals who had
made meagre efforts in the fight
for academic freedom.
Well, kind readers, it seems
that our heroes have shown
their true colors. I dont have to
elaborate upon Pres. OConnells
denial of SSOC recognition. All I
wish to add is that many
believed last month, while the
New Party-SSOC Inquisition was
being conducted, that a
presidential veto of sorts would
be used if the Committee on
Student Organizations voted to
charter SSOC. Those who
adopted this cynical attitude

Raving

These Are Our Heroes?

Rejecting Taylor and Jamess sanity
and concrete endeavors, they took off
down the street toward Tigert following
the lead of the mouth called Margaret
X.
It doesnt matter that he was in
Tampa talking to the Board of Regents
at that very minute ... that he was
doing something . something besides
sitting on the floor.
SSOC yells loudly and frequently
that they tried the channels and the
channels dont work. Well, they tried
one channel and one channel didnt
work so they feel its time to reject all
channels. 1 wonder if no one of them
takes the time to remember that
nothing is going to work if there is
nothing left.
SSOC on tl lis campus has . maybe
. had ... the support of~student leaders.
many Lithpr campuses could say
that. But it doesnt seem to matter to
them. It doesnt penetrate the minds
that are supposedly so open and so
accepting.
It doesnt register that while they sat
on the floor of Tigert making fools out

have seen their expectations
become sober realities.
According to The Gainesville
Sun of March 6, The Board of
Regents, through a prepared
statement under the name of
Chairman D. Burke Kibler 111,
today declared that two
radically-oriented organizations
on Florida campuses (SSOC at
UF and SDS at FSU) cannot be
recognized by any university for
which the board has
responsibility.
Remember Kiblers earlier
statement stating his objection
to the regognition of either
group? It is now obvious that
Kibler Crusade plans to dictate
policy for the pawn-universities
they control, in keeping with the
authoritarian tradition of the
Board of Regents.
So much for our two
heroes. Last May I wrote a
column for this newspaper in

Tuesday, March 11, 1969, The Florida Alligator,

It should be understood that we are speaking
solely as interested individuals and not as
representatives of any campus groups.
MICKEY THURSAM
Murphree Area President
CHARLES DORMAN
Towers Area President
CHARLES MCSWAIN
Tolbert Area Interhall Representative
JEFFREY MAZOR
Jennings Area First Vice President
HERMAN M. HOEN 111
South II Judiciary Representative

By John Galt

of themselves, the student body
president they had driven away with
boos was standing for an hour and a half
talking to other student leaders and
university administrators behind Tigert
Hall ... still trying to find an answer.
Trying to find two answers, each
harder than the other . how to rectify
the injustice of SSOCs charter denial
and how to reach SSOC and make them
listen.
But perhaps SSOC feels Gandhis
shouldnt have friends .. that its
nobler that way?
The ma/ch was SSOCs better
answer... it was more like other
campuses where its all at .. San
Francisco, Berkely, Columbia,
Wisconsin, even Florida State. You can
imagine their frustration to take a back
seat to all of them.
floor Tn Tnfront
front Tnfront of the Presidents office,
smothering their valid complaints
beneath a veneer of foolish
disorganization to show OConnell
what we can do if we want ... to
threaten him.

By David Miller

which I suggested that it might
be wise for Pres. OConnell to
resign, as he had failed to act in
a manner becoming a man of his
high position. Those of you who
werent here last year may not
be aware of the Marshall Jones
Due Process Lynching or the
disgraceful Spencer Boyer affair
or other examples of presidential
indecision.
This sudden disenchantment
with Pres. OConnell on the part
of so many individuals is absurd,
for OConnell is no worse today
than he was last year, which was
bad enough. Its just that not
enough of us were cynical
enough to realize this all along.
Perhaps our heroes are
mortal; perhaps they dont have
to reign forever. Perhaps. Then
again, the oppressive system has
away of perpetuating itself. I
just wonder if theres still time
to make an attempt to get Leroy
Collins as President before FSU
grabs him.

Page 7



Page 8

, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 11, 1969

Orange

ADDKtSS ALL CAMPUS CALENDAR
NOTICES TO PUBLIC FUNCTIONS
OFFICE, J. WAYNE REITZ UNION

Administrative Notices
\

NURSING SCHOLAR SCHOLARSHIPS:
SHIPS: SCHOLARSHIPS: The 1969 Scholarship
examination will be Oct. 14,
1969. Scholarship loans are
awarded by the Florida State
Board of Education to
applicants making the highest
scores. Applicants must have at
least one high school unit in
each of the biological and
physical sciences. Basic
collegiate nursing scholarship
loans are S6OO a year for four
years of S2OO a quarter for
quarters. One-half of the
scholarships are available to
students interested in attending
basic collegiate schools of
nursing and who agree to render
nursing service in a state agency
or institution for at least the
minimum time specified for the
type of scholarship they receive.
Information and application
forms may be obtained from the
County sur srintendent of Public
Instruction in each county.
Application forms also are
available in Room H-101,
College of Nursing, J. Hillis
Miller Health Center.
STATE TEACHERS:
General Loan Scholarship
money has arrived. You may
receive it in the Student
Depository from Mrs. Robinson
or Miss Nabers.
STUDENT JOBS: UF
students available to start work
now are wanted by the Student
Employment. Jobs are available
for typists, library clerks, key
punch operators and draftsmen.
Please contact Student
Employment, Room 23, Tigert
Hall, for further details.

FOR YOUR NEXT CAR LOAN... &
fj r rTry our km cost auto financing Interest is JmJgJljBJ 1
. J computed each month on the unpaid balance and
W' do you ever s w den you trade or pay ahead!! TruIUiMWKJBwAw ~ ~ |
anywhere aha. Payroll deduction available for I
GAINESVILLE FLORIDA CAMPUS FEDERAL CREDIT UNION Cl M I
sth Avenue at the corner of 12th Street Hours:B:ooa.m. 3:30p.m. Monday through Friday %W

WORK-STUDY PROGRAM
JOBS: UF students qualified for
the College Work-Study program
are needed. If your parents'
income is less than $7,000 a year
you may apply. Many jobs are
available on campus. Please
contact Student Employment,
Room 23, Tigert Hall.
GRADUATING SENIORS: If
you have a National Defense
Student Loan, you must
complete the Exit Interview
procedure prior to graduation in
order to keep your account
current.
NOTICE TO STUDENTS:
The Student Accounts sections
is now accepting Short-term
Loan applications for payment
of Spring Quarter Registration
Fees.
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY DEADLINE:
Candidates for admission to the
junior class of September, 1969.
should complete the
department's applicaiton
procedures during the winter
quarter.
GRADUATE COUNCIL
MEETING: There will be a
meeting of the Graduate Council
Thursday, March 13, at 1:30
p.m. in 235 Tigert Hall.

BLUB BULLETIN

FACULTY: There will be a
Dutch treat, German style buffet
Faculty Club get acquainted
dinner, March 11, in the west
side of the cafeteria. $2 a
person.
GRADUATING SENIORS:
Delinquent accounts may be
considered sufficient cause for
cancellation of registration, as
University regulations prohibit
registration, graduation, granting
of credit, or release of transcript
for any student whose account
with the University is
delinquent.
... o ..
9
NATIONAL DEFENSE
LOAN BORROWERS: If you
have been approved for a release
of funds from the National
Defense Loan Program for the
Spring Quarter, and have
pre-registered for that quarter,
your fee payment can be
deducted from your loan. As
soon as you have finished
pre-registering come to the
Student Accounts Office.
SUMMER STUDENT
EMPLOYMENT: The Florida
State Board of Health will have a
few training positions for college
students this summer. For
information and applications,
please contact Student
Employment, Room 23, Tigert
Hall.
POETRY READING: Prof.
Bill Robinson will give a reading,
Poets I Have Known,"
Thursday, March 14, from 4:40
p.m. to 5:30 p.m. in the Reitz
Union, Lounges 122 and 123.

ADDRESS ALL ADMINISTRATIVE NOTICES AND GENERAL
NOTICES TO DIVISION OF INFORMATION SERVICES

Campus Calendar

CAMPUS CALENDAR
Tuesday, March 11
Children's Ballet Lessons, C-4
Union, 2:45 p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
6:30 p.m.
University Films Committee
Meeting, 150 B Union, 7:00
p.m.
Supper Club, Buffet Supper,
University Inn, 7:30 p.m.
Delta Sigma Pi Meeting, 355
Union, 7:30 p.m.
Mixed Media Presentations,
Union Aud., by Students of
RN 365, 8:00 p.m.
Sigma Theta Tau Initiation, New
members, 118 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Education Dames Meeting, 3320
N.W. 28th Avenue, 8:00 p.m.
Music Dept: Jr. recital; Ronna
Lebman, alto saxophone,
University Aud., 8:15 p.m.
*
Wednesday, March 12
English in Action,
Conversational English
between one American
volunteer and one
International, Baptist Student
Center, 4:00-8:00 p.m.
Florida Speleological Society
Meeting, 349 Union, 7:00
p.m.
Pharmacy Dames Meeting, Home
of Dr. & Mrs. Rudolph
Blythe, 1045 N.E. 4th Street,
7:30 p.m.
Gator Sailing Club, 357 Union,
7:30 p.m.
Circle K Meeting 362 Union,
7:30 p.m.

Thursday, March 13
Children's Tap Lessons, C-4
Union, 3:30 p.m.
University Religious
Organization Elections, 368
Union, 4:30 p.m.
Poetry Reading & Discussion,
Prof, Bill Robinson, "Poets I
have Known," 121 Union,
4:40 p.m.
Painting for Fun, 118 Union,
6:30 p.m.
Christian Science Meeting, 357
Union, 7:00 p.m.
Student Contractors & Builders
Assoc. Meeting, 101 Little
Hall, 7:30 p.m.
UNA-USA Meeting, 113 Little
Hall, Speaker: Mrs. Randolph
E. Strout, 7:30 p.m.
Caribbean Discussion Series,
Latin American Colloquium
Room, College Library, 8:00
p.m.
MENSA Meeting, 355 Union,
8:30 p.m.
Friday, March 14
Movie, "Casablanca," Union
Aud., 6:00, 8:30 & 11:00
p.m.
Murphree Area Council Movie,
"Ipcress File", West Wing
Main Cafeteria, 7:00 & 9:00
p.m.
Audubon Wildlife Film,
Lecturer: Roger Tory
Peterson, B 245 Union, 8:00
p.m.
Program Council Dance, "The
Beloved", Reitz Union
Terrace, Free, 9:00 p.m.
UNION BOX OFFICE- Tickets
are now on sale for: Audubon
Film Series, General Public,
Faculty & Staff, $1.25; Univ.
of Fla. Students, $.75;
Children, $.50. University
Film Series, 10 Films,
Geieral Public, Faculty &
Staff, $5.00; Univ. of Fla.
Students, $2.50; Univ. of Fla.
Students, 5 films, $1.50.
SGP: VAN CLIBURN",
General Public, Faculty &
Staff, $3.00, $2.25 & $1.50;
Univ. of Fla. Students, $2.50,
$1.75 & SI.OO



| FOR SALE |
S:YX *XiXHXtf*S:XS*X*XWW 1966 Suzuki 110 2500 cc $225.
372-9317. Ask for Mike or Skip
(A-3t-100-p)
1968 Yamaha 350 cc, only 2400
miles, $775. Stereo component
Monarch amplifier, tuner, Garrard
turntable, athena speakers, S2OO.
378-7773. (A-4t-100-p)
Runs like new! Looks like new! 65
Honda 150 with 2 helmets and many
other extras. Great for getting to
campus. 378-8905 after 6.
(A-4t-100-p)
Rare, white AKC German Shepherd
puppies. Gentle temperment, good
with children. SIOO. Phone
378-0844. (A-st-96-P)
14 Ft. wooden runabout, 35 HP,
traitor access $460. 372-7305.
(A3t-98-P)
Unusually well furnished 10x55
mobile home. A/C and with separate
storage shed with workshop. 5
minutes from Univ. $3250. Call
378-3684 Eves. (A-4t-97=P)
Suzuki 80cc SIOO. Must sell. Call
Bill. Room 97 372-9352.
(A-4t-100-p)
Gibson guitar, steel strings, hollow
dark brown wood, in groovy
condition must sell so best offer will
do. Call 392-9772 after 3:30 p.m.
(A-st-96-P)
| FOR RENT |
Must sublet 1 bedroom furnished
University Gardens Apartment, car carpeted,
peted, carpeted, AC, pool, slls per month.
Call Lee 372-5921. (B-st-99-P)
Luxurious-l-bdrm-apt-to-sublease
furnished-carpeted-central-heat-air
dish w.asher-d isposal-pool-landmark
phase-2-available-March-20-3787618.
(B-3t-99-P)
Must sublease 3 bedrm 2bath fur furnished
nished furnished apt. at Williamsburg, large
living rm. dining rm. dishwasher cen central
tral central air heat pool $260. Call
3780756. (B-st-99-P)
3rd quarter one bedroom apt. Colo Colonial
nial Colonial Manor carpeted & pool */2 block
from campus call Now 378-8470.
(B-98-2t-P)
WANT TO live in Sin City?' Sublet
beautiful 2-bedroom atp. in luxurious
Landmark. Call 378-6494.
(B-st-96-P)
SUBLET 2 br apt. at Landmark
Phase II or 2 roommates wanted to
share same. Pool, health club, etc.
Reasonable rent. Call 378-8982 after
6. Apt. 113. (B-st-98-P)
VILLAGE 34 Sublet spacious 1
bdrm. apt. private patio, quiet
surroundings. Call Lynn 372-6077.
(B-st-98-P)
2 Bedroom apt. in triplex. Central air
& beat kitchen equipped. 3533 SW
24 Ave. Ph. 372-5400, $95 mo.
(B-st-96-P)
One bedroom apt. for sublease. 8
Tanglewood Manor. Beautifully
furnished, central AC, head, cut-rate,
$l3O. Available Mar. 26. Call
378-0990. (B-st-96 P)
Best location in town. 1 blk from
Tigert Hall. 1 br. AC apts. Rents
sllO-$ 120 Colonial Manor Apts.
1216 S.W. 2nd Ave. Apt 1 9-6 p.m.
daily, 2-5 p.m. Sunday 372-7111.
(B-98-6t-p)
Will forfiet SIOO deposit. Landmark
2 Bdr. Sublease for spring qtr. Call
after 5 p.m. (B-4t-100-p)
1 Bedroom Landmark apartment.
Sublet for spring and summer. Call
376-9986. (B-3t-100-p)
Married? Going to be? Nice,
furnished Apt. 1 block from UF
Pinewood paneling 87.50/mo.
Available Mar. 25. Call 378-5883.
(B-3t-100-p)
WANTED
One female roommate needed spring
quarter Landmark Apts. 174 two
bedroom $45 mo. Call 378-0846.
(C-st-94-P)
si! mmm
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Some Pay A Price For Surrender...
Some Fight For...
COLUMBIA PICTURES
TECHNICOLOR TECHNISCOPE -35-

GATOR CLASSIFIEDS

fflwi aasflsfljjaa
| WANTED |
{o ifrfr>iy.s*w W :c: B i x*:s:w-xxq
COED ROOMMATE wanted, large,
air-conditioned, two-bedroom, 16th
Ave. apt. on pool, $37 mo. Village
Park No. 97, Call 372-4751.
(C-st-95-P)
Panic! Need one cellmate for spring
and summer. Landmark Call Sherry
or Judy Ann 378-5554. (C-4t-100-p)
Male roommate to share 1 bdrm.
furn. apt., Summit House, SW 16th
Ct. $67 mo. Call 378-6784.
(C-10t-94-P)
Female to share small house behind
NRM starting spring qtr $45 mo call
3785275 now, through finals and the
break late at night preferable.
(C-st-99-P)
Need 2 coeds for spacious, poolside
Camelot apartment. 2 bedrooms, 2
baths. s6l month. 378-8458.
(C-4t-99-P)
Quiet studious male for 2br apt.
Available 3rd qtr. $41.25 and share
apt with 3 additional roommates.
Call 376-6672 after 6 pm. (C-st-99-P)
Female roommates needed for Land Landmark
mark Landmark apt. or will sublet. 2 bdrm,
dishwasher, on pool. Call 378-5585.
(C-3t-99-P)
Law or Grad student wanted to share
nicely furnished 3-bedroom house
3rd quarter. Utilies pd. Call Bill early
evening 378-3862. (3t-C-99-P)
Need 1 roommate for Frederick Gar Gardens
dens Gardens 2 bedroom apartment spring
quarter. AC, pool. March rent paid.
No deposit needed. Call 378-1978.
(C-st-99-P)
MALE roommate to share two bdrm
apt two blocks from campus AC own
bedroom 60 per month call
372-9611. (C-3t-99-P)
1 or 2 female roommates for spring
quarter. Roomy, 2 bedr. duplex AC.
Call 378-8790, 1912 NW Ist Ave.
(C-st-97-P)
LIVE OFF CA MPUS C.L.O.
$60.00/M. Room & board. Frosh &
sophs, may break. Contracts total
indepen. Call 376-9420. Come by
117 NW 15 St. (C-7t-97-P)
Coolest pad in town. Need male
roommate. Pool, fine furnishings,
bar, fireplace and much more.
SSO/mo. Call before signing
elsewhere 378-4877. (C-st-97-P)
2 female roomates for spring and/or
summer quarters. Rent only $40.25.
Call 378-4565 or come by Apt. 69
French Quarter after 5. (C-st-98-P)
One female roommate for Landmark
sllO for Spring quarter over
pool. Willing to make a deal! Call
378-9604 or 376-7129 TODAY!
(C-st-98-P)
Roommate for V Pk. No. 10. Avail. 3
qt. Share rent with 3 great girls. Call
376-4121 ask for Tita. Will be
moving out end of March. (C-st-97-P)
Roommate wanted to share fantastic
2 bedroom brick house, wood
paneled walls, luxury stereo, T.V.
own room, share $125 mo. plus Vz
utilities, Call Barry 378-6776 after
9:00 p.m. (C-3t-98-P)-
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Spacious apartment one block from
Norman. Have own bedroom.
Available March 17. 378-7638, 1028
SW 7th Ave. $45/month. (C-st-97-P)
Williamsburg Apt. need 1 roommate
spring quarter, pool airconditioned,
dishwasher, 2 bedroom, 2 bath. Call
376-9719. (C-st-97-P)
3 girls need roommate for spring
and/or summer term. Dishwasher,
pool, gym and sauna. Landmark apt.
21. Ph. 378-8467. Ask for Elaine.
$45. (C-3t-96-p)
Landmark Female roommate for
spring quarter apt. 173, $45 a
month. Call after 5:00 378-1007.
(C-st-97-P)
Gome to
Wfeight Watchers
1015 w. UNIV.
Wed. 9:30a.m. l:oop.m.
7:30p.m.
Call 376-8930 for more
information

Tuesday, March 11. 1969, The Florida Alligator,

WANTED |
Doc savage paperbacks, new or used
numbers 1,3, 4,7, 8, 10, and 19.
Will pay up to $2- each. Send a note
to P.O. Box 12934 U. Sta. Will
pick up. (C-3t-100-p)
Female roommate wanted for spring
quarter. 1 block behind Norman
s4l/m & 1/3 Util. A.C. Call
378-0769. (C-4t-100-p)
One female roommate for one
bedroom Village Park apt. on pool
Call 378-3903 after 5 weekdays,
any-time weekends. (C-4t-100-p)
Coed roommate for own room in a
large beautiful modern 2 bdrm
Starlight apt., 3 blocks from campus.
Call 372-6066. (C-2t-100-p)
Female roommate needed for spring
and/or summer quarters. French
Quarter Apt. 65. Phone 372-5554.
(C-4t-100-p)
Wanted one male roommate to rent 2
bedrm apt. Total rent for month is
$165.00. Phn 376-9575. 88 Vill. Park
Apts. Urgent occupancy needed.
(C-4t-100-p)
Female roommate needed for large
Camelot Apt. Fireplace, on the pool.
Reduced rent. Call 378-9694.
(C-4t-100-p)
Need 2 roommates for large 2 bdrm.
house. Near Sin City, Univ., and
sororities. Inexpensive and nice. Call
Steve at 376-9592. (C-4t-100-p)
A male graduate student needs a
friendly and neat roommate to share
a 2-bedroom house at 819 N.W. 19
Ave. $45. Call Sai at 378-3365 or
392-1885. (C-3t-100-p)
.:.fr>:x*x<*x.:.:.:.:.sssss x i rax-x-x*xx | HELP WANTED 1
W; x x x x*x*x*xxx*sssss : : xx x*xssss!
Opportunity for college men to work
as part time life insurance salesmen
while in college as campus agents for
Pacific Mutual Life. 378-6390.
(E-st-99-P)
INHALATION THERAPY
TECHNICIAN TRAINEE On the job
training for mature person. Hospital
experience and some mechanical
aptitude helpful. Salary
commensurate with experience and
education. Paid vacation, holidays,
sick leave, and other benefits. Inquire
personnel director, Alachua General
Hospital, 372-4321. (E-6t-98-P)
ADV MAJORS Excellent
opportunity to gam valuable sales
and layout experience (and $) with
nation's 12th largest college daily.
Must have own car and at least two
quarters before graduating Apply in
person, Room 330, jWRU.
(E-tf-39-nc)
COCKTAIL WAITRESSES
Part-time or full-time Will train.
Must be 21. Dub's Steer Room,
376-9175 after 4. (E-10t-93-P)
EXCITING CAREER secretary to
executive. Plush office nice associates
and excellent pay. Call ALLIED
PERSONNEL of Gainesville 1800 N.
Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)

Ik V y \ SPECIALS HI
1 Lunch and Dinner Sg||j
Tuesday Special j|||
M FRIED CHICKEN M
M ALL YOU CARE TO EAT W
||| Wednesday Special ||i
M CHICKEN STEW & W
I MORRISON'S I
1 CAFETERIAS 9
||L GAINESVILLE MALL J||

Page 9

HELP WANTED
;Wx Experienced cashiers, full and part
time. Apply at Florida Book Store,
16 14 West University Avenue.
(E-st-98-P)
GENERAL OFFICE girls who type
well or handle bookkeeping know
office machines. Great future. Call
ALLIED PERSONNEL of Gainesville
1800 N. Main, 376-4611. (E-st-98-P)
AUTOS I
W;:?x?x :*x^<<<*xx*x*:*x*x:.x.ss : x*x*xxi%'
1959 PORSCHE coupe, good cond.
AM-FM radio new Pirellis, new
interior, inspected. Best offer.
378-3742. (G-3t-97-P)
1960 Austin Healy 3000. Brand new
top and battery, overdrive, excellent
body, absolutely must sell,
graduating. S4OO Call Paul 372-6008.
(G-2t-100-p)
V.W. many buggy 1300 53 H.P. Red
metal flake full top side curtains.
Roll bar 1900 or best offer. See at
sport car specialties. 1929 S. Main.
378-9086.1 G -4 t 1 0 0 -p)
1960 Ford hardtop, 352 cu. in.,
automatic, radio, heater, very good
condition. New starter, generator,
tune-up. Best offer over S3OO.
378-5848 after 5 p.m. (G-st-96-P)
'6B Barracuda sport coupe VB, Facair
radio delux interior, metallic
midnight blue, vinyl top, wide oval
tires, sac warranty, low price.
376-3424. (G-st-97-P)
| PERSONAL I
Sc%XX44*SSS*:*XCX<:.X.X.MANM*S?N!B
WELCOME, JAKE! We're proud to
have you at the SPANISH MAIN
every night from 6 til 9. All those
people who have been asking us to
stay open nights will welcome you,
too! 105 W. University Ave. Phone:
372-0667. (J-4t-100-p)
If you cant go to the ISLE OF
WOMEN, come see us. We went
and returned with tortoise shell
jewelry its famous for. Mantilla
combs, earings (wow!), watch bands,
hair clips, etc. From $2.50 to $6.95.
WHERE? You guessed it THE
SPANISH MAIN, 105 W. Univ. Ave.
Open every night till 9:00.
(J-4t-100-p)
It's no dream!! PERSONAL CHEF
is here!! (J-2t-99-P)
JS m I
color ATBKST!" at
I i "am -I
QHBCf RsE|v*-* ANMAN
1 "BULLITT IS NEXT M

I PERSONAL $
eoeo wbwm cwk
Billy Mitchell Drill Team. Good Luck
on Finals. Youre number one! Your
Angel Sponsors. (J-lt-100-p)
:
Happy Birthday
How Sam?
Play right over it .
Aint that a kick? 40-11
r(J-lt-99-)
| LOST & FOUND |
FOUND: German shepherd puppy on
campus. Call 378-0937. (L-3t-NC-99)
LOST: Phi Delta Theta pin. If found,
call 376-1701. $lO reward. Ask for
Bruce. (L-st-99-P)
FOUND: 1 pr glasses outside
Matherly. Call 378-8061 5:00 to
7:00. (L-3t-98-NC)
Lost metal frame prescription sun
glasses in gray case. Please call Bruce
Webbon 372-1013 or 392-0764.
(L-3t-98-P)
SERVICES
INCOME TAX $4.00 up. Expert
service in two locations to serve you:
1227 W. Univ. Ave. (across from
Ramada Inn) & 107 N. Main St
378-9666. (M-ts-95-P)
ALTERNATORS GENERATORS
STARTERS Electrical systerns
tested, repairs. Auto Electric
service 603 SW Second Street.
378-7330. (M-ts-54-C)
GERMAN lessons and/or tutoring.
Graduate PhD. language exam or
undergraduate levels. Tel. 378-5551.
(st-99-M-P)
VOLKSWAGEN SPECIALIST.
Quality Volks, repairs. Phone
376-0710, 1224 S. Main St.
(M-7t-95-P)
Experienced typist reasonable rates
prompt service. 376-0406.
(M-st-98-P)
LAST TIMB^I
. I LAST "THE NIGHTI
ill DAY THEY RAIDED!,
IW f
UHKI
America's
free-living and
free-wheeling
pleasure capital
and the men
who came to
strip it raw!
AN ANTONIO ISASI FILM
THEY
GAME
IO ROB
IAS
VEGAS
H
IN COLOR
FROM WARNER BROS.-SEVEN AR S
LOCKWOOD SOMMER
_ L£l J U. JACK
COBB BALANCE
mHemya
HURRY...
ONLY 3 MORE I
DAYS LEFT TO I
LOVE
CWAW
TECHNICOLOR
FROM AT CINE BAM A RELEASING COABOBATION B



Page 10

I, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 11, 1969

McTheny Fakes Out Leo, 8-0

By MARC DUNN
Alligator Sports Editor
The UF baseball team won its
third straight game Monday
against St. Leo College, 8-0.
St. Leo is 6-3 on the season

Gators Out To Cage Owls

The UF basketball team
leaves for its first post-season
tournament in history
Wednesday, opening the
National Invitation Tournament
in New York against Temple
Thursday night at Madison
Square Garden.
UF head coach Tommy
Bartlett will take an 11-man
team to New York and the
squad will work out Wednesday
night at the Garden. Players
making the trip are Captain Neal
Walk, Boyd Welsch, Mike
Leatherwood, Richard Vasquez,
Kurt Feazel, Mike McGinnis,
Andy Owens, Ed Lukco, Robert
Agee, Nick Fotiou and Tony
Duva.
There is an amazing similarity
between the Gators and their
first round foe, Temple of
Philadelphia, Pa. Both teams are
18-8, having lost most of their
games by very small margins.
While Gator fans are aware
their club lost seven of this
years games by an average
margin of only 3.1 points per
contest, Temple can claim an

Florida Relays Expands

For the first time in history, the 26th annual
Florida Relays will become a two-day affair on
March 28-29, due to the large success of past meets.
The relay carnival is considered the largest in the
South and is ranked with the best meets in the
nation.
Our meet was getting so large we had to spread
the events over a two-day period, says UF track
coach and meet director Jimmy Carnes. We will
hold the freshman and junior college events on
Friday and the college and high school division on
Saturday.
Over 40 college and university teams along with
110 high schools and 10 junior colleges are expected
to converge on the Gainesville campus for the
two-day meet.
Weems Baskin, past president of the National
Collegiate Track Coaches Association and member
of the Helms Track and Field Hall of Fame will
serve as the meet referee. Baskin is in his 19th
season as head track coach at South Carolina.
Universities that have been attending every year
and are expected to enter this year include: Georgia,

i Looking
| For j| A
| Used Car?
j FIND IT UNDER
autos
IN GATOR
CLASSIFIEDS

BASEBALLERS THIRD STRAIGHT

and has beaten Florida State
University. The Gators are 3-2,
and play again at home Friday at
3 p.m.
Larry Sheffield, working with
one days rest, notched his
second win of the season. St.

Any students interested in
acquiring tickets for the Gators
National Invitational
Tournament games beginning
Thursday night at Madison
Square Garden in New York
should contact UF Ticket
Manager Ray Dorman today at
the athletic Department.
A limited number of student
tickets will be available at the
New York ticket offices at a
reduced rate of $3.50 instead of
the regular price, $6.50.
equal number of heart-stopping
defeats.
The Owls barely missed the
NCAA tournament, losing in a
playoff against St. Josephs in
overtime as the Hawks hit a
basket at the buzzer to win,
68-67. Temple lost to NIT
entrant Army at Army in
overtime, 60-59
Among the Owl highlights are
a 79-59 win over St. Josephs
during regular season, victories
over NIT-bound Fordham,
Duke, NYU, Miami of Ohio

TVS PAIB
Tues. March 11
Union Ballroom
&
8-9 P.M.
Everyone is Welcome!

Livingston State, Florida State, Florida, South
Alabama, Furman, Auburn, East Tennessee State,
Penn State, Middle Tennessee, Duke, Virginia,
Baldwin-Wallace, Baptist College, Alabama,
Rochester, Eastern Kentucky, Tulane, Georgia
Tech, Maryland, Florida A & M, Louisiana Tech,
Yale, Clemson, VMI, North Carolina State,
Kentucky, South Carolina, North Carolina, Wake
Forest, Tennessee, Georgia State, Cornell,
Princeton, Pittsburgh and MIT.
The finest high school track teams from Florida
will be entered along with prep teams from
Alabama, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee.
The quality of the Florida Relays gets better
each year and the 1969 meet will be no exception,
says Carnes. Last year our times and distances were
faster and further than rnost of the times at the
Penn Relays, which is tfie oldest relay carnival in
America.
Deadline for entries is March 17. The Relays will
get under way, Friday March 28, at 2 p.m. Carnes
says that many new events have been added this
year.

Leos Korn went eight innings
and got the loss.
UF scored in the second
inning with one out. Mike Ovca
singled and stole second base. He
moved to third on a single by

(which beat Notre Dame in the
NCAA playoffs Saturday) and a
93-68 win over Manhattan in
Madison Square Garden two
weeks ago, a game in which the
Owls got off to a 17-0 lead and
presented coach Harry Litwack
with his 300th career win.
Temples top scorer is 6-5
senior John Baum, who averaged
19.0'points per game. Joe
Cromer, 6-5, averaged 15.2,
Eddie Mast, 6-9, finished at 9.0
and the guards, 6-3 sophomore
Bill Strunk and 5-11 senior Tony
Brocchi were at 6.9 and 6.3
respectively.
Thursday nights first of four
opening round doubleheaders
pits Temple against the UF and
St. Peters against Tulsa. On
Friday night, Ohio University
battles West Texas State and
Rutgers plays Tennessee,
followed on Saturday night by
South Carolina against Southern
Illinois and Army versus
Wyoming. On Sunday afternoon,
Fordham meets the Missouri
Valley runner-up and Boston
College battles Kansas.

Rod Wright and scored on a
fielders choice.
Right fielder Guy McTheny
had the hottest bat for the
Gators. He got four hits in five
trips to the plate, scored three
runs and had one run-batted-in.
Tony Dobies, center fielder,
and Ovca each contributed two
hits to the Gator attack.
Dick Hclme/
Jeweler/
CLOCK, WATCH & JEWELRY
REPAIRS
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1230 W. UNIVERSITY AVE.
V 2 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS

If you want it fixed NOW I
Not next week I
TRY US I
Sports Car Specialties, Inc. I
1020 SOUTH MAIN I
378-9086 I
NEW LOCATION BETTER SERVICE |
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Frat Handball Berths Set

Sigma Nu, TEP, Pi Lam, and
ATO all reached the semi-finals
in Orange League handball after
not surprising Friday
quarterfinal wins.
The Sigma Nus will be
making their last stab for
contention in the league when
they face the TEPs in the semis.
The Nus had little trouble in
disposing of the KAs, 5-0. The
Nus used the same lineup as in
the SPE match in obtaining the
win.
The TEPs moved one step
closer to the championship they
are favored to win after downing
a hapless Beta team, 5-0. Neil
Littman failed to make the
match and Alan Trumpkin filled
in his singles position with
21-4-5 wins over Mike Healy.
Alan Gruber had little trouble in
disposing of Chuck Rubbins
21-1-0.
Pi Lam played without their
best player in drubbing PiKA
4-1. Ken Burdick missed this
match and Alan Soden, filling in
at the number two singles
position, was the only Pi Lam
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loser dropping two straight to
Phil Petrozella 21-8-7.
ATO primed itself for its big
matchup with the Lammies as
they stormed over Delts 5-0. The
results were the same as in the
first match as ATO won all the
matches and lost only one game.
The big news in Blue action
was the defeat of Chi Phi and
the victory of Phi Tau in the
second round of their handball
tournament.
AGR clipped the Chi Phis
three straight with Van Conoley,
Ted Bellhove, Mike Warren and

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Dave Cobb providing the
necessary impetus for the win.
Phi Tau chopped up Theta
Chi 3-0 to move into undisputed
second place in the league. Pete
Swan, Dave Kirchner, Ken
Fowle, and Gil Pastorizz were all
big winners.
Delta Chi and DU were also
winners and earned a berth in
the semi-finals. The DUs didnt
allow the TEKEs to get over
eight points in any game as
Harry Denlinger, Bill Staley,
Charlie Gressen, and the
infamous Henry Adorno all won
easy matches.

Coach Kensler
To Maryland?
UFs Offensive Line Coach
Ed Kensler has heard nothing
concerning the University of
Maryland Head Football Coach
opening.
This has happened twice
before, Kensler said. They
know my phone number if they
want me.
The 40-year-old coach played
tackle, guard, center and
linebacker in college. He was
in the 1952 Chicago All-Star
football game and was voted
Marylands outstanding
defensive lineman in 1951.

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Page 11



Page 12

!, The Florida Alligator, Tuesday, March 11, 1969

UCLA Has Lew Instead Os Dream

By VITO STELLINO
UPI Sports Writer
Sixteen college basketball
teams have a dream.
The 17th has Lew Alcindor.
Thats the way the NCAA
tournament now lodes and even
though UCLA suffered the
second loss of the Alcindor era
Saturday night, the Bruins are
still favored to win an
* unprecedented third straight
national title.
Southern California showed
the 16 teams still with a possible
shot how the dream can become
a reality by dumping UCLA
46-44 in the final regular season
Activities
Center Gets
Big Boosts
Jim Devaney and Steve
Rohan have brought together
their organizations to raise funds
for UFs proposed Activity
Center.
The result Order of
Omegas Project SCAT (Student
Center Action Team).
Devaney will be General
Chairman and Rohan is the
Assistant General Chairman, in
charge of coordinating student
activities. Positions to be filled
include a public relations
.director, concert director,
alumni liason, financial director
and secretary.
The group is seeking students
to fill the positions.
At their first meeting 14
students attended, representing
Omicron Delta Kappa,
Interfraternity Council, Order of
Omega, Alpha Lambda Delta,
UF Swim team and SCAT.
Without strong student
effort the center may go by the
wayside, Devaney said.
Projects for the group include
a Student Activities Center Day,
an Orange and Blue Day, a
concert, a raffle, a letter-writing
campaign and a 25 cent
membership drive.
The latter has begun with the
UF swimmers each giving a
quarter to become the first
members of SCAT.
# *
The Gator Tipoff Club
donated SIOOO to the Activity
Center fund at Saturday nights
basketball game.
The club is a supporter of the
Gator cagers, traveling to away
games and always attending
home games.
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The
Florida
Alligator
MARC DUNN BILL DUNN
Sports Editor Assistant
Shorts Editor
game of Alcindors career. It was
only the third time in the past
seven years in high school and
college that Alcindor has played
in a losing game.
John Wooden, the UCLA
coach, took the defeat in stride.
I dont feel too bad, he
said, The loss will do us good.
We didnt play up to snuff.
Since UCLA has been looking
rather complacent lately and was
pushed into double over-time by
USC Friday night. Wooden may
be right that the loss will do the

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NCAA TOURNEY ROUNDUP

Bruins some good. The loss may
shake the Bruins up and make
them a tougher team in the
tournament.
While UCLA was losing a
regular season game, the number
of teams still alive in the NCAA
was cut to 17 as nine NCAA
regional games were played and
two conference titles were
decided.
The only conference still
undecided is the Missouri Valley
and that will be untangled
Monday night when Louisville
and Drake meet in a playoff.
This is the way the NCAA
tourney now looks:
, East Regional at College Park,
Md.: North Carolina vs.
Duquesne and St. Johns vs.
Davidson.
Mideast Regional at Madison,
Wis: Kentucky vs. Marquette
and Purdue vs. Miami of Ohio.
Midwest Regional at
Manhattan, Kan.: Texas A&M
vs. Louisville-Drake winner and

Colorado vs. Colorado St.
West regional at Los Angeles:
UCLA vs. New Mexico St and
Weber St. vs. Santa Clara.
In the two conference titles
decided Saturday, North
Carolina won the ACC
post-season crown by defeating
Duke 85-74 and Colorado won
the Big Eight title with a 92-73
victory over Missouri while
Kansas was upset by Kansas
State 64-57.
In the regional games,
Davidson beat Villanova 75-61,
St. Johns topped Princeton
72-63, Duquesne whipped St.
Josephs 74-52, Marquette beat
Murray St. 82-62, Miami of Ohio
stunned Notre Dame 63-60,
Texas A&M beat Trinity 81-66,
Colorado St. nipped Dayton
52-50, New Mexico State topped
Brigham Young 74-62 and
Weber St. beat Seattle 75-73.
Senior forward Ernie Powell
hit a 15-foot jumper with six
seconds left to give Southern

California the win over UCLA.
Ron Taylor had put USC ahead
44-43 with two free throws with
less than a minute remaining but
Alcindors free throw tied it
44-44 to set the stage for
Powells winning shot.
USC had lost 17 consecutive
games to cross town rival UCLA
dating back to 1963 before
finally pulling off this upset.
Miami of Ohio pulled of the
biggest upset in the NCAA
action when it hit 23 of 27 free
throws to dump Notre Dame.
Mike Wren led Miami, which is
now 15-10, with 16 points.
Notre Dames Austin Carr
missed most of the second half
with an ankle injury.
Mike Malory scored 31 points
to pace Davidson to the key
victory over Villanova. Howard
Ported led Villanova with 23
points but he got his fourth foul
midway in the final period and
Davidson took control of the
game during his absence.